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State Senate Unanimously Passes DSU Inspire Scholarship Bill

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Congratulations abound as HB 399 lead sponsor Rep. Darryl M. Scott (r) and DSU President Harry L. Williams celebrate the state Senate passage of the DSU Inspire Scholarship legislation.

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Nearly 150 Delawarean students will benefit from a scholarship at Delaware State University thanks to a scholarship the state Senate unanimously approved on Tuesday, Sept. 21 in a special session. Created by House Bill 399, the DSU Inspire Scholarship program is modeled after the Student Excellence Equals Degree (SEED) program, which provides scholarships for students to attend Delaware Technical & Community College or University of Delaware to obtain an associate’s degree. DSU was excluded from the original program because it does not offer an associate’s degree. The new DSU program would provide financial assistance to 140 students in the same amount that SEED scholars receive. DSU President Harry L. Williams (r) thanks Sen. Nancy W. Cook for her support of HB 399. Dr. Dolores Finger-Wright (center), DSU associate professor of social work, looks on.   Rep. Darryl M. Scott took up the issue this year after several conversations with DSU officials about how the SEED scholarship program was affecting the Dover-based college’s enrollment. Rep. Scott said providing opportunities for Delaware students to attend DSU is critical to their continuing education and sends the right message to students, families and the university community.   “It is important to continue to invest in our future – our children,” said Rep. Scott, D-Dover. “I truly believe the small investment we make today will pay huge dividends, not only for the students, but also for our state. Having a qualified work force is a key criteria companies use to select where they start or move their business.”   Under the program, DSU Inspire scholarship recipients would receive the same amount of funding as SEED recipients for six semesters – the same length as the SEED scholarship. Eligible students must have and maintain a 2.75 GPA and perform 10 hours of community service per semester. SEED students must maintain a 2.5 GPA and do not have a community service requirement.   DSU President Harry L. Williams said that the state Senate’s passage of HB 399 represents a great day for the University. Dr. Harry L. Williams (l) and Sen. Margaret Rose Henry share the happiness over DSU Inspire Bill Senate success.   “The legislature has made a statement that reflects the importance it attaches to investing in higher education and the understanding of the economic impact that it will have on the state,” Dr. Williams said. “You can’t go wrong in investing in education and making it more affordable for Delawareans. Today’s vote by the Delaware Senate clearly shows that consensus among these state elected legislators.”   HB 399, which passed the House unanimously in June, now goes to Gov. Jack Markell for his signature.          

DSU to Hold Sept. 29-30 Symposium on Hurricane Katrina, 5 Yrs. Later

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    Delaware State University’s College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences will host a day and a half symposium entitled “Five Years Later: Hurricane Katrina and Global Disasters in the 21st Century” on Sept. 29-30 in the 2nd floor parlor of the Martin Luther King Student Center on campus. Phyllis Montana-LeBlanc, a compelling central figure in the 2006 Spike Lee Hurricane Katrina documentary When the Levees Broke, will be a featured speaker at 5:45 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 29 symposium session.   The event is free and open to the public   The destruction and devastation wrought by the hurricane along the Gulf Coast and the breaking of the levees in New Orleans represents one of the most important events in American history to occur during the first decade of the 21st century. The symposium will be presented to highlight the impact of Katrina, but also the increasing frequency of both natural and man-made disasters throughout the world.              “Listening and engaging in dialogue with scholars and artists about the significance of such transforming events as Katrina, the earthquake in Haiti, the flooding in Pakistan, and of course the Gulf oil spill will better prepare our students to confront the ever-growing challenges of a complex and dangerous world,” said Dr. Marshall Stevenson, dean of the DSU College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.   The symposium will feature documentaries, artwork from Louisiana native Nina Spencer, presentations by Wilmington News journalist Molly Murray, Dr. Jerry Ward and Dr. Robert Collins from Dillard University in New Orleans, and Ms. Phyllis Montana-LeBlanc, a central figure in the Spike Lee documentary about When the Levees Broke.   The schedule of events – which will all take place in the Martin Luther King Student Center – is as follows:   Wednesday, Sept. 29   4 p.m. – Opening Remarks by DSU President Harry L. Williams 4:15 p.m. – Introduction by Dr. Marshall Stevenson, dean of the DSU College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, “Why Katrina is Important.” 5 p.m. – Presentation by Molly Murray, News Journal journalist, on “Delaware’s Perfect Storm.” 5:45 p.m. – Featured speaker, Phyllis Montana-LeBlanc, a central figure in the Spike Lee’s Hurricane Katrina documentary When the Levees Broke. 7 p.m. – Film documentary: The Storm that Drowned a City.   Thursday, Sept. 30   ·        11 a.m. – Presentation by Dr. Robert Collins, professor of urban studies at Dillard University, New Orleans, “New Orleans at Five Years: Recovery and Resilience after Hurricane Katrina.” ·        12 noon – Film: Axe in the Attic, a film by Ed Pincus and Lucia Small. ·        2:30 p.m. – Dr. Jerry Ward, professor of English, Dillard University, New Orleans, and the author of The Katrina Papers, to give a presentation “The Evidence and Art of Katrina Narratives.” ·        4 p.m. – DSU reflections on Hurricanes. Perspectives from DSU members who were involved with the people of the impacted region. ·        5 p.m. – Film documentary: A Village called Versailles. A film about Vietnamese “boat people” immigrants who had settled in the Versailles section of New Orleans only to have their neighborhood destroyed by the storm. Although those people were among the first to rebuild their neighborhood, their community was then threatened by the dumping of toxic waste nearby.   For more information on the two-day symposium, call the DSU College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences at (302) 857-6628.   -0-  

