NCATE STANDARD 3

 

 STANDARD 3. FIELD EXPERIENCES AND CLINICAL PRACTICE

 

The unit and its school partners design, implement, and evaluate field experiences and clinical practice so that teacher candidates and other school professionals develop and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn.

 [In this section the unit must include (1) initial and advanced programs for teachers, (2) programs for other school professionals, and (3) off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, noting differences when they exist.]  

3a. Collaboration between Unit and School Partners

  3a.1. Who are the unit's partners in the design, delivery, and evaluation of the unit's field and clinical experiences?

Introduction

The Unit’s Clinical and Field Experience process is an important component of the teacher education program. Teacher candidates and interns have the opportunity to participate in practical experiences during the different phases of the program. The unit has a variety of diverse settings for the teacher candidates and interns. Through effective collaboration with many public school partners, The Unit is able to design, implement and evaluate student’s progress toward becoming effective teaching professionals. 

    3(a) Collaboration between unit and school partners 

1.     Who are the unit’s partners in the design, delivery, and evaluation of the  unit’s field and clinical experiences?

The unit involves both primary and secondary school placements in the design, delivery and evaluation of clinical and field experiences. There are 19 public school districts within the state of Delaware. The university collaborates with all Delaware school districts; however, the majority of our students are placed in Capital, Caesar Rodney, Smyrna, Poly tech, Red Clay, Brandywine, Christina, Milford and Lake Forest school districts.  There are also private and charter sites, such as the Academy of Dover and Eastside Charter of Wilmington, that support candidates in practical experiences. Schools that are selected as internship and practica sites for candidates must adhere to the quality standards of Delaware certification regulations as well as meet the expectations of the Unit. (See 3a-1.1)- Delaware collaborative P-12 Schools Listings Delaware State University maintains collaborative agreements that explain the policies and procedures for clinical and field experiences for the candidates. Quarterly meetings with district office, administrators for curriculum, human resources and policy consultants help to guide decision making for the teacher preparation unit .(See 3a1.2)-Quarterly meeting agendas.

In the advanced programs the students are directed to conduct the internships that are appropriate to their program of study within their home schools or surrounding approved venues. Public school sites listed above as well as private schools are utilized for educational leadership sites. There are plans underway to deepen collaborative relationships that will strengthen the school site selection process. The following documents depict the processes of site selection for advanced level candidates. Applied Educational Administration Internship, Portfolio Requirements, Summer Internship Sites.     

3a.2. In what ways have the unit's partners contributed to the design, delivery, and evaluation of the unit's field and clinical experiences?

The Unit’s partner school districts critique and respond to yearly collaborative agreements that indicate they will continue to support and assist in the mentorship of candidates  (See 3a-2.1)-District collaborative agreement form. There are formal and informal meetings that help the Unit to design and implement strategies for the initial and graduate programs. Collaboration with district personnel and site principals enables the Unit to tailor its programs to align with the conceptual framework as well as the goals and objectives for student learning in the districts. All candidates participate in EFE (Early Field Experiences) to develop effective teaching strategies.  During the early field observation stage, goals and objectives are established by individual course instructors regarding observations and initial teaching experiences.  During this phase students spend 10 hours per course for observation in entry level courses and 20 hours per course for practicum experiences in methods courses. The EFE coordinator provides placement information packets to university instructors to determine the best sites for particular course objectives for each student (See 3a2.2)-EFE Placement packet. After  student’s information is returned to the coordinator, the collaborating schools that meet the needs of the students are contacted. The building principal and instructional staff assist the coordinator to identify the appropriate classroom teachers for the placements. After the placements are confirmed, the course instructor then follows up with detailed information concerning course objectives and expectations. In conjunction with building principals, clinical interns are placed for the 14 week placement utilizing the intern placement form. 

The members of the Community Advisory Board (Binder in EH 109) are education professionals, parents, alumni and local business operators who collaborate with the Unit to give input in areas for improvement of the program. Annual collaboration agreements are sent out to the participating school districts that outline the mission and scope of our unit’s teacher preparation program. The district superintendents and human resources personnel agree to provide students with enriched learning environments that promote student learning. 

During the EFE phases of the program, mentor teachers evaluate the performances of the students that interact within their classrooms. Course instructors and the coordinator for EFE receive a performance evaluation for each student that is reflected in the course grade. As supervisors visit the sites, they are able to also collect informal data that assist the coordinator to recommend changes as needed to improve the program.         

