NCATE STANDARD 6


 

STANDARD 6. UNIT GOVERNANCE AND RESOURCES

 

The unit has the leadership, authority, budget, personnel, facilities, and resources, including information technology resources, for the preparation of candidates to meet professional, state, and institutional standards.

 [In this section the unit must include (1) initial and advanced programs for teachers, (2) programs for other school professionals, and (3) off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, noting differences when they exist.]

6a. Unit Leadership and Authority 

6a.1. How does the unit manage or coordinate the planning, delivery, and operation of all programs at the institution for the preparation of educators?

Governance of the Unit is guided by a vision derived from a theme, shared by all members from across academic departments, which is: “Effective Teachers and Leaders within Diverse Populations for the Twenty-first Century.” The Unit manages and coordinates the planning, delivery, and operation of all programs for the preparation of educators. Policy is formulated and reviewed by the Council for Professional Education (CPE), a standing committee of the University Faculty Senate, and then forwarded to the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs via the Faculty Senate (Professional Education Unit Administrative Chart 1 and Chart 2). According to the By-laws of the CPE, the Chair of the Education Department chairs the CPE. The Vice Chairperson is selected by the Unit members and must be a member of a department outside of the Education Department. This organization structure enables the PEU to manage and coordinate all programs involved with the preparation of educators.   

The CPE has jurisdiction over all polices and procedures related to teacher education; these include: (A) Approval of criteria for admission, readmission, and transfers relating to the Teacher Education Program (TEP); (B) Approval of all candidates for admission to the TEP; (C) Approval of criteria for admission of candidates to Student Teaching; (D) Approval of all candidates for admission to Student Teaching; (E) Forwarding of Administrative recommendations and actions to the vice-president of Academic Affairs through Faculty Senate; (F) Transmission of policy changes affecting teacher education curriculum and/or programs for approval of Faculty Senate; (G) Transmission of policy changes affecting Graduate teacher education curriculum and/or programs to the Graduate Council for approval.  

6a.2. What are the unit's recruiting and admissions policies? How does the unit ensure that they are clearly and consistently described in publications and catalogues?

The University assumes the responsibility for recruitment of students.  The Unit has the capacity to interact with the Admissions Office (which does recruitment) to participate in recruitment efforts. Admission to the University is determined by University policy. However, the Unit sets policies for preparation, retention, and admission into the Teacher Education Program (TEP).  

The TEP requirements and student teaching guidelines are clearly and consistently laid out in the University Catalogue and PEU publications - Student Information Handbook 2008-2009. The handbooks address questions that prospective Education majors have regarding students' responsibilities, General Education prerequisites, PRAXIS, GPA, and the interview process. These publications are approved and maintained by the Dean of the College, Counsel and Dean of Graduate Studies, and the Professional Education Unit. The following activities are conducted by the office of student services in the College of Education Health and Public Policy: 1.)   Participate in university Open House and Hornet Day's activities, (2.)  Host an annual Future Educators of America (FEA) Day each spring FEA chapters from the state of Delaware are invited to campus for a briefing, q & a on campus tour, (3.) Building partnerships with various school districts – Graduates from our programs are employed across the state and region. These teachers assist the Unit in recruiting new teacher education students, (4.)  Praxis Prep Classes, Plato Web online tutorial, and workshops presented by ETS representatives each year for Praxis prep, (5.)  STEP Scholarships for Delaware residents-covers full tuition, 6. Majors Fair-March ((recruit from within), (7.)  JROTC Day-March, (8.)  Data bases of student emails are updated regularly to send information about activities and opportunities for students. The unit ensures that recruiting and admissions policies are clearly and consistently described in publications and catalogues.  

6a.3. How does the unit ensure that its academic calendars, catalogues, publications, grading policies, and advertising are accurate and current? 

The Unit ensures that its academic calendars, catalogues, publications, grading policies, and advertising are accurate and current through the work of several committees and administrative departments. These documents and procedures are university wide. The Unit provides input on changes or additions after they have been approved by the CPE.  

