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Kent, Sussex Alumni Host Loockerman Hall Open House

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(L-r) DSU alumni Sylvia Davis Pinkett, Hilda Norwood and Bertha Allen Turner stand with the Christmas tree they put up and decorated in Loockerman Hall as part of the Open House.

 

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    DSU alumni Phil Sadler, Martha Hopkins and Sandra Sutton also helped host the open house. Kent and Sussex County chapters of the DSU Alumni Association held an open house on Dec. 6, 8 and 10 at the Historic Loockerman Hall.   Students, alumni and other visitors were able to experience the inside of the historic Loockerman edifice – which was built circa 1770 and is the only original structure from the University’s 1891 beginning – which served as the center of campus activities during the institution’s almost first 30 years of existence.   History about Loockerman Hall and the institution were presented by Carlos Holmes, and there was also musical performances given by the DSU Concert Choir’s Male Quartet.   In addition to the alumni mentioned in the accompanying photos, DSU alumni Nate Delesline and his wife Vynella help to decorate Loockerman Hall for the event.  

DSU Police Assist in Development of New Law Enforcement Technology

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(L-r) Thomas Connell II and Peter Schecter, both of Advanced Response Concepts, and Dr. John Austin, director of DSU Sponsored Programs, and University Police Chief James Overton stand with the new Condor Crime Scene Management and Evidence Tracking System technology.

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    The Delaware State University Police Department is involved in development of new cutting edge law enforcement technology that is expected to greatly improve upon the documentation of evidence collection as well as crime scene management. DSU Police Chief James Overton talks about the Condor technology with an unidentified Elsmere police officer.   Over the last year, DSU has done research for Advanced Response Concepts – a Fairfax, Virginia-based company – which has been instrumental in the company’s development of the Condor Crime Scene Management and Evidence Tracking System.   With the development of this Condor system, the DSU Police Department will now be a primary tester of the new hardware and software technology and will also be facilitating the use of it by several other law enforcement agencies from throughout the state.   A primary feature of the system is an electronic tablet that police can use to write their investigation and evidence collection information. The tablet will funnel the information into the various types of forms that police investigators have to complete, saving them several hours of work. DSU’s research contributed to toward Arc’s development of this tablet.   The technology uses biometric and secure smart cards that provide for the effective documentation of the chain of evidence custody, thereby reducing the kind of evidentiary issues that negatively impact the prosecution of criminal cases.   The system is designed to enhance the preservation of crime scenes through a portable credentialing station that provides law enforcement and other emergency personnel with the credentials that will ensure access to the involved area.   The DSU Police Department’s involvement in this project was born of two federal grants totaling almost $2.9 million as well as from its partnership with the Delaware Department of Homeland Security.   “This technological advancement could change the standard for crime scene management and evidence tracking,” said DSU Police Chief James Overton. “The DSU Police Department is excited to be a part of this project.”   Advanced Response Concepts will take the feedback from the DSU police and other participating users – one of which is the Dover Police Department – to make improvements to the technology before making it available to the nationwide law enforcement market.  

DSU, DelDOT Sign New Partnership Agreement

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DSU President Harry L. Williams and DelDOT Secretary Carolann (seated l-r) Wicks sign a new partnership agreement that will involve the University in the preparation of students for transportation careers. Behind them are (l-r Carla Elliot, DelDOT Civil Rights administrator, Gov. Jack Markell and Keesha Wilson, partnership project coordinator.