 

During the Clinical phase, mentor teachers complete a mid-term and final evaluation to determine the knowledge, skills and dispositions of each teacher intern. (3a-2.3) Clinical Evaluation form This information is submitted electronically via the TK20 data collection system. The university supervisors also collect informal data from the school partners that are used to make informed decisions for the following school year.   

3a.3. What are the roles of the unit and its school partners in determining how and where candidates are placed for field experiences, student teaching, and internships?

Clinical and Field placements are approved through careful collaboration with our partner school districts within diverse school settings.  Direct collaboration with district and school site administrators assists us in determining the optimum placements for teacher interns (See 3a-3.1 Students Placement form).  The placements are viewed, discussed and finally approved by the director and coordinator for the Offices of Clinical and Field Experiences respectively. Some of the districts have designated specific persons to serve as liaisons to assist in locating proper placements of teacher interns.  Based upon the content of the course, as well as previous placements, candidates are placed with mentor teachers that best fit the course objectives (See 3a-3.2) EFE Mentor Teacher Selection Form. The number of contact hours in the early field phases is based on the level of coursework. Official request forms are sent out to districts by the Field Coordinator that identify the level of field experiences that candidates are seeking.  Levels 1and 2 early field observation hours require 10 contact hours for student candidates. The higher level-3 early field hours are practica that require 20 contact hours for teacher candidates. Principals and some district level liaisons assist the unit in the selection of highly qualified, tenured and effective classroom teachers (See 3a-3.3) DE Teacher Certification web index. The university professors also identify master teachers that have been valuable resources in teaching educational concepts in the local schools. These teachers often become mentor teachers for teacher interns during the 14 week pre-service teaching seminar. The semester prior to student teaching, the interns must submit a senior audit, criminal background checks, medical documentation, pass the Praxis II exam in their content area and successfully complete course (EDUC-416) Analysis of Student Teaching. The student placement form only identifies the student’s preference of geographic location within the state. The Unit informs students that both the Clinical and Field offices will not guarantee selected placement locations; however, we make a concerted effort to accommodate travel issues within reason. 

3a.4. How do the unit and its school partners share expertise and resources to support candidates' learning in field experiences and clinical practice?

All teacher interns are supervised by university and school faculty personnel that are licensed or content professionals in their designated fields. The department chair in collaboration with the clinical director assigns university content supervisors from the unit to each student intern.   The supervisor collaborates with the K-12 mentor teachers to further explain the program expectations that are described in the mentor training modules. (See 3a-4.1) Mentor Training Packet Binder. During the placement, candidates obtain feedback in the form of conferences, e-mail, seminars and TK20 evaluations that are used to monitor progress. The candidates complete pedagogical reflections during clinical and field experiences that are reviewed by course instructors to ensure that the goals of the assignment were addressed.  In addition, the clinical director attends quarterly meetings and staff development sessions for K-12 districts to ensure that best practices are current as well as applicable to the districts in which candidates serve (See 3a-4.2) DE Quarterly Meeting Agenda

3a.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to collaboration between unit and school partners may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

3b. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of Field Experiences and Clinical Practice

 3b.1. What are the entry and exit requirements for clinical practice?

Initial Programs:

The semester prior to student teaching, interns must enroll in course, EDUC-416 Analysis of Student Teaching, where they apply for placements for the upcoming semester. Senior audits are completed for each student by the advisors and forwarded to the student services director. Admission to clinical internship is approved by the Council for Professional Education (CPE). The candidate requirements include an overall GPA of  2.5 or greater, completion of all methods coursework, satisfactory completion of EFE hours required in their prospective program, post a passing score on Praxis II (In students designated content area), TB Testing and Health clearance completed, criminal background check clearance. The exit requirements for candidates are satisfactory completion of Course EDUC-400/500 (Internship placement), at least an overall acceptable mean score on evaluations, and satisfactory completion of the teacher work sample project. Each candidate participates in a formal exit interview with the director of clinical experiences to gather critical program feedback and reflections. A survey is also completed via TK20 for further assessment of candidate data for future program improvement. (See 3b1.1) Student Teaching Handbook located in TK20 Document Room

Advanced Programs:

