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DSU Reduces 2013 Summer Undergraduate Course Tuition Rates

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Undergraduate students will pay the DSU cashiers less for 2013 summer sessions courses, which has been reduced by 35%.

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The Delaware State University Board of Trustees recently approved a 35% reduction in the cost of 2013 undergraduate summer session courses.   The in-state rate this summer will drop from $273 down to $177 per credit hour. The out-of-state summer rate will decrease from $620 to $403.   The reduction – which only applies to undergraduate courses –  will be for both Summer Session I (May 21 to June 27) and  Summer Session II (July 1 to Aug. 8). There is no change in the current per credit hour rates for graduate or doctoral summer courses (in-state graduate – $417; out-of-state graduate – $920; in-state/out-of-state doctoral – $528)/   Dr. Eric A. Cheek, DSU director of Summer School and Summer Programs,  said with this reduction, students can take three courses for less than the price of two during the regular term.   “Many of our students and families are struggling, and as a caring University we need to help them in any way we can,” Dr. Cheek said. “By reducing the undergraduate summer rates by 35%, we are giving students the opportunity to get ahead, catch up or just stay on track and save on their total cost.”   The DSU Board of Trustees approved the summer undergraduate course reduction during its March 18 regular quarterly meeting.  

DSU Computer Science/Info Technology Receives Federal Certification

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Dr. Hongxin Hu, an assistant professor of computer science and information technology who coordinated DSU's application for certification with the National Security Agency, assists computer science student Niya Lester in a computer science class.

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DSU Computer Science and Information Technology Program has recently been certified as meeting federal training standards that are necessary to produce the computer and information technology personnel needed in the current cyber space environment. The Information Assurance Courseware Evaluation (IACE) program of the National Security Agency (NSA) has certified that Delaware State University courseware meets all of the elements of the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) National Training Standards for: Information Systems Security (INFOSEC) Professionals, NSTISSI No. 4011 System Administrators (SA), CNSSI No. 4013 Entry Level This certification adds a tremendous value to DSU's undergraduate computer science and information technology degrees in that an NSA certificate can now be given to each graduate who completes the set of courseware. In addition, it brings DSU one step closer to being designated as a national Center of Excellence in Information Assurance Education. The goal of IACE Program is to provide consistency in training and education for the information assurance skills that are critical to our nation. IACE systematically assesses the degree to which courseware from commercial, government, and academic sources maps to the national standards set by CNSS. With the ever-increasing threat of cyber-attacks to government and commercial networks, this certification will help DSU CS and IT graduates to fill the critical needs for cyber experts to safeguard systems and eliminate vulnerabilities.

DSU to Present the Musical "Ain't Misbehavin' April 4-5

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(l-r) Ain’t Misbehavin’ music director Dr. David Tolley rehearses with Andrew Hazzard and Brandi Hydleburg.

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Ain’t Misbehaving cast – (l-r) Paul Maniweather, LeAndrea Johnson, Tyrone Johnson Jr., Brandi Hydleburg, Deryl Wynn, Jazmin Salberrios and Andrew Hazzard.   Delaware State University’s Theatre Program will presents “Ain’t Misbehaving,” the 1978 Tony Award winner for Best Musical, at 7:30 p.m. nightly Thursday and Friday, April 4-5 in the Education and Humanities Theatre on campus.   The production is free and open to the public.   The musical showcases DSU students Brandi Hydleburg, Andrew Hazzard, Tyrone Ashley Jr., Paul Meniweather, Deryl Wynn, Jazmin Salberrios and LeAndrea Johnson   The production is a salute to the Harlem Renaissance stride piano musician Thomas “Fats” Waller and features a number of his songs such as Ain’t Misbehavin’, Honeysuckle Rose, T’ain’t Nobody’s Business, Black and Blues, and many more.   The production’s director is Dr. Shirlyn Henry Brown and the music director is Dr. David Tolley.

DSU to Hold Weight Management Strategies Conference April 5-6

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The Weight Management Strategies Conference will be held in the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center on the DSU campus.

