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DSU Student Aviators Shine in Regional Flight Competition

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(L-r) The DSU winning aviation team that won the top safety award: Vincent Russ, Marc Anderson, Courtney Walters (instructor/coach) and Kenneth Richie.

 

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  A team of DSU aviation students showed off their aircraft command and took home several top prizes during the Oct. 23-27 National Intercollegiate Flying Association Regional Flight Competition.   The team – Marc Anderson of Felton, Del., Kenneth Ritchie of Ft. Washington, Md., and Vincent Russ of Willingboro, N.J. – won the Top Team Award for Safecon, an award given to the team that demonstrates the most outstanding aviation safety during the competition.   In addition, Mr. Anderson took the 1st place trophies for the Power Off Landing and Short Field Land categories, and also won the Top Male Pilot award.   Mr. Anderson and Mr. Ritchie took jointly took 2nd place in the Message Drop category.   The team was coached by Courtney Walters, a flight instructor and alumnus of the DSU Aviation Program.   “I am particularly proud of the team for winning the team award for safety,” Capt. Stephen R. Speed, director of the DSU Aviation Program. “The other teams emulated many of the precautions that the DSU team put in place in preparation for the competition once they observed how our team approached safety.”   DSU competed in the competition against four other universities.    

Homecoming Photo Gallery

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Delaware State University celebrated Homecoming Oct. 19-24.  Visit the link below to view a photo gallery of just a few of the events that took place that week. www.desu.edu/homecoming-2009-gallery

DSU's Lisa Dunning Receives Rising Star Award

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  Lisa A.Dunning, director of the College of Business Advisement Center, recently received the 2009 Rising Star Award from the American Council of Education Office of Women in Higher Education during the organization’s annual dinner in Lisa Dunning, one of three recipients of the 2009 Rising Star Award. Dover.   The Rising Star Award is presented annually to women in higher education in Delaware who exhibit great potential achieve more and who demonstrate a commitment to higher education, community service and overall leadership.   Ms. Dunning was one of three recipients honored with the Rising Star Award. LeaNora Ruffin, Esq. of Widener University School of Law and Simone George of Wilmington University were the other awardees.    “Each day the opportunity to make a difference in the education and career paths of so many talented individuals renews my energy and uplifts my spirits,” Ms. Dunning told the audience at the awards event. “As I peer through an insightful lens, I see boundless opportunities for all of us in higher education to positively guide, equip, empower and encourage our students to be successful in their future endeavors.”   A 12-year veteran of higher education vocation, she is the director of an Advisement Center that services 600 undergraduate College of Business students. Ms. Dunning has proven herself a leader in fostering the personal growth and professional development of college students, according to her nominators for the award – Genevieve Tighe, director of testing, and Kimberly Sudler, interim assistant vice president of Continuing Education and Institutional Research.   Ms. Dunning is an alumna of DSU, having earned both her Bachelor of Science in Management (Summa Cum Laude) and a Master of Business Administration. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in business administration from Wilmington University.     

Herbarium to Present Guest Lecture on Medicinal Plants

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  Delaware State University’s Claude E. Phillips Herbarium will host a guest lecture by Dr. James Duke on “Some Medicinal Plants of the Eastern U.S.” at 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 7 in the Longwood Auditorium, Bank of America Building on campus.  The event is free and open to the public.  Dr. Duke is a distinguished herbal lecturer with the Tai Sophia Hearing Institute in Laurel, Md., and has written more than 30 books on medicinal plants. A retired 30-year ecologist/botanist with the USDA, Dr. Duke grows hundreds of interesting plants on his six-acre farmette in Maryland. He currently serves as a senior science advisor to Nature’s Herbs and AllHerbs.com.  During the event, an overview of the Claude E. Phillips Herbarium will be presented by Dr. Arthur Tucker, herbarium director, and Dr. Susan Yost, herbarium educator. Following the lecture, there will be a reception and tour at the Herbarium. During the reception there will also be a book signing by Dr. Duke, as well as by D. Tucker and Mr. Francesco DeBaggio of their Encyclopedia of Herbs. Dr. Duke’s wife Peggy will also display some of her botanical art. To attend the free guest lecture, please register online to reserve your seat at http://herbarium.desu.edu; or by phone by calling Ms. Sandy Jacobsen at (302) 857-6415.    