The Academic Calendar Committee is comprised of Administrators, faculty and staff members from across the university. They interact with all components across the University to ensure that all events impacting academics are published in the university calendar. The Undergraduate University Catalog is developed based on submissions from the Unit. The Graduate University Catalog  is developed in the same manner. This process enables the university to have better quality control over its general information provided to the public.  

6a.4. How does the unit ensure that candidates have access to student services such as advising and counseling?

The Unit ensures that all students have access to student services such as advising and counseling. To ensure that support services are tailored to the needs of individual students, the Unit assigns an academic advisor to each student. A comprehensive list of advisors and advisees is posted in the Education and Humanities Building. In addition, the Unit has its own Office of Student Services which has an open door policy to all students at all times. Several clubs and professional organizations also act as resources for workshops, updates, and networking opportunities. The university also has a disabilities service office to support students with learning disabilities in accessing curricular. The university also has a full service counseling office that addresses relational and other issues students may have. This office is situated in the same location as the Unit. 

Other university-wide support services are available from the Office of Mentoring and Advising as well as the Division of Academic Enrichment. These offices provide assistance through individual tutoring, group study sessions, academic success and study skill classes, workshops programs and courses, as well as assistance to students with learning disabilities. (On-line description of Academic Support Center and Office of Mentoring and Advising) and (Counseling Services

6a.5. Which members of the professional community participate in program design, implementation, and evaluation? In what ways do they participate?

The by-laws of the CPE clearly state the purpose, authority, membership, description and duties of officers, the meeting days of the Council, and the sub-committees (Vide: Council for Professional Education Bylaws). The CPE involves all faculty representing professional education programs as well as teacher candidates in the process of preparing “effective teachers and leaders within diverse populations for the twenty-first century.”  Partners who participate in the design, implementation and evaluation are Community Advisory Board, School Partners, teacher candidates, and alumni. Through regular meetings, all PEU members are involved in policy, program design, implementation, and evaluation.  

Policy and program changes are directed by the “shared” vision and the DIRECT standards. Program design and modification is channeled through the curriculum committee of each respective department. The department then gets approval from CPE and from Faculty Senate. Implementation is managed by the department. In addition, each program conducts its own review and evaluation according to the standards set forth by the state Department of Education, NCATE, and respective professional bodies. Policy and program changes are documented in the CPE minutes which are maintained by the Chair of the Education Department. (Council for Professional Education minutes, located in room EH 109).  

All proposed changes by department are shared with members of the Community Advisory Board, school partners, and alumni for their input. Their input is taken into consideration by the Unit in program design implementation and evaluation. 

6a.6. How does the unit facilitate collaboration with other academic units involved in the preparation of professional educators?

The collaboration with academic units involved in the preparation of professional educators is facilitated through CPE which has representation of all the program coordinators, department chairs and deans. Issues relating to curriculum revision and changes, clinical and early field experiences, exit criteria and other pertinent issues concerning teacher preparation in the specialty areas are discussed and resolved through collaboration of the CPE members.  

6a.7. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to unit leadership and authority may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.] 

6b. Unit Budget

 6b.1. What is the budget available to support programs preparing candidates to meet standards? How does the unit's budget compare to the budgets of other units with clinical components on campus or similar units at other institutions?

  Unit Budget

For a vision to be realized, financial support is vital. The University’s commitment to financially supporting the Unit is demonstrated in the dramatic increase of dollars spent per education major since 2007/8.  In 2007/8, 205 undergraduate and 87 graduate education students in the College of Education received $4,325.59 per student. In 2008/9, 159 undergraduate and 91 graduate education students in the College of Education received $7, 737.86 per student. In 2009/10, 205 undergraduate and 111 graduate education students in the College of Education received $6055.27 per student. The $1682.59 per student difference from academic year 2008/9 to academic year 2009/10 reflects a significant increase in education students (66) during a difficult economic year which resulted in budgets being decreased. However, it must be noted that there is still an increase of $1729.68 per student since the academic year 2007/8, so the quality of the programs has been positively affected.  

