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DSU Receives $88K from its Alumni Association

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(L-r) DSUAA Vice President Meeshach Stennett, DSU President Harry L. Williams, DSUAA President Dr. K. Bernard Chase and DSUAA Recording Secretary Shelia Davis take part in the Jan. 22 check presentation.

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              The Delaware State University Alumni Association (DSUAA) has joined its alma mater’s efforts to retain returning students by presenting the institution with a donation of $88,560 to go toward financial aid.   Dr. K. Bernard Chase, DSUAA president, made the presentation during the University’s Jan. 22 basketball double-header at home against Morgan State University. As the Hornet basketball crowd watched, DSU President Harry L. Williams accepted the check at Memorial Hall Gymnasium’s center court on behalf of the Delaware State University Foundation during halftime of men’s game.     Dr. Chase recalled that Martin Luther King, Jr., noted that “life's most persistent and urgent question is: What are you doing for others?” He said it is such a question that has moved the DSUAA to help the students of its alma mater.     “It is the Delaware State University Alumni Association’s responsibility to support and help those who follow in our footsteps,” Dr. Chase said. “So, in the spirit of Dr. King, we are proud to give this contribution to the students.”    Dr. Chase and Dr. Williams were joined in the check presentation by DSUAA Vice President Meeshach Stennett and Recording Secretary Sheila Davis.    “Today, with the presentation of this significant gift, our Alumni Association has established a new benchmark and a new standard for alumni giving,” said Dr. Williams. “We hope that all alumni fully understand what this act means to our students, and that our students fully appreciate what this act means to their futures.”   The sizable gift will provide much needed financial assistance to returning DSU students, Dr. Williams added.   Mr. Stennett, class of 1998, said it is a new day for the DSUAA. “When I was a student, we never received such help from alumni,” he said. “It was important for the students to see this today, so they will be encouraged to be a part of this culture of giving that is being developed.    

DSU Holds Jan. 19 "Kickoff to Wellness"

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DSU President Harry L. Williams and Dr. Ian Smith, health expert of VH1's Celebrity Fitness Club, met some students during a Jan. 19 reception of the DSU President's Residence.

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    DSU launched into a new initiative on Jan. 19 designed to reaffirm its priority in promoting healthy lifestyles among its campus community. DSU student Selena Campbell gets her blood pressure checked during the Kickoff to Wellness.   In a daylong event called “Kickoff to Wellness,” health displays and demonstrations were featured at the Martin Luther King Student Center to raise student awareness concerning the health resources that can be accessed on campus.   Tables were set up to offer information from the DSU Office of Counseling, the Delaware Center for Health Promotions, the Food & Nutrition Club and the DelaWELL Program. In addition students were able to have their blood pressure checked, while the Wellness & Recreation Center gave rhythmic Zumba Fitness aerobics demonstrations.   The Kickoff to Wellness culminated with an evening event that featured Dr. Ian Smith, a nationally known health and wellness expert, as a guest speaker in the MLK Student Center. Dr. Smith did not pull any punches about the state of affairs in our country where physical condition is concerned.   “America should be ashamed of itself,” said Dr. Smith, a medical/diet expert on VH1’s “Celebrity Fitness Club” cable program. “Sixty-seven percent are overweight and our children are the heaviest they have ever been. Our level of physical inactivity is disgusting.”   Dr. Smith said that for the first time in history, it is predicted that this generation will not outlive their parents. “Why? The reasons are heart disease, type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure,” he said.   The health expert recommended that students focus on “smart living” instead of diets. “When you wake up in the morning, eat one piece of fruit,” Dr. Smith said. “Eat two vegetables a day – one at lunch and one at dinner.” (L-r) Danielle Crist and Eleni Dallas demonstrate the moves of Zumba aerobics.   Kemal Atkins, vice president of Student Affairs, said the timing was right to bring Dr. Smith to DSU.   “This was an excellent time to bring in this speaker of international acclaim as a health expert, as the University’s Wellness Center is planning launching activities and people are setting goals,” Mr. Atkins said.   Michelle Fisher, director of the DSU Health Center and the chair of the Student Affairs Health Committee, said a goal of the University is to promote healthy lifestyles campus-wide.   “(The health committee) would like to hold some type of health initiative each month for students and keep healthy living at the forefront,” Ms. Fisher said.   

