News

DSU Senior Raequan Jones Serves as Legislative Fellow in Del. House

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Raequan D. Jones, a senior political science major, is the second DSU student to serve as a legislative fellow at the Delaware General Assembly.

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For senior political science major Raequan D. Jones, he would be hard pressed to come up with a better internship opportunity. Raequan Jones (r) gets some legislative wisdom from state Rep. Donald Blakey, who is one of two DSU alumni currently serving in the Delaware General Assembly (the other is state Rep. Stephanie Bolden).   Mr. Jones of New Castle, Del. is serving as a legislative fellow at the Delaware General Assembly. With aspiration to become an attorney, this internship represents an outstanding highlight to an undergraduate journey that will end in May with his graduation.   “It is a huge stepping stone toward my career goals,” Mr. Jones said. “It will give me access to see how government works and will guide me in what I really want to do and how I want to do it.”   Mr. Jones works on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday afternoons for the Delaware House of Representatives, where he does administrative work, types memos, and records meetings of the following House committees he is serving: Veterans Affairs, Correction, Labor, Sunset as well as Telecommunications, Internet and Technology.   While his work at the state General Assembly is certainly a high point in his undergraduate years, it is not the only highlight.   Mr. Jones, a native of Norfolk, Va. has taken advantage of DSU’s global opportunities through study abroad two trips. In Ghana, Mr. Jones studied agriculture and public policy; while in the course of that work he traveled throughout the entire country. Mr. Jones also did a study abroad stint in South Korea’s Jeju Island, where he studied business at the University of Jeju.   Also at DSU, Mr. Jones served as the president of the Young Democrats from 2012-2014, and represented the University as the Opportunity Scholar at the 2011 Opportunity Nation Summit in New York City. Mr. Jones was also a speaker at DSU’s inaugural Inspired Day of Service in 2012.   As for his post-DSU years, Mr. Jones knows what his next step will be.   “I plan to go to law school and major in constitutional law,” he said. “I am a humanitarian and a human rights activist, so I believe my future will include those areas.”

DSU Dover & Wilmington delayed until Noon; Sussex Closed

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This is not what the campus looks like now. Add the snow and you will have the right picture.

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DSU's main campus in Dover and its Wilmington site on Kirkwood Highway will delay its start opening on Wednesday, Jan. 29 until 12 noon today. All classes and regular actives at those location will be delayed until that time. The DSU Sussex County location at the Del Tech campus in Georgetown will be closed all day on Jan. 29. For updates on the status of University operations, continue to monitor the DSU website, email as well as the Snowline at 302-857-SNOW (7669).

Chinese New Year Celebration at DSU on Feb. 9

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Traditional Chinese Dance will be just one of a number of cultural performances at the Feb. 9 Chinese New Year Celebration presented in the Education & Humanities Theatre on campus by the DSU Chinese Students and Scholars Association.

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Delaware State University’s Chinese Students and Scholars Association will host the 2014 Chinese New Year Celebration from 2-5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 9 in the Education and Humanities Building on the DSU campus. The cultural event on campus is free and open to the public. During the program there will be eight professional performers from Ningbo University in China who will take part in the celebration show. There will also be about 200 student performers from the Chinese Immersion Programs at McIlvaine Early Childhood Center, Allen Frear Elementary School and W.B. Simpson Elementary School, all in the Caesar Rodney School District. The programs will include Chinese traditional singing, dancing and instruments, Korean traditional singing and dancing as well as Kung Fu movements. After the three-hour performance, attendees are invited to take part in the Chinese New Year Banquet being served at the Chinatown Restaurant in the North Dover Shopping Center across from the DSU campus. The cost of the meal is $13.50 for adults and $6.75 for children.

Chemistry Guest Lecture on Cellulose Innovation, Feb. 6

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Delaware State University’s Department of Chemistry will host a Feb. 6 guest lecture by Dr. Stephen Roth of United Catalyst LLC, who will speak on the topic of “Enzymatic         Dr. Stephen Roth Hydrolysis Without Enzymes.”   The guest lecture will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 6 in Room 323 of the Mishoe Science Center South. The event – which is part of the department’s 2014 Sustainable Chemistry Seminar Series – is free and open to the public.   Dr. Roth and his company are working to conquer the major cost obstacle of transforming cellulose – a significant energy source for humans – into its glucose subunits on a large scale. United Catalyst is developing Cellulose-Hydrolyzing Imprinted Polymers (CHIPs), which preliminary data suggests can outperform traditional enzymes in converting cellulosic biomass to glucose at commercial scales.   Dr. Roth is the principal founder and chief science officer of United Catalyst, and is an academic enzymologist specializing in synthesis and hydrolysis of complex carbohydrates. After his academia years at John Hopkins University and the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Roth left higher education to establish Neose Technologies; serving as CEO and chairman, he took the company public in 1996. After retiring from Neose, he later became CEO of Immune Controls Inc. in 2003, which he led until his retirement from that company in 2011.   In 2011, he founded United Catalyst LLC.

