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Dover, County Recognize DSU's 125th Anniversary

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(Center) DSU President Harry L. Williams, DSU Board of Trustees Wilma Mishoe and Dover Mayor Robin Christiansen hold a Dover City Council framed Certificate of Congratulations in recognition of DSU's 125th anniversary.

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The City of Dover and Kent County Levy Court recognized Delaware State University’s 125th anniversary during their respective public meetings. Dover Mayor Robin Christensen and City Councilman Roy Sudler Jr. read and presented a Certificate of Congratulations from the city to DSU President Harry Lee Williams during its Oct. 10 public City Council meeting. Dr. Williams was joined at the meeting by a contingent of DSU administrators, staff and alumni. The City Council’s recognition noted the University’s great determination, persistence, visionary leadership and demonstration of academic excellence. “Throughout its history, the University has been a cornerstone of the Dover community, offering access and educational opportunities to diverse populations from Delaware, the nation and the world,” the council noted in the recognition. For Councilman Sudler, it was a tribute that has a history with his family. He is the grandson of Dr. Luna I Mishoe, who was a longtime transformational president of then-Delaware State College (1960-1987), as well as the son of current DSU Board of Trustees member Dr. Wilma Mishoe. Councilman Sudler noted that it was “truly an honor and historical moment” to recognize the University’s longevity and rich history.  “The leadership and dedication that Dr. Williams has demonstrated under his presidency has helped to continue the legacy and very essence of its historical mission statement,” Councilman Sudler said. “May God continue to shine his light on DSU and carry the institution to greater heights of excellence that exceeds other institutions of higher education.” The next day Levy Court President P. Brooks Banta and other Levy Court Commissioners presented Dr. Williams with a written tribute commemorating 125th anniversary. Dr. Williams was joined at the Levy Court Chambers by a similar DSU contingent that was present at the Dover City Council event. “Great and wondrous things have happened in the history of DSU, and this tribute truly expounds on the great accomplishments that have taken place throughout its long history,” said Commissioner Banta. While connecting DSU’s past with its present, the written tribute also noted the “rich history and the impact you have made upon the State of Delaware. Delaware State University, your emphasis on providing quality education in the areas of teaching, research and public service continues to broaden, as you are strategically poised to provide a workforce steeped in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.”   Several of the commissioners had a special sense of pride in presenting the tribute to DSU. Commissioners Allan Angel, Terry Pepper and Glen Howell all graduated from DSU, while Commissioner George Sweeny’s daughter Amy Sweeny graduated from DSU. (L-r) Kent County Levy Court Commissioners Eric Buckson, Glen Howell, George Sweeney, DSU Board of Trustees member Dr. Wilma Mishoe, DSU President Dr. Harry Williams, Levy Court President P. Brooks Banta, Commissioners Allan Angel, Terry Pepper and County Administrator Mike Petit de Mange, recognize DSU’s 125th anniversary.  

Alums Dr. Jose & Zona Saez Establish Endowed Scholarship

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(L-r) DSU President Harry Lee Williams, Dr. Jose Saez, Jose Saez III, Zona Saez and siblings Jordan and Journey Saez pose with a symbolic display check  that highlights the $10,000 endowment established by the family.

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Dr. Jose and Zona Saez, a DSU alumni couple, have established a $10,000 scholarship endowment for Sussex County (Del.) students majoring in Elementary Education at Delaware State University. The couple both graduated from then-Delaware State College in 1992. Jose earned a Bachelor of Science in Biology and his wife Zona earned a Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education. Dr. Saez – who later attended the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (Pa.) where he earned his doctoral degree – is a kidney specialist and currently operates a private practice as part of Nephrology Associates PA with offices located in Georgetown and Milford. Zona Saez is an educator in Sussex County. The couple has three children – Jordan (currently a DSU student), Journey and Jose III – and the family resides in Lewes, Del. The couple says that they have always had a love for their alma mater and that education is important to their family. “We need more minority teachers in Delaware,” Dr. Saez said. “We hope this endowment will help.”

