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Department of Wellness & Recreation

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Delaware State University
Wellness & Recreation
1200 N. Dupont Hwy
Dover, DE 19904
302-857-7785 Phone
302-857-6080 Fax
 

 

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  Welcome to the  Department of Wellness & Recreation!  Mission Statement The Department of Wellness and Recreation is committed to providing outstanding educational and instructional programs, services and facilities to Delaware State University students, faculty, staff, and the local Dover community. The Department will provide recreational activities and programming that strengthen the campus community by promoting personal health, safety and wellness. Component Areas Adapted Recreation Recreational opportunities for physically challenged and disabled students are offered through our department. Activities such as swimming and weight training can be arranged with individual instruction and assistance.  Aquatics Recreational swimming is available in the Wellness & Recreation Center Pool. Lap swim, open swimming, and special aquatic programming are also made available to all WRC members. Group Fitness Group fitness sessions are held in the WRC and are available to all current members. Sessions are offered at various times throughout the week and admittance is on a first-come, first-served basis. Individuals at beginner, intermediate, and advanced fitness levels are welcome to participate. Informal Recreation The WRC is available for “walk-in” informal recreation at specified hours. Ample time is available for fitness conditioning, lap and open swimming, as well as court sports such as basketball, volleyball, badminton, and indoor soccer. Intramural Sports Intramurals sports are designed to provide a flexible, yet structured environment in which to participate. Sports are co-recreational (men/women) and are offered in either tournament or league format. Special Events This area is unique in that each activity is held in one day or over a brief period of time. The programs offered are designed to promote health and wellness in all of our members. Sport Clubs These groups share a common interest in a sport activity and have gained university recognition via the Department of Wellness & Recreation. The sport club program is student initiated and organized with an emphasis placed on participation.                

Intramural Sports

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Delaware State University
Wellness & Recreation
1200 N. Dupont Hwy
Dover, DE 19904
302-857-7785 Phone
302-857-6080 Fax
 

 

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Come out and PLAY! The Intramural Sports Program provides a wide variety of quality recreational programs in a safe and secure environment designed to enhance the social, mental, and physical well-being of the entire university community. The IM Sports Program performs a vital role in the recruitment, retention, and education of students and personnel. Are you looking for some friendly, on-campus competition? Then you've come to the right place. DSU Intramurals provides opportunities to participate in over 20+ recreational activities either as a team or an individual. These sports provide a great mix of competition, exercise, recreation and fun in a relaxed yet structured environment. With over 20% of Delaware State University students participating in our programs, this is the perfect way to enhance your college experience.  FALL 2013 IM SCHEDULE League Registration & Statistics! Participant Signup Instructions     The Spirit of Competition Sport activities find their origin in the basic human need for the spirit of play. Winning and losing are mere outcomes of this play spirit. What is part of the game is the pure satisfaction of participation (fun, fitness, friendship, stress release, etc.) Without your opponent, you have no game, no contest, and no fun. You are as indebted to them, as they are to you. The spirit of play, then, is based on cooperation. Upholding high standards of integrity and fair play acknowledges this idea of cooperative competition. All players are encouraged to exercise good judgment in the caring for the safety of others as well as themselves. At DSU, an intentional violation of the rules is considered cheating and an offense against the spirit of competition. Abusive language toward officials, other participants, and manipulation of the rules are not "part of the game." A lifetime interest in sports is a goal of all players, which has more meaning than that of a win or a loss — the memory of which often fades quickly. All players are asked to participate within the context of this spirit of play and competition.  
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REGISTRATION

 

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Judicial Affairs Frequently Asked Questions

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    Q: I have been written up for an infraction, what happens next? A: The Office of Student Judicial Affairs will "email a notice to appear" with the time and date of your Prehearing Meeting to your DSU email account. Q: Do I have to be informed that I am being written up before actually being written up? A: Yes, if the student is not informed at the time of the alleged violation that they are being written up, then the rights of the student have been violated.   Q: What is a Prehearing Meeting and why do I have to have one? A: A Prehearing Meeting gives the student the opportunity to accept or not accept responsibility for the alleged violation. If the student does accept responsibility the student will explain the situation to the Director of Judicial Affairs or said hearing officer. A sanction will then be given at that time. If the student does not accept responsibility the case then moves forward to a scheduled Formal Hearing.   Q: Why should I accept a sanction if I am not responsible? A: Students charged with an alleged violation of the Student Code of Conduct have the right to a Formal Hearing before a Judicial Council. Q: What is a Formal Hearing? A: A Formal Hearing allows the student to question witnesses, present evidence and/or witnesses and/or to tell their side of the story. Please see the Rights of the Student in the Judicial System and the judicial section of the Student Handbook for additional information. Q: Do I need an attorney? A: You may have an advisor assist you in the hearing. Attorneys are not allowed to serve as advisors. Your advisors may not speak or question witnesses. The advisor must be another student, staff member or faculty member. Q: Will my parents be notified? A: If you are under the age of 21 and have been found responsible for an alcohol or drug violation, your parents will be notified. For other types of violations or for students over the age of 21 a signed release of information form is required before we can speak to parents about Judicial cases. Q: May my parents or other relatives attend the hearing? A: All hearings are closed and parents and other relatives may not attend. Q: May I have character witnesses? A: Character witnesses may come in to testify about your character. They may be anyone of your choosing, even parents. The character witness will come in to give testimony and then leave the hearing room. Q: Will I have an opportunity to question witnesses? A: You will be able to question witnesses in accordance with the rules. Your questions should be for information purposes only and relevant to the charges. Questions should not be made in a badgering or unduly repetitious manner. Q: Where can I go for additional assistance with my case? A: You may contact the Office of Judicial Affairs for an appointment by calling 302.857.6470.  

