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Three DSU Alumni Inducted into Del. Afro-American Sports Hall of Fame

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DSU President Harry L. Williams (2nd from right) celebrates with DSU's latest inductees into the Del. Afro-American Sports Hall of Fame: (l-r) James Solomon, Norman Oliver and Jimmy Strong.

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           Jimmy Strong     Three alumni of Delaware State University were among the 2011 inductee class of the Delaware Afro-America Sports Hall of Fame (DAASHF) during a ceremony on April 16 at the Modern Maturity Center in Dover.   Among the DSU inductees were:   Former Hornet football star Jimmy Strong, class of ’66 – The DAASHF recognized him for his stellar years as an All-Conference (CIAA) honoree at two positions: punter (1962-64) and defensive back (1961,1964). He finished his Delaware State College career with 28 interceptions and a 43-yard punting average. After playing football for the Wilmington Clippers (1966-1967), Mr. Strong returned to DSC in   James H. Solomon, Jr. 1968 where he served over the next 11 years as a Hornet assistant football coach. The resident of Ellenwood, Ga., was inducted in the DSU Athletics Hall of Fame in 1988.     James Solomon, class of 1990 and 2007, was inducted for the athletics mark he has made as a boys and girls track coach for 24 years at Dover High School. During that time, he has coached his teams to five state championships and six times as runner-up. At the conference level, his teams have won eight dual meets and 10 conference meets. During Coach Solomon’s tenure, he coached high school athletes who were ranked nationally and some of whom would go on to intercollegiate career where they were nationally ranked as well. The Dover resident was named as state Coach of the Year five times, conference Coach of the Year three times and in 2000 he as named as the National Girls Coach representing Delaware.         Norman Oliver     Norman “Stormin” Oliver, class of 1985, was inducted for his work as an athletics administrator through his founding of the Stormin’ Classic Basketball Summer League, which ran from 1980 (the year in which he founded it at age 18) to 2000. Beginning with 54 youth participants in its inaugural year, by the summer league’s 20th year there were 3,000 participants. It is the only summer basketball league in Delaware operating statewide. Many of the students who have participated in the Oliver’s summer league – of which education was the most important component – went on to successful careers and thriving lives. Mr. Oliver resides in Wilmington.   DSU's Ricki Ellison served as the event's mistress of ceremonies. Ricki Ellison, DSU women’s bowling coach, served as the mistress of ceremonies for the 13th annual DAASHF ceremony.  

DSU Professor Recounts His Experience In Japan During Earthquake

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Dr. Gabriel D. Gwanmesia, DSU professor of physics, took this photo of some damage that resulted from the March 11 earthquake in Japan, where he was doing sabbatical research.