Anjosanlynn Fulgham & Tevin Smith Crowned Mr. & Miss DSU

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The 2016-2017 Royal Kingdom: (l-r) Miss Freshman Naeeman Murray, Miss Sophomore Sabrina Monestime, Miss Junior Shahira Singh, Miss Senior Courtney Davis, Miss DSU Anjosanlynn Fulgham, Mr. DSU Tevin Smith, Mr. Senior Marquell Tate, Mr. Sophomore Brandon Gray and Mr. Freshman Aireon Boone

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Delaware State University honored its new royalty during the annual Coronation Ceremony on Oct. 9 as it crowned Tevin D. Smith and Anjosanlynn Fulgham as the 2016-2017 Mr. and Miss DSU. Held in Education & Humanities Theatre, the Coronation theme was “Beauty and the Beast” and featured a creative five-scene skit on the journey of Mr. DSU to find his Miss DSU, based on the 1991 Disney musical romantic fantasy. For slideshow images of the Coronation, click on the below link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157671566862974/show Tevin Darnell Smith is the 12th Mr. DSU in the history of the University since that royal position was established in 2014. Tevin – who is a senior psychology major – is a native Prince George County, Md., where he also grew up. His aspiration after graduation is to go into the field of clinical social work. “I want to open my own practice and help youths in the community and also juvenile delinquents to help them better themselves,” Tevin said. Under his royal platform of “Dreams and Nightmares,” Mr. DSU hopes to provide Del State students with his perspective on the challenges of life. “Sometimes you have to go through nightmares before you reach your destiny,” he said. “I want them to know that challenging situations are just temporary, and that the successful outcomes will be much greater.” He said in striving to be a great mentor and role model at DSU, he works to help other see the value in loving themselves first and watch the growth that follows. Anjosanlynn Fulgham, DSU’s 60th Miss DSU, is a native of Jackson, Miss., but grew up in Prince George's County, Md. A senior psychology major, “Josanlynn” (as she is known by most of her DSU peers), plans to continue her academic journey after she graduates by pursing a master’s degree in public policy with a minor in journalism. “I want to bridge the gap between policy and the community,” Josanlynn said. “I also want to establish a nonprofit to help women who are victims of rape and sexual abuse.” Josanlynn’s platform is “The People’s Queen,” which she connects to the legendary Muhammad Ali. “When he was in the ring he was fighting for more than the boxing match or the title,” she said. As an extension of her Miss DSU title, she said she would like to start a “Dear Queen” project that would eventually develop into a blog and possibly a book. She plans to bring the “Pink Lip Campaign” to DSU in support of victims of rape and sexual abuse. Josanlynn said she also hopes to connect with other alumni, especially with former Del State kings and queens. While giving remarks at the end of the Coronation, Anjosanlynn surprised the packed theatre with her beautiful voice as she sang happy birthday to Tevin, who celebrated his birthday on the same date that he was crowned Mr. DSU. “I take pleasure in singing, dancing, theatre and any opportunity I have to broadcast positivity, especially if it gives me the chance to touch someone’s heart,” she said. Taking the stage with the newly crowned Mr. and Miss DSU were the rest of the University 2016-2017 “Royal Kingdom”: Mr. and Miss Senior – Marquell Tate and Courtney Davis Miss Junior – Shahira Singh Mr. and Miss Sophomore – Brandon J. Gray and Sabrina Monestime Mr. and Miss Freshman – Aireon Boone and Naeemah Murray Little Mr. and Miss DSU – Jace Daniel Hopkins and Savannah Ruth Jones The Coronation’s master and mistress of ceremony were Landon Bailey and India Sage.  

DSU Concludes $20M Greater Than One Campaign

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The staff of the Division of Institutional Advancement -- Dawn Hopkins, Brenda Farmer, Lucie Stairs, LaShawne Pryor, Diane Kirby, Rochelle Ross, Torshana Towles, Charity Shockley, Lorene Robinson, Henrietta Savage, Linda Milligan and Bryant T. Bell -- put forth a remarkable team effort to make the campaign successful. 