Alumna to hold 2nd Annual 5K Walk/Run for Domestic Viol. Awareness

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Witney's LIghts 5K Walk/Run organizer Quincy Lucas presented Dr. Bradley Skelcher, DSU association provost, with a Corporate Citizenship Award for the University's support of the 2009 event.

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DSU alumnus Quincy Lucas, class of 2004 and 2007, is once again engaging the entire state of Delaware in her fight against domestic violence by holding the second annual 5K Walk/Run to bring awareness to the issue.   To be held on the morning Saturday, Oct. 9, the Witney’s Lights Walk/5K Run event will begin with registration at 8 a.m. followed by the walk/run start time of 9:30 a.m. The 5K route will be a double-loop walk or run beginning at Silver Lake Park in Dover and coursing twice through Downtown Dover and back to the park.   Throughout the morning there will be music and festivities at Silver Lake in connection with the Witney’s Lights event, and there will be an awards ceremony there also at 11 a.m.    Mrs. Lucas has been a longtime advocate against domestic violence since the murder of her sister Witney Holland Rose in 2003. Witney was senselessly killed by her ex-boyfriend in Baltimore, and ever since Mrs. Lucas has made it her mission in life to raise awareness about domestic violence.   Mrs. Lucas and her husband Dr. Kevin Lucas have created a non-profit organization named after her sister – Witney’s Lights, Inc. – that is dedicated to raising awareness and spreading education about the issue of domestic violence. Her advocacy was given great momentum when it caught the attention of then-U.S. Sen. Joseph R. Biden, Jr., as Mrs. Lucas’ work on the issue related greatly to the then-legislator’s Violence Against Women Act of 1994.   That connection later resulted in an invitation for Ms. Lucas to give the official nomination of Sen. Biden as the running mate for then-presidential candidate Barack Obama at the 2008 Democratic National Convention. Following the Obama-Biden victory in November, Ms. Lucas and family were asked to accompany the president on the historic Inauguration Train, during which she was asked to introduce the then-president-elect during the journey stop in Baltimore.   All this has served to focus more attention on Mrs. Lucas’ advocacy against Domestic Violence, which she has parlayed in more active work on this issue – including the planned Oct. 9 awareness walk.   Mrs. Lucas says that with 2,800 reported cases of domestic violence last year in a relatively small state such as Delaware, there is a tremendous need for greater awareness and attention to the issue in the First State.   “The Witney’s Lights Walk/5K Run is not the answer to ending domestic violence, but it a strong way to bring awareness to it,” Mrs. Lucas said. “The problem is people don’t talk about it.”   During the 2009 Witney’s Light 5K Walk/Run, Delaware State University received the Corporate Citizenship Award for its support of the event, and DSU organizations are gearing up to support again this year.   Call (302) 382-7308 or email Quincy@witneyslights.com.  

DSU Inaugurates Dr. Harry L. Williams at 10th President

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Dr. Harry Lee Williams speaks about his aspirations for DSU after he took the Oath of Office to become the University's 10th president.