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    Dr. Gabriel Gwanmesia and his host, Professor Toru Inoue stand in front of a high pressure press at Ehime University     Dr. Gabriel D. Gwanmesia, professor of physics, left for a two-month research sabbatical in Japan on Jan. 29, looking forward to sharing his expertise on high pressure physics with the scientists of that country and utilizing the geodynamic technology there.   Little did he know that he would be witness to the greatest earthquake to ever hit Japan.   Dr. Gwanmesia – who is also a DSU alumnus – was on a 60-day research fellowship funded by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science on March 11 and was just leaving a dedication ceremony for a new high pressure neutron lab in the village of Tokai-Mura in Japan’s Ibaraki Prefecture.   The DSU physics professor said he knows almost the exact time he first felt the 9.0 magnitude earthquake – 2:48 p.m. Japan time – because he almost instinctually pointed his camera at a wall clock and took a picture of its hands position.   Just before that he was in an elevator, which the earthquake caused to hit against the shaft wall surrounding it.   “The elevator stopped at the 2nd floor and when the doors opened, I dove out,” Dr. Gwanmesia said.   He said Tokai-Mura – just north of Tokyo in the central part of the country – was about 150 miles from the epicenter of the earthquake. And while that Japanese village was out of harm’s way from the raging tsunami that ravaged northern Japan, it still suffered significant damage from the powerful quake tremors.   The above photo taken by Dr. Gwanmesia shows the damage to roads wrought by the earthquake. Dr. Gwanmesia said he and the other people who were in the lab all poured outside, where the damage was already apparent.   “The vibrations were very severe, causing significant damage to buildings and creating cracks and breaks in the road pavement,” Dr. Gwanmesia said.   During his two-month fellowship, the DSU physics professor was residing mostly on the Japanese island of Matsuyama on the southern end of the country – which was not directly impacted by the earthquake. As fate would have it, he and his host had flown to Tokyo to get to the neutron lab dedication on the same day as the quake.   Their plan to return to Matsuyama that day was delayed. That night Dr. Gwanmesia spent the night with 50 other people in an emergency shelter.   He said the Japanese people were clearly shaken by the quake and resulting damage, but were not frantic or disorderly.   “There was no electricity or running water, but when resources like blankets and other things were made available, there was no fighting or rushing to get them,” Dr. Gwanmesia said. “People just patiently waited their turn.”   The following day, the DSU professor’s host managed to get him back to Tokyo where he was able to catch a plane to return to Matsuyama. Once back there, he proceeded to complete the rest of his fellowship research at Ehime University, located on that island. During his trip, Dr. Gwanmesia observed the process by which a high pressure press converted graphite into the above diamonds.   In the days following the initial quake, Dr. Gwanmesia said he received “tons” of email from worried friends and family urging him to get out of the country.   “I just laughed because (in Matsuyama) we were so far away from the area that was really hit by the earthquake,” he said.   Dr. Gwanmesia said it is a Japanese health custom for people to wear face masks when they have a cold to prevent its spread. He laughingly recalled that one of his nieces saw a Japanese man wearing a mask during the news coverage of the quake, prompting her to write her uncle and tell him to wear a mask to protect him from the danger of radiation.   “Matsuyama was far from the radiation danger area,” Dr. Gwanmesia said. “And even if we were in the danger area, radiation passes through the body. A face mask would provide no protection.”   Far removed from the danger, Dr. Gwanmesia continued his research work that involved utilizing Ehime University’s geophysics facility to produce synthetic minerals he could bring back to DSU and continue his study of materials that exist deep in the earth.   Because those minerals deep in the earth cannot be accessed, scientists have to create synthetic versions of the same minerals to study.   Professor Hitoshi Yusa (l) shows Dr. Gwanmesia a lab during a visit to Japan's National Institute for Material Science. “Such studies allow us to understand the causes of earthquakes,” Dr. Gwanmesia said.   The physics professor said his research interests in mineral physics are dedicated to understanding the behavior of sound waves as they travel through different materials. In addition to gaining a better understanding concerning how the earth has evolved, data from such study can yield valuable information in evaluating the causes of earthquakes, hurricanes or other natural disasters.   In addition to creating synthetic material for his future research, Dr. Gwanmesia also observed the high pressure conversion of graphite into diamonds at the Geodynamic Research Center at Ehime University.   Dr. Gwanmesia earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Physics and Mathematics from then-Delaware State College in 1985, and went on to obtain a Ph.D. in Geophysics (Mineral Physics) from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. A native of Cameroon, West Africa, Dr. Gwanmesia has been a DSU faculty member since 1991.  

DSU, UD, Delaware Tech Reaffirm Partnership Commitment

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UD President Patrick T. Harker, DSU President Harry L. Williams, Gov. Jack Markell and Delaware Tech President Orlando J. George Jr. display the Partnership Proclamation they each signed reaffirming their commitment to collaborate as public institutions of higher education partners to strengthen the First State. 

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    Delaware State University, along with the University of Delaware and Delaware Technical & Community College, joined with Gov. Jack Markell to emphasize the unique partnership among the public institutions of higher education in the First State.   DSU President Harry L. Williams, UD President Patrick T. Harker and Delaware Tech President Orlando J. George Jr. along with Gov. Markell signed a proclamation that reaffirms the three institutions’ commitment to partner in ways that will support, enhance and protect the future of the state of Delaware. DSU President Harry L. Williams -- flanked by (l-r) Gov. Jack Markell, UD President Patrick T. Harker and Delaware Tech President Orlando J. George Jr. -- noted that Delaware is a great environment for such higher education partnerships.   “This collaboration plays out in two ways – one is for students…, and the other has to do with faculty,” Gov. Markell said. He noted that students will benefit by the connective collaboration between Delaware Tech and the two four-year institutions in ways that will facilitate the continuation of their academic journey. The governor added that the partnership of faculty members in research will make a powerful case that federal funding would be effectively used in Delaware.   Dr. Williams said Delaware provides a great environment for such partnerships.   “We are fortunate to be in Delaware; elsewhere there are states that are cutting funding to higher education,” Dr. Williams said. “We want the governor to know that we appreciate his support and that we are working together and will continue to do so.”   Dr. George used the example of math education to show how the institutions are collaborating toward the academic success of students.   “At DelawareTech, math students take courses up to calculus, and they are ready to be junior at either of the institutions and continue working towards a math education degree,” Dr. George said. “We have been doing (such collaborations) for some time now; this was an opportunity today to tell this story in a very public setting.”   Dr. Harker said such higher education partnerships are the standard in Delaware.   “If we can’t work together in this small state, we’re in trouble,” Dr. Harker said.  

