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U.S. Sen. Tom Carper Visits DSU to Highlight Immunizations

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U.S. Sen. Tom Carper talks about the importance of vaccinations during a Immunization Awareness event held Aug. 9 in the DSU Wellness & Recreation Center.

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U.S. Sen. Tom Carper teamed up with Delaware State University and the Delaware Division of Public Health to highlight the importance of immunizations as students prepare to go back to school this month. U.S. Sen. Tom Carper (2nd on left) chats with DSU Student Government Association executive members (l-r) Adrian Sutton, Isaiah McCoy and Darrell Gray.   The event, held at DSU's new Wellness Center, a state-of-the-art center that promotes healthy lifestyles among its students, showcased steps parents and students can take to make sure students are ready and healthy to return to school.   "Encouraging students to lead healthy lifestyles are one way parents and educators can instill good lifelong habits," said Sen. Carper. "By preventing illness, we can also decrease time away from school and work and avoid costly doctor and hospital visits. Staying on top of our immunizations is one way we can all get better health care results for less money."   "Immunizations are vital part of preventive care and Delaware has many options for no cost or low cost immunizations for children," said Dr. Karyl Rattay, Delaware Division of Public Health Director.  "Thank you to Senator Carper and Delaware State University for raising awareness that immunizations are smart medicine."     According to Marianne Carter, director of the DSU-based Delaware Center for Health Promotion, "Being up-to-date with immunizations is an essential requirement for staying healthy. It's far better to prevent illness than to treat it after the fact."     "Because a safe and healthy campus is one of our top priorities at Delaware State University, we follow the standard vaccination guidelines to ensure that our students have had or receive the recommended immunizations," said Dr. Alton Thompson, provost and vice president of Academic Affairs at DSU, which has more than 4,100 students. "Our University health officials work hard to review the immunization history of each student and require them to get any necessary vaccinations they might have missed." Michelle Fisher, director of DSU Student Health Services; Provost Alton Thompson; Dr. Martin Luta, chief of the Communicable Diseases Bureau (state Div. of Public Heath); U.S. Sen. Tom Carper; Kristin Trout. Wellness and Rec. Ctr. coordinator; and Marianne Carter, director of the Delaware Center for Health Promotions, get together after the event. According to the American College Health Association, vaccine preventable diseases continue to occur on college campus. “This creates an opportunity and challenge for colleges and universities,” said Michelle Fisher, director of the DSU Student Health Services. “It creates and opportunity to promote health and educate students on the importance of keeping their immunizations up to date, while it also creates of challenge to put practice in place to monitor immunization compliance, to keep abreast of current health care recommendations, and to regularly monitor disease trends.”   Ms. Fisher added that her health services staff at DSU does a good job at meeting those challenges.   According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, everyone age 6 months and older needs a seasonal flu shot every year. Here are some other shots people need at different ages:    Young children:  · Children under age 6 get a series of shots to protect against measles, polio, chicken pox, and hepatitis among others.   Pre-teens and teens:  · Pre-teens need shots at age 11 or 12 to help protect them from tetanus, diphtheria, whooping cough, meningitis, and HPV (human papillomavirus).  · Teens need a booster shot at age 16 to help protect them from meningitis.  Adults:  · All adults need a booster shot every 10 years to protect against tetanus and diphtheria.  · People age 65 or older need a one-time pneumonia shot.  · Talk to your doctor or nurse about which shots you and your family need.

DSU's Dr. Melikechi Prepares for NASA Work after Curiosity Landing

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Dr. Noureddine Melikechi fields questions from the media about the Curiosity landing on Mars and his work on the NASA mission that will follow.

