Student Affairs

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Student Life

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Thank you for visiting the virtual Office of Student Leadership & Activities (OSLA). We exist to inform and provide our students with co-curricular involvement opportunities and services.  This website is here to help visitors understand our role on campus and find a way to contribute to student life.  If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact us.   OSLA Vision The Office of Student Leadership & Activities at DSU strives to assist our institution become an 'involving college' as defined by George Kuh & Associates (1991) by providing opportunities for student learning outside the classroom through participation in programs and activities. Our desire is to create an environment that provides co-curricular opportunities that advance student learning, foster respect and civility, and provide services for the university community. OSLA Mission Our mission is to support the mission of DSU and the Division of Student Life by supplementing the academic function through student participation in programs activities. We carry out our mission by providing opportunities for participation in the following areas: Leadership Development Programs & Activities Student Organization Membership Our mailing address is as follows: Delaware State University Office of Student Leadership & Activities 1200 N. DuPont Highway Dover, DE 19901 302.857.6390 302.857.6362-fax  

The Office of Student Judicial Affairs

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The Office of Student Judicial Affairs
MLK Student Center
Suite 306
Monday-Friday
8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
302-857-6470
302-857-6472 (fax)
judicialaffairs@desu.edu
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The Judicial system promotes concepts of civility, fairness, respect and conflict resolution by enforcing community standards. Students are held accountable for their behavior in a fair yet developmental manner. The judicial process protects the rights of both individual students and the University community by ensuring that claims of student misconduct are handled equitably and uniformly. To find out more, visit our Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page.     The Rights of the Student in the Judicial System (PDF) Student Judicial Handbook (PDF) Student Judicial System Violation/Infraction Report Form (Word)   To email the online incident report, fill out the form online, save it as a file on your computer, open your mail client, and send the file as an attachment to judicialaffairs@desu.edu or you may click send at the bottom of the completed form.  
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Staff


Paula Duffy, Director
pduffy@desu.edu
302.857.6470

Lawan D. Lanier-Smith, Assistant Director
llanier-smith@desu.edu
302.857.6470

Achieving Academic Success at DSU

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The following are helpful hints to help you achieve success at Delaware State University inside and outside of the classroom. “You're here because you're smart” Successful Students . . . have clear educational goals. (Try writing your goals down on paper.) are active learners who learn for the sake of learning. have good study skills. are interested in their coursework. have the will to succeed. Effective Students . . . have a regular study schedule. usually work at the same time each day. work mostly in a regular study place. review notes soon after a lecture. do not get easily distracted. do not need exams for motivation. (adapted from Walter Pauk, How to Study in College, 4th edition, p. 5 and 14) To achieve successfully and to be effective you need to: Keep academics as your priority! Attend each class regularly. Be sure to participate in class! Find supportive peers with similar academic goals. Meet with your Adviser and instructors regularly. Get to know and utilize University resources. Don't be afraid to ask questions of your Professor and Residence Life staff members - they are here to help you! Do your assignments on a daily basis. Buy and read necessary text for class. Always read before your classes, and write down questions to ask your professor/Instructor. Schedule study time everyday. Don't let assignments and studying pile up. Get involved in an activity on campus. DSU has numerous organizations for student involvement - see what different   organizations have to offer and get involved. Some students suggest getting involved in at least one organization or   activity.  Other students suggest the rule of three: get involved in DSU's version of an organization you were involved   with in high school (i.e. glee club, student government), get involved in a second organization related to your major, and   get involved in a third organization that is completely new to you. Get to know your instructors. They are a valuable resource. The moment you feel overwhelmed in any area of life, seek assistance. Become a good time manager! Strive for excellence. Find a study environment that meets your learning needs. (Library, your room, the lounge, outside under a tree etc.) Set goals for yourself; find someone that can hold you accountable to your goals. Ask a staff or faculty member to be a your Mentor ! If you don't understand something, seek clarification. Always, always ask Questions!! Below are a few important resources from which you can seek assistance. The following are websites that can help you with your study skills: Academic Tips dot Org Sweet Briar College Academic Resource Center Purplemath Time Management The following are GPA calculators: University of Minnesota Duluth GPA Calculator My-GPA-Calculator dot Com  

Roommate Success Guide

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Delaware State University
Department of Housing
and Residential Education

