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DSU, TheDream.US Announce Scholarship Partnership

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(L-r) Delaware Gov. Jack Markell,; Meghan Wallace, governor’s education policy advisor; Donald Graham; DSU President Harry L. Williams; Sadhana Singh, TheDreamUS scholar; state Rep. Joe Miro; state Rep. Paul Baumbach; and Jim Stewart, DSU Board of Trustees member.

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Delaware State University and TheDream.US have jointly announced a historic partnership that will implement a unique scholarship program for immigrant high school graduates who live in states that make a college education for them virtually impossible. TheDream.US Opportunity Scholarship is the nation’s largest scholarship program for DREAMers – immigrant youth who came to the U.S. without documentation. The organization has partnered with Delaware Gov. Jack Markell and Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy and their respective state universities – DSU and Eastern Connecticut State University – to provide scholarship recipients with admissions to institutions of higher education where they can enroll and fulfill their college aspirations. Students interested in the Opportunity Scholarship can apply at http://www.thedream.us. The co-founder of TheDream.US is Donald E. Graham, chairman of Graham Holding Company and former CEO and chairman of the Washington Post. Donald E. Graham expressed his appreciation to Gov. Jack Markell and DSU for partnering with him on his TheDream.US Opportunity Scholarship Program. DSU President Harry L. Williams and Mr. Graham announced the scholarship partnership during a May 10 media event held at DSU. They were joined in the announcement by Delaware Gov. Jack Markell. “This partnership will add to Delaware State’s incredible legacy of creating new opportunities for students to get a great education and pursue their dreams,” Gov. Markell said. “I’m grateful to Don Graham, President Williams, and their teams for their hard work to make this program possible for the deserving scholarship recipients. These students will make Delaware State a stronger institution for everyone and I am thrilled that we are welcoming these talented young people to Delaware.” TheDream.US will offer 500 scholarships to DREAMers who live in states that either prohibit them from enrolling in their state universities or make it cost prohibitive by charging them out-of-state tuition. The scholarship recipients will then enroll in DSU, Eastern Connecticut State University or other universities that partner with TheDream.US. TheDream.US will also offer 100 scholarships to undocumented students who reside in Delaware and Connecticut. “Education is an American value; we should help every student who has worked hard to go to college,” said Mr. Graham. “TheDream.US Opportunity Scholarship will help immigrant students fulfill their dreams of obtaining a college education so they can better the lives of their families, communities, and our nation. We are proud to be partnering with Delaware State University and Eastern Connecticut State University, with the incredible leadership of Gov. Jack Markell and Gov. Dannel Malloy, to give deserving students the opportunity for an affordable college education.” The partnership has been established at the same time that DSU is celebrating its 125th anniversary and is consistent with its historic mission, said DSU President Harry L. Williams. “This exciting partnership with TheDream.US falls right in line with Delaware State University’s mission of providing access and opportunity for diverse populations,” Dr. Williams said.  “In addition, this partnership will help the university stay on its current upward trend of growth and sustainability.” A number of other elected officials have expressed their support for TheDream.US’ scholarship initiative. U.S. Sen. Tom Carper notes that Delaware State University has a proud history of educating a diverse group of young leaders to succeed in the classroom and as outstanding citizens.  “Thanks to this partnership with TheDreamUS, even more students will now have the opportunity to be part of that legacy,” Sen. Carper said.  “If students excel in a U.S. high school, they deserve the opportunity to continue that success in college. Today’s announcement recognizes that an affordable college education is within reach at DSU, and undocumented students won't have to put their dreams on hold.” U.S. Sen. Chris Coons said that America was built on the notion that above all else, our success should reflect our willingness to work hard. He noted while outcomes can’t be guaranteed, everyone should get a fair shot to succeed. “That’s why I’m pleased to learn that TheDream.US will soon help more students attend Delaware State University by helping them overcome out-of-date laws that keep young people, who are here in the United States legally but aren’t American citizens, from accessing in-state tuition and other provisions that make education more affordable,” Sen. Coons said. “Every student deserves access to a good education, and for over a century, DSU has helped make high-quality college education a reality for generations of Delawareans willing to work hard and play by the rules. I’m confident this grant will help DSU continue to fulfill that commitment while maintaining the fundamental American promise that hard work begets opportunity.” U.S. Rep. John Carney noted that an education beyond high school has never been more important than it is in today’s changing economy.  