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NASA’s Curiosity Rover has landed on Mars. Now DSU’s Dr. Noureddine Melikechi will soon contribute his optics expertise as part of the Curiosity ChemCam Team and assist the space agency in analyzing the data that comes back from Mars through the rover. Culminating a 367 million-mile and 36-week flight from earth, the Curiosity Rover was lowered gently by ropes from a rocket backpack onto the Mars surface inside its Gale Crater at 1:32 a.m. EST on Monday, Aug. 6. Dr. Melikechi, who is also the dean of the College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology as well as the University’s vice president of research, showed his excitement during a morning press briefing with local media on Aug. 6. “Imagine, you build something that you can’t test, send it 570 million kilometers, and it works for the first time,” said Dr. Melikechi, referring to the complex landing technique. “I am so proud to be a part of this mission, which includes about 300 scientists – of which I am one – and thousands of engineers.” Angela Lundberg is one of two graduate assistants who will work with Dr. Melikechi in the analysis of the Mars data. He and two graduate assistants, Alissa Mezzacappa and Angela Lundberg, are part of the mission’s ChemCam Team. The ChemCam (Chemistry and Camera suite), one of 10 instruments on the Curiosity, will be used to study the soil and rocks at each place Curiosity stops. The ChemCam will shoot an infrared laser – more than a million watts of power – at rock surfaces on the planet. The resulting light will be read by the unit’s spectrometer, which is expected to provide new information concerning the rock composition of the planet. The ChemCam utilizes a technology called laser-induced spectroscopy, which has been used in determine the composition of objects in extreme environments such as nuclear reactors and on the sea floor. However, this is the first time the technology has been used in space exploration. After the Curiosity does some preliminary checks and scientific work during its early days on the planet, the ChemCam will shoot its first laser blasts in mid-August, Dr. Melikechi said. The primary goal of the Curiosity mission is to study whether the Gale Crater area of Mars has evidence of past or present habitable environments. Dr. Melikechi said the mission will be looking for the past or present existence of liquid water, the chemical elements required to sustain life, and a source of energy, all necessary elements for habitability. “It is my hope that we will see something that no one expects,” Dr. Melikechi said. Dr. Melikechi will travel later this month and again in September to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California to receive the first data from the ChemCam unit. One of the first images sent to earth from Curiosity shortly after its landing on Aug. 6.   State Sen. Brian Bushweller, in attendance at the press briefing, called the landing “a big day for the nation and a big day for DSU.” “Standing shoulder to shoulder with all the others involved in the mission is DSU and its Optics Program,” Sen. Bushweller said. “DSU has given the state something to be very proud of.” This collaboration with NASA on the Mars mission is the latest accomplishment in the career of Dr. Melikechi and in the development of the Optics Program at DSU. Beginning with the establishment in 1998 of the Applied Optics Center on campus, through Dr. Melikechi’s leadership the program has attracted two $5 million research grants from the National Science Foundation in 2006 and from NASA in 2009. The two grants resulted in the establishment of a Center for Research in Education and Optical Sciences and its Applications, and the Center for Applied Optics in Space Sciences. That expansion in the Optics Program infrastructure also led to the creation of master and doctoral optics degree programs, the creation of the University first-ever intellectual property – a laser-based diagnostic device to be used in hospitals – and the attraction of $10 million in state funding for the future construction of an optics facility on campus.

DSU's Dr. Victor Gomia Authors Book on Development Theatre in Africa

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Dr. Victor Gomia's new book Mobilizing the Hordes: Radio Drama as Development Theater in Sub-Saharan Africa explores the use of utilitarian literature through radio drama productions in the continent.

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Dr. Victor N. Gomia, an assistant professor of English in the DSU Department of English and Foreign Languages has published a new book titled Mobilizing the Hordes: Radio Drama as Development Theater in Sub-Saharan Africa. The 296-page volume draws on rich empirical research on radio drama production in Cameroon to offer a strikingly new perspective in development theatre discourse in Africa. Chronicling the history and evolution of development theatre practice in Anglophone Africa and arguing for literary forms that address the basic everyday realities of ordinary people in a medium they understand, the book revisits the crucial question of utilitarian literature in a continent that continues to brandish a begging bowl even as it celebrates fifty years of independence. As a medium of development communication with unique aesthetic qualities found in and not limited to sound and silence, the author argues, radio drama creates events and condenses reality into dramatic constellations with a high sense of authenticity that invites its audience to participate in the creation process with a strong sense of direction in a story, a plot and a moral. This people-oriented culture re-animation process, Gomia asserts, is the fertile ground for grassroots empowerment. It is the point of departure for feasible development initiatives that the book explores. Dr. Gomia holds a Ph.D. in Postcolonial literature and an M.A in Public Administration with concentrations in non-profit and International Development. An author of numerous articles with wide interdisciplinary interest, Dr. Gomia has presented papers at national and international conferences. Prior to taking a position at Delaware State University in Fall 2011, Dr. Gomia had engaged in research and teaching at Yaounde University 1 (Cameroon), University of Bayreuth (Germany), Kentucky State University and Argosy University On-line (U.S.A). The book can be purchased from Michigan State University Press, Amazon.com and African Books Collective.