In the advanced programs, candidates must be in academic good standing (GPA 3.0 or better), not presently on probation, and be a candidate for the advanced degree at the time of applying for the internship. At the time of applying for the Internship, the candidate should have completed all of the graduate coursework for the program. An application and placement process is approved by the Graduate Education Department. The advance program exit requirements are a professional portfolio containing exemplars/products generated over the course of the graduate program of study. After completing the internship, the intern will be responsible for preparing a portfolio of his or her experiences which will include the student’s reflections. The candidate also conducts an oral presentation about his or her experiences to a faculty panel for evaluation (See 3b1.2) Graduate Catalog located in TK20 Document Room

3b.2. What field experiences are required for each program or categories of programs (e.g., secondary) at both the initial teacher preparation and advanced preparation levels, including graduate programs for licensed teachers and other school professionals? What clinical practice is required for each program or categories of programs in initial teacher preparation programs and programs for the preparation of other school professionals? Please complete Table 7 or upload your own table at Prompt 3b.9 below.

  Table 7

The following table describes the minimum number of hours required for each program in the professional education unit.   

Field Experiences and Clinical Practice by Program

Table 3b-2.1

The following table describes the minimum number of hours required for each advanced program in the professional education unit.   

Course Based Field Experiences: MA Program in Educational Leadership

Table 3b-2.2 

3b.3. How does the unit systematically ensure that candidates develop proficiencies outlined in the unit's conceptual framework, state standards, and professional standards through field and clinical experiences in initial and advanced preparation programs?

 Initial Programs

Before teacher interns are placed, the directors for student services and clinical experiences ensure that all course audits are complete, grade point averages are at or above 2.5, and that dispositions and Praxis scores are satisfactory. The assessments for interns are aligned with the unit standards as well as the Delaware Teaching Standards. 

Student interns systematically receive a minimum of four evaluations by university supervisors and two evaluations from site based mentors during the 14 week placement See 3b-3.2 (Intern Evaluations, located on TK20). Teacher interns start in phase one of the placement shadowing and assisting the mentor teacher with classroom activities. During phase two the interns are granted more responsibilities and lesson planning opportunities. The third phase of the placement is the solo teaching segment. The interns are responsible for all instructional operations of the classroom under the supervision of the mentor teacher. The fourth and final phase transitions full responsibilities back to the mentor teacher and affords the intern additional opportunities for reflections See 3b-3.3 (Tentative Phase In Schedule) See TK20 Document Room.

 

Prior to school visits, in-class discussions are conducted concerning the goals and objectives of Early Field Experiences. In addition, the Early Field Experiences Coordinator visits classes to explain the unit’s conceptual framework and its impact in terms of teacher preparation. Instructor syllabi link EFE to the theories propounded in content materials and instructional resources. During school visits to the assigned schools, teacher candidates are given assignments that reinforce teaching strategies taught by course instructors.  Small group sessions and tutorials are also helpful for students to fully grasp how student learning occurs.  At the end of the EFE visits, teacher candidates are encouraged to reflect on their experiences using the reflection forms that are reviewed by the Field Coordinator as well as the course instructor See 3b-3.1 (EFE Reflection form). The issues raised by students in their reflections are usually discussed with students in formal classroom sessions and if necessary, with individual teacher candidates by the coordinator.

 Advanced Programs

In the Educational Leadership program, the applied educational leadership project serves as the program capstone. This project requires the candidate to engage in a field-based internship experience. To start this process, the doctoral candidate initially writes a proposal and obtains approval for a semester long supervised field experience with an Educational Leader at a level above the candidate current level of employment. The field experience shall involve a minimum of 240 hours of activities and projects which permit the candidate to practice/demonstrate educational leadership knowledge and skills related to ELCC standards. The internship proposal should identify activities and projects to be completed that address the ELCC standards over the internship period. At the completion of the internship, the candidate will prepare an extensive product of the experience and an oral presentation that clearly describes the activities completed during the internship in relationship to ELCC standards. This assignment is aligned with the ELCC standards and is relevant to the Educational Doctorate leadership Program outcomes for the college of Education at Delaware State University. The presented product of the internship efforts should reflect on lessons learned in relation to the ELCC standards and the actual experience. This assessment is evaluated using a rubric that identifies assessment components, describes the desired performance of the candidate, and is used to collect data. Complete APA form and style should be adhered to through the entire project (See 3b-3.5) Assignment #4 Applied Leadership Assignment  See TK20 Document Room and Rubric. See TK20 Document Room

 3b.4. How does the unit systematically ensure that candidates use technology as an instructional tool during field experiences and clinical practice?