AstraZeneca Contribution to DSU funds Health Promotion Center

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Holding a $250,000 check are DSU President Harry Williams; Tyrone Jones, director of Corporate and Community Relations; Dr. Claibourne Smith, DSU Board of Trustees chairman; U.S. Rep. John C. Carney Jr.; and Marianne Carter, director of the Del. Center for Health Promotion.

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        AstraZeneca has presented Delaware State University with a $250,000 charitable contribution to support the establishment of the Delaware Center for Health Promotion on campus.   The Delaware Center for Health Promotion (DCHP) will provide DSU’s students, faculty and staff with an on-campus resource for information and guidance about healthy lifestyle choices. The AstraZeneca donation will be spread out over five years.   DSU President Harry L. Williams accepted the $250,000 donation on behalf of the DSU Foundation from Tyrone Jones, Director  of Corporate Community Alliances for AstraZeneca, during the Jan. 13 DSU Board of Trustees meeting. While it is not the first donation from AstraZeneca, to date it is the largest donation to DSU from the company given in support of the University’s internal and external operations.   “AstraZeneca’s expression of financial support reflects its great corporate concern for the health of our campus community and an acknowledgement of Delaware State University’s capability to extend its health outreach to the community at large,” Dr. Harry L. Williams said. “DSU is truly grateful for the pharmaceutical company’s contribution and how it will help us promote good health practices on our campus and beyond.” U.S. Rep. John C. Carney, Jr., said that DSU is a good home for the Delaware Center for Health Promotion. He added that AstraZeneca has always been "a tremendous partner" in the state.   Dr. Williams also said he is excited that the Delaware Center for Health Promotion is joining together with the DSU Health Center and other University health stakeholders to provide the campus community with an unprecedented array of health resources.   U.S. Rep. John C. Carney, Jr., who was a promoter of health initiatives during his days as Delaware's lieutenant governor (2001-2008), traveled from Washington, D.C. to be present for the check presentation. He noted that a constant topic in Congress is the federal deficit, and that health care cost is a big factor in that challenge.   "One way is to encourage people to live healthy," Rep. Carney said. "With DSU and the Delaware Center for Health Promotion, we will do that."   Tyrone Jones, director of AstraZeneca's Corporate and Community Alliances, noted that this same initiative is modeled after two other programs previously supported by AstraZeneca.   "AstraZeneca is pleased to support this collaboration with DSU because we share the same commitment to patient health as well as the same understanding that behavior that is established in early adulthood lasts a lifetime," Mr. Jones said.   Marianne Carter, DCHP director, will focus the center’s efforts on assisting the University in the creation of a student wellness program, on engaging DSU employees in health programs such as DelaWELL, as well as develop community programs for the public.   She said prevention will be the key emphasis in the center's programming. "It is clear that DSU works hard to make its students successful," Ms. Carter said. "We will work on instilling healthy habits in the graduates of this University."   Ms. Carter is already integrating DCHP into University life by serving on the DSU Student Affairs Health Committee. She said the DCHP will be working with the committee to launch a new Weight Loss Program for the student population, to hold a Feb. 24 Health Fair on campus, as well as to conduct an extensive health survey on campus.   “The survey will better inform us about the health needs among DSU students and will guide us in other health programming we will establish on campus,” Ms. Carter said.    

DSU Research Focuses on Sand Tiger Shark Conservation

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Fisheries research students Naeem Willett, Jennifer Green and Johnny Moore hold a Sand Tiger Shark that they will place a transmitter in to track its migrations.