The Unit budget for fiscal year 2010 is as follows:

Operating budget

$214, 225.00

Salary budget

$1, 699, 239.97

STEP Scholar

$200,000.00

Total budget amount

$2, 113, 464.97

 

 

The Unit receives additional financial support for faculty enrichment from the Professional Development Fund, Academic Enrichment fund and Title III grants. Awards for the 2008/9 and 2009/10Academic Years are as follows: 

2008/2009:

Professional Development

STEP Scholarship

Academic Enrichment

Title III Grants

$5695.79

$200,000.00

$6557.88

$310,000.00

 

 2009/2010

Professional Development

STEP Scholar

Academic Enrichment

Title III Grants

$5175.50

$200,000.00

$2346.62

310,000.00

 

 

While the university provides base-level funding to support the quality of all its programs, some programs are better positioned than others. For example, Education had state STEP scholarship to support its students. On the other hand, Nursing Department receives specialized money from the State and the federal government to support curriculum, faculty and students relative their professional programs. Therefore, the total amount of resources available to such programs is contingent upon a number of variables.  

6b.2. How adequately does the budget support all programs for the preparation of educators? What changes to the budget over the past few years have affected the quality of the programs offered?

There are two types of budgets: basic institutional and specialized. The basic budget has assured a minimal level of functioning that supports a quality program with no frills. Over the past few years the Unit has been able to secure specialized funding. These consist of Title III and State Scholar Teacher Education Program (STEP) funds. With the specialized finding the Unit has been able to give more scholarships and to support equipment and technology upgrades. In addition to specialized funds the Unit has been able to augment development for faculty through Professional Development Academic Enrichment funds.  

6b.3. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the unit's budget may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.] 

6c. Personnel

 6c.1. What are the institution's and unit's workload policies? What is included in the workloads of faculty (e.g., hours of teaching, advising of candidates, supervising student teachers, work in P-12 schools, independent study, research, administrative duties, and dissertation advisement)?

Full-time unit members, whose primary responsibility is teaching, are obligated over the Academic Year to carry a teaching load of twenty-four (24) credit hours, normally divided into two semesters of twelve (12) hours each.  Faculty members assigned to teach graduate courses receive 1.33 credit hours of teaching load for each credit hour of a graduate course.  Individual supervision (Independent Study, Student Teaching Observation, Internships and Field Placement) is calculated at two-third (0.67) hour of workload for each student supervised (CBA-12.2.1) Other supporting documents are located in room EH 109. By CBA faculty are obligated to provide a minimum of six clock hours across four day for advising, and office obligations. 

The chair and the dean have the capacity to provide release-times and workload adjustments to support research and administrative assignments of faculty. In addition, workloads can be adjusted by the chair and the dean for relevant service with the mission and scope of the Unit and the college. 

6c.2. What are the faculty workloads for teaching and the supervision of clinical practice?

Unit members, whose primary responsibility is teaching, are obligated over the Academic Year to carry a teaching load of twenty-four (24) credit hours, normally divided into two semesters of twelve (12) hours each.  Faculty members assigned to teach graduate courses receive 1.33 credit hours of teaching load for each credit hour of a graduate course.  Individual supervision (Independent Study, Student Teaching Observation, Internships and Field Placement) is calculated at two-third (0.67) hour of workload for each student supervised (CBA-12.2.1

For internships/clinical practice, the faculty workload rule is heighten in the proceeding discussion. More specifically, faculty members receive 0.67 credit for each student in clinical practice. Consequently if a full workload for faculty members for supervision of clinical practice would be six students (6 x .67 = 4.02). Related documents are located in room EH 109. 

6c.3. To what extent do workloads and class size allow faculty to be engaged effectively in teaching, scholarship, and service (including time for such responsibilities as advisement, developing assessments, and online courses)?