He added that too many young people never get the chance to develop these skills because college is unaffordable or inaccessible to them.    “Delaware State University has a long history of helping first-generation college students access a quality, affordable education,” Rep. Carney said. “This partnership with TheDream.US builds on these efforts and will give DREAMers the chance to work toward a career that will provide a better way of life for themselves and their families.  I welcome these students to Delaware and wish them good luck in their studies.”   State Rep. Joe Miro, R-Pike Creek, said that the partnership between TheDream.US and Delaware State University to provide private funds is a step in the right direction.  “The important issue is that it will open the educational door to students without any cost to the taxpayers of Delaware,” Rep. Joe Miro said.  “This opportunity will help provide a bright and productive future for these individuals.” Addition comments in support of the scholarship included: State Rep. Sean Lynn “I offer my Congratulations to Dr. Williams and the team at Delaware State for entering into this tremendous partnership with TheDream.US.  “A college degree is the ticket to access in the middle class and the nation benefits when we are able to provide access to as many students as possible.  I look forward to welcoming more talented and ambitious students to Dover in the fall.” Rep. Lynn’s 31st Representative District encompasses Delaware State University’s Dover campus. State Sen. Margaret Rose Henry  “Delaware State University was founded to bring the glorious light of learning to those who for too long were shuttered from it. That’s what these scholarships will do for DREAMers and it’s wonderful to see the opportunity to attend college full-time extended to a group of young people who have so much to offer our state and country.”  State Sen. David Sokola “George Washington Carver once wrote ‘Education is the key to unlock the golden door of freedom. This exciting partnership from Delaware State University and TheDream.US will give these students access to those doors and lay the groundwork for them to achieve all of their dreams.” State Sen. Bryan Townsend “This announcement underscores America’s proudest traditions of inclusivity and immigration. My own wife, Lilianna, immigrated to the U.S. when she was young, had an opportunity to attend excellent universities, and is now an attorney.  These new scholarships will give hundreds of other young people similar opportunities to realize their dreams right here in Delaware.” State Sen. Bethany Hall-Long “As a college professor and mother of a college student, I know just how foundational higher education can be for young people. It is wonderful that through the philanthropy of private citizens, more young people who have shown a commitment to this nation will be able to better themselves by pursuing a college degree.”  State Rep. Andria Bennett “For many young Delawareans, obtaining a college education might seem like an unobtainable goal; an opportunity that just isn’t for them. It’s up to all of us to change that thinking and give Delaware students from all walks of life the confidence and the resources necessary to earn their degrees. This program brings us closer to that goal, and I commend Delaware State University and TheDREAM for their efforts.” State Rep. Helene Keeley “A college education is vital for young people to have the best opportunity to succeed in a global economy. Students who have college degrees earn more on average and have more doors opened for them. It’s unfortunate that several states have turned around and locked out DREAMers from accessing the very tools they need to be productive members of society. DREAMers are youths who through no fault of their own find themselves in a situation where they have lived here in America and simply want to be successful residents here. By opening college doors to them here in Delaware, we are offering a generation an opportunity to learn, grow and thrive. I’m proud that Delaware State University is partnering with TheDream.US to provide these scholarships and an education for young people. I’m looking forward to hearing about the success stories this program produces.” Rep. Keeley’s 3rd Representative District (Wilmington South) includes the Latin American Community Center.

