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Tommie Smith to Speak at Delaware State University

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Tommie Smith, one of the two figures in the iconic photo of the Black Power salute during the 1968 Olympics, will speak at Delaware State University in a presentation entitled “Civil Discourse and Silent Gestures” at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 24 in the Education & Humanities Theatre on campus.

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Tommie Smith, one of the two figures in the iconic photo of the Black Power salute during the 1968 Olympics, will speak at Delaware State University in a presentation entitled “Civil Discourse and Silent Gestures” at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 24 in the Education & Humanities Theatre on campus. The event is free and open to the public. During the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, Tommie Smith broke the world and Olympic records with a time of 19.83 seconds and became the 200-meter Olympic champion. As the Star Spangled Banner was played, Tommie Smith and John Carlos stood wearing their Olympic medals, each with a raised a clinched fist covered in a black leather glove in a stand for human rights, liberation and solidarity. The act was captured in a powerful iconic photo that is among the most famous Olympic moments. This act propelled Tommie Smith into the spotlight as a human rights spokesman, activist, and symbol of African American pride at home and abroad. Tommie Smith has made a commitment to dedicate his life to champion the cause of oppressed people. He has written about his 1968 Olympic experience as well as his life before and after in his 2007 autobiography Silent Gesture, copies of which will be available at the event. Mr. Smith will be available to sign copies of his book after his presentation.

New Economic Dev. Leadership Institute Launched at DSU

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DSU’s University Center for Economic Development and International Trade (UCEDIT) has launched a new Economic Development Leadership Institute to cultivate future global business leaders from among DSU students.

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DSU’s University Center for Economic Development and International Trade (UCEDIT) has launched a new Economic Development Leadership Institute to cultivate future global business leaders from among DSU students. The new initiative, led by the Dr. Michael Casson, director of both the UCEDIT and the Leadership Institute, and Wade Robinson, assistant director of the Leadership Institute, has selected four DSU students to be the inaugural fellows – Zachary Corrothers, Maurice Harris III, India Keal and Jamal Maddox. In February 2015, Dr. Casson wrote the below article in the U.S. Economic Development Administration Newsletter about the implementation and projected outcomes of the institute.   Spotlight: The Economic Development Leadership Institute February 2015 Newsletter of the U.S. Economic Development Administration Guest Column by Michael Casson Director, University Center for Economic Development and International Trade (UCEDIT) Associate Professor of Economics, Delaware State University The economic development challenges faced by the U.S. are often concentrated in communities plagued by low educational attainment, high crime rates, low income levels and limited financial and physical capital. These communities are disenfranchised and underrepresented in the public arena and can be found in both urban and rural environments. Delaware State University's (DSU) student population represents many of the urban environments of the Northeast that are both disenfranchised and underrepresented. Thus, the question was, "How do we identify and train tomorrow's economic development leaders?" More specifically, "How do we empower the youth in our most economically challenged communities with the prerequisite skills for successful economic development within their own community?" DSU’s Center for Economic Development and International Trade (UCEDIT) is a recent recipient of the Economic Development Administration’s (EDA) University Center award. The purpose of this funding is to leverage the resources of the University to support the economic development initiatives of the State of Delaware. The success of UCEDIT, as well as other entities throughout the country with the same charge, is contingent on the development of young economic development leaders who are often products of these environments. The economic development, growth and sustainability of a community are contingent on both economic development education and leadership. With this thought in mind, UCEDIT, with the support of DSU's Agriculture Extension program, founded the Economic Development and Leadership Institute (EDLI). The purpose of the EDLI is to provide underrepresented students with theoretical, practical and experiential learning in the field of economic development while introducing and cultivating the tenants of effective leadership in developing economies both domestic and abroad. Since its inception in the Spring of 2014, UCEDIT has garnered key partnerships from the International Economic Development Council (IEDC); the City of Dover, Del.; the Kent County, Del. Economic Partnership; the Delaware Economic Development Office; the City of Wilmington, Del; the City of Smyrna, Del.; and the City of Milford, Del. Their economic development training includes the following key components: Economic Development Training: EDLI Fellows are receiving their primary economic development training (six courses in total) from the International Economic Development Council (IEDC). The Fellows have already completed the Introduction to Economic Development and Business Retention and Expansion courses. UCEDIT Fellow: Fellows transition from Junior Fellows to Senior Fellows within EDLI (from year 1 to year 2). Fellows are currently supporting research and outreach projects identified by UCEDIT throughout the course of the academic year.  Internship: Junior Fellows will be placed in an internship during the summer following their first year with one of our partnering economic development agencies mentioned above. The internship will require Junior Fellows to commit 20 hours/week for eight weeks. JUICE Chapter: Fellows are currently in the process of chartering the first Juxtopia Urban Innovation and Cooperative Entrepreneurship (JUICE) chapter at DSU. The JUICE chapter is a college/university organization that trains students with urban entrepreneurship skills required to innovate and commercialize high-tech products from their institution and that solve some of the most “painful” problems afflicting surrounding communities.  Experiential Learning: Fellows tour economic development initiatives throughout the region with the leading economic development professionals responsible for the project’s completion. The Fellows have toured downtown Baltimore, MD and learned about the economic development strategies. Several more tours are scheduled for this year. Speaker Series: Fellows are engaged by leading economic development professionals in the country through our guest lectures series. Travel Abroad: Senior Fellows will be afforded an opportunity to travel abroad to countries in Western Africa to apply their economic development knowledge to real-life development efforts. Fellows are currently supporting a team of leading researchers in their evaluations of a Trade Hub in the ECOWAS region of Western Africa.