DSU Professor Emeritus Receives Maritime History Award

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Dr. William H. Flayhart (left), professor emeritus at DSU, holds his recently presented 2009 C. Bradford Mitchell Award for his research and scholarship that produced the book The American Line 1871-1902, which he holds with Dr. Harry Williams (r), DSU provost and vice president of Academic Affairs.
 
 

 

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   Dr William H. Flayhart III, professor emeritus at DSU, has been presented the 2009 C. Bradford Mitchell Award for his research and publication of The American Line 1871-1902.   The award was presented recently by the Steamship Historical Society of America during an event in Chester, Pa. In praise of the recipient, Barry Eager, the organization’s Awards Committee chairman, noted that in Dr. Flayhart’s authorship of The American Line, he has set “an example of the highest scholarship in the field of maritime history.”   The book details the history of the American Line, a transatlantic steamship service that operated from Philadelphia and New York to European ports. The steamship’s service history had been untold until Dr. Flayhart’s research and scholarship on the subject – which produced a definitive historical account within the annals of engine-powered vessels history.   Dr. Flayhart taught history at Delaware State University for 35 years until his retirement in 2005. Shortly afterward he was given the title of professor emeritus at the institution.            

Actress Dr. Tonea Stewart Speaks to Freshmen Class

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Actress Dr. Tonea Stewart (2nd from left) spent some time with DSU students (l-r) George Brown, Naomi Gabriel, Ashley Cohen and Desiree Hazzard after she spoke at a Freshmen Forum event.

 

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  Dr. Tonea Stewart, actress, professor and motivational speaker, visited DSU on Oct. 29 to be a guest speaker in front of the entire first-year student class during a Freshmen Forum event. Dr. Stewart, in urging the students not to take their educational opportunity for granted, told them the story of her grandfather. She said he was a former slave in his youth, whose eyes were burned out by whites because he wanted to learn to read. Dr. Tonea Stewart expressed her appreciation of the stage accommodations provided by DSU Theater Manager John Samardza (l) for her guest lecture.   As an actress, Dr. Stewart is best known for her recurring role as Aunt Etta in the television show “In the Heat of the Night.” She has also starred in television show such as “ER,” Touched by an Angel” “Matlock,” as well as in movies such as Mississippi Burning, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and A Time to Kill, the last movie of which she earned a NAACP Image Award nomination.   She has also received a Gold Medal Award for her narration of the Public Radio Internationals Series Remembering Slavery.   In addition to her acting endeavors, Dr. Stewart is currently the director of Theater Arts at Alabama State University.  

DSU Health Alert

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  Oct. 30, 2009   There has been a significant increase in the number of cases of H1N1 influenza as well as other respiratory viruses over the past few weeks at Delaware State University.    As this is the beginning of the flu season, this increase is to be expected. DSU students are being urged to follow good hygiene, stay home and away from others when sick and seek medical care early.   DSU students should not go to class if they have flu-like symptoms. While the University realizes that class attendance is important, attendance with flu symptoms puts everyone else in the classroom at risk.   Students with flu symptoms are being urged to notify their instructor by email or telephone that they will be absent from class and call the Student Health Center to schedule an appointment.    University health services recommend the seasonal influenza vaccine, as well as the H1N1 influenza vaccine when it is available.    The University has implemented a plan for the isolation of students with influenza-like symptoms. Any residential student found to have influenza-like symptoms is being encouraged to go home if their family home is close enough to make that feasible.   DSU students should call the Student Health Center at 302-857-6393 or your healthcare provider for any questions or further information.     