DSU Presents the Student Production "Spunk" Jan. 29-31

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The cast of "Spunk": (l-r) Kendra Gravely, Harry Hudson, Megan Felix, Andrew Hazzard, Bryant Hazzard, Tyrone J. Ashley Jr., Ashleigh Summers, Kenny Elston, Dana Matthew and Dorian McDonald

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Andrew Hazzard (l) and Dana Matthews play a newlywed couple in the tale "Gilded Six Bits." DSU’s College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences will present the student production of “Spunk - Three Tales by Zora Neale Hurston” at 7:30 p.m. nightly on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, Jan. 29- 31 in the Education & Humanities Theatre on campus.   The performances are free and open to the public.   Three tales of joy, pain and love are representative of storytelling in the keys of the blues. The first tales is called “Sweat” is the story of a love gone wrong, while the second piece “Story in Harlem Slang” is told in the vernacular of Harlemese street hustle. Finally the third tale “The Gilded Six Bits” is the bittersweet triumph of young love.   The Hurston works are adapted as stage productions by George C. Wolfe with music by Chic Street Man. Bryant Hazzard serves as the music director of the production and provide some nice jazz ivory chops.   "Spunk" features student actors Ashleigh J. T. Summers, Tyrone J. Ashley, Jr., Andrew Hazzard, Dana A. Matthews, Megan S. Felix, Dorian McDonald, Harry T. Hudson, Kenneth R. Elston, Kendra N. Gravely, and Jay Felton Jr. Lincoln, Del., Bryant Hazzard serves as musical director.   The Rev. Shirlyn Henry Brown is the director of the play, the University’s final theatre production of the season. "Come and experience a taste of strength, passion and survival, as only Zora Neale Hurston can tell," Rev. Brown said.   Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960) was an African American folklorist, anthropologist and author. She wrote four novels and more the 50 published short stories, plays and essays. She is best known for her novel Their Eyes Were Watching God.   All performances are free and open to the public. For further information please call 302 857-6573.

DSU to Host Guest Lecture Green Chemistry in Ag/Industry Jan. 23

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Delaware State University’s Department of Chemistry will host a Jan. 23 guest lecture by Dr. Brian Coleman and Dr. Seetha Coleman-Kammula of Simply Sustain LLC who will speak on the topic of “Opportunities for Applying Sustainability and Green Chemistry Tools and Frameworks in Industry and Agriculture.”   The guest lecture will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 23 in Room 323 of the Mishoe Science Center South. The event – which is part of the department’s 2014 Sustainable Chemistry Seminar Series – is free and open to the public.   The guest speakers will discuss the use of science based tools and methods such as industrial ecology, life cycle impact assessment and green chemistry to cut energy, water, waste and chemical-use and to design better products. They will share examples of how they have used these tools and methods in a packaging company, in consumer applications, and in automobiles.      Dr. Seetha Coleman-Kammula has over 25 years of experience – first at Royal Dutch Shell and later at Basell, a Shell BASF Joint Venture. At Basell she was senior vice president of Strategic Marketing, Innovation & Asset Management and a member of the  Board of Directors of Indelpro in Mexico.   Dr. Brian Coleman spent 15 years with Royal-Dutch/Shell in product analysis and testing, product development, and manufacturing support in the Netherlands and the UK. In the second phase of his career with Shell he gained experience of quality, change management, leadership development and management consulting in Belgium and the United States.   In addition to being husband and wife, the duo are founding partners of Simply Sustain LLC, which according to its corporate philosophy statement is a cutting-edge management consulting firm dedicated to making companies better at making products than making waste. Simply Sustain employs the three-dimensional corporate strategy of achieving harmony among people, the environment and profitable economic development.

DSU to REOPEN for Classes & Activities Thursday, Jan. 23

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The sidewalks around the Mishoe Science Center as well as the other areas of the campus are expected to be cleared of snow by Thursday morning, Jan. 23.

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Delaware State University will reopen the campus for its regular schedule of classes, meetings and other activities on Thursday, Jan. 23. All employees are expected to report for work at their regular scheduled start time.   Included in the resumption of activities are the scheduled DSU Board of Trustees morning committee meetings and the afternoon regular public meeting on Jan. 23.   For updates on any changes to the planned reopening of the University, continue to monitor the DSU Snowline at (302) 857-7669, the DSU website and the University email system.  