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Dr. Vita Pickrum, vice president of the Division of Institutional Advancement, led the campaign. Delaware State University recently announced that its five-year Greater Than One (GTO) Campaign for Students exceeded its $20 million goal and successfully concluded four months ahead of schedule – making it the greatest fundraising campaign in the University’s 125-year history. The University surpassed its objective by raising $20,370,762 during the five-year campaign that began in January 2011. Its conclusion was announced at the Sept. 22 DSU Board of Trustees meeting. The GTO Campaign’s overarching purpose has been to raise funds to support the University's work in achieving its primary and constant goal of student success. Toward that goal, the largest portion of the funds raised (nearly $9 million) will be used for scholarships and to strengthen DSU's endowment, which will provide scholarships to future students in perpetuity. There have already been 3,238 scholarships awarded during over the last five years with funds raised through the campaign. At the close of the campaign, the University’s endowment had grown from $20.3 million in January 2011 to its current total of $27.2 million. Beyond the scholarship dollars raised, portions of the $20 million campaign will also be used to support areas of student programming, faculty support and university support – all toward the goal of student success. “The Greater Than One: Campaign for Students exceeded our expectations in the amount that was raised, the number of overall donors, the number of alumni participants and in the growth of the endowment,” said Dr. Vita Pickrum, vice president of DSU Institutional Advancement. “This campaign has built a strong foundation for future campaigns.” DSU President Harry L. Williams said the campaign’s success is the result of the increasing “culture of giving” that is inclusive of all segments of the University community as well as supporters outside of the University. “The tremendous support for this campaign reflects the giving of a great host of individuals, foundations,  and corporations who have chosen to help DSU achieve its long-term student success goals,” Dr. Williams said. “But then again, DSU could not do so without the help of its corporate partners, community friends, alumni as well as the University’s faculty and staff.” Among the 6,488 donors who contributed to the campaign, highlights include: The $134,076 Jane Waters Bickham Endowed Scholarship for early childhood education majors was the largest alumni endowment given during the campaign. The upgrade of DSU’s STEM laboratories became a reality through $600,000 donated by the Good Samaritan Inc., the Welfare Foundation and the Marmot Foundation. The Longwood Foundation awarded DSU $2 million for Project Aspire, which funded scholarships and mentoring support to increase the University’s graduation rate. A $400,000 gift from the Verizon Foundation helps DSU focus on STEM, entrepreneurship, design thinking and mentoring. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation awarded DSU a $1.2 million grant that supports the analytics involved in the assessment of the University’s innovative Individual Development Plan. A $50,000 grant from M&T Bank supports student scholarships. A grant of $200,000 from Barclays Bank led to the creation of a Mobile App Academy. A $700,000 grant from Delmarva Power will establish a Center for Renewable Energy. Alumni participation increased from 5% to more than 11% over the course of the campaign.

DSU Arts Center/Gallery Exhibits Clark Fox's Iconic Pop Art

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Political pop artist Clark Fox (center) talks about his signature painting of George Washington with student worker Kayla Redman and Jennifer Gunther, DSU Art Center/Gallery director (holding the painting).

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Clark Fox does some restorative touch-ups on one of his works before it is hung in the DSU Arts Center/Gallery. The Delaware State University Arts Center/ Gallery will host an exhibit and other related events by renowned political pop artist Clark Fox that will all be in connection with a show of his works entitled “Typology”, which highlights some of his early paintings. The exhibit will be displayed at the Arts Center/Gallery from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 6 to Wednesday, Nov. 16. A Meet the Artist opening reception will be held from 5-6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6 in the Arts Center/ Gallery. The reception and ongoing exhibition are free and open to the public. The DSU exhibition is taking place in conjunction with a longer Clark Fox exhibition at the Biggs Museum of Art, 406 Federal St. in Dover. That exhibition, entitled “Icon Chains,” will begin at the Biggs Museum with an opening reception on Friday, Oct. 7 and will continue on display until Jan. 22. A Gallery Tour will take place at the DSU Arts Center/Gallery at 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27. Mr. Fox will give a presentation and then a walking tour of the works being featured at the Arts Center/Gallery. Clark Fox's two-sided work of a young depiction of legendary Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung. Finally there will be a panel discussion in connection with the exhibition, entitled “The Politics of Art… The Art of Politics” at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 3 in Parlor A of the MLK Jr. Student Center. Mr. Fox will be joined by three other DSU professors in a panel discussion that will focus on the role of contemporary artists within the social protest movements. A Native American from Texas, Mr. Clark is known as the “Godfather of Underground Art,” through his advocacy of street art in the mid ‘70’s and collaborated in Washington, D.C. with iconic artists such as Ron English, Shepard Fairey, Daniel Johnston, Big Al Carter and others. His iconic imagery combines to convey a rich take on reality, the state of the world, our country, as well as his own unusual psychic identity and nature.  His works belong to more than 35 museum collections including the Corcoran Gallery, National Gallery of Art, Metropolitan, Katzen, Phillips Collection, Vogel Collection, Philadelphia Museum, and Smithsonian American Art Museum. His signature portraits of George Washington now appear in a book published by the Smithsonian Press called Handmade Holiday Cards from 20th Century Artists and has established a reputation of assisting other artists to show their exhibits to the world. “Typology” represents Fox’s first major successes within the American art world, which were largely architectural works from 1967 through the early-1980s. “Everything (concerning my works) has to do with humanism,” Mr. Fox said. “They are about social politics and everything is connected with a story.” Such as his painting of the “Mr. Peanut” mascot – the long time logo of the Planters peanut snack food. He notes that “Mr. Peanut” represent capitalistic branding to make the snack attractive to more than the lower classes. Clark Fox's iconic pop art of "Mr. Peanut." “Planters branded it to be cocktail peanuts and the logo was dressed up with a top hat to make it a snack food of the bourgeoisie,” Mr. Fox said. Although largely self-taught, Mr. Fox earned his undergraduate degree at Pratt Institute and Corcoran School of the Arts. He later opened a non-profit exhibition gallery in nation’s capital called the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA DC), where he helped up and coming artists exhibit their work.  