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    Dr. Harry Lee Williams formally took the oath of office Friday morning as the 10th president of Delaware State University during a packed Inauguration Ceremony in the Memorial Hall Gymnasium on campus. Dr. Harry L. Williams received the Presidential Medallion from Dr. John Land (r) and Dr. Claibourne Smith, both of the DSU Board of Trustees.   With his mother, wife, two sons, three brothers, extended family and his native North Carolina friends looking on along with the DSU family and other well-wishers, Dr. Williams received the Presidential Medallion and investiture from Dr. Claibourne D. Smith, chair of the Board of Trustees, who served as acting DSU president from September 2008 to January 2010.   “We must heed the call to be more engaged with Delaware and the nation, demonstrating our capacity to be ever more useful and relevant to a society under stress,” Dr. Williams said in his inauguration address. “We choose the path that capitalizes on our strengths, effectively addresses our shortcomings, and seizes the opportunities before us as we march into the upper echelons of the top Historically Black University’s in the nation.”   “Our students will graduate, and graduate with tools they need to thrive in this ever-shrinking world, improving the lives they touch,” the DSU president said.   Dr. Williams succeeds Dr. Allen L. Sessoms, the 9th DSU president who served from 2003-2008 before leaving to become president of the University of the District of Columbia.   Gov. Jack Markell was joined in the Inauguration Ceremony by Delaware’s entire Congressional Delegation – Gov. Jack Markell will participate in the inauguration, as well as the entire Delaware Congressional Delegation – U.S. Sen. Thomas R. Carper, U.S. Sen. Ted Kauffman and U.S. Rep. Michael N. Castle.   Gov. Markell noted that DSU has a special president. “Dr. Williams is humble, but he has the intellectual resources to know how to take the school to the next level,” the governor said.   Rep. Castle said being a higher education president is a challenge because there are so many constituencies – students, faculty, staff, alumni, elected officials, the public, etc.; but noted that DSU’s 10th president is more than capable.   “Dr. Harry Williams has the ability to lead in ways that are rarely seen in this country,” Rep. Castle said. The Inauguration of Dr. Harry L. Williams brought together the rare gathering of four Delaware higher education presidents. (From l-r) Dr. Patrick T. Harker of the University of Delaware, Dr. Orlando J. George Jr. of Delaware Technical & Community College, Dr. Williams, Gov. Jack Markell and Dr. William N. Johnston of Wesley College.   The Inauguration Ceremony brought together four of the five presidents of Delaware’s institutions of higher education – Dr. Patrick T. Harker, president of University of Delaware; Dr. Orlando J. George Jr., president of Delaware Technical & Community College; and Dr. William N. Johnston, president of Wesley College. Wilmington University President Jack P. Varsalona had a scheduling conflict and could not attend.   Remarks were also given by Dover Mayor Carlton Carey, Sr.; Dr. Charlie Wilson, chair DSU Faculty Senate; Irene C. Hawkins, assistant vice president of DSU Human Resources; Kathleen Charlot, president of the DSU Student Government Association; Dr. K. Bernard Chase, president of the DSU Alumni Association; as well as Dr. Harvey Durham, chancellor and provost emeritus of Appalachian State University, who Dr. Williams calls an important mentor in his higher education career.   The DSU Concert Choir performed Moses Hogan’s arrangement of “My Soul’s Been Anchored,” while the DSU Approaching Storm Band played “Variations of Amazing Grace.” The singers and musician then joined together to lead the gathering in the DSU Alma Mater.   Hired in late November 2009, Dr. Williams officially took the helm of the University on Jan. 10. Shortly after beginning his tenure as president, Dr. Williams established a Blue Ribbon Commission to craft a new vision statement and set of core value to guide the University's future trajectory toward being among the premier HBCUs in the country.   After a little more than four months of work, the commission completed its work and Dr. Williams approved and adopted the following:   Vision Statement As one of America’s most highly respected Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Delaware State University will be renowned for a standard of academic excellence that prepares our graduates to become the first choice of employers in a global market, and invigorates the economy and the culture of Delaware and the Mid-Atlantic Region.   Core Values Community, integrity, diversity, scholarship and outreach.   Dr. Williams’ first six months as president has been met with great enthusiasm off-campus as well, in large part to his personal outreach to numerous segments – including community groups, alumni, the state General Assembly and Gov. Jack Markell, city and county officials, the business sector and others. The DSU president has met with John Wilson, the executive director of the White House Initiative of HBCUs, and even traveled to Washington, D.C. to hear directly from President Barack Obama concerning the education agenda of the nation’s chief executive and the role that Historically Black Colleges and University should play in that vision. Dr. Harry L. Williams' wife and two sons joined him on stage before he took the oath of office. (l-r) Austin, Dr. Robin Williams and Gavin, along with the DSU President.   In addition, Dr. Williams took a trip in the summer of 2010 to the People’s Republic of China and South Africa with other DSU officials to finalize new agreements with several institutions in those countries to facilitate student/faculty exchanges and other collaborations.   Dr. Williams served as DSU’s provost and vice president of Academic Affairs from July 2008 until he assumed the presidency. His 22-year career in higher education includes serving as an administrator at his alma mater Appalachian State University, North Carolina A&T, University of North Carolina General Administration, as well as a consultant with Noel-Levitz, a top national enrollment management consultation firm.   Dr. Williams has a Bachelor of Science in Communication Broadcasting and a Master of Arts in Educational Media, both from Appalachian State University. He earned an Ed.D. in Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis from East Tennessee State University.   As an athlete, Dr. Williams competed as an undergraduate in track and cross country at Appalachian State University. He continues to stay in shape by running four miles at the beginning of each day.   He is married to Dr. Robin S. Williams, the DSU First Lady. Their 18-year union has produced two sons: Austin, age 14 and Gavin, age 10.  

