News

You are here


DSU Student and Wife Become NASA Ambassadors

Description: 

 

(l-r) Bryan Greenly, a DSU physic major, and his wife Tommi Barrett-Greenly, have been selected to serve as NASA ambassadors.

Body: 
  A Delaware State University undergraduate student and his wife have been selected to be among a group of top interns that will serve as ambassadors for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Bryan E. Greenly, a junior physics major at DSU, and his wife Tommi Barrett-Greenly, a University of Delaware graduate majoring in education technology, have found a way to do an educational experience together despite being at different institutions..   The couple – who were married in May 2009 – found that a love for science was one of the things they had in common. Mr. Greenly said his wife got him interested in NASA after she found out about internship opportunities with the space agency.   “So we both applied for the summer 2009 session – we were both accepted,” Mr. Greenly said. “We picked up the whole family and spent the summer in Hampton, Va.”   The DSU physics major said it was during the summer internship that they were informed of opportunity to become NASA ambassadors.   “We decided to both apply because we are into NASA’s objective and what they are trying to achieve for the United States,” Mr. Greenly said. “NASA does so many things that people don’t even hear about.”   He said that being an advocate for NASA is something that comes naturally to them. “It is something we feel, that NASA is the coolest thing in the world,” he said.   As two of the 105 NASA ambassadors selected nationwide, the couple will do presentations in the Delmarva region, work at job fairs for the agency and conduct other outreach endeavors for the space agency.   In addition to her graduate studies, Mrs. Barrett-Greenly is a teacher at the Morris Early Childhood Center in Lincoln, Del., where she has been named the 2010 Milford School District Teacher of the Year.  

President Williams Attends Obama's HBCU Event

Description: 

 

DSU President Harry L. Williams, shown on Feb. 1 with Dr. John S. Wilson Jr. (r) of the White House Initiative on HBCUs, was reunited with the administration official at the Feb. 26 executive order signing by President Barack Obama that promises support for HBCUs.

feature_image: 
Body: 
  DSU President Harry Lee Williams spent Feb. 26 in Washington, D.C. with other HBCU leaders to witness President Barack Obama’s signing of an executive order that renews the White House’s commitment to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The executive order renews White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities that was begun in 2002 under the administration of President George Bush. According to a White House press release, the event – which took place in the White House East Room – demonstrates President’s Obama’s strong appreciation for the historic role these institutions have played in the education of citizens as well as the Administration’s commitment to assist HBCUs in accomplishing their missions.   Specifically, the executive order establishes the White House Initiative on HBCUs to be housed in the U.S. Department of Education under the leadership of Executive Director John S. Wilson Jr., as well as establish a President’s Board of Advisors in HBCUs.   Dr. Wilson was in attendance at DSU when Dr. Williams announced that establishment of a Blue Ribbon Commission to create a new vision and set of core values for the University. He also met that same day with the DSU president and commission members to explain President Obama’s commitment to HBCUs.   DSU President Williams said that it was a tremendous experience to attend President Obama’s executive order signing along with the entire Congressional Black Caucus and more then 40 other HBCU presidents.   “President Obama made it clear that he is in full support of HBCUs,” said the DSU president. “He cited the importance of the sustainability of HBCUs because it is going to be important of his 2020 goal of improving the number of people earning degrees.   Dr. Williams added that President Obama has requested $98 million in new money for HBCUs, with a large percentage of that going toward financial aid for students and increasing the Pell Grant.   According the White House press release, the Obama Administration is also requesting $20.5 million for a HBCU Capital Financing Program. This would provide HBCUs with access to financing for the repair, renovation and construction or acquisition of education facilities, instructional equipment, research instrumentation and physical infrastructure.   Including Delaware State University, there are 105 HBCUs located in 20 states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands, which serve more than 300,000 undergraduate and graduate students.  

DSU to Present the Jena Production "America, Amerique" at the Schwartz

Description: 

 

The March 4 performance of the America, Amerique cast (left) is a rescheduled date, as the original Feb. 12 date was postponed due to the snowstorm of that week.