The use of instructional technology is a vital component that is represented during EFE instruction and school visitations. Candidates are expected to incorporate technology into their lesson planning and delivery as they visit classrooms for practical experience. In addition, they are required to activate TK20 accounts for electronic data submissions of designated assignments from designated courses. The student interns complete all sections of the Teacher Work Sample in which they must utilize technology as an instructional tool  See 3b-4.1  

3b-4.1.1 Aggregate Data Spring 2007 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment  See TK20 Document Room

3b-4.1.2 Aggregate Data Fall 2008 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room

3b-4.1.3 Aggregate Data Spring 2009 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room

3b-4.1.4 Aggregate Data Fall 2009 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room

3b-4.1.5 Aggregate Data Spring 2010 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment. See TK20 Document Room

University faculty and school-based mentor teachers submit clinical experience evaluations that identify the candidate’s use of technology as an important instructional component. TK20 accounts communicate important instructional strategies and techniques to candidates from the unit as well as to the mentor teachers in the field during the placements See 3b-4.2 (data collection system binders). TK20 Document Room

Faculty Guide Tk20 has user guides for both students and faculty members. 

Student Guide Tk20 has user guides for both students and faculty members. 

Unit candidates have access to smart boards and other instructional tools during clinical and field experiences. Mentor teachers assist students successfully plan, deliver and reflect upon innovative technology based lessons in all content areas. Candidates are also expected to integrate creative instructional strategies and other grade level appropriate technologies to enhance student learning experiences.  

3b.5. What criteria are used in the selection of school-based clinical faculty? How are the criteria implemented? What evidence suggests that school-based clinical faculty members are accomplished school professionals?

Mentor teachers are selected in conjunction with participating school districts and the Director of Clinical and field experiences. The Community Advisory Board is also able to give direction in terms of community/district concerns. School district contracts of collaboration provide the criteria for selection of clinical faculty. Building principals complete the mentor placement form which gives the university the option to select the mentors based upon the needs of individual students See 3b.5.1(School site selection form) students are placed within diverse settings in surrounding districts. The site principal, in conjunction with the Director of clinical and Field Experiences, makes final placement recommendations. See 3b.5.1(School site selection form) students are placed within diverse settings in surrounding districts.  The site principal in conjunction with the Director of Clinical and Field Experiences make final placement recommendations.  The teachers must hold a valid Delaware teaching certificate in the area of supervision, completed 3 plus years of satisfactory performance as a classroom teacher, successfully complete the DSU mentor orientation and demonstrate a commitment to mentoring student interns. The Delaware (DEEDS) certification website allows the unit to verify mentors’ credentials before candidates are finalized for placements.  See (3b-5.2)-DE Educator credential verification webpage or https://deeds.doe.k12.de.us/public/deeds_pc_findeducator.aspx

3b.6. What preparation do school-based faculty members receive for their roles as clinical supervisors?

The preparation that school based faculty receive for their roles as Clinical supervisors is comprehensive and intense. Prior to placement, each university supervisor attends an orientation and receives a handbook that outlines the mentorship process and expectations. See  3b-6.1 (Clinical  Supervision Orientation Agenda) located in TK20 Document Room.  In addition, the school based personnel attend an orientation or electronic workshop sessions on the conceptual framework and standard operational procedures. The electronic training module method was adopted in 2009 to accommodate the needs and schedules of school site based personnel. See 3b-6.2(Electronic Training Modules) located in TK20 Document Room. The Mentor teacher responsibilities and expectations are sent via email before students arrive for placements and are followed up with phone calls for clarification. This serves as an opportunity to network, plan and answer questions before student interns report to the school site. An electronic binder is sent to each mentor teacher that explains the assessment process in depth. The binders, sent via TK20, provide on-going training and assistance to promote a quality experience for the interns. See 3b6.3 (Electronic Binders via Tk20). The binder contains all of the forms, evaluations and surveys that are required during the placement .The university supervisors that visit student interns in schools also serve as supports to assist mentor teachers as needed.  