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The Sand Tiger Shark has been around for 250,000 years. Despite the female shark’s ability to only produce two baby sharks every couple of years, the species has managed to survive very well over most of that time. DSU graduate research student Johnny Moore assists  in measuring a sand tiger in the Delaware Bay.   However due to directed fisheries and unintentional bycatch, the sand tigers are now considered to be a Species of Concern by the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) as a result of significant population declines over the last several decades.   In an effort to reverse this trend, DSU fisheries staff and students are working in collaboration with the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) and the NMFS as part of a five-year $350,00 grant. The primary focus of this grant is to develop a conservation plan for sand tigers in the Delaware Bay, which serves as an essential habitat for sand tigers. Working with regional stakeholders, Dr. Dewayne Fox, associate professor of fisheries, is leading the effort to identify threats to sand tigers to assist in rebuilding populations of this large shark.   Since 2005 Dr. Fox and his lab have been working in collaboration with Dr. Brad Wethebee of the University of Rhode Island on Delaware's sharks. Sand tigers are the largest commonly occurring shark in Delaware waters and ecologically serve as an apex predator, feeding on mainly smaller fish and invertebrates. Although sand tigers are found in many nearshore areas that are also  popular swimming destinations, they are generally not considered dangerous to humans.   The Delaware Bay serves a unique role in the conservation and recovery of sand tigers as it serves as a critical foraging habitat during the summer months when most growth occurs. In fact, the Delaware Bay is thought to have one of the largest population of sand tigers in North America, further emphasizing the need to collect information on their habitat requirements.   The sand tiger research efforts at SDU take place during the warm summer months when the species return from their overwintering grounds spanning the waters off of North Carolina to Florida. There are three components to the project:: 1.) is developing a better understanding of the sand tigers’ habitat needs; 2.) to identify threats or hindrances to the species recovery; and 3.) outreach and education.   Research on the sand tiger habitat requirements is based on cutting edge technology that utilizes an extensive array of passive acoustic receivers. DSU staff and students capture sand tigers using baited lines with up to 100 hooks at a time. Upon capture, each sand tiger is measured and the sex is determined. In 2010, DSU researchers managed to land a total of 113 sand tigers – some of which were as much as 11 feet in length.   Throughout the course of the summer research work, about 25 to 50 sand tigers are surgically implanted with transmitters that have a battery life of 6.5 years. These transmitters are individually coded and allow researchers to track the movements of tagged sand tigers. The data on the movements of sand tigers is then developed into predictive models, which allow the NMFS and DNREC to better predict the impact of human action on sand tiger habitats.   The information on the movements of tagged sand tigers is also central to planned outreach and education activities. Through a web-based interface, members of the public will be able to track the movements of individual sand tigers during the species’ residency in Delaware Bay as well as in locations where the transmitters are detected on distant arrays.   DSU’s sand tigers have been recorded numerous times in North Carolina and Georgia. One sand tiger that was tagged in the Delaware Bay in 2008 has been recorded by NASA scientist at Cape Canaveral, Fla. during the past two winters. That same sand tiger has returned dutifully to Delaware’s waters during the summer months in a previously unknown linkage between Delaware and Florida. DSU graduate researcher Johnny Moore implants a transmitter in a small sand tiger prior to release in the Delaware Bay. Dr. Dewayne Fox (l) restrains the sand tiger.   Dr. Fox joking noted, “Who doesn’t want to visit Florida during the winter months?”   The DSU researcher said the goal is to work with stakeholders such as commercial fishers, the U.S.Army Corp of Engineers, and others to provide them with guidance on when is the best time for conduct their activities.   He noted that the need for a better understanding of the species' habitat is especially important in light of the dredging activities of the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers. Such research data can help provide guidance to minimize the impacts of such activity on the sand tiger.  

DSU President and Others visit Grandson of DSU 2nd President, William C. Jason

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DSU President Harry L. Williams presents William C. Jason III a University sweat shirt during a Dec. 20 visit to the nursing home where he resides.

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  Several University employees led by DSU President Harry L. Williams paid a nursing home visit on Dec. 20 to William C. Jason III, the grandson of the longest serving president in the history of the institution – William C. Jason. Dr. Williams was joined by Dr. Dolores Finger Wright, associate professor of social work, Nancy Wagner, director of Community Relations, and Carlos Holmes, director of News Services, in visiting Mr. Jason at the Capitol Health Care facility in Dover and in paying tribute to the honored lineage of the past president.   William C. Jason (the first) was the 2nd president of the College (1895-1923) and his 28-year presidency tenure remains the longest among the 10 presidents in the University’s history. He is credited with shepherding the institution – then called the State College for Colored Students – through its earliest difficult decades as a fledgling college. Also present during the visit was the grandson's wife of 40 years, Carol Jason, who is a 1960 alumna of DSU.    

DSU Adopts 11 Families for Christmas

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DSU President Harry L. Williams (far left) and a group of DSU staff members and administrators stand around a truckload of gifts purchased with donations from University employees and students. The gifts will go to less fortunate families in the local community.