Body: 
  Delaware State University will host the JENA Company production entitled America, Amerique at 7 p.m. Friday, March 4 at the Schwartz Center for the Arts in Downtown Dover. Live on stage, America, Amerique is the story of American immigrants – and America – 1845 to the Present. From the Irish potato fields to Mid-western farms and New York tenements … from New England factories and the railroad across the Rockie, to the Mexican border 2008…and elsewhere. The startling and extraordinary production uses music, sound, and seven actors to bring the audience to unknown worlds. “Voices from Our Past, Dreams for the Future, and a Battle that still rages today, the audience will learn, to know deeply, where we’ve been, where we’ve come from, maybe even where we’re going, in this American story, the story of immigrants. The production is free to students with I.D. and is open to the public with a $10 fee for adults. For tickets call the Schwartz Center for the Arts box office at (302) 678-5152. For further information contact Dr. Donald Parks at (302) 678-3583 or e-mail at Donald@schwartzcenter.com. School groups and other community groups are welcome to participate in this opportunity to learn about the history of immigration in America.      

University Mourns Two Faculty Members

Body: 
  Delaware State University is mourning the recent deaths of two faculty members. Dr. Yaw Ackah, professor of sociology and criminal justice, passed away on Feb. 17 after a lengthy illness. Dr. Ackah began teaching at DSU as an assistant professor in 1993 after he earned his doctorate in sociology and criminal justice from Howard University. By 2003, Dr. Ackah had risen to full professor status at DSU.                       Dr. Yaw Ackah His research in their areas of crime in Washington, D.C., race and health disparities among prison inmates, and transnational crime resulted in published articles in several academic publications. Dr. Ackah was a native of Ghana. “He was a dedicated teacher, a good scholar, a compassionate faculty member, a decent person, and he was a scrupulously honest person,” said Dr. Kofi Blay, chair of the Department of Sociology. “He has left a gap that will be difficulty to fill.”   He is survived by his wife Georgina and five sons, Eric, Ernest, Thomas, Samuel and Ellis, as well as other family members and friends.   To allow time for family member to travel from Ghana to the United States, a viewing will be held from 6-8 p.m. Friday, March 12  at Torbert Funeral Home on Del. 10. The funeral at 1 p.m. Saturday, March 13 at Wesley United Methodist Church, 209 S. State Street in downtown Dover. The 1 p.m. funeral start time is a rescheduling from the original planned 2 p.m. time, which had to be changed due to a parade event that will be going  on in downtown Dover that afternoon.   Dr. Clorice D. Thomas-Haysbert, associate professor of hospitality and tourism management, passed away on Feb. 20 after a long battle with cancer. Dr. Thomas-Haysbert began teaching in the DSU Department of Hospitality & Tourism Management in the fall of 2003. She had been on sick leave since the spring semester 2009.        Dr. Clorice Thomas-Haysbert “Dr. T.H., as we called her, was very caring and sincere where the Hospitality & Tourism Management students were concerned and faithfully served as their mentor and advisor, said Dr. Cynthia R. Mayo, the department’s chair.   Dr. Mayo added that Dr. Thomas-Haysbert served as the chair of the department’s Curriculum Committee and also served on the Assurance of Learning Committee. Prior to arriving at DSU, she was the director of the Hospitality Management Program at Howard University.   She is survived by her husband Raymond Haysbert, as well as other family and friends.   There will be a Memorial Service at 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 27 at Centennial United Methodist Church, 44 East Mt. Vernon Street, Smyrna, Del. Friends can call on the family at the church two hours before the service begins.  

Band Celebrates European Success with Dover Concert

Description: 

 

For many members of the DSU Approaching Storm Band, their recent performances overseas were their first trip to Europe.

Body: 
  The Delaware State University Approaching Storm Band will perform a concert at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 25 at the Schwartz Center for the Arts in downtown Dover.   The concert is in celebration of their recent triumphant European trip in which the band gave outstanding New Year's Day performances in London, England and Paris, France. The band will perform some of the compositions that it performed during that trip – including songs by Beyoncé, Michael Jackson, Jennifer Hudson and others. The DSU Approaching Storm percussionists make a rhythmic statement on the streets of London.   The 80-member band is led by Randolph Johnson, DSU band director. Also performing in the concert will be the Sweet 16 Flag Team and the Del*A* Gance Dancers.   Tickets are $10 at the door.   The Schwartz Center for the Arts is located at 226 South State St. in downtown Dover.      