DSU Announces No Tuition Increase for 2016-2017

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There will be no change in neither the in-state or out-of-state tuition rates for the 2016-2017 academic year. 

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The Delaware State University Board of Trustees recently approved the institution’s tuition and fee structure for the 2016-17 academic year. There will be no increase of in-state and out-of-state tuitions. The in-state tuition will remain unchanged at $3,755 and the out-of-state tuition will remain unchanged at $8,069 per semester.  The mandatory fees for all students – student activities, technology and student center complex – will remain unchanged as well. There will also be no additional increase to reside in the University’s traditional residential halls, which ranges between $3,488 and $3,745 per semester. There will be a modest 3% increase in the meal plan rates; which is contractually required to cover the increase in the Consumer Price Index “The University continues to work hard to keep its higher education experience affordable,” said DSU President Harry L. Williams. “As our students and their families look toward the 2016-2017 school year, they now have the comfort of knowing that their tuition costs will not increase.”

VP Biden Shares Thoughtful Wisdom at May Commencement

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Vice President Joe Biden told the graduates that it is important to balance career success with personal happiness. He said love for family, friends and colleagues fosters relationships and builds trust.

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Dr. Wilma Mishoe, DSU Board of Trustees member, enjoys a photo op with Vice President Joe Biden. Her father, Dr. Luna I. Mishoe, was the president of then-Delaware State College when Biden was first elected to the U.S. Senate in 1972. Delaware State University’s Class of 2016 endured some late rains during the May 7 Commencement Ceremony, but wearing quickly supplied ponchos, they still marched across the stage to signal the completion of their academic degrees. To see a photo slideshow of images from the ceremony, click on the below link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157668011182946/show Held outdoors at Alumni Stadium, 554 undergraduates, 61 masters and 13 doctoral graduates took part in a historic ceremony as it featured the highest active elected official to ever speak at DSU – U.S. Vice President Joseph R. Biden, who is in the final year of his last term in that national elected office. Vice President Biden’s participation in the ceremony comes one week before the University will officially begin a yearlong celebration of its 125th anniversary as Delaware’s only historically black institution of higher education. To view the video of the entire Commencement Ceremony, click on the below link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sH_qrRD5BX4 U.S. Sen. Thomas R. Carper introduced Biden as the commencement speaker, noting that graduates can learn a lot from the vice president. “He is the kind of leader he has been: humble, not haughty; has the heart of a servant, who knows his job is to serve, not be served; he has the courage to keep out of step with everyone else who is marching to the wrong tune,” Sen. Carper said. “He believes elected officials ought to build bridges to unite people, not build walls to divide them.  He believes leaders are purveyors of hope, that their job is to appeal to our better angels and to be aspirational.” In his address, Vice President Biden noted that like many students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities, he was the first in his family of “modest means” to go to college. But he added that this current generation of graduates has significant advantages that his generation did not have. “You have the technology at your disposal; you’re better educated,” he said. “You’re the most talented, tolerant and technologically advanced generation in American history. You can be the next Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Robert L. Johnson or Ursula Burns. You are equipped now with the capacity to be what you dream of." However, Vice President Biden predicted that the Class of 2016 will be challenged to learn how to balance material success with happiness. “Successful people and happy people understand that the good life is about being personal, being engaged,” Vice President Biden said. “Being there for a friend or colleague when they’re injured in an accident, remembering to congratulate them on a marriage or a birth of a child, being available as they go through difficult loss and personal failure. It is about loving someone more than you love yourself. It just all seems to get down to being personable. That is the stuff that fosters relationships and breeds trust. It allows you to do the things you need to do in a complex world to get things done.” U.S. Sen. Chris Coons also spoke at the ceremony, noting that the Class of 2016 is a product of a university that excels in research and scholarship. “As you graduate and leave this campus today, don’t leave it in your rear view mirror, but hang it right in front of you as a star that guides you in the months and years to come,” Sen. Coons said. “Remember the faculty (members) who have taught you. Remember your fellow graduates who are part of the partnership on your journey and hold close the values that made your time here at DSU the foundation of your future success.” David Turner, chairman of the DSU Board of Trustees, noted that the latest DSU graduates have used a variety of bridges to cross over the diverse obstacles of life. Denise Young Smith (l), Apple vice president of Worldwide Human Resources, is awarded an Honorary Doctor of Letters by DSU President Harry L. Williams. “I challenge you – the historic Class of 2016 – to cross any obstacle, to be the captain of your own ship, (and) to come together, because together you are greater,” Mr. Turner said. “And when you do this, you have every right to expect nothing more than greatness.” During the commencement ceremony DSU President Harry L. Williams awarded an Honorary Doctor of Letters to Denise Young Smith, vice president of Worldwide Human Resources for Apple. Ms. Young Smith noted that the Class of 2016 is yet another fruit of the 125-year legacy of DSU. “DSU – a stellar member of American HBCUs – you possess a special formula for success,” she said. “DSU, you are resilient, unafraid to take smart risks. You’re strategic and you recognize the great value of great talent and courageous leadership. You are innovative, global, thoughtful, tenacious, thoughtful, joyful, optimistic and purpose-driven. Protect these valued attributes as you embark on another 125 years of astounding success. ” In other Commencement highlights: Dr. Williams awarded a Presidential Academic Award to Shakirah A. Abdul-Rashid, who graduated with a cumulative 4.0 grade point average on the way to earning a Bachelor of Arts degree in Mass Communications in the concentration of Television, Radio and Film. Ms. Abdul-Rashid will continue working toward her aspiration to become a writer, director and producer in TV/Film by pursuing a Master of Fine Art at Savannah (Ga.) College of Art and Design. (L-r) Shakirah Abdul-Rashid, Presidential Academic Awardee, and Leslie Asanga Fogwe, Presidential Leadership Award recipient. Dr. Williams also awarded the Presidential Leadership Award to Leslie Asanga Fogwe, a native of Cameroon who has lived in the U.S. for the last four years. In addition to excelling as a 3.97 GPA honor student who completed his Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry in three years, he found time to serve as vice president of both the Men’s Council and Rotaract Club, as well as the treasurer of the Honor Students Association and as its Honors King during the Homecoming Coronation. He also donated his time as a volunteer at the Modern Maturity Center, Beebe Hospital, Kent General Hospital and Christiana Hospital. The oldest graduate of the May Class of 2016 is 72-year-old Tommie Moore. A resident of Smyrna, Del., she completed a Bachelor of Social Work. The May 2016 DSU Commencement’s youngest graduate is 20-year-old Zayna Allen of New Jersey, who earned a Bachelor of Arts in Mass Communications.