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   A number of DSU administrative staff members and student organizations pooled their compassion and financial resources to make Christmas a happy time for the children of less fortunate families in the Dover-area About 65 DSU employees who work in the University’s Administration Building as well as several student organizations raised enough donations among themselves to help 11 local families as part of the Adopt-a-Family program.   In addition to the administrative staff, the campus’ Latin American Student Organization, DSU Chapter of the America Chemical Society, Iota Phi Theta and the University’s greek organizations also contributed to the Adopt-a-Family drive.   “It is not a surprise that DSU employees are extending this gesture of love for others,” said DSU President Harry L. Williams. “It is reflective of the University’s attributes of outreach and community service, part of our core values that characterize what this institution is about.”  

DSU's Dr. Andrew Goudy Honored as 2010 Delaware Black Achiever

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Attending the event: Dr. Andrew Goudy (center) is flanked by David Turner (l) and Leroy Tice, Esq, Bd. of Trustees members; top row (l-r) Germaine Cheatham, interim assistant vice president of Admissions, Dr. Alton Thompson, provost, Dr. Judith Ray of Cheney University, Dr. Noureddine Melikechi, dean of the College of Math., Nat. Sci. & Tech., and Brenda Farmer, director of Ceremonies & Events.

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    Dr. Andrew J. Goudy, chair of Delaware State University’s Department of Chemistry, has been honored as a 2010 Delaware Black Achiever by the YMCA of Delaware. Dr. Andrew Goudy received his Black Achiever Award from Roots actor LeVar Burton, who was the evening event's keynote speaker.   Dr. Goudy was recognized among 21 other honorees on Dec. 9 at the YMCA of Delaware’s 2010 Black Achievers in Business and Industry Awards Ceremony held at the Chase Center in Wilmington, Del.     He received the Black Achiever’s Award from actor LeVar Burton, renowned for his portrayal of Kunta Kinte in the landmark miniseries Roots and his later regular role in Star Trek: The Next Generation. Mr. Burton was the keynote speaker at the event.   A DSU faculty member since 2001, Dr. Goudy is presently a professor and chair of the Department of Chemistry, where he is also the director of the University’s Hydrogen Storage Research Center. Prior to joining DSU, he was a full professor of physical chemistry at West Chester University (WCU).    His area of research specialization is metal hydride kinetics. The results of his research have been published in refereed journals and have been presented at international research conferences held in places such as the Germany, Canada, Sweden, Japan, Poland, as well as within the U.S.   He has supervised the research projects of 42 WCU students and 14 DSU students; 22 of whom have co-authored publications and/or have presented papers at research conferences. Eleven of his students have received MS degrees in chemistry and applied chemistry.    He earned a BS Degree in Chemistry Education and an MS Degree in Analytical Chemistry from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. He received his PhD in Physical Chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh.   Off-campus, he is a member of the Dover Capital City Rotary, an organization for which he served as president in 2007. As part of his Department of Chemistry’s outreach, he invites high school students into his laboratories where they can learn and develop some lab techniques.      

Kent, Sussex Alumni Host Loockerman Hall Open House

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(L-r) DSU alumni Sylvia Davis Pinkett, Hilda Norwood and Bertha Allen Turner stand with the Christmas tree they put up and decorated in Loockerman Hall as part of the Open House.

 

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    DSU alumni Phil Sadler, Martha Hopkins and Sandra Sutton also helped host the open house. Kent and Sussex County chapters of the DSU Alumni Association held an open house on Dec. 6, 8 and 10 at the Historic Loockerman Hall.   Students, alumni and other visitors were able to experience the inside of the historic Loockerman edifice – which was built circa 1770 and is the only original structure from the University’s 1891 beginning – which served as the center of campus activities during the institution’s almost first 30 years of existence.   History about Loockerman Hall and the institution were presented by Carlos Holmes, and there was also musical performances given by the DSU Concert Choir’s Male Quartet.   In addition to the alumni mentioned in the accompanying photos, DSU alumni Nate Delesline and his wife Vynella help to decorate Loockerman Hall for the event.  

DSU Police Assist in Development of New Law Enforcement Technology

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(L-r) Thomas Connell II and Peter Schecter, both of Advanced Response Concepts, and Dr. John Austin, director of DSU Sponsored Programs, and University Police Chief James Overton stand with the new Condor Crime Scene Management and Evidence Tracking System technology.