Philly News Anchor Ukee Washington Cooks at DSU!

Description: 

 

CBS3 News Anchor Ukee Washington (r) gets his cooking groove on under the guidance of Village Cafe chef Craig Johnson.

Body: 
   Ukee Washington, news anchor of CBS3/CW PHILLY (KYW-TV), came to DSU on Feb. 19 to try his hand at culinary work as a Guest Chef for the dinner time crowd at the Village Café. DSU Hornet newspaper reporter Ishah Bass interviews Ukee Washington during his Village Cafe visit. Mr. Washington worked at the Chef’s Table in the middle of the dining room – a new Village Café feature – creating Shrimp Scallops Creole. Under the guidance of Village Café chef Craig Johnson, Mr. Johnson mixed in the necessary ingredients and then served them up to some hungry students.   He also took the microphone and shared from encouraging words with the DSU students in the dining room, urging them remain steadfast in the academic and professional goals, as well as to always strive for excellence.   The news anchor’s visit is a part of the Village Café’s celebration of Black History Month.  DSU President Harry L. Williams stopped by and gave Ukee Washington's culinary skills the thumbs up after sampling his dish.   For Mr. Washington, his visit to the campus was actually a homecoming. He is the son of the esteemed Dr. Ulysses S. Washington, who was the longtime chair of the University’s Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources. The younger Washington grew up at then-Delaware State College, living with his father in the house that U.S. Washington still occupies behind Conrad Hall.      

Rotaract Club Established on Campus

Description: 

 

 

(L-r) Kemal Atkins, interim vice president of DSU Student Affairs, Debbie Taylor and Fran Johnson, both of the Camden-Wyoming Rotary; and the DSU Rotaract officers: Charles Eke, president, Jamel Smiley, vice president, Terrell Davis, treasurer, and Yeshi Asseged, secretary stand together to display the DSU Rotaract Charter.
 

 

Body: 
  A group of DSU students have joined to establish a Rotaract Club of Delaware State University under the sponsorship and guidance of the Camden-Wyoming Rotary Club.  Representatives of the Camden-Wyoming Rotary presented the DSU Rotaract Club with its inaugural charter at a Feb. 19 ceremony in the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center.   Rotaract – which stands for Rotary-In-Action – is a program of Rotary International for men and women aged 18-30. Rotaract clubs work under the guidance of their local Rotary Club in sponsoring and seeking to foster leadership, responsible citizenship, high ethical standards, international peace and understanding.   The DSU Rotaract Club is led by Charles Eke, president, Jamel Smiley, vice president, Terrell Davis, treasurer, and Yeshi Asseged, secretary. There are currently 15 members, according to Mr. Eke.   “We plan to focus on literacy and work to reach out to children,” Mr. Eke said.   The group was started under the encouragement of DSU Board of Trustees member Jose Echeverrí and DSU’s Office of Student Affairs.   There are more than 8,000 Rotaract clubs in the world, and in some locations Rotaract is growing faster than Rotary, according to Fran Johnson, president of the Camden-Wyoming Rotary.  

DSU President and Wife Received Warmly by Civic Leaders

Description: 

 

First Lady Dr. Robin Williams and her husband DSU President Harry Williams receive a welcome dance from the Sankofa African Dance Company during a reception by Dover-area civic leaders.