Kenneth A. Carter Named New DSU Football Head Coach

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Athletics Director Candy Young (l) and DSU President Harry L. Williams (right) welcome new Hornet football Head Coach Kenneth “Kenny” A. Carter during a Jan. 21 media event.
 

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DSU President Harry L. Williams has named Kenneth A. Carter as the new head coach of the Hornet football program. Dr. Williams and Athletics Director Candy Young introduced the new head coach during a Jan. 21 press event held on campus in the University’s Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center. “With this head coaching appointment, a fresh new chapter is beginning for the Hornet football program,” said Dr. Williams. “We are excited about the future, not only concerning what this will mean for DSU on the football field, but also in terms of the overall success of our student-athletes.” Coach Kenneth A. Carter explained his student-athlete-focused priorities during the press event The new Hornets football head coach inherits a team that was 2-10 overall and finished 10th in the MEAC with a 2-6 league record this past season. Athletics Director Young said Coach Carter has a proven record of success. “I believe he will bring that energy and motivation to the Hornet football team.” She added that the head coach selection was consistent with the University’s Strategic Plan goal of Student Success, as “Coach Carter is very enthusiastic about the total growth of our young men.” Coach Carter said he is “extremely excited” about this new chapter in his football career. “There are only 250 such opportunities in Division I football, so it is truly a blessing,” he said. The incoming coach added that his coaching priorities are to be “fundamentally sound, thorough and ensure that the team understands that physicality, proficiency and energy will not be compromised.” Coach Carter assumes his new head coaching post after serving during the 2014 football season in multiple assistant coaching positions for Youngstown State University in Ohio – as wide receiver coach, coordinator of passing game and co-coordinator of special teams. Prior to that, Coach Carter served as a running backs coach and special teams coordinator for the University of Louisville from 2010-2014. During those years, Louisville was the Big East Champion in 2012 and co-champion of that conference in 2011 and made three bowl appearances, including the Sugar Bowl in 2013. From 2008-2010, Coach Carter was an assistant running back coach for the University of Florida, which was the BCS National Champion in 2008. From 2001-2003, Coach Carter also served as the recruiting coordinator for running backs for Vanderbilt University in Tennessee. In addition, between 1990-2000 he held assistant coaching posts at Penn State University, the University of Pittsburgh, Louisiana State University, Furman University, as well as at his alma mater The Citadel (Military College of South Carolina). In 1997, he completed an NFL internship as a defensive assistant under Miami Dolphins Head Coach Jimmy Johnson. Coach Carter was a four-year letterman as an inside linebacker for The Citadel, during which time he was the college’s 1989 Special Teams Player of the Year. At that same school, he earned a Bachelor of Science in Health and Exercise Science in 1990.  

DSU and MLK Jr. Day -- Photo Slideshow

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The DSU Concert Choir performed at the 23rd annual Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Prayer Breakfast at the Modern Maturity Center in Dover.