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    Gov. Jack Markell joined with Department of Transportation (DelDOT) Secretary Carolann Wicks, DSU President Harry L. Williams, and Associate Secretary of Education Amelia Hodges on campus Dec. 3 to announce a new formal agreement between DelDOT and DSU. DSU President Harry L. Williams, shown here shaking DelDOT Secretary Carolann Wicks hand, said that the partnership is consistent with the University's Vision Statement, as it prepares DSU students to be first-choice in transportation job opportunities.   The new accord creates the Transportation Education Development Program (TED) – a one-of-a-kind program will establish education and training courses at DSU aimed at developing curriculums for potential employees, and to create awareness of possible careers in surface transportation.   “This partnership benefits students and the state by preparing some of our future transportation workers, whether they will become engineers, appraisers, surveyors or land planning specialists,” Gov. Markell said. “It’s in our interest and theirs to make sure they enter the workforce educated, trained, and prepared to succeed with a clear path forward.”   Secretary Wicks said the program is important to DelDOT. “Today’s agreement with Delaware State University will help the Department of Transportation tap into a previously under-utilized resource, to help us prepare current and future potential employees with the education and skills necessary to move into the future,” she said.   DelDOT, the Department of Education (DOE), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), and DSU will partner in this program to provide training in support fields for workers in transportation. As DelDOT’s current workforce changes due to retirements in the future, the training programs and courses that will be offered will help to ensure that the knowledge and skills needed by future DelDOT workers are available and maintained.    President Williams said the University is excited about its role in the new program. “The partnership provides our young people with a roadmap toward great careers and professional growth in the transportation arena,” the DSU president said. “It also fits right into our University's vision to assist the state with targeted needs--in this case the professionals and skills needed to fulfill the goals of Delaware's transportation blueprint.”   The partnership agencies will sustain pipeline activities that will highlight possible transportation careers for potential employees, as well as the academic offerings at DSU. The program will also take advantage of an existing partnership for the recruitment of engineers, and will include Delaware Technical and Community College in the collaborative effort. DelDOT will coordinate with the DOE for outreach efforts to schools in order to create an awareness of existing programs and careers in education that will be available.    The program, which was specifically designed in Delaware, also supports an Executive Order by President Barack Obama to encourage relationships between federal agencies, state agencies which are the recipients of federal funds, and Historically Black Colleges and Universities.   The details of the new partnership were worked out over the last two years by Keesha Wilson, executive assistant to the DelDOT Secretary, and John Austin, DSU director of Sponsored Programs.  

DSU Aviation's Marc Anderson Wins Regional Top Pilot

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As the Region VII "Top Pilot," Mr. Anderson will compete in the national competition at Ohio State University in the spring.

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  Delaware State University aviation student Marc C. Anderson recently made his mark by winning the “Top Pilot” honors recently at the National Intercollegiate Flying Association Region VII Flight Competition held at the Brookhaven Airport, N.Y.   Mr. Anderson, a senior aviation professional pilot major from Felton, Del., amassed the highest total score after competing in eight flying and ground categories that measured the contestants’ performance in flying, landing, navigation, preflight exercises, as well as other areas.   As the Top Scoring Contestant and Top Pilot, Mr. Anderson will represent Region VII at the National Flying Competition at Ohio State University in the spring.   Currently working towards his Certified Flight Instructor’s Rating, Mr. Anderson has accumulated more than 300 flight hours. He is a member of the Air Force Reserves, for which he serves as a C-17 loadmaster.   “I want to be commissioned to be a C-17 pilot (in the Reserves) here in Dover,” Mr. Anderson said of his future goals. He added that he is currently hoping to get an internship with Continental Airlines in the spring, and later hopes to fly for that major airline.   Also competing in the regional for the DSU “Flying Hornets” were Robert Saunders, Will Jester, Bryan Shultz and Andrew Meiers. They were coached by Courtney Walters, a DSU honor graduate and flight instructor.   The DSU aviation team competed in the regional against schools such as Dowling College, the U.S. Military Academy, Rensselear Polytechnic Institute, Bridgewater State University and other colleges and universities.  

Thirty Chinese Exchange Students Improve their English at DSU

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DSU President Harry L. Williams (center) poses with a large group of Chinese students who are currently studying at DSU.

