News

You are here


John Land Retires from DSU Board; Named Trustee Emeritus

Description: 

 

Dr. John Land reacts to some information Board Vice Chair David Turner read from the Resolution making him Trustee Emeritus.

Body: 
    The DSU Board of Trustees today voted to name Dr. John W. Land as Trustee Emeritus following the announcement that he is stepping down from his appointed board post, bringing to a close his 19-year tenure as a voting member. Dr. John Land (center) shows the Board's resolution with David Turner (l), Board vice chair and Dr. Claibourne Smith, Board chair.   A class of 1966 alumnus of then-Delaware State College and a board-appointed trustee member since 1992, Dr. Land served as board vice president from 2004-2008 and returned to that office in 2010 until September of that year. He has served as the chair of the board’s Student Affairs Committee, as well as a member of the Building and Grounds (of which he is a former chair), Finance and Audit committees.   Dr. Claibourne D. Smith, board president, said that the trustees have been proud to have a distinguished graduate and community leader such as Dr. Land to serve on the board.   “Dr. Land has been active, not only as a Trustee and member of several key committees, but as the Board’s vice chair as well,” Dr. Smith said. “He has been instrumental in developing the board’s vision, strategic directions and policies.  I could not have had a more vital partner than Dr. Land in providing leadership for the board and the University.”   DSU President Harry L. Williams said Dr. Land has been a strong voice on the board. “Dr. Land has been a real inspirational leader for his beloved Delaware State University,” Dr. Williams said. “His wisdom and candid responses to questions will truly be missed.”   Dr. Land was moved by the resolution that named him Trustee Emeritus. "I owe DSU more than I could ever give it," he said. "If it wasn't  for DSU, I wouldn't be here."   In the wake of the August 2008 resignation of DSU President Allen Sessoms and the subsequent elevation of Dr. Smith from his board chair post to acting president, Dr. Land became the acting chair of the board and served 17 months in that capacity until Dr. Smith resumed his Board leadership role.   Dr. A. Richard Barros said he considers Dr. Land in the highest esteem. “When it comes to representing Delaware State University, John Land has been the ultimate warrior,” he said. “His work with our Student Affairs Committee and his tenure as our Board’s vice president and acting president has enabled our school to rise to the top.”   For 19 years, Dr. Lands established a reputation as a committed and engaged trustees for the betterment of his alma mater DSU. Dr. Land’s DSU roots go back to the mid-1960s when he was enrolled as a student. During those years, he played as a running back on the Hornet football team and became the team captain his senior year. A powerful running back, Dr. Land climaxed his Hornet career by gaining 600 yards on the ground and scoring seven touchdowns during that final year.   After he completed his Bachelor of Science Degree in Health and Physical Education in 1966, Dr. Land was drafted into the NAFL where he played with the Wilmington Clippers. He ascended to the NFL where he played for the Baltimore Colts (1969) and the Philadelphia Eagles (1970). He ended his 10-year football career with the Philadelphia Bell of the WFL (1973-75), where in 1974 he became the first African American to rush for 1,000 yards in the city of Philadelphia.   Dr. Land was inducted in the DSU Athletics Hall of Fame in 1988 and in the Delaware Sports Museum and Hall of Fame in 1997.   A committed alumnus of his alma mater, Dr. Land has supported the institution with his leadership skill and his enthusiastic support. Dr. Land also sets an example for alumni in his financial support of DSU as a long time President’s Club-level contributor. He chaired the Delmarva Scholarship Golf Classic for over 10 years, an event that has raised over $356,000 in scholarships for DSU students. Dr. John Land credits DSU for bringing him together with his wife (l), and he credits his wife and family with being instrumental in making him a successful man.   On Sept. 13, 2005, DSU presented him with an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters in recognition of his unselfish and dedicated service to the institution.   Dr. Land taught in Delaware for 10 years before moving into the business arena. After working for the Xerox Corporation in sales, he later joined Delmarva Power, where he eventually served as the vice president of Procurement and Corporate Services up until his retirement in 2005.   Active in volunteer activities, Dr. Land has served on the boards of the Charter School of Wilmington, LPGA Urban Youth Golf Advisory Board, Junior Achievement, Brandywine YMCA, and Alliance for Children and Families, among others. In 2004, Children and Family First presented Dr. Land with the J. Thompson Brown Award to recognize his accomplishments as a community volunteer.    