Delaware State University
302.857.6326
302.857.6333 fax

housing@desu.edu

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Roommate Success Guide Congratulations, your college years have begun!  Many new and different experiences await you. An important part of college is learning to get along with others by developing an awareness and appreciation for other lifestyles and values.  One of the first opportunities you will have is establishing close relationships with others.  The time you will also learn about living in a community will be when you move into your room!  The information below is designed to assist you in building a positive relationship with your roommate. Also be sure to look at Emily Post’s tips for roommate success. The Guide to Positive Roommate Relations Having a positive relationship with your roommate depends on each of you trying to make an honest attempt to get know the other.  When students are placed in a residence hall they must prepare for this new experience with an open mind and an appreciation for those differences that exist in each person’s background.  The following information is designed to assist you in practicing the important communication skills of careful listening, open and honest feedback, and reaching a mutually agreed upon living arrangement. Part I: About My Background During the first couple of days at Delaware State, sit down with your roommate and begin to get to know each other.  Even if you have been friends before coming to school, it is important to start getting to know each other as roommates.  If you have just met your roommate it can be difficult to begin sharing, but start with the basics. Some suggested topics for “breaking the ice”: Discuss your family backgrounds and hometowns. Share you reasons for choosing Delaware State University. Describe your neighborhood, your high school friends, and your best friends. Explain your hobbies, interests, and activities. Answer the questions: What will you miss most while being away from home? What will you miss the least? Part II: Personal Preferences Once you have covered the basics about each other, you are ready to move into more serious areas of concern for roommates.  Living in the same room does not mean that you must do everything together nor will you necessarily be the best of friends, but you do have to develop the ability to communicate with each other and adapt to each other’s lifestyle.  Discuss the following questions with each other. Discuss your sleeping habits (i.e., weekdays, weekend, etc.). Discuss what kind of sense of humor you have (e.g., silly, sarcastic, etc.). What time do you typically come home by?  (e.g., before midnight, after midnight, 2:00 am)  Discuss how to handle late nights and evenings. Discuss issues about the noise level in the room (e.g., TV, radio, studying, sleeping, etc.). How much TV do you watch and what kinds of shows do you like to watch? Does it bother you if your roommate watches TV when you are in the room? (Give examples when it would/would not be okay). Discuss what state you like the room to be in (e.g., very neat, messy, etc.) What kind of music do you listen to?  Are there any types of music that you dislike? Where do you like to study? What belongings of yours are you willing to share?  If so, what are the ground rules? How do you feel about the use of drugs/alcohol? Do you smoke? (Keep in mind, residents cannot smoke in the residence halls.) What are your spiritual or religious values? What are some of your habits that a roommate might need to know? What guidelines should be set for guests in the room?  Under what circumstances can someone else stay in the room?  Does this conflict with the University’s overnight guest policy? Part III: My Emotional Style How you experience and express your feelings has a lot to do with how easy you are to get along with.  Roommates who enjoy living with each other typically “read” each other’s feelings fairly accurately, and respond with empathy.  By sharing some information about your emotional style, you may make understanding and responding to each other easier. Discuss the following issues: When I am upset about something I usually… Something that will usually cheer me up… When things are going really well I’m usually… I would prefer to be left alone when… When do you need time alone? How will you let me know when you need time alone? You’ll know when I’m angry because I usually… What makes you angry? How will you let me know when you are angry? I get tense or uptight when… What makes you tense or uptight? How will you let me know when you are tense or uptight? You’ll know I am tense/stressed because I usually… How will you let me know when you are tense/stressed? Something that is likely to annoy me is… How will you let me know what annoys you? We will communicate feelings or frustrations by… To me, relaxing is…    Part IV: My Impressions/Reactions The quality of roommate relationships is related to the communication between roommates.  Positive relations have been shown to be typified by roommates more clearly understanding each others' expectations, more openly communicating with each other, and their ability to verbalize to each other thoughts and feelings about one another.  During all of your discussions with your roommate, listen carefully.  Try to be unconditionally accepting of what you hear even though you may disagree.  When you are accepting, your roommate will feel free to express things honestly. Try to follow these guidelines: Be willing to listen and speak openly. Try to understand rather than evaluate or judge. Be receptive to different ways of life and different values. Be willing to make compromises. Spend time getting acquainted. Be aware of assumptions and try to get the facts.    When differences arise, try talking out issues while using the communication skills that help most—be open and honest, listen closely, and be specific. Use the Roommate Agreement Form (see below), reevaluate your living situation, and change the ground rules.  You will both change throughout the year, which means that this document should change as well.  However, if difficulties do arise in your roommate relationship, there are people and resources on campus available to assist you: Talk with a residence life staff member in your corridor or another staff member in the building. Seek assistance from the Resident Advisor, Manager, or Assistant Manager. If you still have a need for further assistance, The Roommate Agreement Form This agreement is designed to help roommates get to know each other, and to start opening the lines of communication on topics that we know are important for successful roommate relationships. A blank Roommate Agreement will be given to all residents within the first day or two after move-in.  Roommates fill out and sign the Roommate Agreement Form together. This agreement may be revised at any time.  Residents are encouraged to revisit this agreement after the first month of the semester. Click here for a copy of the Roommate Agreement Form in Adobe Acrobat (PDF) format.   
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Roommate Success