Workloads and class sizes typically allow faculty members to be engaged effectively in teaching, scholarship and service. Student faculty ration at the undergraduate level is approximately 14:1. When you take into consideration that the division of student services provides guidance and advisement to freshmen and sophomore students the advising loads on faculty is significantly reduced. This occurs because Unit faculty members are freed-up to provide guidance and advising to junior and senior students only. At the advanced level the ratio between faculty and students is much smaller than at the undergraduate level. With the exception of foundation courses, class sizes are usually capped at 25.  

6c.4. How does the unit ensure that the use of part-time faculty contributes to the integrity, coherence, and quality of the unit and its programs?

The Unit employs a strategy for ensuring that part-time faculty members contribute to maintaining the integrity, coherence, and quality of the Unit and its programs. Adjunct faculty members are screened by the personnel committee of the Department and Department Chair.  Adjunct faculty members participate in orientation sessions to prepare them to teach in the Unit. Courses syllabi are shared with adjuncts, and, students evaluate course delivery. If they are teaching two courses, they are encouraged to attend faculty meetings and professional development sessions.  

6c.5. What personnel provide support for the unit? How does the unit ensure that it has an adequate number of support personnel?

There are several personnel providing support for the Unit. First, there is a dedicated student services staff member for education majors. She is complimented by others in this Unit. Second there is a dedicated Technical Analyst staff member who is responsible to assist students with technology needs. Third, there is an office of Clinical and Field Experiences which is staffed with a Director, EFE Coordinator a secretary and a graduate assistant. Fourth, the Unit has three secretaries to support the chair, graduate programs and the faculty. Fifth, there are three additional graduate assistants who provide support to the Unit. Six, the Unit hired a Praxis Coordinator who is assisted by a student worker.  Outside the department the Director of Center for Teaching and Learning and the Center for Distance Learning personnel provide additional services. A list of support and other related documents are located in room EH 109. The Dean of the College of Education Health and Public Policy determines the need for support personnel and seeks funds from the university to fill the need.  

6c.6. What financial support is available for professional development activities for faculty?

There are several venues for financial support for faculty member’s professional development activities. The Unit has been fortunate in the past several years to secure competitive funding from Title III. As a result, funds have been available for professional development activities for faculty. As a result of the CBA, the Department provides $200 for professional development. The University also has Professional Development Funds (per CBA) that can be used for faculty development activities. In addition the University also has Academic Enrichment Funds from the Provost Office as per CBA. Faculty can apply for funds to enhance their academic growth. The table below indicated the funds that have been available to the Unit. 

Professional Development

Academic

Enrichment

Title III Grants

$5695.79

$476.97

$310,000.00

 

 

 6c.7. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to personnel may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.] 

6d. Unit facilities

 6d.1. How adequate are unit--classrooms, faculty offices, library/media center, the technology infrastructure, and school facilities--to support teaching and learning? [Describe facilities on the main campus as well as the facilities at off-campus sites if they exist.] 

Currently, classrooms are equipped with standard chalkboards and a limited number of WIFI internet access. Plans are in place to upgrade several classrooms with multimedia capability. Meanwhile, faculty can reserve rooms with whiteboards, an AV central console, and computer wiring in nearby buildings. The University has a plan for total upgrading and enhancing the entire Education Humanities Building (EH) with cutting edge technological resources. A large, attractive room is available in the EH building for student seminars and special functions. In addition, most of the graduate courses are taught in a classroom with technology resources. The pre-school laboratory which is conveniently located in the EH building has adequate technology and space. There is a dedicated computer lab that is used to teach instructional technology to teacher candidates. The Center for Teaching and Learning, that offers professional development programs for faculty, is located in an adjacent building and is easily accessible by PEU members. 

All faculty members serving the Unit have adequate office space equipped with computers and other accessories. Faculty members of the Unit have adequate offices in the Education and Humanities (EH) building and Memorial Hall with easy access to the dean and the department chair. Other PEU faculty members have adequate offices within their departmental locations. Every faculty member has a personal computer with access to the internet and Banner, the electronic source of student data. 