1st Lady's Tea/Gentlemen's Brunch -- Photo Slideshow

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Although the First Lady's Tea for graduating females and the President's Gentlemen Brunch for graduating males were separate events, the two groups came together for a combined shot with their hosts -- Dr. Harry L. Williams and his wife Dr. Robin Williams.

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DSU President Harry L. Williams and his wife, University First Lady Robin Williams celebrated the Class of 2016 during the traditional First Lady’s Tea and the DSU President Gentlemen’s Brunch. The two events were held separately, but nonetheless adjacent to each other in the parlors of the MLK Jr. Student Center. At the events’ end, however, the graduating men and women came together to join the president and his wife for a symbolic group photo – (shown above) with the men encircling the women as their protectors, and the women inside the circle as the sustainers of the men who surrounded them. For images of both events, click on the below link:. https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157668065871235/show

Gov. Markell Signs DSU 125th Resolution

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Celebrating the signing of Senate Joint Resolution No. 8: (l-r) Dr. Vita Pickrum, Dr. Bradley Skelcher, State Sen. Brian Bushweller, State Rep. Timothy Dukes,  DSU President Harry L. Williams, State Rep. Ronald Gray, Gov. Jack Markell (seated), State Rep. Harvey Kenton, Dr. Stacy Downing, Rep Ruth Briggs-King, Rep Dave Wilson and Rep Lyndon Yearick