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Delaware State University’s College of Education, Health & Public Policy will host a Weight Management Strategies Conference on April 5-6 in the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center.   Under the theme of “Obesity doesn’t have to be a Delaware Epidemic,” the conference will include health care professionals, community advocates, service providers and members of the public for an educational event that will focus on strategies for overcoming the First State’s obesity problem.   The conference is taking place during National Public Health Week.   In 2011, about 29 percent of adults in Delaware were obese, according to a study by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Trust for America’s Health. This earns the state 19th place among all states and Washington, D.C., for the percentage of obese adults, those with a body mass index of 30 or higher, in a report from the two organizations called “F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America’s Future 2012.”   According to the study, if the state’s obesity rate continues on its current path, 65 percent of Delaware adults will be obese by 2030, earning the First State third place for the highest obesity rate.   Dr. Frederick K. Asinor, dean of DSU’s College of Education, Health and Public Policy, says that the level of obesity in Delaware is unacceptable because this is a disease that something can be done about.   “It is a consequence of our choices. And many of those choices are made passively, in a comfortable but rigor-free environment,” Dr. Asinor said. “So we can prevent obesity by excising and reducing our fat, sugar and salt intake knowing that these are products that are linked directly to obesity, heart disease, cancer and stroke, among other killer diseases.” -more- The conference is designed to facilitate the creation and the implementation of weight management strategies for communities, companies or organizations that reduce the incidence and prevalence of obesity.   The conference will include as a keynote speaker Dr. Calvin B. Johnson, founder and president of the Altre Strategic Solutions Group, LLC, and the 24th Secretary for Health of Pennsylvania, as well as special guest of honor Dr. J Nadine Gracia, deputy assistant secretary for Minority Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.   The conference will also feature a number of health and social work professionals from the Mid-Atlantic Region, including:   Hank Cardello – director of Obesity Solutions, Hudson Institute Dr. Donna M. Christensen –member of the U.S. House of Representatives (U.S. Virgin Islands), Congressional Black Caucus’ Health Braintrust Dr. Jodi Dampeer-Moore – associate professor, DSU Dept. of Nursing Dr. Susan M. Gross – research associate, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Dr. Erica M. Jackson – associate professor, DSU Dept. of Public & Allied Health Sciences Dr. Tina L. Jordan – professor, DSU Dept. of Social Work Rich Killingworth – chief of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Del. Division of Public Health Dr. Giridhar Mallya – director of Policy and Planning, Philadelphia Dept. of Health Megan A. Maloney – visiting professor of movement science, DSU Dept. of Public & Allied Health Sciences Mary Kate Mouser – executive director, Nemours Health and Prevention Services Terry M. Murphy – president and CEO, Bayhealth Medical Center Dr. Karyl Thomas Rattay – director of the Del. Division of Public Health Dr. Margo Wooten – director of Nutrition Policy, Center for Science in the Public Interest      

Concert Choir, President at DSU Day at Legislature - Photo Slideshow

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The DSU Concert Choir performed for the first time ever before the Delaware Senate in its Legislative Hall chamber on March 26. The choir also performed for the state House of Representatives.

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It was Delaware State University Day at the state Legislative Hall on March 26, which was marked by performances by the DSU Concert Choir and a visit by DSU President Harry L. Williams along other DSU officials and alumni. The DSU Concert Choir has annually performed for the House of Representatives in its chamber, but on this day for the first time ever, the choir also sang for the Delaware Senate in a separate performance in that chamber as well. The choir performed the songs “Steal Away,” “A Witness,” and “Rise, Shine for the Light is Coming.” For images of the DSU Day, click on the below slide show of photos:

Del. Secretary of Ag Ed Kee to Speak at DSU April 4

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                   Ed Kee The Dean’s Seminar Series of the College of Agriculture and Related Science will feature Delaware Secretary of Agriculture Ed Kee as a guest speaker on the topic “Delaware Agriculture Today: The Intersection of Science, Policy and 200 Years of Tradition” at 3 p.m. Thursday, April 4 in room 111 of the Ag Annex Building on campus. Secretary Kee, a noted agriculture historian, will highlight the growth and successes of the First State’s farming history from peach orchards to the modern poultry industry. He will discuss the accomplishments of Delaware’s No. 1 industry – with an $8 billion economic value – that the challenges still ahead.

DSU presents Jefferson historian Henry Wiencek in Guest Lecture April 2

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           Henry Wiencek DSU will present journalist, historian and author Henry Wiencek in a guest lecture at 11 a.m. Tuesday, April 2 in the Room 309 of the Bank of America Building on campus. Mr. Wiencek is an acclaimed journalist, historian and author. His 1999 book The Hairstons: An American Family in Black and White won the National Book Critics Award. His 2003 book An Imperfect God: George Washington, His Slaves and the Creation of America won the Los Angeles Times Book Award for History. His most recent work Master of the Mountain: Thomas Jefferson and his Slaves (2012) has spawned a lively debate on the founding fathers and the legacy of slavery in America, and will be the subject of his guest lecture at DSU. The guest lecture is co-sponsored by the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences and the Department of History, Political Science and Philosophy.