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Roommate Assignments All first-year students are required to live in the traditional residence halls. Exception are made for in-state students who who live with their parents or spouse. The Department of Residence Education and Services will consider exceptions to this upon receipt of a written request. Housing assignments for first-year students are made at random. Reciprocal roommate requests and requests for non-smoking roommates are honored whenever possible. Once you have completed and mailed us your application along with your non-refundable $200 room deposit, we will assign you a room and a roommate.  If you already know each other, be sure to discuss what items each of you will bring. This will allow you to make best use of the space in your room. We discourage students from pre-selecting a roommate for several reasons: Students who were friends before college most likely have never LIVED together.  Living with a roommate is a very   different relationship than that of a friend or acquaintance.  Often pre-selecting a roommate results in unrealistic   expectations of each other. Students who are friends are able to widen their circle of friends by living in different rooms and residence halls. One of the greatest opportunities for a new college student is to learn how to live and build mutual respect with   someone who is different from them. First-year students who wish to live together may make that request either on their housing contract or by contacting the Department of Residence Education and Services at (302) 857-6326 by May 1 before their first year. We make every attempt to pair mutual roommate requests. The two students who request each other must also request the same options on the housing contract (living community, smoking, etc.).

Become a Resident Assistant!

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The Department of Housing and Residential Education participated in the 3rd Annual Inspired Day of Service on March 29 at the Delaware Food Bank in Milford. Pictured are President and Mrs. Williams, their two sons, along with Housing Director Phillip Holmes, staff RDs, SRAs and RAs. This day of service is an opportunity for students to demonstrate the core values of the university and work towards the completion of their community service requirements.

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The Department of Housing and Residential Education is glad to know that you may be interested in a position as a Resident Assistant. The RA position is a very important part of the DSU family. As an RA, you will have an opportunity to positively affect the lives of others. The Residential Education staff is made up of Resident Directors (RD's), Senior RA's (SRA's) and current Resident Assistants (RA's). The people in these positions share a common bond of caring and respect for each other and for each resident. We are looking for people who are interested in sharing their spirit and enthusiasm for their school and their time with others. The RA serves in one of the most comprehensive roles in the Student Affairs Division. No student problem escapes the RA's involvement. This is one of the most difficult student positions to hold and to perform well. To be called on to do so many tasks, to hold so many responsibilities, and to be accountable for so many other people during the time you are shaping your own education, is one of the greatest challenges you will face during your life as an RA here at DSU. RA's act as supervisors of their floor/wing or apartment unit and, as such, gain valuable experience in organization, leadership, supervisory methods, and peer counseling in the area of conflict resolution. This experience may benefit you later in life and should certainly be added to your resume. All of these are valuable tools to develop, regardless of your later role in life. Print, fill out and submit the Resident Assistant Application to Laws Hall main office, Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Mr. Phillip Holmes Director Dept. of Housing and Residential Education Delaware State University Full Time Employment Opportunities: The Office of Human Resources is located in the administration building on the third floor. The mailing address is: DSU Office of Human Resources 1200 N. DuPont Hwy. Dover, DE 19901 Phone: 302.857.6261 Fax: 302.857.6264 Email: hr@desu.edu

