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DSU Explores Possible International University Partnership

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(l-r) Amir Mohammadi, executive vice president of finance; Michelle Zhoug Yi of China; Vijaya Kumaran Nair of Malaysia; Zhang Fu Qiang of China, DSU President Harry L. Williams and Dr. Claibourne Smith, chairman of the DSU Board of Trustees, met along with other administrators to explore the joint establishment of an International University in China.

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    DSU President Harry L. Williams hosted a July 25 visit by a joint delegation from China and Malaysia to explore a potential partnership in the creation of an International University. Dr. Harry L. Williams receives a gift from Zhang Fu Qiang of China   Dr. Williams and other DSU administrators welcomed Vijaya Kumaran Nair, a Malaysian native and founding vice president of the new venture; a Michelle Zhoug Yi, a Chinese native and founding member of the management team of the new venture; and Zhang Fu Qiang, vice president of the Chamber of Industry and Commerce in Beichen, Tianjin, China, where the International University would be based.   The delegation discussed with DSU officials the proposed International University and explored the possibility of a DSU branch campus at the International University, partnering with educators in China, India and Malaysia as members of the proposed global university system.   No decision has been made concerning DSU’s possible involvement in the educational venture, but both sides agreed to continue exploring the possibility.   Joining Dr. Williams and the visiting delegation for the discussion from DSU was Dr. Claibourne Smith, chairman of the University Board of Trustees; Provost Alton Thompson; Amir Mohammadi, executive vice president of finance and University treasurer; Kemal Atkins, vice president of Student Affairs, Dr. Fengshan Liu, associate vice president of International Affairs; Dr. Dyremple Marsh, dean of the College of Agriculture and Related Sciences; Dr. John Austin, interim dean of the College of Education, Health & Public Policy; Dr. Shelton Rhodes, dean of the College of Business; and Tom Preston, University general counsel.  

Harry Downes Jr. named Police Chief, Director of Public Safety

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Harry W. Downes, Jr., a retired state police major, became the new chief of University Police and director of Public Safety effective July 18.

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    Delaware State University has named Harry W. Downes Jr., a retired Delaware State Police major, as its new director of the Department of Public Safety and chief of University Police.   Chief Downes brings over 25 years of law enforcement and senior-level executive management experience to his new leadership post at DSU. He served from 1983 to his retirement in 2009 with the Delaware State Police, beginning as a trooper and moving up to a progressive number of posts that culminated in his promotion to the rank of major and his assignment as an administrative office on the executive staff in 2005.   During his State Police career, he served as a special investigations detective, a corporal in the Community Service Unit, a sergeant in the Rural Community Policing Unit, a lieutenant for the Traffic Patrol, as well as a training coordinator. As a captain, he developed domestic violence policies and served as an investigator in that area throughout Delaware, as well as served as the director of the Training Academy.   Prior to his state police tenure, Chief Downes served as a cadet and an officer in the Camden-Wyoming Police Department from 1980-1983.   “His extensive law enforcement background from his many years with the Delaware State Police includes areas such as human resources, training, executive leadership and many others responsibilities and are the types of experiences that are important for a university to have in its chief of police and director of Public Safety,” said Kemal Atkins, DSU vice president of Student Affairs. “In addition, Chief Downes has strong ties in the surrounding Dover community and throughout the state that will help the University strengthen its connections and partnerships beyond its campus.”   In addition to his law enforcement background, Chief Downs also served as the director of DSU’s Sussex County satellite site in Georgetown from 2010 to the summer of 2011.   Chief Downes has associate degrees in criminal justice and computer science from Delaware Technical and Community College, a bachelor’s degree in general studies and a master’s degree in public administration both from Wilmington University. He has also completed the Northwestern School of Police Staff and Command at Northwestern University, Police Supervisor’s School at Penn State University and National Incident Management System from the Department of Homeland Security in Washington, D.C.   A Delaware native, Chief Downes is a 1979 product of Caesar Rodney High School.   “I am very pleased to be the next chief of the DSU Police Department,” Chief Downes said. “However, this post is not about me, but it is about leading an outstanding team of officers to provide the safest environment possible at DSU.”   Chief Downes officially began his new public safety post with DSU on July 18. He succeeds former Chief James Overton, who left the DSU earlier this year after six years in that post to become the director of the Department of Public Safety at the University of Massachusetts.  