London Delegation Extends Open Invitation to DSU Marching Band

Description: 

 

(L-r) Timothy Chamber, DSU asst. band director, Dr. Marshall Stevenson, Randolph Johnson, DSU President Harry L. Williams, Lord Mayor Duncan Sandys, Provost Alton Thompson, London Parade's Bob Bone and Jonathan Whaley met March 1 on campus to recognize the band. Mayor Sandys presents a gift plaque to Dr. Williams.

Body: 
    The DSU Approaching Storm Band has made such an impression during their New Year’s Day performance in London, England, a delegation from the country recently visited DSU to extend an open invitation for the marching band to return. (L-r) Randolph Johnson, DSU band director, and DSU President Harry L. Williams receive a framed open invitation from Westminister Lord Mayor Duncan Sandys. The English elected official is dressed in the country's traditional red overcoat for mayors.   Lord Mayor Duncan Sandys of the city of Westminister, along with Bob Bone and Jonathan Whaley, both of the parade’s organizing committee, visited DSU on March 2 and met with DSU President Harry L. Williams, along with Dr. Marshall Stevenson, dean of the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, and Randolph Johnson, director of bands.   The University’s Approaching Storm Band traveled to England in late December to perform in the annual New Year’s Day London Parade.   After presenting Dr. Williams and Dr. Stevenson with some gifts, Mayor Sandys – adorned with his ceremonial red long coat that is tradition dress of mayors in England – presented Mr. Johnson with a framed letter that expressed the following:   “In recognition of an unparalleled reputation for outstanding performance abilities and deep appreciation of unwavering support of London’s Parade over many years, the patrons and the organizing committee of the New Year’s Day Parade and Festival – London, in association with Youth Music of the World, the City of Westminister, the Lieutenancy of Greater London and the London Mayor’s Association, take great pleasure in extending an open invitation to the Delaware State University Bands, Delaware, USA, to participate in London’s New Year’s Day Parade and Festival, whenever they are able to do so.”   Duncan Sandys, Lord Mayor of The City of Westminister Patron and host of the London Parade Festival  

DSU Associate Professor of Art Explores Family in Current Exhibition

Description: 

 

Dr. Donald Becker stands in the Arts Center/Gallery with an installment piece he created for his current exhibition, which plans to make into a permanent installment for exhibition elsewhere.

Body: 
    Dr. Donald W. Becker, chair of the DSU Art Department, is featuring an exhibition in the DSU Arts Center/Gallery of his works that delve into his family roots Dr. Donald Becker stands alongside one of 25 print pieces in his current exhibition.   Dr. Becker’s exhibition entitled “Sheren Ho Wanen” will be featured in the Arts Center/Gallery until March 18 and is free and open to the public.   It features 25 print works and an installation piece, that all represent symbolic expression of his family. The associate professor, who has been a DSU faculty member since 1997, said that the exhibition is the product of seven years of work.   “All of the works are derived from symbolic references to my family and where I grew up in the Adirondack Mountain in upstate New York and by Lake Ontario,” Dr. Becker said.   The Sheren Ho Wanen is one of three families within the Wolf Clan of the Mohawk Tribe. Dr. Becker is a distant relative of that family.   “I have a large and complex family,” he said. “Part of my family has been here for thousands of years and some got here in the 1600s.”   Among the exhibition works are some woodcut prints, etchings, as well as an installation piece – of handmade paper, avocado shells, muslin and tar paper – that is a prototype for a future work. “(The installation work) is a small model of something I want to make as a permanent installation someplace,” Dr. Becker said.   The DSU Arts Center Gallery is open from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.    

BEEP Professionals Show Students Perseverance Roadmap to Success

Description: 

 

DSU Alumni BEEP professionals (l-r): Alfonso Jones, Ronald Pinkett, LaCresha Millner, John Ridgeway, DSU President Harry L. Williams, Jonas Acquah, Melissa Carpenter, Kevin Washington and Malachi Allen. The eight alums returned to their alma mater to participate in the Feb. 24 BEEP event.