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    Thirty students from the People’s Republic of China are at DSU increasing their fluency in the English language while at the same time learning about American culture.   The Chinese students are enrolled as visiting exchange students at DSU as a result of agreements that were signed over the summer between Del State and several universities in that Far East country. Chinese exchange students (l-r) Haoru Nie, Jiafu Zhang, Jing Li, Yilin Yuan, Pei Wang and Di Zhu are all enjoy their time at DSU and in the U.S.   The students are majors of various different disciplines, but all are getting an emersion crash course in the English language to build on the English they took in school.   “I am making a lot of friends here,” said Pei Wang, an English major from Changchun University of Science and Technology. “But sometimes they have their own dialect, and it is sometimes hard to understand.”   Pei said he has tried to bridge the language comprehension gap by learning English songs and rap music lyrics.   Yilin Yuan, another English major, has aspiration to be an interpreter. “It is difficult to get a (interpreter) certificate in China,” she said. “Here I am trying to make every minute count.”   Haoru Nie, a sport administration graduate student from the Ningbo University, has made a dramatic change from the bachelor’s degree in English to sports. “It is a new field for me,” Haoru said. “I like administration and management.”   Jiafu Zhang, who is pursuing a master of business administration, said he thinks DSU has a superior program. He added that he enjoys his interaction with the students. “We share ideas with each other,” said Jiafu, who is from Yunnan University of Economics and Finance. “The students are very helpful.”   Di Zhu, an optics major, said he finds it interesting how Americans will go out of town for activities only to return the same evening.   “I have an American friend who drives to Georgetown (in Washington, D.C.) to play basketball for an hour and a half, and then come back that same night,” Di said.   The 20 Chinese exchange students will return to their country after 2010 fall semester.  

DSU Chosen to be Part of National Curriculum Project

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    The Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) has named Delaware State University among the 32 colleges and universities chosen in a competitive process to participate in General Education for a Global Century, a curriculum and faculty development project.   The project is part of AAC&U's Shared Futures initiative and is funded by the Henry Luce Foundation. Over 140 institutions applied to be part of the initiative.   "We are excited to be chosen to be part of this AAC&U's development project, especially because Delaware State University launched its new General Education Program a little over a year ago," said Dr. Alton Thompson, DSU provost and vice president of Academic Affairs. "As we work hard to develop our students so they will make their mark on the world, we believe our global emphasis at DSU will provide well-defined and valuable input for this project."   Dr. Thompson added that the selection of DSU reflects the University's unique approach to its global studies and general education curricula, an approach that integrates well with the institution's new vision and core values.   The DSU team members who will participate in the project are Dr. Alexa Cawley, Dr. Andrew Lloyd, Dr. Akwasi Osei, Phyllis Collins, Dr. Donald Becker, Dr. Padmini Banerjee, and Genevieve Tighe.   