Two DSU Professors Publish Book on Migration and Transculturation

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Dr. Myna German, chair of the DSU Dept. of Mass Communications, and Dr. Padmini Banerjee, associate professor of psychology, display the book Migration, Technology and Transculturation, on which they served as co-editor and contributors..

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  Two DSU professors have teamed together as editors and contributors to publish a new book – Migration, Technology and Transculturation: A Global Perspective.   Dr. Myna German, chair of the Department of Mass Communications, and Dr. Padmini Banerjee, associate professor of psychology, co-edited the book and jointly contributed the opening overview chapter in the 14-chapter collaborative work that features scholarly perspectives from academic writers from around the world.   The book examines the complex dynamics of transnational migration and the dual and often multiple lives that entails for migrants – giving rise to the subject of transculturation. This collection of thought-provoking nonfiction writings contributes to the ongoing conversations across borders and disciplines, through empirical and theoretical articles that are presented within an interdisciplinary framework.   According to Dr. German, she and Dr. Banerjee began working on the book in March 2009. Financial support from DSU enabled them to attend conferences that put them in contact with some of the authors who would contribute to this book. The two faculty members also issued a “request for papers” on the book subject and received a number of submissions that way as well, some of which were also incorporated in the collective work.   In addition to authors from the United States, Australia, Brazil, India, Italy, Russia, the United Kingdom and elsewhere, there are also other DSU writers who contributed to the work. Dr. Divyesh Raythatha, assistant professor of mass communication, wrote a chapter on “The Role of Media Convergence and Communications Technology in Instantaneous Dissemination of Human Rights Violation Reports.” In addition, Dr. John D. Rich, assistant professor of psychology, contributed the book’s afterword section.   Migration, Technology and Transculturation: A Global Perspective can be purchased online at Amazon.com.    

DSU Receives the 2011 Climate Leadership Award for Go Green Initiatives

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Delaware State University’s dedicated effort to establish sound environmental practices on campus was affirmed on June 23 when the institution received the Second Nature Climate Leadership Award from the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC).  DSU President Harry L. Williams (r) receives the Second Nature Climate Leadership Awards on behalf of the University from Dr. Anthony Cortese, president of Second Nature. Presented to DSU President Harry L. Williams at the 5th annual Climate Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the award – which was in the Master’s Colleges and University category – recognizes DSU for the work it has done since it committed to be part of the ACUPCC in 2009.   The University’s Go Green Sustainability Committee – led by Vita Pickrum, associate vice president of Development, and a steering committee of University vice presidents and deans – has mushroomed into seven subcommittees that include more than 80 active members from the University’s business and administration personnel, as well as students, faculty and staff from all walks of DSU academic life.   In addition to accessing a diverse group of intellectual resources from among its employees, DSU’s Go Green initiative has also engaged students in the effort through the creation of a Green Ambassador organization. This student organization continues to be an active participant in the Go Green planning, related events coordination and spearheading the education effort among their student peers on campus.   As a result of the work of these students, the Green Ambassadors’ president Terrell Davis received the 2010 AASHE Student Sustainability Leadership Award. In addition, two other DSU students were selected to be EPA OnCampus Ambassadors to assist in promoting environmentally conscientious initiatives on campus.   On April 20, Delaware State University held a daylong celebration in recognition of Earth Day and the turnout of faculty, staff, students and the community exemplified the University’s enthusiasm and efforts toward climate neutrality and sustainability that extends far beyond one celebrated day of the year. As part of the festivities, DSU art students developed a mini-exhibition entitled “Found Objects,” which used objects that had been left to go to the local landfill and were creatively converted into art sculptures. Amir Mohammedi, vice president of Business & Administration, speaks on how sustainability has become key to DSU's mission.   As a historically black university, the environmental marshalling of its DSU members has led the way among other HBCUs and resulted in Ms. Pickrum being invited to the Dec. 3 United Nations 16th Conference of Parties in Cancun, Mexico, where she gave a presentation on DSU’s Go Green Initiative. In addition, DSU’s environmental efforts were recognized nationally during the 2010-2011 academic year in publications of the ACUPCC, United Negro College Fund, Jet Magazine and Black College Today.   During the second day of the June 21-22 ACUPCC Climate Leadership Summit, Amir Mohammadi, DSU vice president of Business & Administration, was a panel participate in a work session in which he shared how DSU has financed its sustainability projects.  