Two DSU Students to Perform in 105 Voices Concert in D.C. on Sept. 19

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(L-r) DSU Concert Choir members Charles Monroe Murrell III and Marcel J. Sawyer will represent the University as they perform in the 105 Voices of History Concert in Washington, D.C. on Sept. 19.

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    Two DSU Concert Choir members and their director will represent Delaware State University as they perform in the upcoming 3rd annual 105 Voices of History National Choir Concert in the nation’s capital.   The concert will be held at 5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 19 in the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. The concert – which will have one singer from each of the 105 Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the country – will feature the mass choir performing traditional choral works and spirituals, as well as gospel and jazz selections.   Representing DSU at the concert will be:   ·        Marcel Jorden. Sawyer, a second semester DSU freshman from Cherry Hill, N.J. The graduate of Cherry Hill West High School is a music education major.   ·        Charles Monroe Murrell III, a senior from Dover, Del. The graduate of Dover High School is a music major with an emphasis in composition.   ·        Dr. Curtis Everett Powell, director of DSU Choral Activities, who will serves as one of the concert conductors along with Dr. Wayne Barr of Tuskegee University, Jeremy Winston of Wilberforce University, and D’Walla Simmons Burke of     Winston-Salem State University.     In addition, Rear Admiral Helena O. Mishoe, a 1974 biology graduate of DSU, will serve as the grand marshal for this year’s 105 Voices concert. She is currently the associate director for Minority Health Affairs in the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute for the National Institute of Health. She is married to the Henry Mishoe, the nephew of former Delaware State President Luna I. Mishoe (president from 1960-1987).   It will be the third year in a row that Delaware State University has been represented in that mass choir.   Renowned gospel singer Shirley Caesar will host the concert. Also the choir will be joined by the featured guest vocalist Kim Burrell, a nationally known jazz gospel artist and Stellar Award winner..   Tickets to the concert can be purchased by phone at (800) 444-1324 or in person at the Kennedy Center Box Office in Washington, D.C.    

Thomas Preston Appointed DSU General Counsel

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  DSU President Harry L. Williams has appointed Thomas P. Preston, an attorney with the Wilmington law firm of Blank Rome LLP, as the new General Counsel for the University.                   Thomas P. Preston, Esq. The new general counsel post has been created to replace DSU’s former assistant vice president of Legal Affairs position, and will provide the University with on-campus legal expertise and guidance.   Mr. Preston has been an attorney with Blank Rome since January 2003. Prior to that he practiced law with the Wilmington firm of Reed Smith LLP from 2000 to 2003. He served as a managing partner and lead counsel for both firms, specializing in corporate and commercial law.   He also worked as a partner and lead counsel for the Wilmington law firm of Duane Morris LLP from 1975 to March 2000.   Mr. Preston currently serves as the president of the Tatnall School Board and as a member of the WSFS Financial Corporation-WSFS Band Board. He is also a former member and chairman of the St. Francis Hospital/Foundation Board.   He has a Bachelor of Arts in American Studies from Yale University and a Juris Doctor from the University of Virginia Law School.   He will begin as the DSU general counsel on Oct. 1.    