Faculty Guide Tk20 has user guides for both students and faculty members.   To access the Faculty Guide, go to: https://desu.tk20.com/campustoolshighered/start.do

Student Guide Tk20 has user guides for both students and faculty members.  To access the Student Guide, go to: https://desu.tk20.com/campustoolshighered/start.do

It contains all the forms, evaluations and surveys that are required during the placement. The university supervisors that visit student interns in schools also serve as support systems to assist mentor teachers as needed.  

3b.7. What evidence demonstrates that clinical faculty members provide regular and continuous support for student teachers, licensed teachers completing graduate programs, and other school professionals?

Evidence that demonstrates that clinical faculty members provide regular and continuous support for student teachers, licensed teachers completing graduate programs and other school professionals is presented in the following narrative. Regular on site visits and informal conferences take place with interns/ mentor teachers and faculty supervisors throughout the student’s placement See 3b7.1 (Supervisor Travel logs, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ) See TK20 Document Room. Feedback is provided to all interns by university supervisors on their observed performance and evaluations (at both undergraduate and advance levels). All undergraduate interns report to the campus every two weeks for seminar class EDUC-400. These critical sessions serve as staff development support and reflection of field performance See 3b-7.2 (Semester Seminar Log).  Expert speakers and staff development personnel visit the interns on campus for sessions that link to experiences at the school site. The TK20 data system also serves as an important resource for mentors and university supervisors throughout the placement. Intern evaluations are submitted at designated intervals during the placement by both university supervisors and mentor teachers See (3a-2.3) Clinical Evaluation form ). Additionally, samples of student portfolio assessments are located in EH 109.   

3b.8. What structured activities involving the analysis of data and current research are required in programs for other school professionals?

The structured activities involved in the analysis of data and current research required in programs (Ed. Leadership, Masters Program) are the action research project, thesis. Each candidate develops an action research proposal as one assignment of the Action Research course.  The proposal must address an issue in an educational organization and receive the endorsement of the course instructor and building-level (or higher) administrator where the research is designed to be conducted.  As the capstone project, the candidate must execute the research as designed, prepare results and recommendations from the project, and present the research to a panel of professionals (faculty and educational leaders).  The project is assessed using the Action Research Project rubric and scoring guide. In a written detailed report, the candidate will describe a framework for the Action Research Project and include a statement of purpose for the action research investigation. Key components of the written report include an outline of the plan of action, a description of the setting, and the assumptions and limitations of the project, including figures and tables. Course EDUC-688 Action Research in Education (in TK20), Description of Assessment and Its Use (in TK20), Description of Action Research Project (in TK20

Delaware State University, College of Education Health and Public Policy See (3b8.1), Course Based Field Experiences: MA Program in Educational Leadership See TK20 Document Room

Activities that further reinforce the analysis of data and current research is the thesis/dissertation process. In the thesis project, there is a committee chair and members who guide the development of this activity. 

In the Dissertation project, there is a dissertation committee chair and members who guide and supervise the dissertation research. In addition, for both processes, thesis and dissertation, it is normally required that the research process be prepared to go through the Institutional Review Board. 

3b.9. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the design, implementation, and evaluation of field experiences and clinical practice may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.] 

(3b.9.1) Spring 2010 Intern Disposition Assessment: Faculty's Evaluation See TK20 Document Room

(3b.9.2) Application for Internship See TK20 Document Room

(3b.9.3) Course Based Field Experiences: MA Program in Educational Leadership See TK20 Document Room

(3b.9.4) 2010 Co-operating Teacher See TK20 Document Room

(3b.9.5) Delaware State University Education Department Employer Satisfaction Survey See TK20 Document Room

 

3c. Candidates’ Development and Demonstration of Knowledge, Skills, and Professional Dispositions to Help All Students Learn

 3c.1. On average, how many candidates are eligible for clinical practice each semester or year? What percent, on average, complete clinical practice successfully?

There is an average of 21 teacher candidates per year. Teacher candidate eligibility (n=64) and completion rates (n=62) show that 98% of all eligible teacher candidates at Delaware State University have successfully completed their final clinical practice experience. One teacher candidate did not complete the clinical practice due to medical issues. The other teacher candidate experienced serious medical problems in the Spring, 2010.  

The data indicates the unit is extremely successful in terms of candidate eligibility and completion of the clinical practice.