DSU Alumnus, Admissions Counselor Named Among Men of McCafe

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            Harold Burnett     Harold Burnett, class of 2007, has been selected as one of five winners of the Men of McCafe Casting Call, a national search for five community service-oriented men who are making a difference in the African American community.   Mr. Burnett and the other winners made their first official Men of McCafe public appearance at the July 1-3 Essence Music Festival in New Orleans. They also volunteered with New Orleans-based organizations and assisted with service programs through Ronald McDonald House Charities of New Orleans.   The DSU alumnus was the first-ever Mr. DSU during his 2006-2007 senior year. He currently works at his alma mater as an admissions counselor.  

DSU Board of Trustees Approves 2011-2012 Tuition Rates

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The Delaware State University Board of Trustees today approved the institution’s tuition for the 2011-2012 academic year, which includes moderate increases in the tuition and room & board rates.   During a special June 28 meeting, the board approved a 5.5% increase in tuition ($6,226 in-state and $14,221 out-of-state, both per year). Last year’s in-state tuition was $5,901 and out-of-state was $13,480.   The board also approved a 5.5% increase in both the traditional residential hall room rates (which now range from $6,676 to $7,168) and the meal plan rates (which now range from $3,168 to $3,572).   DSU President Harry L. Williams said that the loss of federal stimulus money that DSU and other institutions of higher education had received factored into the rate increase. “The Trustees kept this year’s increase relatively low, as it has over the past several years, in order to balance giving a high quality education to our students with the recognition that our student population comes with great financial need,” said Dr. Williams.   This year’s increases notwithstanding, Dr. Williams noted that DSU continues to remain competitive with other comparable institutions of higher education in the region and be an educational “best buy.”   The rates for the on-campus University Village Apartments and the institution’s off-campus University Courtyard Apartment complex will be set after those facilities’ Housing Foundation meets in the near future to determine the changes for the upcoming year.   Full tuition and fees details

DSU Establishes New Partnerships in China

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Dr. Harry L. Williams (l) shakes hands with Sanming University Vice President Jian Liu after the signing of the accord between the two institutions. Applauding behind them are administrators from both universities.

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Delaware State University has recently expanded its partnerships in China with agreements with three universities that will bring about 100 Chinese students to DSU in the fall and send DSU faculty members to teach in that Far East country. (L-r) DSU Provost Alton Thompson, Ningbo Univ. of Technology President Haoqi Gao and DSU President Harry L. Williams stop for a photo moment after formalizing the accord that will send DSU faculty to teach there. DSU President Dr. Harry L. Williams and Dr. Alton Thompson, provost and vice president of Academic Affairs, recently returned from China where new accords were signed with Ningbo University of Technology, Sanming University and Zhaoqing University.   “We had a good meeting of the minds with these three universities,” Dr. Williams said. “We all want the same thing for our students – to provide them the opportunity to grow intellectually by exposing them to other cultures, something we have agreed to work together to make happen.”   The agreements with Sanming University and Zhaoqing University facilitate student and faculty exchanges with DSU. About 60 Chinese students from those two institutions will attend DSU in the fall as part of the American Cultural Program, in which the students will take English courses to improve their fluency and also courses in American literature and history.   While in China, Dr. Thompson gave an address at the dedication of the Global Village at Jilin Hauqiao Foreign Language Institute, which entered into a formal agreement with DSU in 2010 and will send students here in the fall. Dr. Thompson impressed the audience of more than 1,000 with his knowledge of Confucius, and left no doubt that the Jilin students would be in good hands at DSU.   “Our number one job is to give our students a quality education, such that they will become well-read, well-spoken, technically proficient, socially responsible and globally competent as productive and contributing citizens in our knowledge-based global society,” Dr. Thompson told the audience.   Another 40 Chinese students from Sanming and Zhaoquig will enroll at DSU in a regular degree program during the upcoming school year. According to Dr. Fengshan Liu, DSU associate vice president of International Affairs who also made the trip to China, many of those degree-seeking students will be enrolled in the University’s MBA program.   Dr. Alton Thompson give an addresses during a Julin Hauqiao Foreign Language Institute event, assisted by an unidentified interpreter. Dr. Williams also formalized an agreement with Ningbo University of Technology that will send DSU accounting faculty to that university to teach courses that will introduce the latest curricula, education resources and teaching methods in the United States in the field of accounting, as well help familiarize Ningbo students with international accounting practices and sound business principles.   Dr. Thompson said the agreements will also result in study abroad opportunities for DSU students in China – an opportunity a group of students has already taken advantage of this month. A group of 15 DSU music and science students traveled to China in late May for a learning experience trip. In addition to a wealth of cultural tours, the science students took a course in ecology and the music students gained an appreciation of the culture through a music course. A group of DSU students on a one-month learning experience in China meet up with the DSU delegation in Shanghai.   Diamond Moore, a junior biology major from Newark, Del., said it was exciting being out of the country for the first time in her life.   “It showed me how similar we are to other cultures,” Ms. Moore said. “We are all human and we all do similar things; it’s just language that divides us.”   Dr. Thompson said such international experience will put DSU students in a better position to make their mark on the world.   “To be world leaders, our students need to have a good perspective of other cultures,” Dr. Thompson said. “Upon graduation, we want our students to be globally competent.”          