The Sept. 17 Evening of Inspiration SOLD OUT

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    The Evening of Inspiration, the entertainment gala that will take place on the evening of Friday, Sept. 17 as part of the Inauguration events, has been SOLD OUT. There are no more tickets available for that event that will take place in the Martin Luther King Student Center.   For more information, contact (302) 857-6055.  

Pilot Ground Certification Course Offered Thru DSU Sussex Site

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Robert Young, DSU associate professor of aviation, will teach the newly offered flight training in Sussex County.

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   Delaware State University’s Department of Aviation has expanded its flight training program into Sussex County with a newly offered Private Pilot Ground Certification Course. The course will be taught from 6 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. from Sept. 16 to Dec. 16 at the Sussex County Emergency Operations Center at the Sussex County Airport in Georgetown.   The course will prepare students to take the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) ground school examination, which is a requirement for obtaining a private pilot certification. The course – which will be taught by Robert Young, DSU associate professor of Aviation – is open to the general public.   “This is a great opportunity for the people of Sussex County to take advantage of quality training in flight fundamentals,” said Capt. Steve Speed, DSU Aviation Program director.   “As we continue to bring quality credit and non-credit programs to the Sussex Site, it has been exciting to work with Capt. Speed and Mr. Young to provide this course in aviation for the first time in Sussex County,” said Harry Downes, Jr., Director, DSU Sussex Site. “It is our goal to bring additional aviation courses to the Sussex Site.”   The course also qualifies for the Early Bird Program for high school students with a grade point average of 3.0 or above. The Early Bird Programs allows junior and senior Delaware High School students to take college courses at DSU at no tuition cost.   For more information, contact the DSU Aviation Program at (302) 857-6713 or at (302) 245-4245.    

$400,000 USDA Grant Received

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(L-r) DSU President Harry L. Williams, Dr. Albert Essel and Dr. Dyremple Marsh welcomed U.S. Sen. Thomas R. Carper and USDA official William Donald Clifton II to the University as they brought news of a $400,000 grant for the institution.

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    U.S. Sen. Thomas R. Carper joined DSU President Harry L. Williams on campus Aug. 17 in celebrating a $400,000 USDA grant to the University’s Cooperative Extension to provide outreach assistance to underserved farmers in Delaware.   (L-r) U.S. Sen. Thomas R. Carper talks with farm producers Jeymy Vidro and her mother Carmen Matamoros, both of Georgetown, and Janice Truitt, a Dover resident who is also a DSU alumna, '73. Looking on is DSU President Harry L. Williams. Delaware State University is one of 40 institutions to be awarded a competitive USDA grant to provide outreach assistance to social disadvantaged farmers and ranchers.   Sen. Carper and USDA officials met earlier that day at the DSU Martin Luther King Student Center with Delaware farmer producers to explain how they will be able to benefit from the grant. They then joined Dr. Williams, along with Dr. Dyremple Marsh, dean of the DSU College of Agriculture and Related Sciences, and Dr. Albert Essel, associate dean of the DSU Cooperative Extension for a media event on the grant.   Delaware’s senior U.S. senator commended DSU for applying for the grant. “We need DSU to play a big role in the economic development efforts in this state,” Sen. Carper said. “This is the kind of work that DSU can do a lot of and help farmers Delaware.”   Dr. Essel said DSU will use the grant to provide farmers with technical assistance and education through USDA programs, help them identify profitable farm enterprises, as well as provide them assistance in the development of marketing strategies.   “We will do it through different education strategies, including working one-on-one with individual farmers at their homes and farms, through group workshop and also by taking them on trips to successful farms,” Dr. Essel said. “We will be targeting underserved farmers in all three Delaware counties.”  

DSU Presents Alumni Art Exhibition Sept. 1-18

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The DSU alumni artist: (seated l-r) Alexander Gamble, Michael J. Morris, Tony Burton; (standing) Carl Vincent Williams and PJ. Foster. There works will be exhibited at DSU from Sept. 1-18.