Semester/Year

Eligible Candidates

Candidate Completers

Fall /07

9

9

Spring/08

13

13

Fall /08

9

8

Spring/09

13

12

Fall /09

4

4

 

 

Spring/10

16

16

 

 

Total

64

62

 

 

3c.2. What are the roles of candidates, university supervisors, and school-based faculty in assessing candidate performance and reviewing the results during clinical practice?

The role of the teacher candidates and their participation within the assessment process allows them to respond to feedback from university supervisors and mentor teachers. After each observation, candidates are given the opportunity to reflect upon and question the results of their performance assessment. Each candidate maintains a self-reflecting journal which includes instructional best practices and practices in need of modification to improve P-12 student learning. 

The role of the university and site-based faculty is to evaluate teacher candidate performances though a variety of instruments that are aligned with the units conceptual framework. Each clinical placement is monitored and supervised by an assigned university supervisor, of the appropriate content knowledge, in the candidate's field of study. Supervisors collaborate with school based faculty on a regular basis to monitor progress of interns throughout the placement. The interns receive a minimum of (4) evaluations from the assigned supervisor during the 14 week placement. The mentor teacher assigned to the student performs (2) evaluations. The mentor teacher’s first evaluation is administered at the midterm and the final evaluation at the conclusion of the internship.  If an intern is experiencing difficulty in any areas of the evaluation (unacceptable) an intern improvement plan (IIP) is activated by the director, supervisor and site mentor immediately to address the specific issues. This plan contains action items for the intern and completion dates for improvement.   

All (6) of the evaluations are electronically submitted via TK20 for analysis by the clinical director See 3c-2.1(Intern Improvement Plan). The DSU evaluation is aligned with the (PEU) unit standards as well as the (DTS) Delaware teaching standards. 

3c.3. How is time for reflection and feedback from peers and clinical faculty incorporated into field experiences and clinical practice?

Time for reflection and feedback from peers and clinical faculty are incorporated into field experiences and clinical practice in that all students are required, as part of their clinical and field experience responsibilities, to complete reflective and self-evaluation summaries. Reflection is one of the major components of the Unit Conceptual Framework and is a necessary and integral part of all field experiences and clinical practice. For example, during student teaching, teacher interns maintain reflective journals and logs. In addition, the field experience Director holds a student teaching seminar every two weeks and informal reflection and self-evaluation takes place through think-pair-share and group discussion. Moreover, interns also reflect with mentor teachers and university supervisors during individual and team conferencing.  There are 6 teaching evaluations performed for each student intern. There are 2 completed by the mentor teacher (mid term and final) and 4 evaluations completed by the university supervisor throughout the semester. Immediate performance feedback from each evaluation is given to the interns when possible. The scores and commentary from the evaluation are logged into the data collection tool (TK20) for analysis (3c-3.1) Observation Reflections in TK20 Document Room.

 

For advance level students, there is a required opportunity for peer and faculty feedback when candidates present their internship capstone to faculty and peers within their respective cohorts. So, overall opportunities are available for both undergraduate and advance level candidates. 

3c.4. What data from multiple assessments provide evidence that candidates demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions for helping all students learn in field experiences and clinical practice?

Multiple assessments are conducted collaboratively during field experience and clinical practice using standards-based and rubric guided assessments.  During clinical practice, student teaching internship, the three major unit assessments (Lesson Planning, Student Teaching Evaluation, and Teacher Work Sample) are assessed electronically using TK20 as the Unit-Wide data collection system. All clinical practice assessments have been implemented in a newly designed “Binder” format and the assessments are included in tab format for easy access. This electronic binder contains all documentation needed for internship experiences of the teacher candidate. Each individual Mentor Teacher and University Supervisor is required to complete all sections of the binder as they pertain to their teacher candidate respectively.   

The clinical practice provides the teacher interns with an opportunity to develop knowledge, skills, and dispositions. More specifically, the Teacher Work Sample is designed to focus the teacher candidate on short and long-term planning, K-12 student assessment, and reflection. For example, each teacher intern must assess student learning through the completion of a unit of instruction in which pre- and post-assessment occurs with data collection. The pre-assessment data is used to determine student needs and to assist the teacher candidate with future planning. The post-assessment is used to determine if indeed student learning took place, during the instructional unit, by comparing pre- and post-test scores. Finally, teacher candidates analyze the data and reflect on the unit of instruction through the completion of the Teacher Work Sample. This is one assessment used to determine teacher candidate effectiveness during the student teaching internship. Teacher candidates are evaluated during early field experiences using multiple assessments. Mentor teachers complete a field experience scoring guide for each candidate that identifies the level of proficiency of knowledge, skills and dispositions. The aggregate data reported in the scoring guide illustrates that candidates are performing on target in all components of the Teacher Work Sample. (Scoring Guide).  