The institutions selection are from all regions of the country and include institutions of many different types -- including two-year and four-year public and private institutions. The selected colleges and universities:       California State University --San Marcos, (CA) Carnegie Mellon University (PA) Central College (IA) College of William and Mary (VA) Delaware State University (DE) Haverford College (PA) John Carroll University (OH) Keene State College (NH) Kennesaw State University (GA) Lynn University (FL) Miami University (OH) Michigan State University (MI) Minneapolis Community and Technical College (MN) Monroe Community College (NY) Nebraska Wesleyan University (NE) Oregon State University (OR) Rider University (NJ) San Jose State University (CA) Southern Connecticut State University (CT) Spring Hill College (AL) St. Edward's University (TX) St. Lawrence University (NY) The College of Wooster (OH) University at Albany, SUNY (NY) University of Maryland College Park (MD) University of Massachusetts Amherst (MA) University of North Carolina at Charlotte (NC) University of South Florida (FL) University of Wisconsin Colleges (WI) Utah Valley University (UT) Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VA) Worcester Polytechnic Institute (MA)   DSU is the only HBCU (Historically Black Colleges and Universities) among the 32 institutions selected for this project..   “Increasingly, in their mission statements and strategic plans, colleges and universities promise that their graduates will develop the knowledge, skills, and values necessary to act as responsible and productive global citizens in an interconnected and interdependent world. Yet in most cases general education curricular designs have not kept pace with the rhetoric,” said AAC&U Director of Global Learning and Curricular Change Kevin Hovland. “These selected institutions will all be working together to create clear and creative pathways—horizontally and vertically—through which students can connect their learning and achieve essential global learning outcomes. Many of these schools have already made significant progress in reimagining general education for a global century and, in this project, they will be able to test new curricular models, assess global learning outcomes, and share insights with each other and with the larger higher education community.”   This new project builds upon innovative efforts to reframe general education courses and programs, and create coherent curricular designs that address complex, global issues across divisions and disciplines. In concert with a Global Learning Leadership Council, DSU will help lead a high profile, national effort to:   articulate essential global learning outcomes for all students refine and disseminate models of global general education curricula that can be adapted across all institutional types provide faculty development opportunities to assist college faculty in designing and teaching interdisciplinary, integrative courses that focus on real-world global issues develop rubrics to assess global learning outcomes   The DSU teams members will spend the fall and winter on their home campuses refining general education reform strategies and strengthening connections between existing general education goals and outcomes and essential global learning outcomes. They will also inventory the curricular and co-curricular opportunities for global learning that already exist on their campuses and ways those opportunities could be better integrated within their larger general education efforts. Working through a social networking website, team members will help identify common areas of interest and concern. Those critical issues will be addressed in the project’s central activity—an intensive summer institute in 2011.   “It was gratifying to see how many campuses applied to be part of this initiative,” said AAC&U President Carol Geary Schneider. “It is testament to how seriously today’s academy takes the challenge of preparing college students to participate effectively and responsibly in an interdependent global community. Both their future employers and our society need students with much higher levels of global knowledge and skill. This initiative will help the higher education community graduate students with these critical capacities. The Shared Futures initiative and this work on general education are important foci for AAC&U’s ongoing work to connect liberal education with the needs of a fast-changing world.”  