Vocal and Choral Organizations

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    Welcome from the Musical Director Welcome to our celebration of many wonderful years of great music making. The unique aspect of the Delaware State University choral program is the intertwining of many musical styles, presenting them with great distinction, precision and heart. We seek to meld together classical, gospel, sacred, Negro Spirituals, jazz, and secular music styles into a unique musical tapestry. We are proud of this diversity and we celebrate it. The performing arts are indispensable expressions of our human heritage, having traditionally been the most significant reminder of past civilizations. By studying to become a musician/artists/performer, you will be intrinsically motivated to study that which elevates each of us to our highest achievements. An audition is required in order to be in the choral ensembles. The audition is a simple one, and most (though not all) who attempt it are successful. The typical audition (not for scholarships) usually follows the following format: I will lead through simple warm-up-style vocalizations to determine the range and your ability to sing in tune. I will clap rhythms and ask you to echo them. I will play short melodies and ask you to echo them on a neutral syllable. I will listen to a prepared song you might wish to sing. This item is not required for non-music majors, but I encourage it so that you can show me your best efforts. Also, you basically control this part of the audition. A piano accompanist will be provided, if you wish. We will discuss the choral program here at Delaware State University, and answer questions of each other as needed. Whether you are planning to major in music or simply want to participate in the various choral ensembles available on campus, we are confident that your experiences will be rewarding.  
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Dr. Curtis Everett Powell
Musical Director
CPowell@desu.edu
Phone: 302.857.6693

ARMY ROTC Program

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    The Four-Year Program Students at Delaware State University, through a Cross-Enrollment Agreement with the University of Delaware, have the opportunity to earn a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army upon completion of the military science program and baccalaureate degree requirements. The four-year program consists of the completion of eight semester courses, totaling 12 credits, and one summer encampment. Courses at the 100 and 200 level are open electives to freshmen and sophomores. These courses are offered on the campus of Delaware State University. A military obligation is incurred only if the student contracts for commission during the last two years and receives pay. The Two-year Program The two-year program is designed to provide sophomores and juniors who have not completed the first two years of military science the opportunity to qualify for advanced ROTC and to obtain a commission. The student has at least two years of full-time academic status remaining to qualify. As a prerequisite, the student must complete a six-week summer basic camp. Students are paid while attending this camp. Military veterans generally qualify automatically for the two-year program. All Army ROTC courses are offered at Delaware State University. There is also now a Three-Semester-Option available for juniors that have finished their first semester and are interested in ROTC. Advanced Camp The ROTC student desiring to receive a commission must successfully complete a six week summer encampment, normally between the junior and senior years. This camp allows the student to apply, in a totally military environment, those leadership and technical skills studied on campus. Students are provided uniforms, food, lodging and medical care at no cost and are paid during this period. Pay and Allowance ROTC students contracting for a commission during the junior and senior years receive a subsistence allowance of $450-$500 per academic month. Obligation: Up to three years of active duty (full-time employment) and five years of reserve duty (one weekend per month and an annual two-week encampment), or eight years of reserve duty in the National Guard or Reserve Components, upon receipt of a commission. Army ROTC Scholarship Two, three, and four year scholarships are awarded on the basis of academic merit and leadership potential. Scholarships pay full tuition and mandatory fees, $900 per year for books and supplies, and $300-$500 (increases each academic year) subsistence allowance per academic month. Obligation: Up to four years of active duty (full-time employment) and four years of reserve duty (one weekend per month and an annual two-week encampment), or eight years of reserve duty in the National Guard or Reserve Components, upon receipt of a commission. A limited number of scholarships are available to qualified students who desire a commission in the Army Reserve or National Guard. Academic Delay ROTC graduates may apply for a delay from entry on active duty for the purpose of obtaining an additional academic degree. Contact Army ROTC www.ArmyROTC.com 1-800-830-ROTC Captain Betty Cummiskey (302) 831-8216 cummiske@udel.edu  