DSU Equestrian Team Selected for National Tourney

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The DSU equestrian team has been selected for the fourth straight year to compete in the national tourney. For the first time, both the english and western DSU riders have chosen for the April 14-16 tournament in Waco, Tx.

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    Alicia Maynard will compete in the Western category of the national tourney.     For the first time in its five-year history, the Delaware State equestrian team will send its English and Western squads to the 2011 Varsity Equestrian National Championship April 14-16 in Waco, Texas.   The Hornet equestrian team has been to the national tournament in the previous three years, but this is the first year that both the English and the Western squads have been selected.   “This is the result of five years of hard work,” said Jennifer Ridgely,  who is in her fifth year as the DSU equestrian head coach. “We have seven seniors on the team this year. What a way for them to go out!”   Delaware State is seeded 11th in the 12-team field for the national English (Hunter Seat) championship. This is the third tournament selection for the Hornets' English squad, which also competed in the 2008 and '09 competition. Amanda Holtz, western rider   Delaware State is the No. 12 seed in this year's Western tournament. The Hornets are in the championship field for the second straight year after earning its first selection in 2010.   DSU's case for the national championship tournament was strengthened by team wins over perennial powers South Carolina and New Mexico State. South Carolina is the No. 5 seed in this year's VENC Western field and No. 6 in the English competition. New Mexico State's Western and English teams were also selected for the 2011 national tournament.             Kayla Blair, english rider “The idea of going out and competing against the big teams has really paid off, because the tournament officials look hard at the strength of the schedule,” Coach Ridgely said. “This was our most successful year against bigger schools.”     DSU also had strong showings against tournament qualifiers Baylor and Tennessee Martin this season.      The Hornet equestrians will face South Carolina in the tourney's opening round.            

DSU Mourns the Passing of Devon Miller, Who Inspired Peers and Others

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    The Delaware State University family is mourning the loss of Devon Miller, a sophomore criminal justice major and Approaching Storm Marching Band member, who collapsed and died unexpectedly Saturday morning (March 19) while at home visiting his family in Philadelphia. Devon Miller, shown here performing with the Approaching Storm Band at a recent Hornet home basketball game, was a criminal justice major who had aspirations to work for the FBI.   According to the family, Devon died from a severe asthma attack.   Devon, 20, was an inspiration to campus members who knew him or saw him perform in the band, as he was physically challenged with arms that were not fully developed at birth. He nevertheless performed admirably on the tenor drums for the marching band and did not let his disability hinder him in the pursuit of his academic dreams.   “He did more for the band than the band ever did for him,” said Randolph Johnson, DSU band director. “The students had daily contact with him, and for some of them it might have been the first time they had been in close contact with someone with a disability like that.   “They found out that he was just like everyone else, and that was a part of their education experience,” the band director said. “The disability didn’t matter.”   Evelyn Miller Palmer, his adopted mother, said that DSU was his first and only choice.   “My granddaughter Angela Porter went to DSU and she would come home and tell him about the school. We would go sometimes to homecoming games and other events at DSU, and he would go with us,” Mrs. Palmer said. “He always said he wanted to go to DSU.”   Mr. Johnson described Devon as a “mannerable” young man, but added that “at the same time he was a prankster, which endeared him to his fellow students.”   Crea Johnson, a baritone musician in the band, said Devon’s ability to move beyond his disability both musically and socially was a major influence on anyone who came in contact with him. “His personality outshone the physically challenge he had; he was always smiling,” she said. “Musically, he was an outstanding percussionist.”   Ms. Johnson warmly remembers the day Devon surprised her and others with his culinary skills. “He cooked a dinner of barbeque chicken along with macaroni & cheese at his apartment in the Village for a bunch of us.”   The band director noted that in January he and Timothy Chambers, assistant band director, went to the Honda Battle of the Bands in Atlanta, Ga., to recruit new band members.   “We were setting up our table when Devon unexpectedly showed up in his band uniform,” Mr. Johnson said. “Devon had gone down to see relatives down there, and he decided he would surprise us and help us to recruit down there.”   Mr. Johnson noted that while band rehearsal could be a strenuous activity, Devon never complained. “His legacy is his dedication and untiring effort to be the best band member he could be,” he said.   The viewing and funeral will be held on Friday, April 1 at Enon Tabernacle Baptist Church, 230 Coulter St., Philadelphia. The viewing will take place from 9-11 a.m. and the funeral will begin at 11 a.m. The burial will take place immediately after the funeral at the Shelton Hills Cemetery in Philadelphia.    