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Although classes were not held Jan.19 in honor of the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday, the University was still very active in the two community events that celebrated the civil rights leader. The DSU Concert Choir performed at the annual Alpha Phi Alpha MLK Jr. Prayer Breakfast, where DSU President Harry L. Williams and a group of administrators and faculty were in attendance. That was followed by the 12 noon annual MLK Jr. Program in the Education and Humanities Theatre at DSU. For images from both events, click on the below link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157650371537561/show The entire Delaware congressional delegation – U.S. Senators Tom Carper and Chris Coons and U.S. Rep. John Carney – as well as State Sen. Brian Bushweller and Dover Mayor Robin Christiansen attended the program at DSU and gave remarks. The event also featured the Sankofa African Dance Company, the Sankofa String Orchestra, the Mt. Zion AME Church Children’s Choir and praise dancer Ms. Jasmine Roberts, also of Mt. Zion. The keynote speaker at the DSU program was James Collins, the Chief Information Officer for the state of Delaware and also a minister at Victory Christian Fellowship of Dover

Toyota Financial Services Donates $10,000 to DSU

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(L-r) Kevin Shuman of Toyota; James Shaw of Morehouse College; Cheryl Hitchcock of Morgan State Univ.; Morgan State Univ. President David Wilson; John Ridgeway of Toyota, DSU President Harry L. Williams; Dr. Richard L. Lucas Jr. of Bowie State Univ.; and Edward Cornwell III of Howard Univ., all stand with the display check representing the total of $50,000 donated to the five HBCUs from Toyota.

 

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In honor of the life and vision of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Toyota Financial Services (TFS) announced Jan. 16 that it has made a donation of $10,000 to Delaware State University as part of a total of $50,000 the automobile producer awarded to five Historically Black Colleges & Universities (HBCUs).   In addition to DSU, Toyota Financial Services also presented $10,000 each to four other HBCUs – Bowie State University, Howard University, Morehouse College and Morgan State University. All five institutions are recognized by TFS as providers of exceptional educational opportunities within many of the communities in which TFS operates. DSU President Harry L. Williams (l) chats with Morgan State President David Wilson during the Jan. 16 check presentation event at Toyota Financial Services at their site in Owings Mills, Md. DSU President Harry L. Williams traveled to TFS’s site in Owings Mills, Md., to join representatives of the other schools in celebrating the generosity of Toyota. The DSU president noted that Toyota’s financial support is in the spirit of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., as its donation helps students perpetuate the great civil rights leader’s dream for all generations of students. “Such support is so vitally important for our students at DSU as well as the other HBCUs,” said Dr. Williams. “This donation from Toyota enhances our efforts to keep our students on track to fulfill their academic and professional aspirations.”   Mike Groff, TSF president and CEO, said that Dr. King observed that “Education must enable a man to become more efficient, to achieve with increasing facility the legitimate goals of life.” Mr. Groff said TSF’s donations help further the principles Dr. King championed and are consistent with TFS’ deeply held commitment to diversity and inclusion, “TFS is honored to support the mission of HBCUs and the dreams they help make possible,” the TFS president said. “In the years since we launched our Making Life Easier program to support education initiatives, after-school programs and financial literacy among underserved youth, TFS has provided millions of dollars in scholarships to deserving students across the nation and our associates have devoted their time and talents to many meaningful national- and community-based programs,” noted John Ridgeway, corporate manager, Customer Service Center - East for TFS, who presented the donations to each institution on behalf of the company. “As an extension of our existing relationship with HBCUs, including a partnership with the Toyota Green Initiative, we believe our contribution to these fine institutions will help them with the critical task of addressing issues that impact student retention and will help create a bright future for the populations they serve.” Mr. Ridgeway is also a DSU alumnus who earned a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration in 1975 from then-Delaware State College.   TFS has been recognized for its longstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion, including being named as a DiversityInc Top 50 company for six years in a row and has been consistently recognized by other related publication as a best company for diversity and best places to work.  For more information about Toyota's commitment to diversity and inclusion, please visit www.toyota.com/diversity.  

Dr. Smith Steps Down as Board Chair; Turner Succeeds Him

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Dr. Claibourne Smith, who during the Jan. 15 board meeting announced that he is stepping down immediately as board chair, receives a standing ovation after it was announced that the University’s Administration Building is being renamed after him. Dr. Smith will continue to serve as a board member until his term expires in 2016.