Another means of assessing teacher candidate performance is with the Student Teaching Evaluation. All mentor teachers and university supervisors are required to complete a mid-semester evaluation and a final evaluation of their assigned teacher candidate (s). Rubric assessment scores for both the Teacher Work Sample and the Student Teaching Evaluation are computed to determine candidates’ final grades (3c-4.1):  

(3c-4.1)Aggregate Data Spring 2007 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment See TK20 Document Room

(3c-4.2)Aggregate Data Fall 2008 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room

(3c-4.13Aggregate Data Spring 2009 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room

(3c-4.4)Aggregate Data Fall 2009 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room

(3c-4.5)Aggregate Data Spring 2010 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment. See TK20 Document Room

At advance level, knowledge, skills, and dispositions are assessed during internship using a portfolio assignment that is aligned with ELCC standards. The purpose of this assignment and activity requires the candidate to compile a professional portfolio containing exemplars/products generated throughout their course experience. The following are project specific items that must be included as part of the Portfolio: ( Action Research Project, Leading School Change Project, Accumulation of Case Studies, Strategic Plan, and Internship Project and Papers ). The candidate may elect to include other items of interest, but the listed items are mandatory. The candidate makes all effort to retain and collect important documents over the course of their graduate program of studies. The Portfolio provides reflections on the candidate’s personal growth and development in relation to ELCC standards. Course related topics for this project include: analyzing educational issues, steps in strategic planning, strategic alignment, examining organizational resources (internal and external), committee(s) identification, organizational influence on leader, alignment of curriculum, managing conflict, and facilitating change in educational organizations. As part of the field-experience, candidates have the choice to meet with any of the building administrators to shadow and to discuss aspects of the strategic plan or to retrieve pertinent information. Strategic planning is a developmental process utilizing many resources and stakeholders in a sequential process and should result in professional growth of the candidate and organization. The candidate should be able to identify the relationship between the exemplars included in the Portfolio and the ELCC standards which they exemplify. This assessment is evaluated using a rubric that identifies assessment components, describes the desired performance of the candidate, and is used to collect data. This assignment is aligned with the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) standards and is relevant to the Master in Educational Leadership Program outcomes for the College of Education at Delaware State University. See (Portfolio Rubric)   

3c.5. What process is used to ensure that candidates collect and analyze data on student learning, reflect on those data, and improve student learning during clinical practice?

 The process used to ensure that candidates collect and analyze data on student learning, reflect on those data, and improve student learning during clinical practice is The Teacher Work Sample (TWS). It is the primary source of assessment addressing student learning respectively and is a requirement for all candidates across initial programs. The TWS allows candidates to demonstrate proficiencies that effectively impact student learning. The TWS guides teacher candidates through a process of designing lessons based on the diverse needs of all learners. This rich and meaningful project requires candidates to synthesize the content and pedagogical knowledge and skills they have learned throughout the teacher preparation program. The TWS is comprised of seven sections, each containing its own rubric, adapted from the Renaissance Teacher Work Sampling Project. The  rubric includes the following seven sections; 1) Contextual factors; 2)Learning goals; 3) Assessment plan; 4) Design for instruction; 5) Instructional decision-making; 6) Analysis of student learning; and 7) Reflection and self-evaluation. The TWS is completed by teacher candidates as a part of their requirements for the Student Teaching Seminar which is completed concurrently during the internship. 

TWS data show that teacher candidates have a clear understanding of how to initially assess students to determine a baseline for instruction. Teacher candidates progress from the early stages of understanding the context and diversity of the teaching setting, to assessing student learning, to determining the curriculum and instructional strategies by preparing focused lessons for all learners, to assessing the learning that occurs during instruction, to reflecting  on the learning and planning for future learning. 