DSU Recording Studio Expands Possibilities for Music Students

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Eric Jackson works the mixing console under the guidance of Dr. David Tolley, associate professor of music.

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    The DSU Department of Music is now widening the educational possibilities for its students with the addition of a professional music technology lab and recording studio.   The facility additions are expanding the aspirations of DSU music students beyond the performance and music teaching arena, and into the diverse areas that make up the music industry. Andre Dubose (l)  and Vernon "Telly" work on a keyboard track in the studio.   These music department enhancements have been largely the result of a generous $400,000 gift by an anonymous donor. The funding allowed the department to expand its existing music technology lab in the Education and Humanities Building, as well as design and renovate an adjacent area into a recording studio.   Dr. Yvonne Johnson, chair of the Department of Music, was instrumental in the planning of the new facilities and in working with the anonymous donor.   The music facilities expansion includes the installation of 12 synthesizer keyboards in its technology lab, each one outfitted with a Mac computer workstation that are all loaded with the latest music technology software. The expansion also included the construction of a sound-proof recording studio that features a Pro Tools HD integrated C-24 mixing console.   The technological enhancements are moving the department to an expansion of its degree offering – in which a student pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Music will be able to earn it with a concentration of Music Industry. The new concentration is pending Faculty Senate approval, which could happen before the end of the 2011 spring semester.   “Under a music industry concentration, students will be able to gain skills in recording technology, commercial composition, as well as in the business side that includes marketing, promotions and music management,” said Dr. David Tolley, associate professor of music.  Jenee Gueh of Baltimore has recorded some Christian music tracks in the studio.   The new recording facility has opened up a new internship opportunity for music students, as it has resulted in the establishment of a student-run Class Records, which is responsible for putting together compilation CD projects and marketing them. The students split up the their responsibilities into the areas of marketing, sales, artists & repertoire and internet.   Already one year old, Class Records is slated to release its third compilation CD this spring semester.   “Instead of doing their internship working for a company, they are the company,” Dr. Tolley said.   Jenee Gueh, a music major from Baltimore, has used the studio to lay down some Christian Music vocal tracks. “I have benefited tremendously from this studio here,” Ms. Gueh said. “Now I don’t have to go to an unfamiliar studio and get charged an arm and a leg.”   Randy McClure, sophomore music major from Dover, said the new music facilities provide great opportunities for musical development. “There are a lot of resources here to help us,” Mr. McClure said. “This will make us better musicians.”   Mr. McClure added that the recording studio and music technology lab help to raise the students level of professionalism. "It makes us more legitimate, because we can showcase our talent by recording it and then putting it into distribution.   “We are attracting students from all majors who are interested in working with the technology that we have available here,” said Marty Denson, the department’s music technology specialist.     (L-r) Albert Holden, Randy McClure, Nicole McCrae and Marty Denson get their music groove on in the studio.                         

DSU's Vanessa Nesbit wins 1st Prize for Poetry Book

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Vanessa Nesbit's poetry book Rivers Running in Desert Places recently took first place in the Del. Press Association's Creative Verse category.

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   Vanessa D. Nesbit, senior management and budget analyst for the College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology, is also a local poet and published author whose 2010 published collection of poetry recently took a 1st place prize in a state competition. Ms. Nesbit’s book Rivers Running in Desert Places recently took the 1st place prize in the category of “Creative verse….book or chapbook of poetry,” in the 2011 Delaware Press Association’s Communications Contest.   The contest featured works of over 140 communications professionals, writers and photographers from across the Delmarva and Delaware Valley region, spanning 89 categories of print media, radio and television, advertisement/public relations and web/electronic media.   Ms. Nesbit is a long-time member of the Delaware Press Association and a past executive board member.  In 2007 she published her first book of poetry Fairy Tales and Stranger Love, which took 2nd place in the Creative Verse category that year.   Her books can be purchased online at www.amazon.com.    

DSU Accounting Major makes her Delaware Boxing Debut with Win

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Melinda Levasseur (in the green) puts a "whupping" on Tisha Himes during their March 19 fight in Harrington. The DSU accounting major sent Himes back to her locker room after a quick TKO in the first round.