DSU Hosts Debate on Constitutional Interpretations

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Dr. Lee Strang (left) of the University of Toledo College of Law, argues why originalism is the way the U.S. Constitution should be interpreted in deliberations on contemporary issues, while DSU's Dr. Sam Hoff gathers his thoughts on the rebuttal he would give that argued his living document position.

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People interested in constitution law at DSU witnessed a debate Sept. 28 on the issue whether the country’s foremost guiding document should be judicially interpreted through an “originalism” philosophy or as a “living document. Held in the Longwood Auditorium in the Bank of America Building, the debate event was sponsored by the DSU Law Studies Program and the Intercollegiate Studies Institute as part of Constitution and Citizenship Day. The debate pitted Dr. Lee J. Strang, a John W. Stoepler Professor of Law and Values from the University of Toledo College of Law, against Dr. Sam Hoff, a George Washington Distinguished Professor of History and Political Science, and the director of the DSU Law Studies Program. Dr. Strang argued on behalf of the originalism philosophy, which holds that the interpretations of the U.S. Constitution should be based on what reasonable persons living at the time of its 1788 adoption would have understood the ordinary meaning of the text to be. Dr. Hoff argued on behalf of the living document position, which holds that it has a dynamic meaning in which contemporaneous society should be taken into account when interpreting key constitutional phrases. Dr. Strang gave some background on how originalism operates in practice, and then argued that the justifications for originalism are popular sovereignty, good consequences, natural rights and human flourishing. Dr. Hoff noted that that many parts of the U.S. Constitution are vague, producing multiple meanings and interpretations. He argued that the resulting constitution could have been a conscious effort by white property owners to create a government favoring their interests. During their debate, Dr. Strang and Dr. Hoff applied their arguments to the contemporary issues of same-sex marriage, gun control and abortion.

DSU Participates in United Against Sexual Assault Day

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These members of the Hornet men's and women's track team pose with DSU President Harry L. Williams and other administrators during "United Against Sexual Assault Day." The student-athletes set up an information table in the MLK Student Center on Sept. 28 to educate the DSU community about the issue.

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Delaware State University has joined with other Delaware institutions of higher education to make a statement against incidents of sexual assaults. The Title IX coordinators of the state of Delaware made Sept. 28 “ United Against Sexual Assault Day” in which all of the Delaware higher education entities – Delaware State University, the University of Delaware, Delaware Technical and Community College, Wilmington University, Wesley College and Goldey Beacom College – distributed teal-colored wristbands and educated their respective campuses to nail home that message. More than 100 students received one of these teal-colored wristband as an expression of their commitment to help prevent sexual assaults and harassment. At DSU, members of the Hornet men and women’s track teams volunteered their time to distribute the wristband and man an information table at the MLK Student Center. In addition to educating DSU students on the issue, they had their own version of the game “Jeopardy,” the answers of which pertained to the topic of sexual assault and harassment prevention. Carlos Young, a freshman member of the track team, said that he and his fellow volunteers tried to get the point across that such crime should be reported. “If you see something, you should say something,” Mr. Young said. Cameron Burgess, also a freshman on the track team, said sexual assault and harassment is a serious issue. “You really can’t take it as a joke,” he said. “These things really do happen.” During the day, the volunteers got more than 100 students to pledge a “bystander” – to be someone who would help others not to be a victim of sexual assault or harassment. Officers of the DSU Police Department also go in the act by wearing teal t-shirts underneath their uniform in support. “We are so proud of the Men and Women’s Track teams that help to recruit the bystanders and gave momentum to the campaign,” said Candy Young, associate vice president of Student Affairs.  “DSU is such an awesome community because we believe in our students, faculty, staff, and administration.” DSU will continue the education campaign through Oct. 5.

DSU's UCEDIT Win $110,500 Contract for Wilmington Work

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(L-r) Wilmington Mayor Dennis P. Williams, Dr. Michael Casson Jr., UDECIT director; Jeffrey Flynn, director of Office of Economic Development in Wilmington; Pamela Dixon Ridgeway, Christiana Care Health System executive; and Audrey Van Luven, Christiana Care Health System executive, pose with a display check symbolizing the new contract with UCEDIT.