Nursing's Dr. Mary Watkins Named Professor Emeritus

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    Dr. Mary P. Watkins has been named professor emeritus in the Department of Nursing by a unanimous vote of the Delaware State University Board of Trustees. Dr. Mary P. Watkins, professor emeritus   Dr. Watkins, who is retiring this year as a full professor, first came to DSU from Coppin State College to serve as a visiting chair in 1993. Although the original plan was for Dr. Watkins to return to Coppin State after one year, she ended up staying at DSU where she immediately became the permanent chair of the Department of Nursing. She would serve in that post from 1993-2006 and would continue as a faculty member until her retirement in 2011.   Her impact was felt immediately soon after she became the permanent chair. In 1994 under her leadership, the Bachelor of Nursing Program was enriched by the development of a pathophysiology and pharmacology course, which was also developed into an advance course level for the graduate program.   During her tenure as chair, the department established a Master of Science in Nursing that offers an advanced practice clinical specialty in public health nursing and role development in nursing teaching education. Also developed during her tenure is an additional specialty area in advanced adult health nursing.   Under her leadership, the DSU Department of Nursing has been awarded two national accreditations with the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (eight-year periods, 1995-2003 and 2003-2011) and the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (10-year, 2003-2013). Her leadership also led to the full accreditation of the Master of Science in Nursing (2007-2012, the maximum five-year period). Dr. Watkins has contributed 15 articles over the years for professional and academic nursing publications, and has begun writing a textbook in pathophysiology in advanced practice nursing. The former nursing chair joins four others who are living DSU professor emeriti -- Dr. Kenneth Bell, former dean of the College of Agriculture and Related Science and University provost and vice president of Academic Affairs; Dr. William Flayhart, former chair of the Department of History, Political Science and Philosophy; Dr. Gustav Ofosu, former chair of the Department of Biology; and Dr. Warren Rhodes, former director of the Psychology Graduate Program.    

New Student Center Complex Dedicated

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(L-r) DSU President Harry L. Williams, Dr. Claibounre D. Smith, DSU Board of Trustees chairman, and the Rev. Walter Fauntroy, the event's keynote speaker, display the wall plaque for the new Martin Luther King Student Center. A photo gallery of the event can be seen by clicking on /administration/gallery-mlk-building-dedication-featuring-rev-walter-fauntroy.