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Dr. Claibourne D. Smith, who has been the chair of Delaware State University’s Board of Trustees since 1992, announced at the Jan. 15 regular board meeting that he is stepping down as head of that DSU governance body, effective immediately. Dr. Claibourne Smith (l), who stepped down as chair of the DSU Board of Trustees on Jan. 15, passes the gavel to David Turner, who the board immediately elected as his successor. Immediately after Dr. Smith’s announcement, the trustee members proceeded to nominate and unanimously elect David Turner as the new board chair and Barry Granger as the vice chair. In honor of Dr. Smith and his more than 25 years of service on the board and 22 years as chairman, the board also voted unanimously to rename the building where the meeting took place as the Claibourne D. Smith Administration Building. Although he stepped down as chair, Dr. Smith said he will continue as an active board member until his term expires in 2016. He noted that he has always felt that a good leader of any organization should plan for his or her successor. “Several years ago during a meeting of the board, I told them that I can’t be chair forever,” Dr. Smith said. “I said that we have to have someone ready to serve in that role, after me.” Toward that end, Dr. Smith appointed Mr. Turner to be chair of the Development and Investments Committee after he came on the board in 2008. In 2009, Mr. Turner was given the opportunity to serve as acting vice chair, and was later elected permanent vice chair in 2010. “I wanted to see how he would do in those leadership posts and he did well,” Dr. Smith said. “He is a natural to take on the post as chair. As a dedicated alumnus, he will take us places we have never been before.” DSU President Harry L. Williams and new Board Chair David Turner present Dr. Smith with an appreciation award for his long time leadership service to the board and University. Mr. Turner said that Dr. Smith set a good tone on the board through his dedication to the leadership work of the governing body. “Dr. Smith’s mentorship has been very valuable to me,” he said. “It is not easy to share the leadership of an organization, but he has done so openly and willingly.” The naming of the Administration Building after him took Dr. Smith by surprise. “I am deeply honored for this to be bestowed upon me,” Dr. Smith said “I could not have done any of this by myself. This has been a great board that has truly been engaged in the business of this University.” Among the highlights of his long tenure as chair, Dr. Smith pointed especially to the college becoming a university in 1993 and the opportunity to serve 16 months as the acting University president. “Serving as acting president made me a better board chair,” he said. DSU President Harry L. Williams began his report to the board during the meeting by making the name change official and calling the edifice the “Claibourne D. Smith Administration Building.”

GE Nigeria CEO Visits DSU to Explore Future Partnership

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(From l-r) Vita Pickrum, associate vice president of Development; Dr. Alton Thompson, provost and vice president of Academic Affairs; Pamela Hall, managing director of GE Healthcare (Nigeria) and DSU alumna; DSU President Harry L. Williams; Dr. Lazarus A. Angbazo, president and CEO of GE Nigeria; Dr. Noureddine Melikechi, dean of the College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology; and Dr. Dyremple Marsh, dean of the College of Agriculture and Related Sciences.
 

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DSU President Harry L. Williams hosted a Jan. 12 luncheon meeting on campus with Dr. Lazarus A. Angbazo, the CEO and President of GE Nigeria, and Pamela Hall, managing director of GE Healthcare in Nigeria. The meeting was also a homecoming for Ms. Hall, an alumna who earned a BS in Physics and Mathematics from DSU in 1994. Dr. Williams, Dr. Angbazo, Ms. Hall, and other DSU officials explored some internship and training partnership possibilities for GE Nigeria and DSU. Also joining in the lunch discussions were Dr. Alton Thompson, provost and vice president of Academic Affairs; Dr. Noureddine Melikechi, dean of the College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology; Dr. Dyremple Marsh, dean of the College of Agriculture and Related Sciences; Dr. Marsha Horton, College of Education, Health and Public Policy; Vita Pickrum, associate vice president of Development; and Dr. Lisa Dunning, assistant vice president of Alumni Relations. Further discussions will take place toward finalizing future collaborations between the DSU and GE Nigeria.

President & 1st Lady's Holiday Open House -- Photo Slideshow

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Dr. John Austin, associate vice president of Research and Sponsored Programs, is greeted by DSU President Harry L. Williams and his wife Dr. Robin Williams during their annual Holiday Open House, held Dec. 16-17.

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Warm fellowship and good food abounded Dec. 16-17 as DSU President Harry L. Williams and First Lady Robin Williams welcomed faculty and staff to their annual Holiday Open House. For images of the event at the President’s residence, click on the below link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157647496230563/show  

DSU President's Scholarship Ball -- Photo Slideshow

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DSU’s First Family and a legendary international singing star at the President’s Scholarship Ball – (l-r) Gavin and Austin Williams, Dionne Warwick, Dr. Robin Williams and DSU President Harry L. Williams.
 