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Delaware State University’s Center for Economic Development and International Trade (UCEDIT) has won a $110,500 contract from the Delaware Department of Labor and the City of Wilmington for work it will do in connection with the state’s TRAIN (Today’s Reinvestments Around Industry Needs) program. Of the funds received, $20,000 was earmarked for the development of Wilmington’s Workforce Development Strategic Plan.  The balance of the funds, $90,500, will be utilized to implement workforce training based on the recommendations and strategies gleaned from the Strategic Planning process.  This program will train citizens of Wilmington in the areas of customer service and technical support.   While the main goal is to provide customer service training and technical support to Wilmington residents, the skills developed through this program can also provide solid career advancement for individuals in the areas of office of administration, billing and collections, and sales and client relationship management. The comprehensive customer service education provides training in essential professional skills, an understanding of their importance and their value to the company and the customer, and a career development plan that supports career advancement. Employers will benefit from this program in a number of ways including, but not limited to, increased brand recognition as an employer of choice in the local region, a partnership with the training provider to ensure employee retention and engagement, productive and engaged employees, and an improved customer satisfaction, retention, and loyalty. To help achieve these goals the City of Wilmington and UCEDIT has partnered with New Castle County Chamber of Commerce, AA Consulting, Christiana Care Health System, Comcast Corporation, Capitol One, and Alpha Technologies. Dr. Michael H. Casson Jr., UCEDIT director, notes that the prosperity of local and state economies and the health of their colleges and universities are highly correlated.   “Thus, the leveraging of DSU's research, expertise and resources is essential to the economic development strategies of the State,” Dr. Casson said. “To this end, the UCEDIT is excited about the opportunity to actively support the workforce development strategies of the City of Wilmington and their corporate partners.”

Dr. Debbie Harrington Sworn in as New Board Member

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Dr. Debbie Harrington is welcomed as a new Board of Trustees member by David Turner, the board chairman. Dr. Harrington has been appointed by the board to serve a six-year term.

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The Delaware State University Board of Trustees today swore in its newest member -- Dr. Debbie Harrington, a retired U.S. Army colonel.                        Dr. Debbie Harrington Dr. Harrington -- a native of Portsmouth, Va., and currently a resident of Middletown, Del. -- has been appointed to a six-year term by the board to succeed former board member James Stewart, whose term expired Aug. 31.   In her Army career, Dr. Harrington was an expert logistician with 25 years of experience in international multi-modal transportation systems and infrastructure, procurement, contracts, facility management and supply distribution. After her retirement from the U.S. Army in 2005, Dr. Harrington worked in the areas of nonprofit organizational management, community development and social justice. She has served the State of Delaware in several capacities. She served on a task force established by the state General Assembly to study education for students with visual impairments. She also works with the Delaware Department of Visual Impairment on education and employment initiatives and serves on its Rehabilitation Advisory Council. Most recently, Dr. Harrington has worked with the Delaware Department of Education to strategically plan for the education of students with low-incidence disabilities. She also is an appointed commissioner and chairs the commission that administers the State Use Law. She has managed the Sanctuary at Kingdom Square, a mega Baptist Church in Landover, Md., and the Resurrection Center churches in Wilmington and Middletown. At those churches, she has conducted capital planning and extensive outreach opportunities in education and economic empowerment. She has a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Norfolk State University in Virginia, a Master of Science in  National Resource Strategy from the National Defense University, Industrial College of the Armed Forces in Washington, D.C., and a Doctor of Education in Innovation and Organizational Leadership from Wilmington University.

DSU Residence Hall Assoc. Helps Build Home for Needy

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The DSU students helped in the construction of a Habitat for Humanity home for a needy family and demonstrated Delaware State University emphasis on community service and outreach.

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The DSU Residence Hall Association sacrificed a good part of their Saturday on Sept. 17 to join forces with Habitat for Humanity to help build a home for a family in need. (L-r) Cierra Major-Callazo and Arianna Johnson work together to measure a piece of wood. Twenty-two RHA members – students who represent residential halls on the campus – met the Habitat workers on the 100 block of N. New Street in Dover to assist them in the building of the new home. The offering of their helping hands is consistent with the RHA’s theme for this year – "The Take Over, from the Campus to the Community." The campus organization lived up to that theme by making an impact and positively representing Delaware State University, said Phillip Holmes, director of DSU Housing and Residential Education. “In the Department of Housing, we pride ourselves on serving others, so at the beginning of semester, RHA was charged with doing more community service in our area,” Mr. Holmes said. “The students enjoyed themselves, learned a lot about building a home and got to meet the people who will be moving into the house, which was special.” The students’ efforts were also consistent with two of the University’s Core Values – Outreach and Community Service.

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