Teacher candidates score consistently high on all portions of the TWS. Additionally, it is scored by their same discipline university supervisor and one other university supervisor, to provide inter-rater reliability. The data reveals that teacher candidates develop a clear understanding of the challenges associated with learning and assessment. The Student Teaching seminar provides support to teacher interns throughout their teaching placement and creates numerous opportunities to share concerns as the TWS project evolves. This encourages a significant amount of self-reflection throughout the project. See Table (3c5.1) TWS.  

3c.6. How does the unit ensure that all candidates have field experiences or clinical practice that includes students with exceptionalities and students from diverse ethnic/racial, linguistic, gender, and socioeconomic groups?

The Professional Education Unit at DSU firmly believes that early field experiences and clinical experiences are vital and integral components of the teacher preparation program. As such, the curriculum of each teacher preparation program within the Unit provides opportunities for early field experiences and practicum experiences in the foundational courses and subject area methods courses. Teacher candidates are placed within K-12 student populations that represent students of different races, cultures, socioeconomic levels, family backgrounds, and academic abilities including special learning needs. In fact, most classes in which teacher candidates are placed for early field experiences and clinical experiences are inclusive classrooms that contain student populations identified as special learning needs students. The DSU teacher candidates are mostly placed in the school districts surrounding the capital city of Dover. The demographic distribution of student population as shown in the link below demonstrates that placement schools represent a diverse ethnic and racial population having a wide range of socioeconomic groups and a substantial representation of students with special needs from various categories. The description of the selection process to ensure diverse placements are available in EH109.    

 Student placement spread sheets (3c6.1) 

The link above shows collaborating DE school demographics that assist in the process of ensuring diverse school placements for candidates and interns. 

http://profiles.doe.k12.de.us/SchoolProfiles/District/Student.aspx(3c6.2) 

3c.7. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the development and demonstration of knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions for helping all students learn may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.] 

 Optional  

1. What does your unit do particularly well related to Standard 3?

The university supervisors and collaborating schools are always willing to assist our teacher candidates with planning and lesson delivery in all phases of field experiences. Instructors meet with students after scheduled class periods as well as during office hours to discuss specific concepts that they may be having difficulty comprehending. Our smaller class sizes afford us the opportunity to properly address the needs of each teacher candidate in the program. The mentor teachers utilized at the school sites are very receptive to developing the knowledge, skills and dispositions of our teacher candidates. The diverse classroom settings in the Dover Delaware area are excellent for our candidates to develop quality teachings strategies that positively affect learning for all students. The high degree of communication and collaboration between the supervising faculty and the Director of Clinical and Field Experiences provides a solid foundation that supports student teachers experiences in the schools. The onsite Early Childhood Lab School provides early field experiences in a number of courses across the Unit.   

2. What research related to Standard 3 is being conducted by the unit or its faculty? 

The following examples are evidence of faculty research related to Standard 3:  

(3c.7.1) Related Research Candidates Establishing The Linkages Among Context, Assessment, and Instruction Using an Adapted Teacher Work Sample (TWS) in Rural Capstone 

(3c.7.2) ACT 2007 Conference Presentation PPt. Experiences  Presentation:  Infusing Constructivist Strategies into the Capstone Clinical Experience using TWS Methodology  

Exhibits

1.   Memoranda of understanding, minutes from meetings, etc. to document partnerships with schools (Located in EH 109)

2.   List of criteria for the selection of school-based clinical faculty (e.g., cooperating teachers, internship supervisors) 3b.5.1School site selection form

3.   Professional development opportunities and requirements for school-based clinical faculty 3b.6.1 Clinical  Supervision Orientation Agenda

4.   Descriptions of field experiences in programs for initial and advanced teacher candidates and other school professionals Field Experiences and Clinical Practice by Program

5.   Descriptions of clinical practice in programs for initial teacher candidates and other school professionals Early Field Experience Scoring Guide

6.   Student teaching handbook

7.   Assessments and scoring rubrics/criteria used in field experiences for initial and advanced teacher candidates and other school professionals Located in TK20

8.   Assessments and scoring rubrics/criteria used in clinical practice for initial teacher candidates and other school professionals

9.   Agendas from meetings with cooperating teachers and internship supervisors 3b.6.2 Electronic Training Modules

10. Summary results of candidate assessments upon entering and exiting field experiences (Cross-reference with Standard 1 as appropriate.)

11. Completion rates for candidates in student teaching and internships by semester Candidate Eligibility and Clinical Practice Completion Rates