Jenkins and Evers Hall Compete in Green Games Competition

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(L-r) Eboni Church, Lennea Davis, Madeline Porter all of Jenkins Hall; DSU President Harry L. Williams, Eboni Wimbush of Johnson Controls, and Evers Hall's Rie Green, Diamond Wade, Megan; along with Chanel Paul, president of the DSU Green Ambassadors, gather to launch the start of the Green Games.

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The students of Evers and Jenkins residence halls are facing off in DSU’s first-ever Green Games competition in which the dormitory that is the most energy efficient and shows the most passion for environmental responsible practices will win the contest. (L-r) Bob Steele of Johnson Controls; Vita Pickrum, DSU Sustainability Committee chair; Amir Mohammadi, DSU executive vice president; Judy Mouton and Lisa Brown of Johnson Controls; Carolyn Curry, vice president of Institutional Advancement; and Eboni Wimbush of Johnson Controls, gathered to take part in the Green Games announcement on March 19 in the MLK Student Center on campus. Between March 19 and April 18, the amount of electricity used will be measured in each residential hall. Students will work to reduce its energy consumption by unplugging electric components in the residential hall for at least an hour each day. Evers and Jenkins will also be judged by its use of social media to promote green practices as well as its attendance at a March 22 green lecture by Dr. Bradley Skelcher, DSU associate provost. The Green Games are being jointly coordinated by the University and Johnson Controls, a company that has installed technological enhancements at DSU over the last couple of years that has resulted in energy reductions and savings for the University. “It is a great opportunity for students to take an active part in DSU’s Go Green efforts and to show some pride being environmental steward,” said Vita Pickrum, the chair of the DSU Sustainability Committee. The energy efficiency performance of Evers and Jenkins throughout the one-month competition can be monitored by going to www.bedashboard.com/kiosk/54. The winning residential hall will be announced on Earth Day, April 18 and will receive a prize to be determined by the University by the end of the competition. 

Alumni Visit the Hornets Fan Pride Center at the 2013 MEAC -- Photo Slideshow

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Jimmie and Tina Strong were honored with the 2013 Delaware State University Distinguished Alumni Award 

Photos by Carlos Holmes

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DSU alumni and supporters attend the Hornets Fan Pride Center at the Norfolk Plaza Downtown Hotel during the 2013 MEAC Tournament. For images from the event click on the photo slideshow below:

DSU Participates in the Final Day of Harriet Tubman Celebration

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DSU President Harry Williams (center) along with his family join the other participants -- members of Iota Phi Theta, the DSU women's track team, the DSU Alumni Association, as well as members of Dover High School -- of a 14-mile relay run in celebration of Harriet Tubman and the path she took through Delaware to free slaves from the south.

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DSU President Harry L. Williams passes the batons to the first two runners -- DSU students Malik Bazemore and Markland Turner -- to symbolically launch the 14-mile relay run commemorating the path Harriet Tubman took through Delaware to bring slaves to freedom. Delaware State University gave strong representation at the final day of the “Ten for the Tenth” celebration of Harriett Tubman as the DSU First Family was joined by members of DSU fraternity Iota Phi Theta, the DSU Women’s Track Team, the DSU Alumni Association as well as members of Dover High School for the commemorative relay run event in Kent County. DSU President Harry L. Williams, along with his wife Dr. Robin Williams and their two sons Austin and Gavin, met the group at Brecknock Park in Camden where the participants gathered to be transported to Sandtown, Del., the starting point of the 14-relay run. Dr. Williams spoke to the group, commending them on their involvement in keeping the memory of Harriet Tubman alive and talking about the significance of the Underground Railroad's "Moses," and then symbolically passed the batons to the first two runners. The DSU president ran part of the relay, making the event part of his normal daily run. Dr. Williams is known for beginning each day early in the morning by running five miles around the campus. The final day of the Ten for the Tenth commemoration marked the 100th anniversary of Harriet Tubman's death, who died on March 10, 1913 in Auburn, N.Y. Ms. Tubman is known for her daring resistance to slavery as the “conductor” of the Underground Railroad, through which she helped countless slaves escape from their southern captivity to achieve their freedom. Delaware was particularly significant in Ms. Tubman’s journey, as the Underground Railroad came through the First State through Sandtown and Camden and on northward. A similar event was also held in New Castle County, with both events tracking the newly established Delaware Harriet Tubman Byway. The primary organizers of the final day event in Kent County were Penny Marshall, a retired U.S. public defender, and her parents and DSU alumni Frank and Mary Marshall.

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