Body: 
    The DSU College of Business held its annual Black Executive Exchange Program (BEEP) and Alumni Open House on Feb. 22 under the theme “Perseverance – A Roadmap to Success. DSU alumnus Kevin Washington, regional vice president of Primerica Financial Service, gives DSU student his thoughts during a BEEP forum  panel discussion on the "Challenges in Today's Economy".   Nineteen BEEP professionals – recognize during this event as “visiting professors” – participated in the daylong event that feature workshops, roundtable and forum discussions, mock interviews and a wealth of interaction between DSU College of Business students and the visiting professionals.   The group included eight DSU alumni (listed below with an asterisk*).   The event culminated with a case study competition between four teams of DSU students. The teams each presented their case study on Starbucks and Conservation International, with the winning group being Team 3 whose members were Stephen Bowe, Erika Grant, Kiara Watts and Victoria Williams. Each winning member was awarded a $300 book scholarship.   The visiting professors were:   Jonas Acquah* – financial control analyst, J.P. Morgan Malachi Allen* – senior accountant, BNY Mellon Asset Servicing Roxanne Allen – human resource manager, UPS Sheldon Allen – director of sales, UPS Kevin Bankett – division manager, UPS Melissa Carpenter* special agent, UPS Larry Chamberlain – division manager, UPS Anthony Heath, UPS Valerie James, assistant vice president, CIGNA HealthCare Jimmie Jennings, division manager, UPS Alfonso Jones* youth aid officer, Delaware State Police LaCresha Milner* senior audit associate, KPMG LLP Ronald Pinkett* chief financial officer, Brandywine Counseling & Community Services John Ridgeway* corporate manager, Toyota Damond Thorington, area safety manager, Supervalu Kevin Washington* regional vice president, Primerica Financial Services Thomas White, UPS Myron Williams, UPS Charles Wright III, vice president of Institutional Advancement, Peirce College.  

DSU Announces First-Ever Intellectual Property Transfer

Description: 

 

DSU President Harry L. Williams, shakes hands with Dr. Steve Buckley, co-founder and president of Photon Machines, Inc. after the Feb. 24 announcement. Dr. Noureddine Melikechi, DSU vice president of research, looks on. 

Body: 
    DSU has announced the transfer of an intellectual property created by its optics scientists to a technology company for the development of a device for use in hospitals and laboratories. Dr. Noureddine Melikechi said Dr. Yuri Markushin, DSU senior research scientist, has been instrumental in the work that has led to the intellectual property transfer from DSU to Photon Machines.   DSU has reached an agreement with Photon Machines, Inc., in which a Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy-Tag Method (LIB-Tag) developed from the University’s optics research work will used in the creation of laser technology that can be used in hospitals and labs for diagnostic work.   DSU President Harry L. Williams made the announcement during a Feb. 23 media event held in the Hardcastle/Selby Conference Room in the Administration Building on campus.   This breakthrough is an innovative development in the evolving area of proteomic – the large-scale study of proteins, their structure and functions. The DSU optics-method addresses the need in proteomics to be able to rapidly identify proteins and enzymes.   This development represents the first-ever transfer of intellectual property by DSU in the institution’s history.   “This is reflective of not only the great strides we have made in our diverse research endeavors at this University, but of the purposeful direction that DSU’s scientific agenda is moving toward,” said DSU President Harry L. Williams.   Through the DSU LIB-Tag Method, individual proteins and molecules can be detected and analyzed, and this can be instrumental in the diagnosis of medical conditions. The spectroscopy-based method is faster, more advanced and efficient than the biotechnology method currently used, said Dr. Noureddine Melikechi, DSU vice president of research and dean of the University’s College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology.   “This is a significant major step in our scientific and technological pursuits,” Dr. Melikechi said. “It is a strong indication that with a little help and support, DSU can play a major role in enhancing knowledge-based economic growth locally, regionally and nationally.”   Dr. Melikechi said he is particularly proud of the contribution of students in the research work of the Optics Program. “Our students are part of the future, and they have to be a part of designing it,” he said.   The research in the DSU Optics Program allows graduate students like Franz Delima to contribute work toward the science accomplishment like the one announced on Feb. 24. Photon Machines has the exclusive worldwide license from DSU to develop the LIBS-Tag technology. The University is in the process of getting a patent finalized for this intellectual property.   “Photon Machines is excited to be licensing this innovative technology from DSU which both plays to one of our core technologies, and also promises to be an important innovation in biomedical diagnostics,” said Dr. Steve Buckley, co-founder and president of Photon Machine.   Dr. Buckley this new advancement has the potential to make a tremendous change in the lives of people through this advance method of analyzing individual proteins. “Protein in your blood has a lot of information about one’s health,” Dr. Buckley said. “This can be a game changer in health care.”   The Redmond, Washington-based Photon Machines specializes in the development of advanced, laser-based instrumentation. Its series of Analyte™ laser ablation systems are used worldwide in chemistry and geochemistry laboratories, and its new Insight™ LIBS systems allow rapid elemental analysis. The company specializes in the rapid integration of unique laser-based technologies and spectroscopies into new instruments, and software that facilitates method development and data reduction.   Dr. Melikechi, who founded the University’s first Applied Optics Center in 1997, credits then-Gov. Thomas R. Carper (now U.S. Senator from Delaware) for “planting the seed” with his support of that first optics facility.   Under Dr. Melikechi leadership, the DSU Optics Program has been awarded two separate $5 million research grants – in 2006 from the National Science Foundation and in 2009 from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, commonly known as NASA.   Several state legislators were in attendance for the announcement. "DSU is enhancing our youth, because they are getting a world-class education," said state Rep. William Carson.    