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    Melinda Levasseur, a sophomore accounting major who transferred in the fall to DSU from East Tennessee State University, had high hopes that she would be a member of the Hornet soccer Melinda Levasseur will seek her eighth victory in her March 19 bout at the Harrington Fairgrounds. team. However for a variety of reasons, it just didn’t happen.   But she has a sporting pursuit to passionately fall back on – boxing.   Melinda "The Gem" Levasseur, a 5-foot 10-inch, 165-pound right-handed amateur fighter who competes in the middleweight and light heavyweight female classes, showcased her boxing skills on Saturday, March 19 in her Delaware debut at the Harrington Fairgrounds Exhibit Hall   In front of a packed Harrington boxing crowd, Melinda made quick TKO work of her opponent Tisha Himes of York, Pa. by sending her back to her locker room after only one round. Ms. Levasseur now has an amateur record of 8-1.    Boxing has become a significant enough passion for Ms. Levasseur that she is considering eventually turning pro. But her amateur boxing success aside, the sport of soccer has really been Melinda’s first love.   A soccer player throughout her youth, her involvement in the sport was disrupted during her senior year of high school in Johnson City, Tenn., when she suffered a torn ACL. Her rehabilitation led her to regularly working out in a gym, where she was introduced to boxing.   “I started using boxing to get back into shape,” Ms. Levasseur said.   Her sights, however, were still set on returning to soccer; but it never became a reality for her. Although she was offered a partial soccer scholarship at Milligan College, she was unable to pull together the rest of the funds to enroll at the time. Upon transferring to DSU in the fall 2010, she hoped that she would make the Hornet soccer team. But the combination of her late registration and some eligibility complications kept her off the team and ended any intercollegiate sports possibilities for her.   While she was working through those soccer aspirations, she moved her boxing activity beyond the gym and began taking on fights.   Ms. Levasseur began amateur boxing a couple of years ago and won her first seven fights. She went on to represent the Southeast Region in the 2010 National Golden Gloves. She lost her first fight in that Golden Gloves Championship in June 2010 in Hollywood, Fla.   That lone loss did not discourage her, but rather motivated her. And now that she has rebounded with her eight win, Melinda is now looking toward possibly turning pro at some point. She has become a fixture at the KOK Boxing Club in Bridgeville, Del., where she works out under the watchful eye of her trainer Tyrone Sabr. He said she is a skilled boxer who works hard in the ring. Melinda's trainer Tyrone Sabr give her some sage ring wisdom during a recent workout.   “She has beautiful hands and feet, and she can think. I believe she can go a long way,” said Mr. Sabr, who has two sisters – Sharon (Lee) Beard and Sheila (Lee) Cooper – who graduated from DSU.         Melinda says she loves the way boxing challenges her athletically, as well as enjoys the work out and the dedication that the sport requires. “There is a great sense of accomplishment that you don’t get from anything else,” she said.   The daughter of Louis Levasseur of Johnson City, Tenn., and Lisa Marie Clark of Magnolia, Del., Melinda says she inherited the athleticism of her father. Her decision to move to Delaware to be near her mother resulted in her enrollment at DSU. Melinda Levasseur (center) gets a victory pose with boxing promoter Bruce Hibbs (l) and trainer Tyrone Sabr after her March 19 TKO win.   Her boxing match will take place next to the Harrington Casino takes place where she also currently works part-time as a waitress. Her professional accounting aspirations relates to the casino.   “I want to get my CPA and work for a casino in auditing or forensic accounting,” Melinda said. She added that her desire to turn pro has been tempered by her priority to finish her degree. “I want to make sure I take care of my schooling first,” she said.   Although she didn't get much of workout during the less than one-round fight against Himes -- an opponent who found her to be too quick in the ring to handle -- Ms. Lavasseur was glad to re-establish herself in the ring.   "It was good to be back in the ring, as it's been around a year since my last fight," Melinda said. "It was good to have so much support from the casino, my family and friends."       Photos and article by Carlos Holmes  

DSU at the 2011 MEAC Tournament in Winston-Salem, NC

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  The 2011 MEAC Tournament in Winston-Salem, N.C. attracted a number of DSU alumni and administrators who witnessed the honoring of alumnus Donald Wright, ’65, as the Outstanding Alumni representative of DSU. During the March 7-12 tourney, University President Harry L. Williams demonstrated great hospitality in his designated president’s suite at the Joel Coliseum tournament site, hosting a diverse variety of DSU family members and guests during the March 10-11 quarter-finals and semi-finals nights. Dr. Williams also went on the court on that latter night to be recognized along with the other MEAC school presidents.  