Student Government Association Establishes $10,000 Endowment

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SGA President Kathleen Charlot (l) presents a display check to DSU President Harry L. Williams, representing the $10,000 scholarship endowment it has established.

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    Delaware State University’s Student Government Association has taken on the challenge of financial support for students by establishing a $10,000 endowed scholarship.   According to Kathleen Charlot, SGA president, the new SGA Scholarship Fund will be specifically for returning students and will be merit-based, requiring that the eligible students have at least a 3.0 grade-point-average.   Ms. Charlot, who presented a $10,000 check to DSU President Harry L. Williams just prior to the Oct. 16 DSU Homecoming Game between North Carolina A&T and Del State, said financial struggles are a constant concern that they hear especially from returning students.   “Instead of complaining about the University not having enough scholarship money, we decided to take matters into our own hands,” Ms. Charlot said.   The SGA president said that the new endowment fund was generated from its budget, taking from revenues that have earned from different events. Ms. Charlot said the SGA has also made a provision for the money to continue to go into the fund.   “We put it in our constitution and by-laws that the SGA has to put 10% of its revenue into the endowment,” she said.    

DSU Establishes Three New Degree Programs

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Students will learn new analytical skills in the new Master of Science in Food Science Program, one of three new degrees recently established at DSU.

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    Delaware State University has added the following new undergraduate degree program and two new master’s degree programs:   Bachelor of Science in Forensic Chemistry – This undergraduate degree program, which applies chemistry in the development of evidence in legal matters, will provide students with the theoretical background and laboratory skills in Forensic Chemistry to pursue jobs in government agencies, forensic and toxicology labs, medical examiners officers, hospitals, police department and others. The program will provide students a focus on cutting edge forensic analytical technique used in both the field and the lab. It is the second forensic degree program launched by DSU’s College of Mathematics, Natural Science and Technology; the Forensic Biology Degree Program was launched last year.   Master of Science in Family & Consumer Science Education – Designed for individuals who possess a bachelor’s degree in Family & Consumer Sciences and are seeking an advance degree and teaching certification in that same discipline. This degree helps to address a nationwide shortage of family and consumer sciences teachers. Graduates of this MS program will be able to teach in middle and high schools, as well as work in cooperative extensions, food service management, human resources, among others.   Master of Food Science – Formerly a concentration under the Master of Science in Agriculture, DSU has developed this discipline into a full Master of Science degree program under the Department of Human Ecology. This new graduate program prepares graduates with an undergraduate degree in agriculture, biology, chemistry or food and nutritional science for an excellent career in the high-tech food industry. The Master’s Program in Food Science is a multidisciplinary program that integrates knowledge in biology, chemistry, microbiology, nutrition and engineering to the study and production of nutritious and safe foods. Among the career opportunities that can result are food chemistry, food microbiology, food safety and quality assurance, biotechnology and pharmaceutics, nutrition labeling and packaging, food analysis/control, sensory evaluation, food processing and engineering, food marketing, as well as sales and distribution.  

DSUAA honors Hall of Fame Inductees

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The 2010 DSUAA Hall of Fame inductees and honorees (seated l-r) Minnie Hill and Mrs Dorothy Talbert; Standing l-r) Dr. Harry Williams (non-inductee), William Ross, Dr. Tom Butler, Dr. Yvonne Johnson, Rev. William Granville Jr., John Martin, Philip Sadler, Nathan O. Thomas, John Ridgeway and Dr. Bernard Chase, DSUAA president.

 

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  Seven new members were inducted into the DSU Alumni Association Hall of Fame as part of the 2010 Homecoming activities on campus.   The inductions were held on Oct. 15 in the Martin Luther King Student Center. The newly inducted DSUAA Hall of Fame members are:   Rev. Dr. William Granville, education – 30-year executive with Mobil and founder of the Granville Academy.  John Ridgeway, business – corporate manager for Toyota Financial Services. William Ambrose Ross, community service –former president of the Columbia Interfaith Housing Corporation and former president of the League for Human Rights in Baltimore, in which he was involved in writing the first public accommodations stature for that city’s local government. Dr. Tom Butler, honorary alumnus – 22½-year DSU professor of social work Dr. Yvonne Johnson, honorary alumna – DSU 39-year  associate professor of music Dr. John Martin, Sr., honorary alumnus – DSU athletics director 1986-1995. Philip G. Sadler, Jr., Rebecca Brockington Lifetime Achievement Award – 30-year accountant, auditor and financial manager for a number of government and private entities. He is also a life member of the DSUAA and has served as its national president, and vice president.   In addition, special Dedicated Service Awards were presented to Minnie Hill, Jean Allen Wilson and Ernest Talbert (posthumous).  

DSU Establishes New Enrollment Record with 3,819

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    With its fall 2010 enrollment, Delaware State University has once again broken its record for the number of students attending the institution.   DSU’s fall 2010 total enrollment has been officially tabulated to be a record 3,819 – the first time the institution’s enrollment has exceed 3,800. This year’s enrollment surpasses the previous fall 2007 DSU record of 3,756.   The record enrollment was in part due to the record number of students enrolled in graduate and doctoral studies (447) and the second highest new freshmen class (906). The previous record for advanced studies enrollment was 387 in both 2006 and 2009 and the record enrollment for new freshmen is 940 in 2005.   “This year’s record enrollment is a tribute to the hard work over the last few year of our Enrollment Management team,” said DSU President Harry L. Williams. “DSU’s admissions counselor, recruiters and their executive leaders have earnestly employed the best practices known in enrollment management, and it has resulted in more students then ever before that DSU can help in attaining their aspirations and dreams.”    

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