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The 2014 President’s Scholarship Ball drew more than 400 supporters of student success to the Dec. 13 event. For images of the Scholarship Ball, click on the below photo slideshow: https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157647461871654/show Held in the ballroom of the Dover Downs Hotel and Casino, the President’s Scholarship Ball was emceed by DSU alumna Cathleen Trigg-Jones, an actress, author, and former news anchor and reporter for MY 9 and FOX 5 News-New York. Dr. Harry L. Williams presents the President’s Award to Dionne Warwick after her performance. During the event, the University announced the launch of the public phase of DSU’s $20 million Greater Than One: Campaign for Students. Ms. Trigg-Jones – who graduated in 1992 from then-Delaware State College – followed that by making an impassioned case for financial support for DSU students. That plea led to on-site spontaneous donations of over $20,000 from attendees for scholarship support, bringing the preliminary total raised to over $150,000. The Scholarship Ball reception featured smooth music by the Joe Baione Jazz Sextet, while the Scholarship Ball dinner portion featured the music vocals of renowned Grammy Award-winning singer Dionne Warwick. The dance portion of the night was propelled by the versatile Delaware band Mike Hines and the Look. The event also featured auctioneer Frank Chick, Jr., CEO of Chick’s Farm & Feed Supply, who successfully received over $6,820 in live bids for various items as well as the autographed chair used during Ms. Warwick’s performance. In addition, the Scholarship Ball received support from 18 sponsors, including lead supporters: Premier sponsor –DuPont, Diamond sponsor – Delmarva Power, Platinum sponsor – AstraZeneca, and Gold sponsors – Delaware Today and the Delaware State News. During the event, President’s Community Partner Awards were presented to community activist and DSU supporter Beatrice “Bebe” Coker; Jocelyn Stewart, senior director of Community Investment for Barclaycard US; DSU alumni Donald and Dolores Blakey; and Enid Wallace-Sims, Delmarva Power public affairs manager and DSU alumna. “It was a very good Scholarship Ball,” said DSU President Harry L. Williams. “In addition to exceeding our fundraising goal, we also attracted new friends to the University.” To learn more and support the Greater Than One: Campaign for Students, visit desu.edu/GreaterThanOne.

2014 December Commencement -- Photo Slideshow

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Some 2014 December Commencement graduates take the Alumni Pledge after receiving their diplomas.

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DSU held its 2014 December Commencement on Dec. 13 in the Memorial Hall Gymnasium where more than 200 graduates received their diplomas. For images of the December Commencement, click on the below link followed by more information about the graduation event: https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157649735229911/show Among the 2014 December undergraduates receiving their diplomas, four completed their academic journey as Summa Cum Laude (3.75 GPA and above), 10 as Magna Cum Laude (3.5 to 3.74), 13 as Cum Laude (3.25 to 3.49), and 13 as Honorable Mention (transfer students with 60 or more credit hours at DSU). DSU President Harry L. Williams presented the Presidential Academic Award to Marco Kano, an international student from Bradenburg, Germany, who maintained a 4.0 GPA throughout his entire undergraduate journey. Mr. Kano has completed a Bachelor’s Degree in Engineering Physics. Dr. Williams presented an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters to Beatrice “Bebe” Coker, a community activist in Wilmington and throughout the state of Delaware, as well as a strong supporter of DSU. The DSU president noted that she was instrumental in working with DSU and the State of Delaware to create the Inspire Scholarship, and also has “served as an important advisor to the University on numerous issues, has been an overall champion for the University and has helped raise funds for DSU especially among the churches around the state and in Wilmington in particular.” The keynote speaker was Dr. Walter Kimbrough, president of Dillard University, who alluded to the current activism over the injustices of police actions in Ferguson, Mo. and New York City to challenge the graduates to go beyond simply being involved in the highly visible demonstrations. “The real world needs real leaders concerned real people,” Dr. Kimbrough said. “At some point, the hands are going to go down, Labron (James) and Derrick Rose aren’t going to be wearing warm-up shirts that say ‘I can’t breathe,’ and the 4 to 15-minute die-ins will end; and when that happens, that’s when the real work begins.”    

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