DSU's Feb. 26 "A Tribute to Donald Byrd" to Honor the Famed Musician

Description: 

 

DSU will celebrate the famed musician and artist-in-residence with performances of prose and gospel-jazz.

feature_image: 
Body: 
    The Delaware State University Foundation, Inc., will celebrate a legendary jazz musician as it presents “Amazing Grace – A Tribute to Dr. Donaldson T.L. Byrd” from 2-4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 26 in the Education & Humanities Theatre on campus. Doors open at 1:30 p.m. Legendary jazz musician and DSU artist-in-residence Dr. Donald Byrd.   The Tribute to Dr. Byrd will feature an exciting afternoon of prose and gospel jazz highlighted by jazz artist and DSU alumnus Dr. Carlton Cannon and his group JABARI, which has performed with the legendary musician in the past.   JABARI features Mr. Cannon on sax (who as a DSU student was mentored by Dr. Byrd in the 1990s), longtime Philadelphia pianist Dennis Fortune, Baltimore guitarist Ron Smith, world traveled bassist Karl McNeil, master percussionist Kenyatta Henry, renowned drummer Vernell “Dooder” Mincey, as well as vocalist/trumpet player Crystal J. Torres, who is billed as a “modern-day musical trailblazer who has performed with Roy Hargrove, Beyonce Knowles, Paquito D’Rivera and other renowned performers.   The Tribute event will also feature performances by some of DSU’s top student musicians.   In addition to being renowned in the jazz world as a stellar trumpet musician and composer, Dr. Byrd is also an Artist-in-Residence at DSU.   Tickets are $10 for general admission and $5 for DSU students and can be purchased online at www.desu.edu/drbyrdtribute. The proceeds from the Dr. Donaldson T.L. Byrd Endowed Scholarship will benefit music students.   Dr. Byrd, a professional jazz musician since the 1950s, became known as one of the top trumpeters of the jazz “hard-bop” genre as he performed with musicians such as John Coltrane, Sonny Rollins, Herbie Hancock and Thelonious Monk. Ironically at one point in the 1950s, Dr. Byrd actually replaced Clifford Brown in Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers band.   In the 1970s, Dr. Byrd began to record jazz fusion that combined jazz with funk, soul and R&B. While teaching music at Howard University in 1974, Dr. Byrd formed a jazz fusion group that consisted of his best students and called them the Blackbyrds. The group produced the 1972 album Black Byrd, which became Blue Notes Records’ highest-ever selling album. In the 1990s, Dr. Byrd jazz fusion explorations expanded to the hip-hop genre.   Dr. Byrd has recorded 38 jazz albums and performed on countless other musicians’ recording projects. In 2002, the National Endowment for the Arts recognized Dr. Byrd as one of its NEA Jazz Masters. As an educator, Dr. Byrd has developed a “Music + Math = Art” education program that he has introduced to youth across the country.   A native of Detroit, Mich., Dr. Byrd is an alumnus of Wayne State University and the Manhattan School of Music. In 1982 he earned an Ed.D from Columbia Teachers College of New York City.   For more information about the Tribute to Dr. Byrd, call (302) 857-6055.  

DSU to Present Two One-Act Dramatic Plays

Description: 

 

Jazmyn B. Duncan (l) and Tyree Evans star in the one-act play Soul Gone Home

feature_image: 
Body: 
    Bill Jamerson and Trawick star in Wine in the Wilderness, a story of love, art and urban unrest in the 1960s.     A group of Delaware State University student-thespians and community actors will take the stage to perform two separate one-act plays at 8 p.m. Thursday and Friday, Feb. 24-25 in the Education and Humanities Theatre on campus   The evening of dramatic productions – which is free and open to the public – will include the one-act plays:   Soul Gone Home by Langston Hughes; a play that deals with a relationship between a mother and a son as explored by the two posthumously. Starring student-thespians Jazmyn B. Duncan and senior Tyree Evans.   Wine in the Wilderness by Alice Childress; a play that deals with the perceived images of African American women against the backdrop of the 1960s riots in Harlem. Starring student-thespians Jeremy Rodgers, Nicklas “Pete-Bailey” Robins, Gelila E. Asfeha and community actors Tiffany Trawick and Carlos Holmes.   Shirlyn Brown, a DSU adjunct professor, is the director of the one-act plays. Technical support is being provided by John Samardza, theatre manager, and the DSU Play Production II class.  