The William C. Jason Library Learning Center is a modern building located in the center of campus. The Library has 4,551 AV, 3,169 Video Library, 240,084 printed volumes, 268,561 microfiche, 30,489 bound periodicals, 35,067 E-books, and 39,811 e-journals. In addition, the library offers many support services for all students and faculty. The library has a modern computer lab with 100 state of the art computers, having access to many databases.  A comfortably furnished writing center, with ten new computers, is located on the second floor and is open Monday through Thursday 10:00 am to 9:00 pm and on Sundays 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm for a total of 48 hours per week. The Comprehensive Learning Center, also located on the second floor, provides credit courses and support services, including services for students with disabilities. These convenient and central services support education students in their endeavors to become effective teachers. One hundred computers are available in the library every day of the week during specified hours. In addition, the agreement with the public schools clearly states that teacher candidates “be given the opportunity and benefits of using public school facilities” (School District Agreement). Therefore, teacher candidates have adequate access to technology on the DSU campus and within the public schools.  

A Technological Assessment System (TK20) has been introduced in the Unit in order to facilitate collection and analyses of candidates’ performance data. Each PEU faculty can use this system for assessment of students’ performance and for improvement of instruction. Program coordinators can use the assessment data generated through this system for program evaluation and improvement.   

The Center for Distance Education and Learning Technologies, housed in the EH building, is convenient for faculty members who offer web enhanced and on line courses. The Blackboard Learning Management system allows faculty to electronically provide their students with necessary information and with an avenue to communicate with the professor or peers online. The Blackboard Instructors Lab at the Center has seven computers, software and cameras for recording video-instructional modules. The Unit faculty members use the on-line course development training facilities at this Center. The Center also provides Blackboard training to the teacher candidates on request by the instructors. The campus has an adequate number of computer labs available for student use.

6d.2. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to unit facilities may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.] 

6e. Unit resources including technology

  6e.1. How does the unit allocate resources across programs to ensure candidates meet standards in their field of study? 

To ensure candidates meet standards in their respective fields of study, a wide variety of resources are available for the Unit members including teacher candidates. The William C. Jason Library Learning Center provides a variety of resources and support. Instructional technology tools are available to both faculty and students throughout the campus.  Faculty and students have access to ongoing training and support in the area of teacher education and distance learning using the Blackboard learning system. Also, CampusTools HigherEd (TK20) is a technological assessment system being used by the Unit. This system provides a standards-based form of assessment tracking for data management for the PEU. The department chair judiciously apportions resources across programs to ensure that candidates meet standards in their respective field of study. 

6e.2. What information technology resources support faculty and candidates? What evidence shows that candidates and faculty use these resources?

Faculty members in the Unit have access to the internet resources, LCD projectors, Laptop computers and televisions. All these resources are integrated in various lessons as evidenced in course syllabi and through peer and chair observations. In this case faculty members model the application of technology in the lessons for candidates. As a result, candidates develop lesson plans that have evidence of various types of technology. Candidates also integrate technology in their presentation in classroom, and capstones (internship practices, action research/multimedia presentations, thesis and dissertations).  The Center for Distance Education and Technologies uses The Blackboard Learning system in which faculty members conduct threaded and non-threaded discussion forums with candidates.  In this case student are actively engages in using technology. 

6e.3. What resources are available for the development and implementation of the unit's assessment system? 

Technological Assessment System (TK20) was introduced to the Unit in order to effectively and efficiently capture, store, and analyze students’ and faculty data. A Technology Analyst was hired by the Unit to assist with the collection and analysis of candidates’ and faculty data. In addition, a Unit Assessment Committee was created to review the assessment tools for the Unit and its programs.  The integration of this technology assisted assessment plan has been very useful in monitoring teacher candidates’ progress through their professional preparation and coursework. An early alert system has recently been upgraded to help track the progress of all students and alerts advisors and instructors of potential shortfalls in academic success of students. 

6e.4. What library and curricular resources exist at the institution? How does the unit ensure they are sufficient and current? 