feature_image: 
Body: 
  DSU President Harry Lee Williams and his wife Dr. Robin S. Williams received a warm reception from a group of Dover-area civic leaders at a Feb. 18 gathering at the Kirkwood Community Center and made clear their commitment to become an active part of the community and to “transform” the University into a premier institution. The event began with a reception line in which the Williams got acquainted with each attendee one-on-one and learned about each one’s civic and professional roles in the community.   The emcee Dr. Donald A. Blakey – an alumnus of the University – then seated the DSU president and his wife in two large African-style wicker chairs, where they received a rhythmic welcome through a performance by Sankofa African Dance Company. Reuben Salters (2nd from left), founder of the Inner City Cultural League, introduced Roxie Carter (l), president of the Central Delaware NAACP, to DSU new First Couple -- Dr. Robin S. Williams and Dr. Harry L. Williams.   Dr. Robin Williams – who is currently concluding her tenure as an associate dean at North Carolina Central University and will be soon joining her husband permanently at DSU – traveled from Durham, N.C. to join her husband at the event.   “I was going to be here at this gathering whether there was one person here or many, because I want to be a part of the community,” DSU’s new First Lady said.   President Williams then spoke to the group, sharing how as a couple he and his wife stayed on one accord concerning their professional aspirations and made it a priority to be mutually supportive of each other’s careers and achievements.   The President also shared the role that his faith played in pursuing the top post of the University, and how it has given him the strong belief that he has been placed at DSU for a purpose.   “We are going to transform DSU,” President Williams said. ”It’s going to be a university that will move to a whole new level.   The President told the gathering he has established a Blue Ribbon Commission to create a new vision for the University, and added that public forums will be held through the state to obtain the ideas and perspectives from community members concerning DSU’s future direction.   “It is important to create a vision, because if you have no vision, you perish,” Dr. Williams said. “We are going to set a vision that is going to set us on a course, and that will maintain and sustain our institution.”   President Williams said community’s support is vitally important.   “We need for you to talk about DSU in a positive way, because there are a lot of positive things happening on our campus,” the DSU president said. He added that DSU has survived for 119 years and because people in Delaware have believed in the institution.   I am delighted to be here, I am excited about the challenges we are going face,” Dr. Williams said. “I know we are going to win, I just know it.”   Among the attendees were Dover City Council members Rueben Salters and Sophia R. Russell, Bishop Thomas Holsey of the Institutional Church of God in Christ, Harold Stafford, president of the Inner City Cultural League, Rev. Rita Paige and her sister Dr. Wilma Mishoe, the daughters of former DSU President Luna I. Mishoe, Roxie Carter, president of the Central Delaware Branch of the NAACP, Marian Harris, founder and executive director of the House of Pride and many others    

Dr. Claibourne D. Smith Receives Reappointment to the Board

Body: 
  Gov. Jack Markell has reappointed Dr. Claibourne D. Smith to another six years as a member of Delaware State University's Board of Trustees. Dr. Smith has been a governor’s appointee to the board since 1987, when he was first appointed to finish the term of former board member Arthur Richardson. In 1993, Dr. Smith was elected by the board to serve as chairman, which he            Dr. Claibourne D. Smith served until 2008, when he stepped down to serve as the acting president of the University.   When Dr. Harry Lee Williams became DSU’s 10th president on Jan. 10, Dr. Smith returned to the board and was re-elected as board chairman. With the governor’s reappointment, Dr. Smith is now in his 22nd year as a board member and his 16th year as board chairman.   A chemist by profession, Dr. Smith retired in 1998 from DuPont as the vice president of technology and vice chairman of Corporate Education. The Centerville, Del. resident has also previously served on the Delaware State Board of Education, the State Commission on Higher Education, as well as president of the Delaware Math and Science Foundation.          

Two DSU Students Work with NBC at the Olympics

Description: 

 

Mass Communications majors Shanae Newman (l) and Kevin Davis are representing DSU with their work ethic at the Winter Olympics in Vancouver.

Body: 
  Delaware State University is once again making its mark at the World Olympics. Almost two years after four DSU mass communications students spent an internship working at the Summer Olympics in China, now there are two other students from the same department who are currently assisting with the media production at the Winter Olympics in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The two mass communications students – Kevin P. Davis, a junior television production major, and Shanae M. Newman, a senior broadcast journalism major – are getting valuable real world experience in their chosen professional vocations as a part of the NBC production team at the Olympics. Mr. Davis is working as a “logger,” in which he will review all of the NBC footage that comes into the International Broadcast Center and assign time codes on them. “This will give me an insight to the whole spectrum of what NBC is doing at the Olympic,” said Mr. Davis, native of Wichita Falls, Tex. and now a Dover resident. “Even though it is an internship position, it is important to the overall success of the production.” Ms. Newman will be working with different producers and production team members as a “runner.” The Baltimore native said that she will be there to do whatever is needed to be done. “I will get to see how the broadcasters prepare before they go on the air,” Ms. Newman said. “I will also get to see how the productions are set up.” Equally valuable, both said, will be the opportunity to work side by side with the NBC production team members and hopefully develop professional relationships that could be beneficial to their future careers.  

Pages