Candy Young Named as DSU's New Athletics Director

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Candy Young receives congratulations from DSU President Harry L. Williams after he named her the new athletics director at DSU. When she assume the leadership post on Aug. 13, she will be first female ever to serve as AD at DSU.

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DSU President Harry L. Williams announced today that he has appointed Candy E. Young as Delaware State University’s new Athletics Director.   Ms. Young moves into DSU’s top athletics post after serving over the last seven months as an interim senior associate athletics director. She has also served as the senior women’s administrator for athletics since September 2010. Newly appointed AD Candy Young addresses the DSU athletics staff and coaches after being named to the post.  She is the first female to ever be appointed to that post in the history of DSU.   She first came to DSU in 2006 as the head women’s track and cross country coach, a coaching post she served in until 2010. She served as the acting athletics director for the University from March to May of 2009.   Prior to her arrival, Ms. Young served as an assistant men and women’s track coach at California State University, the University of Pittsburgh, Ohio State University, and Seton Hall University from 1992 to 2006. During her 1989-92 stint with Seton Hall, the women’s track team was the Big East Champions in 1992-93. She also served as the head coach of the USA World University team in 1997.   As a high school track star, Ms. Young set a world record in 1980 – which still stands – in the 100-meter hurdler (12.94 seconds) during her senior year at Beaver Falls High School in Pennsylvania. That same year, she earned a spot on the U.S. Olympic 100-meter hurdle team, only to be robbed of the chance to compete by the U.S. boycott of the Olympics that year in protest to the Russian invasion of Afghanistan.   She would go on to compete for Fairleigh Dickinson University in Teaneck, N.J. where she was an eight-time All-American and a world-record holder in the indoors 55-meter hurdler.   The DSU president said Ms. Young’s leadership ability has been well-demonstrated at DSU and that she will bring stability to the DSU Athletics Program. “She is committed to staying here, to building the DSU Athletics Program, and to establishing new levels of excellence,” Dr. Williams said. “As a former Olympian and a world-record holder, Ms. Young brings a set of standards to the DSU athletics that will move it to new heights.”   Ms. Young’s selection came after national search. Serving on the DSU Search Committee were Provost Alton Thompson (chair); Carolyn Curry, vice president of Institutional Advancement and chief of staff; Jordan Williams, interim director of the Wellness & Recreation Center; Head Bowling Coach Ricki Ellison; Dr. Charlie Wilson, chair of the Faculty Senate and associate professor of biology,.and Frank Marshall, DSU alumnus and athletics booster.   Dr. Thompson said Ms. Young brings a diversity of experience to the AD post that the DSU Athletics Program needs to be highly competitive in Division I sports. “She can identify with student athletes and provide the leadership that will result in an exceptional learning environment where they can compete at the highest level across the wide spectrum of sports,” the search committee chair said.   The provost added that the timing of the AD announcement was fitting. “We are announcing the naming of a former Olympian as our new AD at the same time that the Summer Olympics are going on in London,” Dr. Thompson noted.   Ms. Young said that she is honored that Dr. Williams and the DSU AD selection committee has chosen her to be the athletics director, and that she is excited about being named the first female AD in the history of this institution. “Our future plans are to revive the department with energetic sports programming,” Ms. Young said. “The core values of this institution will be the foundation for transforming the athletic department.”   The new AD said that consistent with being a former track athlete, she is ready to hit the ground running.   “I am a sprinter and we come out of the blocks fast; I am a hurdler and we leap tall buildings,” Ms. Young said. “As an athletics program, we are going to get to the finish line.”   Ms. Young has a Bachelor of Arts in Biological Education from Fairleigh Dickinson University, and a Master of Arts in Sports Administration from DSU.   Ms. Young, who will take over as the DSU AD effective Aug. 13, will succeed former Athletics Director Derek Carter, who stepped down in January to assume a new post with the University. Eric D. Hart, associate athletics director of Academic Services, has served since then as the interim AD.