John Land Retires from DSU Board; Named Trustee Emeritus

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Dr. John Land reacts to some information Board Vice Chair David Turner read from the Resolution making him Trustee Emeritus.

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    The DSU Board of Trustees today voted to name Dr. John W. Land as Trustee Emeritus following the announcement that he is stepping down from his appointed board post, bringing to a close his 19-year tenure as a voting member. Dr. John Land (center) shows the Board's resolution with David Turner (l), Board vice chair and Dr. Claibourne Smith, Board chair.   A class of 1966 alumnus of then-Delaware State College and a board-appointed trustee member since 1992, Dr. Land served as board vice president from 2004-2008 and returned to that office in 2010 until September of that year. He has served as the chair of the board’s Student Affairs Committee, as well as a member of the Building and Grounds (of which he is a former chair), Finance and Audit committees.   Dr. Claibourne D. Smith, board president, said that the trustees have been proud to have a distinguished graduate and community leader such as Dr. Land to serve on the board.   “Dr. Land has been active, not only as a Trustee and member of several key committees, but as the Board’s vice chair as well,” Dr. Smith said. “He has been instrumental in developing the board’s vision, strategic directions and policies.  I could not have had a more vital partner than Dr. Land in providing leadership for the board and the University.”   DSU President Harry L. Williams said Dr. Land has been a strong voice on the board. “Dr. Land has been a real inspirational leader for his beloved Delaware State University,” Dr. Williams said. “His wisdom and candid responses to questions will truly be missed.”   Dr. Land was moved by the resolution that named him Trustee Emeritus. "I owe DSU more than I could ever give it," he said. "If it wasn't  for DSU, I wouldn't be here."   In the wake of the August 2008 resignation of DSU President Allen Sessoms and the subsequent elevation of Dr. Smith from his board chair post to acting president, Dr. Land became the acting chair of the board and served 17 months in that capacity until Dr. Smith resumed his Board leadership role.   Dr. A. Richard Barros said he considers Dr. Land in the highest esteem. “When it comes to representing Delaware State University, John Land has been the ultimate warrior,” he said. “His work with our Student Affairs Committee and his tenure as our Board’s vice president and acting president has enabled our school to rise to the top.”   For 19 years, Dr. Lands established a reputation as a committed and engaged trustees for the betterment of his alma mater DSU. Dr. Land’s DSU roots go back to the mid-1960s when he was enrolled as a student. During those years, he played as a running back on the Hornet football team and became the team captain his senior year. A powerful running back, Dr. Land climaxed his Hornet career by gaining 600 yards on the ground and scoring seven touchdowns during that final year.   After he completed his Bachelor of Science Degree in Health and Physical Education in 1966, Dr. Land was drafted into the NAFL where he played with the Wilmington Clippers. He ascended to the NFL where he played for the Baltimore Colts (1969) and the Philadelphia Eagles (1970). He ended his 10-year football career with the Philadelphia Bell of the WFL (1973-75), where in 1974 he became the first African American to rush for 1,000 yards in the city of Philadelphia.   Dr. Land was inducted in the DSU Athletics Hall of Fame in 1988 and in the Delaware Sports Museum and Hall of Fame in 1997.   A committed alumnus of his alma mater, Dr. Land has supported the institution with his leadership skill and his enthusiastic support. Dr. Land also sets an example for alumni in his financial support of DSU as a long time President’s Club-level contributor. He chaired the Delmarva Scholarship Golf Classic for over 10 years, an event that has raised over $356,000 in scholarships for DSU students. Dr. John Land credits DSU for bringing him together with his wife (l), and he credits his wife and family with being instrumental in making him a successful man.   On Sept. 13, 2005, DSU presented him with an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters in recognition of his unselfish and dedicated service to the institution.   Dr. Land taught in Delaware for 10 years before moving into the business arena. After working for the Xerox Corporation in sales, he later joined Delmarva Power, where he eventually served as the vice president of Procurement and Corporate Services up until his retirement in 2005.   Active in volunteer activities, Dr. Land has served on the boards of the Charter School of Wilmington, LPGA Urban Youth Golf Advisory Board, Junior Achievement, Brandywine YMCA, and Alliance for Children and Families, among others. In 2004, Children and Family First presented Dr. Land with the J. Thompson Brown Award to recognize his accomplishments as a community volunteer.    

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