Student Life

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Thank you for visiting the virtual Office of Student Leadership & Activities (OSLA). We exist to inform and provide our students with co-curricular involvement opportunities and services.  This website is here to help visitors understand our role on campus and find a way to contribute to student life.  If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact us.   OSLA Vision The Office of Student Leadership & Activities at DSU strives to assist our institution become an 'involving college' as defined by George Kuh & Associates (1991) by providing opportunities for student learning outside the classroom through participation in programs and activities. Our desire is to create an environment that provides co-curricular opportunities that advance student learning, foster respect and civility, and provide services for the university community. OSLA Mission Our mission is to support the mission of DSU and the Division of Student Life by supplementing the academic function through student participation in programs activities. We carry out our mission by providing opportunities for participation in the following areas: Leadership Development Programs & Activities Student Organization Membership Our mailing address is as follows: Delaware State University Office of Student Leadership & Activities 1200 N. DuPont Highway Dover, DE 19901 302.857.6390 302.857.6362-fax  

The Office of Student Judicial Affairs

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The Office of Student Judicial Affairs
MLK Student Center
Suite 306
Monday-Friday
8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
302-857-6470
302-857-6472 (fax)
judicialaffairs@desu.edu
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The Judicial system promotes concepts of civility, fairness, respect and conflict resolution by enforcing community standards. Students are held accountable for their behavior in a fair yet developmental manner. The judicial process protects the rights of both individual students and the University community by ensuring that claims of student misconduct are handled equitably and uniformly. To find out more, visit our Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page.     The Rights of the Student in the Judicial System (PDF) Student Judicial Handbook (PDF) Student Judicial System Violation/Infraction Report Form (Word)   To email the online incident report, fill out the form online, save it as a file on your computer, open your mail client, and send the file as an attachment to judicialaffairs@desu.edu or you may click send at the bottom of the completed form.  
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Staff


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Paula Duffy, Director
pduffy@desu.edu
302.857.6470

Beverly Williams, Senior Secretary
bwilliams@desu.edu
302.857.6470

Achieving Academic Success at DSU

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The following are helpful hints to help you achieve success at Delaware State University inside and outside of the classroom. “You're here because you're smart” Successful Students . . . have clear educational goals. (Try writing your goals down on paper.) are active learners who learn for the sake of learning. have good study skills. are interested in their coursework. have the will to succeed. Effective Students . . . have a regular study schedule. usually work at the same time each day. work mostly in a regular study place. review notes soon after a lecture. do not get easily distracted. do not need exams for motivation. (adapted from Walter Pauk, How to Study in College, 4th edition, p. 5 and 14) To achieve successfully and to be effective you need to: Keep academics as your priority! Attend each class regularly. Be sure to participate in class! Find supportive peers with similar academic goals. Meet with your Adviser and instructors regularly. Get to know and utilize University resources. Don't be afraid to ask questions of your Professor and Residence Life staff members - they are here to help you! Do your assignments on a daily basis. Buy and read necessary text for class. Always read before your classes, and write down questions to ask your professor/Instructor. Schedule study time everyday. Don't let assignments and studying pile up. Get involved in an activity on campus. DSU has numerous organizations for student involvement - see what different   organizations have to offer and get involved. Some students suggest getting involved in at least one organization or   activity.  Other students suggest the rule of three: get involved in DSU's version of an organization you were involved   with in high school (i.e. glee club, student government), get involved in a second organization related to your major, and   get involved in a third organization that is completely new to you. Get to know your instructors. They are a valuable resource. The moment you feel overwhelmed in any area of life, seek assistance. Become a good time manager! Strive for excellence. Find a study environment that meets your learning needs. (Library, your room, the lounge, outside under a tree etc.) Set goals for yourself; find someone that can hold you accountable to your goals. Ask a staff or faculty member to be a your Mentor ! If you don't understand something, seek clarification. Always, always ask Questions!! Below are a few important resources from which you can seek assistance. The following are websites that can help you with your study skills: Academic Tips dot Org Sweet Briar College Academic Resource Center Purplemath Time Management The following are GPA calculators: University of Minnesota Duluth GPA Calculator My-GPA-Calculator dot Com  

Roommate Success Guide

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Delaware State University
Department of Housing
and Residential Education