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  Delaware State University christened its new Student Center Complex with a Feb. 25 Dedication Ceremony in its new Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center, ushering in a new era of campus life for the institution. The dedication of the Complex – which includes the Strength & Conditioning Facility, the Wellness & Recreation Center with its connected swimming pool, and the MLK Student Center – combined the event with DSU’s annual observances of Martin Luther King’s Birthday and the University’s Founders’ Day. The Rev. Walter Fauntroy gave the keynote address.   The Honorable Walter Fauntroy, civil right activist and former U.S. congressman, gave the keynote address. Rev. Fauntroy worked with Dr. King in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference at the height of the civil rights movement in the 1960s.   Rev. Fauntroy said he was elated that Martin Luther King Jr. would remain the namesake title of the Student Center at DSU.   “My hope and belief is when they write the history of the Obama era, they will write that there lived at DSU great faculty and students who worked to finish the goal of Martin Luther King – to redeem the soul of America,” Dr. Fauntroy said. “We can live together if we follow Martin Luther King’s dream, which is rooted in the American Dream.”   Remarks were also given during the ceremony by DSU President Harry Lee Williams; Kathleen Charlot, current DSU Student Government Association (SGA) president; Leroy Tate, Delaware State College alumnus and the 1968 SGA president; Dr. Claibourne Smith, chairman of the DSU Board of Trustees; and Diedre Ottley, DSU Alumni Association president.   “With a student population of more than 3,600, we can proudly say that with the completion of the Student Center Complex, the University is providing an outstanding campus life infrastructure for its students,” Dr. Williams said. “These structures join the Education and Humanities Theatre, the Longwood Auditorium and other facilities at DSU to provide an unparalleled capacity for college life.”   Dr. Claibourne D. Smith, chairman of the DSU Board of Trustees, said that the Student Center Complex will make students’ experience at DSU more meaningful. “We understand that the intellectual, emotional and social growth they experience will come not only from the academic classrooms, but from the overall campus life to which they are exposed,” said Dr. Smith, who also served as acting president from September 2008 to January 2010. “We believe with the completion of the Student Center Complex, we have greatly enhanced the environment for that growth.” (L-r) Dr. Claibourne D. Smith and DSU President Harry L. Williams cut the ribbon for the Student Center Complex, while the University's First Lady Robin S. Williams and Dover Mayor Carlton Carey Sr. look on.   The DSU Concert Choir provided a particularly poignant moment during the event with its moving performance of the medley “His Light Still Shines.” The 81-member choir -- directed by Dr. Curtis Powell, director of Choral Activities, positioned themselves along each aisle and the back section of the auditorium, alternating their singing with an oratory that focused on how Dr. King’s light still shines at DSU. A number of people in attendance could be seen wiping tears from their eyes by the end of the performance.   In addition to the ribbon cutting ceremony, University opened a 1968 time capsule that had been embedded in the cornerstone of the original Martin Luther King Student Center and extracted during its demolition. That time capsule contained items that were related to a May 10, 1968 Dedication Ceremony for that original student center.   Items for a new time capsule have been collected to be placed in the cornerstone of the new MLK Student Center. Those items will include letters from Dr. Williams and DSU Board of Trustees Chairman Claibourne D. Smith, photos, campus publications, a current campus map, a brick from the original MLK Student Center, an undergraduate studies Viewbook, a 2009 Homecoming guide, yearbooks and several other items that reflective of campus life in the current era.   The completed 54,000 square foot Wellness & Recreation Center includes dual basketball courts with seating areas and men and women’s locker rooms on the first floor. The second floor has a variety of Lifestyle weight machines and free weights as well as a running track that winds around the exercise areas and overlooks the basketball courts on the floor below. The facility also has a juice bar with tables and seating, as well as areas for aerobic and other fitness classes.   The Wellness Center & Recreation Center – finished in the summer of 2009 – was the second phase of a $22.5 million project that began with the fall 2008 completion of the first phase’s Strength & Conditioning Facility for student-athletes. That facility features a large Division I-A weight training area and modern locker rooms for Hornet teams.   Connected to the Wellness & Recreation Center is a $5.6 million swimming facility that connects to the Wellness Center’s locker rooms. The recreation pool features a fountain at its center, three lap lanes, an inter-pool bench with water jets, and four inter-pool basketball hoops. The swimming pool was completed in the fall of 2009.   The Wellness & Recreation Center was recently recognized among seven indoor facilities in the country to be awarded the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association’s 2010 Outstanding Sports Facility Award. The DSU Concert Choir provided a memorable musical moment with their rendition of "His Light Still Shines."   The Complex project culminated with the late 2009 completion of the new Martin Luther King, Jr. Student Center. It is about three times the size of the previous one-floor MLK Student Center that existed from 1967 to 2006. The $23.4 million facility provides students with more space then ever to spend their social time, conduct their organizational activities, while at the same time giving the community a new facility for holding events. The first floor of the Student Center features an Austin Grill dining facility, which includes a Tex Mex menu that may be enjoyed in an abundant seating area. The first floor also has an enlarged DSU Bookstore and Post Office, vast open lounge areas and a modest stage. The Student Center’s second floor includes a large 7,656 square foot-auditorium that may be partitioned into three separated areas or it may be a large single area where dances, concerts or other types of large gatherings may be held. In addition, the second floor also includes a game room, a meeting room and open and closed lounge areas. The Student Center’s third floor provides ample office meeting spaces for the Student Government Association’s Executive Council, The Hornet student newspaper, Mr. and Miss DSU, and the Graduate Studies Council. The third floor also includes the administrative offices of Student Leadership & Activities, Career Planning, Judicial Affairs, Auxiliary Services, as well as the Office of the Vice President of Student Affairs. The primary architects for the project were Holzman, Moss, Bottino Architecture (HMBA) of New York, N.Y., and the construction management firm was EdiS Company of Wilmington, Del. Leroy Tate, 1968 SGA president, lifts up an item from the 1968 time capsule while Brenda Farmer(far right), event emcee, describes it for the audience. Joining Mr. Tate on stage are fellow 1968 classmates (l-r) Peggy Trout, Vivian King and Pat Randolph.   HMBA and DSU worked together to develop a et of environmentally-responsible goals for the project. Sustainable features incorporated into the final design included the implementation of a waste management program for demolition of the original student center, reduced disturbance to the site, use of regional and natural materials, a natural ventilation system for lounge and dining areas, large overhangs at the south and west sides to reduce heat consumption, reduction of net to gross area ratio by providing efficient circulation, light-colored roofs to reduce solar gain, as well as the use of salvaged bricks.