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Back in the 1970s a group of aspirating artists created a strong bond during their undergraduate years at then-Delaware State; one that grew stronger over time. The group of four DSU alumni from the 1970s as well as an art graduate from the 1990s will present their works in an Alumni Art Exhibition that will take place from Sept. 1-18 in the DSU Art Center Gallery on campus. The exhibition will be free and open to the public from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Mondays thru Fridays during that period. A Meet the Artist Reception will take place from 5-7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 16. The exhibition will feature the works of alumni artists Carl Williams, ’74; Mike Morris, ’75; PJ. Foster, ’71; Tony J. Burton, ’75; and Alexander Gamble, ’97. They have been specifically invited to do an alumni exhibition to coincide with the events that will take place from Sept. 15-18 in connection with the Inauguration of Dr. Harry Lee Williams as DSU’s 10th president. The artists, who all graduated from DSU with a BA in Art Education: Tony Burton – Currently an art teacher at Woodbridge High School in Bridgeville, Del., Mr. Burton enjoys cartooning and drawing caricatures. Over the years, he has produced cartoons for local newspapers, clubs and businesses. In the classroom, he uses his life experiences to bring an up-to-date learning philosophy to his students. He now resides in Camden, Del. PJ. Foster – A former art instructor and a past president of the Wilmington Arts Council, Mr. Foster’s current art project is a series of aqua mixed media collages. He is also an actor who has been cast in several upcoming film projects. Mr. Foster also was a football free agent with the Houston Oilers. He is a resident of Wilmington, Del. Alexander Gamble – This artist’s sojourn is inextricably connected to his spiritual journey, from which he has come to be a born-again Christian. His art is reflective of his life before and after that conversion. Mr. Gamble also applies art talents in his advertising business AGCagency & Freelance Advertising. He is a resident of Wilmington, Del. Michael J. Morris, a.k.a. Mijomor – This Eastern Shore artist works with different mediums ranging from pencil to serigraphy, but his primary medium is oil. His subject matters includes people in day-to-day situations, poetry and painting combinations, landscapes, collaged images of Africa and surrealism. He also teaches visual and performing arts at Wicomico High School in Wicomico, Md. and at James M. Bennett High School. He is a resident of Salisbury, Md. Carl V. Williams with his piece "Grace Jones in the Wind," one of his works that will be part of the Alumni Art Exhibition.   Carl Vincent Williams – A longtime resident of Wilmington, Del., his artistic style consists of graphic collages and semi-abstract lines and shapes to form his images. He works on hot and cold press watercolor paper with acrylics, inks and surprisingly, a natural material – hornet’s nests. He also teaches at the Moyer Academy in Wilmington, Del.   Carl Williams said the idea of staying artistically connected by doing exhibitions together was a conversation that took place during their undergraduate year. He and Mr. Morris were the first to make it happen.   “Mike and I started out in the early 1980s by doing an exhibition together, and it kept growing,” Mr. Williams said. “The core was founded with DSU artists and it was such a success, we began to relish the idea of bringing other artists on.   The joint artistic endeavor has evolved into “Points of Juxtaposition” an exhibition group which in addition to the DSU alumni includes artists from other institutions of higher education and art circles.   For the DSU alumni, the exhibition at DSU is something they have desired for some time. After an August meeting with University officials in preparation for the exhibition, the alumni artist were all reminded their greatest DSU influence and mentor – Arturo Bassols   “He was our artistic father,” said Mr. Williams. “He taught us that as God created the heaven and earth, so has he given some men the gift to create, whether it be by painting, sculpture or other art.”   Mr. Bassols taught at DSU from 1974 until his retirement in 2000. The department chair for much of his tenure, Mr. Bassols died after a tragic accident at his home about a year after he retired.   Mr. Morris noted that Mr. Bassols taught them both the technical and the practical sides of art. “He taught us how to survive as art teachers,” Mr. Morris said. “He showed us how to teach kids without having a big budget.”   Mr. Williams recalls that under Mr. Bassols the art students created the scenery for the mid-1970s DSC student production of “Purlie,” and that the dividends went beyond that play. “That scenery was later purchased by the DuPont Theatre Company, and the money went back into the Delaware State College art department.   The Alumni Exhibition will feature 33 individual works from these five artists.

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