2012 Greg Jackson Basketball Camp -- Photo Slideshow

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The final day of the 2012 Greg Jackson Youth Basketball Camp gave participants a chance to show what they learned on the court.

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The 2012 Greg Jackson Summer Youth Basketball Camp, held July 23-27 in DSU’s Memorial Hall Gymnasium, provided more than 50 local boys and girls with four days of offensive, defensive and team fundamentals. DSU Men’s Head Basketball Coach Greg Jackson said the camp is reflective of the DSU’s emphasis on community outreach. “These kids are our future, and one day they will be doing what these coaches are doing,” he said. “It is our job to help prepare them.” For images of the basketball camp, click on the below photo slideshow: Assisting Coach Jackson with the camp were men's assistant coaches Keith Walker, Jerrell Wilkerson and Arthur Tyson.

DSU Police Add Three New Vehicles to its Fleet

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(L-r) Ptlm. Joshywn Abrams and Ptlm. Heather Golding stand with two of the three new vehicles in the DSU Police Department's fleet -- Dodge Charger car (left) and a Chevy Tahoe SUV.

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DSU Ptlm. Joshwyn Abrams points to a printer that comes with the department's new vehicle additions. The DSU Police Department has upgraded its fleet of law enforcement vehicles on campus with the addition of two new Dodge Charger cars and a Chevy Tahoe SUV. The DSU police put the new 2012 vehicles in service on campus last week. In addition to being equipped with the standard law enforcement equipment – including an in-car laptop – the new cars also come with a printer that can produce enforcement tickets and reports. Including the three new vehicles, the DSU Police Department maintain five vehicles in its law enforcement fleet.  

Canaan Baptist Church Donates $10,000 for Book Scholarships

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Dr. Christopher A. Bullock, pastor of Canaan Baptist Church of New Castle, and DSU President Harry L. Williams hold a display check representing the church’s recent $10,000 donation to the University.

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Canaan Baptist Church of New Castle, Del. has shown its support for higher education by donating $10,000 to Delaware State University. The donation will go toward book scholarships for Delaware students. Eligible students will be able to receive as much as a $250 book scholarship. “We support Delaware State University because we believe in the vision of Dr. Harry Williams, and support the direction and prospects of the University under his leadership,” said Dr. Christopher A. Bullock, Canaan Baptist pastor. “We believe in the power of partnership between church and state, and we believe it is critically important for students who come out of our church and might go to DSU. Therefore we want to be supportive in a tangible way.” Canaan Baptist Church was established in 2003 and currently has about 2,000 members. Dr. Bullock is in his eighth year as the church’s pastor.

DSU's Dr. Andrew Blake Authors New Book

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Dr. Andrew Blake holds a copy of his new book. Dr. Andrew Blake, associate professor of English in the Department of English and Foreign Languages, has published a book titled African Students Studying in America:  Their Experiences and Adjustment Problems at an HBCU, an abridged version. This book explores the adjustment problems and experiences of international students who have studied in the United States of America.  First, it examines the varied adjustments that international students deal with in general.  Second, it investigates the experiences of African students at a historically black institution- Delaware State University, a rare study on Africans studying specifically at a historically black institution.  Dr. Blake has presented papers at national conferences addressing the adjustment problems of international students on U.S. college campuses.  His study is referenced in the Center for Immigration Studies website.  Dr. Blake has also served as a staff writer for newspapers in Delaware and has served in administrative positions at DSU and Lincoln University, PA.  The book can be purchased from Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Reader Store, and many other websites.  