DSU Names 2011 Faculty Excellence Award Recipients

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The 2011 DSU Faculty Excellence Award recipients: (l-r) Dr. Mazen Shahin, Dr. Venu Kalavacharla, Dr. Nicola Edwards-Omolewa and Dr. Dahlia Jackson-O'Brien, all holding the award they each individually received.

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        Dr. Nicola Edwards-Omolewa holds the FEA plaque she and the other recipients received.     Delaware State University has named four faculty members as the institution’s 2011 Faculty Excellence Award recipients.   The University has selected the below faculty members in the following categories of Teaching, Research/Creative Activities, University/Community Service and Advising:   Faculty Excellence in Teaching Dr. Nicola Edwards-Omolewa, assistant professor of mathematics, has been recognized for her outstanding contributions to program and curriculum development, as well as her dedication to teaching and student development. She has a student-centered teaching philosophy that is innovative yet still directed toward the basic learning and understanding of mathematics.   She serves as the coordinator for K-8 math courses for teachers – incorporating a curriculum that she co-designed – and has initiated an undergraduate teaching assistant program for math majors. Her dedication to teaching is apparent by her involvement in reforming the curriculum and improving the quality of educations provided by the department.       Dr. Venu Kalavacharla Faculty Excellence in Research and Creative Activities Dr. Venu Kalavacharla, associate professor of plant science, has established a Plant Molecular Genetics & Genomics Laboratory that serves as a resource center for the College of Agriculture and Related Sciences and the University. He has submitted a number of successfully funded research proposals totaling $5.2 million and is the DSU principal investigator for the Delaware EPSCoR program funded by the National Science Foundation.    Recently, Dr. Kalavacharla spearheaded the establishment of the Center for Integrated Biological and Environmental Research in collaboration with Delaware Technical and Community College and Wesley College.           Dr. Dahlia Jackson-O'Brien Faculty Excellence in University and Community Service Dr. Dahlia Jackson-O’Brien, assistant professor of animal science, conducts applied research to assist local and regional sheep and goat farmers to produce healthy animals. She has planned, coordinated and presented at 30 regional and national programs over the past four years, serving approximately 5,500 youth and adults.    She is a contributor to a regional newsletter and was the recipient of the 2008 Directors Spirit Award and the DSU Cooperative Extension Employee of the Year award. She also serves on a number of departmental and University committees and has mentored 33 high school, undergraduate and graduate students.             Dr. Mazen Shahin Faculty Excellence in Advising Dr. Mazen Shahin, professor of mathematics, is the director of several student-centered funded projects including Bridge to Doctorate (BTD), Sciences and Math Initiative for Learning Enrichment, Alliance for Minority Participation and Science and Technology Academy for Residence Scholars. He has served as an advisor for 41 graduate students in the NSF-funded BTD program. His responsibilities include indentifying and working with faculty co-advisors and departmental chairpersons to ensure the student’s successful completion of the program and transition into Ph.D. programs.   His success as an advisor and dedication to students is apparent in the success rate of students completing the BTD program. Dr. Shahin regularly attends on and off campus advisement trainings and surveys students to determine how to better meet their advising needs.    Each recipient received a monetary award of $2,500.  

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