Alumnus Establishes Endowment for Criminal Justice Majors

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DSU alumnus Matthew W. Horace, class of ’85, said he needed to figure out how to give back to his alma mater in meaningful way. The 21-year veteran of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives took over as the Special Agent in Charge of its newly created Newark, N.J. Field Division in early 2008. After he received a briefing in that capacity on the fatal shooting of DSU students in 2007 in that city, Horace said he found “a cause worth pursuing.” DSU Acting President Claibourne D. Smith and alumnus Matt Horace hold a display check representing the first installment of a newly established scholarship endowment.   The alumnus is establishing a $10,000 Horace Foundation Endowment to provide scholarships to DSU criminal justice majors in memory of three students – Terrance Aeriel, Dashon J.I. Harvey and Iofemi Hightower – who were shot execution-style in a Newark school playground just weeks before their were to begin their 2007 fall semesters at DSU. The students were simply enjoying each other’s company along with DSU student Natasha Aeriel when a gang accosted them in an apparent armed robbery and brutally shot them. Ms. Aeriel, Terrance’s sister, was wounded but miraculously survived the shooting.   “By all accounts, they were good kids with bright futures,” Mr. Horace said. “This endowment is being set up to help kids who are pursuing criminal justice degrees, and hopefully will help make it possible for such students to make a difference, or even possible to solve or prevent such crimes.”   Mr. Horace announced the endowment during the Oct. 23 DSU Alumni Association Legacy Banquet and Hall of Fame Inductions held at the Dover Downs Hotel & Casino Rollins Center. The ATF special agent, who earned a 1985 BA in English from then-Delaware State College, was one of the DSUAA’s 2009 inductees for his achievements in government and law.   He was also a Hornet offensive lineman under then-Head Football Coach Joe Purzycki, who introduced Mr. Horace during the induction program.   In addition to his ATF career, Mr. Horace is also a certified leadership consultant for FranklinCovey and accomplished public and motivational speaker. He says DSU has been a significant factor in his success. “My professional development started at DSU,” he said. “It taught me something about making a difference.”   He said the Horace Foundation Endowed Scholarship is a way in which other alumni can make a difference as well. Mr. Horace said he hopes other alumni will be inspired to continue the endowment’s growth and thereby help more DSU criminal justice majors achieve their degree and professional aspirations.   “I think people want to give, but also want to know they are giving to a specific cause,” Mr. Horace said. “I am hopeful that there are alumni who will find this endowment a worthy cause.”   The stated mission of Horace Foundation Endowment for Criminal Justice Studies is to develop “educated, confident and caring leaders” who will share the values of law enforcement and contribute to the profession’s excellence.    To contribute to the Horace Foundation Endowed Scholarship, go to www.desu.edu/giving.   To contact the foundation, email horacefoundation@rcn.com or horacefoundation@gmail.com .                

What is all the concern about H1N1?

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Jane Abiona, senior nursing major, administers the H1N1 vaccine to Michelle Fisher, director of the DSU Health Services, under the supervision of clinical practitioner Dr. Jodi Dampeer-Moore.