DSU To Host "The Three Doctors" Jan. 30

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Delaware State University’s Make Your Mark Speaker Series will feature “The Three Doctors” – Dr. Sampson Davis, Dr. Rameck Hunt and Dr. George Jenkins – at 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 30 in the 2nd floor parlor auditorium of the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center on campus.   Kicking off DSU’s Black History Month events, the presentation is free and open to the public.   “The Three Doctors” has become a nationally-known story of three men from low-income areas of Newark, N.J., who became friends in high school, where they made a pact with each other to get through high school, college and medical school successfully.   After high school, the trio attended and graduated from Seton Hall University; two of them -- Hunt and Davis – would go on to medical school and become medial doctors. Jenkins would go on to dental school and become a dentist.   The three doctors have co-authored three books: The Pact, We Beat the Street and The Bond. There is also a documentary, The Pact, which chronicles their joint story of a friendship that provided mutual strength in fulfilling their dreams.   The trio has also established The Three Doctors Foundation, which works to inspire and motivate youths through education and to achieve leadership and career success in their communities through the formation of peer and mentor relationships. The Foundation’s premise is “Our Children Can Not Aspire To Be What They Can Not See.”   Following the guest speaker portion of the event, The Three Doctors will hold a question and answer session with the audience.

Descendant of William C. Jason Sets Up Endowment for Library

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DSU President Harry L. Williams accepts a display check representing the Mr. and Mrs. William C. Jason Endowment from Carol and William Jason during a ceremony in the Library named after the second president of the institution.

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Carol Jason shows a rare book formerly owned by William Jason Sr. which contains the institution's College Catalogues from 1893 to 1918. A new endowment has been set up by a descendant of William C. Jason, the longest serving president in the history of DSU.   Williams C. Jason III and his wife Bertha Carol Jason presented a display check to DSU President Harry L. Williams representing a $10,000 endowment in a ceremony in the William C. Jason Library on Dec. 19.   The Mr. and Mrs. William C. Jason Endowment will go toward the support of general operation of the William C. Jason Library at DSU.   William C. Jason Sr. was the president of the then-State College for Colored Students from 1895 to 1923.

Water Found on Martian Soil, DSU Researcher Says

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The Mars Curiosity rover has found significant traces of water in the Martian soil, according to Dr. Noureddine Melikechi, DSU professor of physics and dean of the College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology. Scientists announced the news with a full report in the September 27 issue of the journal Science, titled "Soil Diversity and Hydration as Observed by ChemCam at Gale Crater, Mars". Spectra measurements from the scoop walls of a location on Gale Crater dubbed as "Rocknest" are characterized with strong emissions from elemental hydrogen. Scientists believed the hydrogen measured was coming from water. This quantity also explains earlier orbital observations (neutron, gamma ray and near infrared spectroscopy) from previous Martian missions. The research team includes scientists from the DSU Optical Science Center for Applied Research (OSCAR). Noureddine Melikechi, who is also the University vice president of research and a co-author of the Science article, said that the ChemCam instrument onboard Curiosity employs the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique to examine the elemental content of its Martian target, the first of its kind on a planetary mission. Dr. Melikechi said that this is a major step in the quest to attain a better understanding of Mars.  “The results of the analysis of the data collected by ChemCam during the first 100 sols (a sol is a Martian day) show the power and usefulness of laser spectroscope,” he said. “Even at 300 million kilometers from home, we are able to characterize dusts, soils and rocks in a way that was never possible before Curiosity.” LIBS is an active analytical technique that makes use of a laser pulse to analyze materials of interest at a distance by creating a plasma, which emits photons at characteristic emission line wavelengths corresponding to the elemental composition of material. ChemCam starts by shooting a high power laser pulse into the Martian soil and rock to be studied. The small sampling area of the ChemCam laser (~350 to 550 um) and percussional applications of 30 to 50 laser pulses on the same spot allow it to reach deeper into the target. More precise elemental analysis can be resolved as variations of components in different layers of the target soil are revealed while laser pulses drill into the target. ChemCam showed that the Martian soils consist of two distinct types: a fine-grained type that is representative of the Martian dust all over the surface, and a coarser-grained type that corresponds to local rocks. Three groups of soil were also found by ChemCam: a mafic type (a mineral rich in magnesium and iron), a felsic type (an alkali-aluminum- and silica-rich mineral) and an intermediate type. Hydrogen was found ubiquitous in the mafic soil, a key finding showing those water molecules are bound to the fine-grained soil particles. “This result has important implications; since mafic soil likely is widely distributed on Mars, it potentially could be the source for water,” said Melikechi. Comparison of ChemCam results with that of Curiosity's other instruments confirms that hydrogen detected by ChemCam is most likely associated with water. Moreover, the instrument tested more than one hundred targets in Rocknest and found consistent water content regardless of the sampling area. And when Curiosity went in deeper into the soil, the same concentration of water was found in the newly unearthed soil. There were thought to be several possible carriers for the hydrogen source: (1) adsorbed atmospheric H2O; (2) hydrated crystalline minerals, including phyllosilicates and salts; and (3) amorphous or poorly crystalline hydrated phases. Further comparisons with results from ChemMin rule out  the  first two possibilities. More data collected by ChemCam is ready for analysis. "It is highly likely that much more information will be available, especially after Curiosity arrives at Mount Sharp," Melikechi said. "Mount Sharp is particularly interesting because it has sediment history of several billion years, which would provide valuable information about the geology and climate changes on Mars."  

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