University Village

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  This on-campus, student housing neighborhood is the third of three phases at this campus. It is located on 25 acres of land owned by the university. Ambling originally began its relationship with the university back in 2001 when it completed the original phase of on-campus housing. Following the success of the first phase and shortly thereafter a second phase of housing, Ambling was engaged to develop University Village, a student community and dining facility located within the DSU campus. Featuring four-story residential buildings with contemporary architecture and distinctive brick and stucco exterior treatments, University Village comprises four buildings containing 300 units, 628 beds and a 250 seat dining hall facility. As in the first two phases, the units were designed primarily for upper classmen and graduate students and feature luxury apartments in one-bedroom/ one-bath, two-bedroom/two-bath and four-bedroom/ two-bath configurations ranging from 540 to 1,241 square feet. Each comfortably furnished apartment has full sized beds, a full kitchen with refrigerator, ice maker, range, microwave and dishwasher, high-speed university linked Internet access, cable TV and university-linked private phone service as well as convenient living and dining areas. Each suite-style unit offers many of the same amenities with a kitchenette in lieu of a full kitchen. Each floor also provides conveniently located laundry facilities. University Village features community areas, study rooms, picnic areas and ample green space. Fire alarms, sprinklers, and extinguishers, exterior blue light emergency phones, intrusion alarms, bedside panic-button alarms, card access for building and unit entry doors as well as keyed knobs on each bedroom door are also provided. This community is very nicely landscaped which adds to its striking curb appeal. Delaware State University made the effort to ensure that this new community blended with the overall campus master plan for the best interest of the students and for the continued growth of the University. Student housing is in great demand at this rapidly growing campus. This project provides attractive new housing for upper classmen and graduate students, many of whom lived in residence halls or in market-rate housing further from campus. Financed with tax exempt bonds, the project is owned by a non-profit foundation.    University Village   On Campus   Residents Co-ed Upper-class 30+ credits Building Style Suites & Apartments Residence Floors 4 Building Capacity 628 Approx. number sharing bath 1, 2 or 4 Can stay during breaks Yes Carpeted Rooms Yes Coin - Free Laundry Yes Study Lounge No A/C Yes Handicap Accessible   Monthly Rent    

Cora E. Warren - Frederick J. Franklin Hall

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  Warren-Franklin houses 328 coed upper-class students. Warren-Franklin Hall was erected in 1992 and was dedicated in the memory of these two staff persons in May 1996, Miss Warren was employed by the University from 1944-1969. She served as Dean and Assistant Dean of Women in Tubman Hall. Mr. Franklin was employed by the University from 1953 to 1978. He served as Director of Men’s Activities, Director of Student Personnel, Track Coach and Registrar. Warren-Franklin is a suite style facility, equipped with a main lounge, kitchen recreation room, study lounges, laundry rooms, vending area, data lines, and cable and telephone lines in each room.    Warren- Franklin Hall     West Wing East Wing On Campus     Residents Upper-class Coed Upper-class Coed Building Style Suites Suites Residence Floors 3 5 Building Capacity 135 193 Approx. number sharing bath 6 6 Can stay during breaks No No Carpeted Rooms No No Coin - Free Laundry Yes Yes Study Lounge Yes Yes A/C Yes Yes Handicap Accessible     Monthly Rent      

W. Richard Wynder Tower

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  Wynder Towers houses 86 coed first year honor students. Richard Wynder graduated from Delaware State University and was the first alumnus to receive a doctoral degree. He held many positions at this institution, the last being Vice President and Dean of Student Affairs. Richard Wynder Tower was erected in 1985. Wynder Tower is a suite-type facility that is connected to Tubman Hall by a breezeway. It is equipped with laundry rooms, kitchen, computer, telephone and television lines in each room.    Richard Wynder Towers   On Campus   Residents Freshman and Honors Building Style Suites Residence Floors 6 Building Capacity 86 Approx. number sharing bath 4 Can stay during breaks No Carpeted Rooms Yes Coin - Free Laundry Yes Study Lounge No A/C Yes Handicap Accessible   Monthly Rent  

Meta V. Jenkins Hall

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  Jenkins Hall houses 245 first year coed students. Meta V. Jenkins from the State College for Colored Students (now Delaware State University) in June 1921. She was one of the founding organizers of the Philadelphia Charter of the DSU Alumni Association. Jenkins Hall was erected in 1970 and dedicated during the ninety-first anniversary of Founder’s Day, February 7, 1982. Jenkins Hall has a kitchen on each floor, main lounge, laundry room, recreation area, and computer, television, and telephone lines in each room.   Meta V. Jenkins Hall   On Campus   Residents Upper-class and Honors Building Style Traditional Residence Floors 3 Building Capacity 245 Approx. number sharing bath 27 Can stay during breaks No Carpeted Rooms No Coin - Free Laundry Yes Study Lounge No A/C Yes Handicap Accessible   Monthly Rent  

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