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  Update: The H1N1 vaccine clinic scheduled for Wednesday, November 18 has been canceled.  The next vaccine clinic is scheduled for Thursday, November 19 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Wellness & Recreation Center.  In addition to students, faculty and staff who have chronic health conditions may receive the vaccine. Vaccine clinics Tuesday, 11/17, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wellness & Recreation Center  Wednesday, 11/18, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. EH Building CANCELED  Thursday, 11/19, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wellness & Recreation Center This vaccine is especially important for people who have chronic conditions such as asthma and other respiratory disorders, diabetes, heart disease, as well as women who are pregnant. For more information, call the Student Health Center at 857-6393. Although the H1N1 virus has been a big story in the media lately, some people may not have paid close attention to the articles and news broadcasts concerning this illness. However, like everyone in the country, DSU community member should be informed about the sickness origins, the symptoms and the preventive actions that can be taken to stay healthy. For information about the origins of H1N1, visit Center for Disease Control website at www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/. According to the CDC, symptoms for H1N flu are similar to the symptoms of seasonal flu in humans and may include: Fever, greater than 100 degrees F Sore throat Cough Stuffy nose Chills Headache and body aches Fatigue To prevent the spread of H1N1 flu, the CDC suggests: Avoid contact with ill people. When you cough or sneeze, cover your nose and mouth with a tissue or your sleeve (if you do not have a tissue). Throw used tissues in a trash can. Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective. If you think you are ill with flu, avoid close contact with others as much as possible. Stay at home. Seek medical care if you are severely ill, such as having trouble breathing. Do not go to work, school, or travel while ill. It is also important to note that H1N1 influenza viruses are not spread by food. Students who believe they may have contracted the virus or have flu-like symptoms or other concerns should call the Student Health Center at ext.6393. Faculty and staff with similar concerns should contact their medical provider. Additional information is available at the CDC Web site: www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/.

Jazz artist, Donald Byrd named Artist in Residence

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DSU Acting President Claibourne Smith holds a display check with Dr. Donald Byrd, the University's newly named distinguished artist-in-residence, after the jazz musician's announcement that he has established a $10,000 scholarship endowment to benefit music students.

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  September 04, 2009 Delaware State University announced today that internationally renowned jazz musician Dr. Donaldson T.L. Byrd – commonly known in the jazz world as Donald Byrd – has been named as a distinguished artist-in-residence at the institution. As a distinguished artist-in-residence, Dr. Byrd will conduct master classes and give lectures, conduct fundraising on behalf of DSU, participate in performances when appropriate and serve as an ambassador for DSU. “We are inspired by the fact that Dr. Donald Byrd is a legend who represents for the young people all that they work and strive for,” said DSU Acting President Claibourne Smith. “We are honored to have such a legendary person with his artistry and thirst for excellence.” Dr. Byrd served as a distinguished artist-in-residence at DSU from 1996 to 2001. After pursuing other projects elsewhere, the legendary jazz musician has decided to return to DSU. As an expression of his renewed commitment to the University, the famed musician has established a $10,000 endowed scholarship fund in his name that will benefit music students at DSU. In announcing the endowment, Dr. Byrd drew a parallel between his life and the life of famed jazz trumpeter Clifford Brown, an influential 1950s musician who attended DSU (then-Delaware State College). “Like my father I never drank or smoked…. Clifford Brown didn’t drink or smoke,” Dr. Byrd said. “This school is outstanding, and here I am just trying to follow in (Brown’s) footsteps.” Dr. Byrd, a professional jazz musician since the 1950s, became known as one of the top trumpeters of the jazz “hard-bop” genre as he performed with musicians such as John Coltrane, Sonny Rollins, Herbie Hancock and Thelonious Monk. Ironically at one point in the 1950s, Dr. Byrd actually replaced Clifford Brown in Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers band. In the 1970s, Dr. Byrd began to record jazz fusion that combined jazz with funk, soul and R&B. While teaching music at Howard University in 1974, Dr. Byrd formed a jazz fusion group that consisted of his best students and called them the Blackbyrds. The group produced the 1972 album Black Byrd, which became Blue Notes Records’ highest-ever selling album. In the 1990s, Dr. Byrd jazz fusion explorations expanded to the hip-hop genre. Dr. Byrd has recorded 38 jazz albums and performed on countless other musicians’ recording projects. In 2002, the National Endowment for the Arts recognized Dr. Byrd as one of its NEA Jazz Masters. As an educator, Dr. Byrd has developed a “Music + Math = Art” education program that he has introduced to youth across the country. A native of Detroit, Mich., Dr. Byrd is an alumnus of Wayne State University and the Manhattan School of Music. In 1982 he earned a Ed.D from Columbia Teachers College of New York City.  

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