Actor Clifton Davis Comes to DSU to Film an Upcoming Movie

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Dr. Warren Rhodes (l), DSU professor emeritus, enlisted actor Clifton Davis to star in "God's Amazing Grace," a movie in which several scenes were filmed on the DSU campus July 17. Dr. Rhodes is the screenwriter and director of the production.

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7/18/12 Stage/screen/television actor and minister Clifton Davis brought his star power to DSU on July 17 to take part in an upcoming movie, several scenes of which were filmed on the DSU campus. Clifton Davis (l) and members of the cast and crew prepare to shoot a scene in the William Jason Library. DSU's Jackye Fountain (3rd from the right) plays a member of media during a press conference scene. The Dover-based production company Calvary Pictures, Inc.  is producing “God’s Amazing Grace,” which features Mr. Davis starring as one of the primary characters in the later parts of his life in the last part of the film. “God Amazing Grace” tells the true-life story of two brothers from their youth to their adult years. Despite their Christian upbringing, both brothers become involved with violence, drugs and other crimes as teenagers.  One brother – played in his later life by Mr. Davis) is eventually able to break away from the immoral lifestyle to achieve great success in life, while the other brother never escapes the wrong road, eventually reaping the consequences thereof.  The movie reveals the impact of God’s grace and mercy upon the lives of both brothers, despite their very different life choices.  “People ask me why I am doing this movie, and I tell them it is my way of giving back,” Mr. Davis said. “Everyone has to start somewhere, so this is my way of helping this young production company.” Mr. Davis took a break from his performance in the play production Wicked, which is touring the West Coast, to fly out to Dover to do the filming. Scenes for the movie where shot in the auditorium of the Price Building, and on the first and sixth floors of the William Jason Library. Among the local actors starring in the production were Dr. Rebecca Batson, DSU dean of libraries; Jackye Fountain, DSU tutor coordinator in the Department of Academic Enrichment; Maurio Watson, Wm. Jason Library technician, as well as several DSU students as extras. The screenplay was written by Dr. Warren Rhodes, Professor Emeritus of Public and Allied Health Sciences at DSU, who is also the director of the movie. Dr. Rhodes is also an established playwright, having written and directed two gospel musicals, The Sermon and The Sermon, Part 2, which have been performed over the last two decades locally and throughout the mid-Atlantic region. Clifton Davis gained prominence in the ‘70’s and ‘80’s starring in the popular TV series, “That’s My Mama” and “Amen”. . Over the years he has also starred in made-for-television movies such as Scott Joplin and Don’t Look Back: The Story of Leroy “Satchel” Paige, as well as big screen films such as Any Given Sunday and Kingdom Come.  Mr. Davis has made guest appearances on numerous TV shows, and currently appears regularly as the host of “Backstage Pass.” Dr. Warren Rhodes (l) discusses a scene in the library with actors Clifton Davis and Dr. Michelle Brown. Mr. Davis, who is also an ordained Christian minister, currently hosts the TV shows Backstage Pass and Praise the Lord on the Trinity Broadcasting Network.  He has also hosted gospel music specials such as Gospel Superfest, Take It to the Bridge, and The Stellar Awards.  Clifton Davis will be in Dover in mid-July for filming and to attend a fundraiser in connection with the film project. Calvary Pictures, Inc. is a subsidiary of Calvary Baptist Church of Dover. The movie – which is also being filmed in Baltimore, Md. and others sites in Dover on other dates – is projected to be released in the spring of 2013.

2012 President's Society -- Photo Slideshow

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(L-r) Mary and Frank Marshall join Drs. Reba and Berlin Hollingsworth for the June 29 DSU President's Society Reception.

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7/18/20 Dr. Harry L. Williams and his wife Dr. Robin Williams recently hosted the June 29 President’s Society Reception in honor of University supporters – comprised of alumni, employees, administrators, and friends of DSU – who have donated $1,000 or more over the last year. See the below photo slideshow for images of the event:  

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