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    The Delaware State University Police Department is involved in development of new cutting edge law enforcement technology that is expected to greatly improve upon the documentation of evidence collection as well as crime scene management. DSU Police Chief James Overton talks about the Condor technology with an unidentified Elsmere police officer.   Over the last year, DSU has done research for Advanced Response Concepts – a Fairfax, Virginia-based company – which has been instrumental in the company’s development of the Condor Crime Scene Management and Evidence Tracking System.   With the development of this Condor system, the DSU Police Department will now be a primary tester of the new hardware and software technology and will also be facilitating the use of it by several other law enforcement agencies from throughout the state.   A primary feature of the system is an electronic tablet that police can use to write their investigation and evidence collection information. The tablet will funnel the information into the various types of forms that police investigators have to complete, saving them several hours of work. DSU’s research contributed to toward Arc’s development of this tablet.   The technology uses biometric and secure smart cards that provide for the effective documentation of the chain of evidence custody, thereby reducing the kind of evidentiary issues that negatively impact the prosecution of criminal cases.   The system is designed to enhance the preservation of crime scenes through a portable credentialing station that provides law enforcement and other emergency personnel with the credentials that will ensure access to the involved area.   The DSU Police Department’s involvement in this project was born of two federal grants totaling almost $2.9 million as well as from its partnership with the Delaware Department of Homeland Security.   “This technological advancement could change the standard for crime scene management and evidence tracking,” said DSU Police Chief James Overton. “The DSU Police Department is excited to be a part of this project.”   Advanced Response Concepts will take the feedback from the DSU police and other participating users – one of which is the Dover Police Department – to make improvements to the technology before making it available to the nationwide law enforcement market.  

DSU, DelDOT Sign New Partnership Agreement

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DSU President Harry L. Williams and DelDOT Secretary Carolann (seated l-r) Wicks sign a new partnership agreement that will involve the University in the preparation of students for transportation careers. Behind them are (l-r Carla Elliot, DelDOT Civil Rights administrator, Gov. Jack Markell and Keesha Wilson, partnership project coordinator.

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    Gov. Jack Markell joined with Department of Transportation (DelDOT) Secretary Carolann Wicks, DSU President Harry L. Williams, and Associate Secretary of Education Amelia Hodges on campus Dec. 3 to announce a new formal agreement between DelDOT and DSU. DSU President Harry L. Williams, shown here shaking DelDOT Secretary Carolann Wicks hand, said that the partnership is consistent with the University's Vision Statement, as it prepares DSU students to be first-choice in transportation job opportunities.   The new accord creates the Transportation Education Development Program (TED) – a one-of-a-kind program will establish education and training courses at DSU aimed at developing curriculums for potential employees, and to create awareness of possible careers in surface transportation.   “This partnership benefits students and the state by preparing some of our future transportation workers, whether they will become engineers, appraisers, surveyors or land planning specialists,” Gov. Markell said. “It’s in our interest and theirs to make sure they enter the workforce educated, trained, and prepared to succeed with a clear path forward.”   Secretary Wicks said the program is important to DelDOT. “Today’s agreement with Delaware State University will help the Department of Transportation tap into a previously under-utilized resource, to help us prepare current and future potential employees with the education and skills necessary to move into the future,” she said.   DelDOT, the Department of Education (DOE), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), and DSU will partner in this program to provide training in support fields for workers in transportation. As DelDOT’s current workforce changes due to retirements in the future, the training programs and courses that will be offered will help to ensure that the knowledge and skills needed by future DelDOT workers are available and maintained.    President Williams said the University is excited about its role in the new program. “The partnership provides our young people with a roadmap toward great careers and professional growth in the transportation arena,” the DSU president said. “It also fits right into our University's vision to assist the state with targeted needs--in this case the professionals and skills needed to fulfill the goals of Delaware's transportation blueprint.”   The partnership agencies will sustain pipeline activities that will highlight possible transportation careers for potential employees, as well as the academic offerings at DSU. The program will also take advantage of an existing partnership for the recruitment of engineers, and will include Delaware Technical and Community College in the collaborative effort. DelDOT will coordinate with the DOE for outreach efforts to schools in order to create an awareness of existing programs and careers in education that will be available.    The program, which was specifically designed in Delaware, also supports an Executive Order by President Barack Obama to encourage relationships between federal agencies, state agencies which are the recipients of federal funds, and Historically Black Colleges and Universities.   The details of the new partnership were worked out over the last two years by Keesha Wilson, executive assistant to the DelDOT Secretary, and John Austin, DSU director of Sponsored Programs.  

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