Delaware State University
302.857.6326
302.857.6333 fax

housing@desu.edu

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Roommate Success Guide Congratulations, your college years have begun!  Many new and different experiences await you. An important part of college is learning to get along with others by developing an awareness and appreciation for other lifestyles and values.  One of the first opportunities you will have is establishing close relationships with others.  The time you will also learn about living in a community will be when you move into your room!  The information below is designed to assist you in building a positive relationship with your roommate. Also be sure to look at Emily Post’s tips for roommate success. The Guide to Positive Roommate Relations Having a positive relationship with your roommate depends on each of you trying to make an honest attempt to get know the other.  When students are placed in a residence hall they must prepare for this new experience with an open mind and an appreciation for those differences that exist in each person’s background.  The following information is designed to assist you in practicing the important communication skills of careful listening, open and honest feedback, and reaching a mutually agreed upon living arrangement. Part I: About My Background During the first couple of days at Delaware State, sit down with your roommate and begin to get to know each other.  Even if you have been friends before coming to school, it is important to start getting to know each other as roommates.  If you have just met your roommate it can be difficult to begin sharing, but start with the basics. Some suggested topics for “breaking the ice”: Discuss your family backgrounds and hometowns. Share you reasons for choosing Delaware State University. Describe your neighborhood, your high school friends, and your best friends. Explain your hobbies, interests, and activities. Answer the questions: What will you miss most while being away from home? What will you miss the least? Part II: Personal Preferences Once you have covered the basics about each other, you are ready to move into more serious areas of concern for roommates.  Living in the same room does not mean that you must do everything together nor will you necessarily be the best of friends, but you do have to develop the ability to communicate with each other and adapt to each other’s lifestyle.  Discuss the following questions with each other. Discuss your sleeping habits (i.e., weekdays, weekend, etc.). Discuss what kind of sense of humor you have (e.g., silly, sarcastic, etc.). What time do you typically come home by?  (e.g., before midnight, after midnight, 2:00 am)  Discuss how to handle late nights and evenings. Discuss issues about the noise level in the room (e.g., TV, radio, studying, sleeping, etc.). How much TV do you watch and what kinds of shows do you like to watch? Does it bother you if your roommate watches TV when you are in the room? (Give examples when it would/would not be okay). Discuss what state you like the room to be in (e.g., very neat, messy, etc.) What kind of music do you listen to?  Are there any types of music that you dislike? Where do you like to study? What belongings of yours are you willing to share?  If so, what are the ground rules? How do you feel about the use of drugs/alcohol? Do you smoke? (Keep in mind, residents cannot smoke in the residence halls.) What are your spiritual or religious values? What are some of your habits that a roommate might need to know? What guidelines should be set for guests in the room?  Under what circumstances can someone else stay in the room?  Does this conflict with the University’s overnight guest policy? Part III: My Emotional Style How you experience and express your feelings has a lot to do with how easy you are to get along with.  Roommates who enjoy living with each other typically “read” each other’s feelings fairly accurately, and respond with empathy.  By sharing some information about your emotional style, you may make understanding and responding to each other easier. Discuss the following issues: When I am upset about something I usually… Something that will usually cheer me up… When things are going really well I’m usually… I would prefer to be left alone when… When do you need time alone? How will you let me know when you need time alone? You’ll know when I’m angry because I usually… What makes you angry? How will you let me know when you are angry? I get tense or uptight when… What makes you tense or uptight? How will you let me know when you are tense or uptight? You’ll know I am tense/stressed because I usually… How will you let me know when you are tense/stressed? Something that is likely to annoy me is… How will you let me know what annoys you? We will communicate feelings or frustrations by… To me, relaxing is…    Part IV: My Impressions/Reactions The quality of roommate relationships is related to the communication between roommates.  Positive relations have been shown to be typified by roommates more clearly understanding each others' expectations, more openly communicating with each other, and their ability to verbalize to each other thoughts and feelings about one another.  During all of your discussions with your roommate, listen carefully.  Try to be unconditionally accepting of what you hear even though you may disagree.  When you are accepting, your roommate will feel free to express things honestly. Try to follow these guidelines: Be willing to listen and speak openly. Try to understand rather than evaluate or judge. Be receptive to different ways of life and different values. Be willing to make compromises. Spend time getting acquainted. Be aware of assumptions and try to get the facts.    When differences arise, try talking out issues while using the communication skills that help most—be open and honest, listen closely, and be specific. Use the Roommate Agreement Form (see below), reevaluate your living situation, and change the ground rules.  You will both change throughout the year, which means that this document should change as well.  However, if difficulties do arise in your roommate relationship, there are people and resources on campus available to assist you: Talk with a residence life staff member in your corridor or another staff member in the building. Seek assistance from the Resident Advisor, Manager, or Assistant Manager. If you still have a need for further assistance, The Roommate Agreement Form This agreement is designed to help roommates get to know each other, and to start opening the lines of communication on topics that we know are important for successful roommate relationships. A blank Roommate Agreement will be given to all residents within the first day or two after move-in.  Roommates fill out and sign the Roommate Agreement Form together. This agreement may be revised at any time.  Residents are encouraged to revisit this agreement after the first month of the semester. Click here for a copy of the Roommate Agreement Form in Adobe Acrobat (PDF) format.   
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