Faculty and teacher candidates have access to resources at the William C. Jason Library Learning Center. The library has aggressively pursued securing resources to support quality that are appropriate for methods courses. AV volumes have increased 15.3% since 1999. Printed volumes have increased 3.9% since 1999, microfiche by 87.5% and bound periodicals by 10.1% (Library Holdings Report). The library allocates budget funds specifically for departments (Library budget). In addition, the library maintains an upgraded computer lab. These computers have access to online databases. Librarians trained in technology are available to help students and faculty. The resources include inter-library loan and updated virtual references. The list below itemizes the resources:

·         AV                                   4,551

·         video library                    3,169

·         printed volumes              240,084

·         microfiche                       268,561

·         bound periodicals            30,489

·         e-books                          35,067

·         e-Journals                       39,811 

6e.5. How does the unit ensure the accessibility of resources to candidates, including candidates in off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, through electronic means?

The Unit ensures accessibility of resources to candidates through several electronic means.  The Unit faculty and students have unencumbered access to online teaching and learning tools as well as resources at off campus locations such as Wilmington and Georgetown Sites, which both are equipped with instructional computing labs. To support these resources and off campus learning, the Center for Distance Education and Technologies provides tools and resources for online instruction and learning. This center controls and implements the Blackboard learning management system for both online and web-enhanced courses. The University has now mandated the use of University e-mail addresses for all faculty and students. This mandate significantly improves the ability of Unit faculty members and students in communicating via technology.

6e.6. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to unit resources, including technology, may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.] 

Optional  

1. What does your unit do particularly well related to Standard 6?

There are six practices that the Unit executes particularly well. Shared governance is established such that every member of the unit has an opportunity to participate in policies involving curricular changes. The Unit has put in place a system of orienting adjunct faculty members such that the integrity of the quality of the programs is maintained. The hiring of the Technology Analyst has tremendously enhanced the Unit’s ability to manage its assessment process. In addition, the office of student services within the Unit has improved the advisement and tracking of education majors during their early matriculation years (first two years). Finally, the addition of the Praxis Coordinator and the acquisition of the Title III grant have increased the number of students passing Praxis I and II. Passing of these exams make these students eligible for admission into Teacher Education and Internship experiences respectively. Descriptions of the unit governance structure, including organization charts Unit’s Administrative structure, are shown in Chart 1 and Chart 2

2. What research related to Standard 6 is being conducted by the unit or its faculty?

Exhibits

1.      Policies on governance and operations of the unit polices and procedures related to teacher education

2.      Descriptions of the unit governance structure, including organization charts Professional Education Unit Administrative Chart 1 and Chart 2

3.      Minutes of meetings of unit governance committees (Located in EH 109)

4.      Unit policies on student services such as counseling and advising advising and counseling and On-line description of Academic Support Center and Office of Mentoring and Advising) and (Counseling Services)

5.      Recruiting and admission policies recruiting and admission policies

6.      Academic calendars, catalogues, unit publications, grading policies, and unit advertising Academic Calendar Committee, Undergraduate University Catalog and the Graduate University Catalog

7.      Unit budget, with provisions for assessment and technology See Table 6.b.1.

8.      Budgets of comparable units with clinical components on campus or similar units at other campuses See Table 6.b.1.

9.      Faculty workload policies CBA-12.2.1

10.  Summary of faculty workloads  (Located in EH 109)

11.  List of faculty by full-time and part-time status (Located in EH 109)

12.  List of support personnel in unit (Located in EH 109)

13.  Faculty development expenditures Professional Development Funds,  

14.  List of facilities, including computer labs and curriculum resource centers computer labs,

The Center for Distance Education and Technologies

Center for Teaching and Learning

William C. Jason Library Learning Center

15.  Description of resources related to the unit assessment system and the use of information technology by faculty and candidates Technological Assessment System (TK20)

 

 

16.  Description of library resources, including electronic resources William C. Jason Library Learning Center

17.  Description of resources for distance learning The Center for Distance Education and Technologies