DSU alumnus Aaron Spears Nominated for NAACP Image Award

Body: 
    Aaron Spears acting work on The Bold and the Beautiful has earned him a NAACP Image Award nomination.     Aaron D. Spears, DSU class of '94 and a star on the daytime drama The Bold and the Beautiful, has been nominated for the Best Actor in a Daytime Drama Series by the 2011 NAACP Image Awards.   In that category, Mr. Spears is vying for the award against three other nominees – Cornelius Smith Jr. of All of My Children; Darnell Williams of All of My Children; as well as his Bold and the Beautiful co-star Rodney Saulsberry.   The winners of the 42nd annual NAACP Image Award will be honored during the airing of the show on March 4 on the Fox Network.   Mr. Spears, who first began acting his senior year at DSU in the spring of 1994, has been a regular cast member of The Bold and the Beautiful since 2009. On the soap opera, he portrays the character of Justin Barber, an executive vice president of a publishing company.   In addition to his daytime drama success, Mr. Spears has performed in the movies Mannsfield 12, Babel, Traci Townsend, Blue Hill Avenue and Makin’ Baby. He will be starring in the upcoming crime action film Disrupt/Dismantle.   

Guest Lecture Feb. 24 to Explore Foreign Aid Effectiveness

Body: 
    Dr. Claudia Williamson will give a critical analysis of the effectiveness of U.S. foreign aid.     The DSU Economics Speaker Series will host Dr. Claudia Williamson from New York University to present “The Trouble with Foreign Aid,” at 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 24, in Bank of America, Longwood Auditorium.   Dr. Williamson will discuss the effectiveness of the billions of dollars in annual U.S. foreign aid in reducing worldwide poverty and explore the possible alternatives. The presentation is free and open to the public.   Despite the transfer of billions upon billions of dollars in U.S. foreign aid annually, a substantial amount of the world remains in extreme poverty and stagnant growth. Dr. Williams will discuss the pro and con arguments concerning foreign aid and review the most current research statistics on the subject.   Dr. Williamson is a post-doctoral fellow with the Development Research Institute at New York University, where she also teaches as an adjunct faculty member. She has published numerous journal articles on foreign aid, property rights, international trade and other economic issues.   The event is sponsored by the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation.  

Vamsi Matta Wins 2nd Annual Brain Bee at DSU

Description: 

 

2011 Delaware Brain Bee winners (l-r) Rathnabushan Mutyala, 3rd place from the Charter School of Wilmington; Carole Linde, 2nd place from Indian River High School; and the 1st place winner Vamsi Matta of the Charter School of Wilmington, who all stand with Dr. Princy Mennella, the competition coordinator. 

feature_image: 
Body: 
    The Charter School of Wilmington dominated the 2nd annual Delaware Brain Bee sponsored and conducted by Delaware State University, with two of its students placing among to the Vamsi Matta's 1st place finish will send him to compete in the National Brain Bee in Baltimore in March. He poses with his trophy along with Del. Sen. Colin Bonini, who attended the competition. top three winners.   Vamsi Matta of the Charter School of Wilmington took first place in the 2011 state competition that challenges high school contestant’s knowledge about the nervous system.   Carole Linde of Indian River High School took 2nd place and Rathnabushan Mutyala from the Charter School of Wilmington   In this challenging competition, Delaware high school students answered questions about the nervous system. Topics ranged from how the brain functions normally to what goes wrong in the brain in connection with disorders like Alzheimer's disease, addictions, Lou Gehrig’s disease and depression.    This year competition featured contestants from the Charter School of Wilmington, Cab Calloway School of Arts, Cesar Rodney High School, Indian River High School and Polytech High School.   Vamsi Matta’s first place finish in the Delaware Brain Bee will send him to represent the First State in the National Brain Bee, to be held in March 2011 in Baltimore, Md.     A student from the Charter School of Wilmington has won the Delaware Brain Bee in both years of its existence. The 2010 winner was Amy Forster from the same school, who went on to represent the state in the National Brain Bee and placed 17th out of 36 high school competitors across the country.  

Pages