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On May 3, Gov. Jack Markell signed Senate Joint Resolution No. 8, which honors DSU in the observance of its 125th anniversary. Sponsored by State Sen. Brian Bushweller and State Rep. Sean Lynn, the below Senate Joint Resolution No. 8 reads:     DELAWARE STATE SENATE 148th GENERAL ASSEMBLY SENATE JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 8   HONORING DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY ON THE OCCASION OF THE 125TH ANNIVERSARY OF ITS FOUNDING ON 15 MAY, 1891, AND DESIGNATING 15 MAY 2016 AS “DSU DAY IN DELAWARE.”             WHEREAS, on the 15th Day of May, 1891, the Delaware General Assembly enacted legislation establishing an institution of higher learning to be known as “the State College for Colored Students”; and             WHEREAS, the legislature’s action came in response to the enactment by the U.S. Congress the year before of the Second Morrill Act, which provided for the establishment of land-grant colleges for African American students in states that maintained separate educational facilities for white and black students; and             WHEREAS, the new college first opened its doors for classes on the Second Day of February, 1892, with a total of twelve students, a number which had risen, by 1895, to 28 students, with the first class of degree candidates graduating in 1898; and             WHEREAS, when the college began, five courses of study leading to a baccalaureate degree were offered: Agricultural, Chemical, Classical, Engineering, and Scientific; with a Preparatory Department being established in 1893 for students who needed remedial education upon entering the college before pursuing a major course of study; and             WHEREAS, a three-year “normal course,” leading to a teacher’s certificate was initiated in 1897, which was extended to a full four-year bachelor’s degree course in 1911; and             WHEREAS, to provide an opportunity for its students who were preparing to become teachers, the college opened a “Model Grade School” during the 1916–1917 school year to provide a higher quality education for students in grades four through eight from both Delaware and out-of-state;  and WHEREAS, in 1921, at a time when Delaware public schools were segregated, with most Delaware African American students without ready access to the City of Wilmington—which then had the state’s only high school open to African American students—having to end their studies after completion of the Eighth Grade, Delaware State College also undertook the extremely important role of establishing a high school in the then-DuPont Building (which operated for the next 31 years) to provide downstate students with a full high school education, granting a high school diploma on successful completion of a four-year course of study, after which many of these students entered a regular course of college study; and             WHEREAS, in 1944, the college received provisional accreditation by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, followed in 1947 by an act of the Delaware General Assembly renaming the institution “Delaware State College”; and             WHEREAS, in November,1949, the continued existence of the college was threatened when its accreditation was revoked, leading to strong and concerted effort to maintain the existence of the institution and regain its accredited status, an effort led from 1953 to 1960 by Delaware State College President Jerome H. Holland, whose pivotal leadership is widely credited with guiding the institution to the point where it regained its Middle States accreditation in 1957, a status it has retained ever since, and, concurrently, has achieved and maintained national accreditations of its Teacher Education, Nursing, Social Work, Hospitality and Tourism Management, and Food and Nutritional Science degree programs, as well as the international accreditation of its College of Business; and             WHEREAS, since 1957, Delaware State has grown in stature as a center for teaching, research and public service and has broadened its programs and course offerings greatly; and             WHEREAS, while Delaware State—which, in 1993, officially became Delaware State University—has remained among the finest “Historically Black Colleges and Universities” in the United States, it now serves a diverse student population, with undergraduate studies organized into six colleges containing a total of 21 academic departments offering 53 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degrees and five doctoral degrees; and             WHEREAS, by the fall of 2014, Delaware State University’s student enrollment had grown to 4,644 students, and its campus had grown from a 95-acre property with three buildings to the present 356-acre pedestrian campus with over 40 buildings and four outdoor athletic fields, as well as two farm properties in the Kenton and Smyrna areas, subsidiary locations in Georgetown and Wilmington, and an Airway Science Program that maintains a fleet of aircraft and a base of operations at the Delaware Air Park in Cheswold; and             WHEREAS, throughout its history, Delaware State has been led by many outstanding educators and trustees, as well as ten presidents:  Wesley P. Webb (1891–1895); William C. Jason (1895–1923); Richard S. Grossley (1923–1942); Howard D. Gregg (1942–1949); Oscar J. Chapman (1950–1951); Jerome H. Holland (1953–1960); Luna I. Mishoe (1960–1987); William B. DeLauder (1987–2003); Allen L. Sessoms (2003–2008); and Harry L. Williams (January, 2010–Present); with Maurice E. Thomasson serving as acting president from 1949 to 1950 and again from 1951 to 1953, and Claibourne D. Smith serving in that capacity from 2008 until 2010; and             WHEREAS, Delaware State University remains today, as it has been throughout the past 125 years, a great treasure in the life of the First State, which has given its many thousands of students the keys to lives of success and accomplishment;             NOW, THEREFORE:             BE IT RESOLVED by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 148th General Assembly of the State of Delaware, with the approval of the Governor, that we do hereby extend to Delaware State University, its students, alumni, faculty, staff and administration, the heartfelt congratulations and best wishes of the State of Delaware on the occasion of the 125th Anniversary of this great educational institution, together with our thanks for the positive role the university has played in so many lives over the years.             BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the 15th Day of May, 2016 is hereby designated as “DSU Day in Delaware.”             BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that we also extend to them the sincere hope that Delaware State University will continue to prosper and serve as an important force for good in the State of Delaware for many more years to come.             BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that a suitably-prepared copy of this document be presented to Dr. Harry L. Williams, President of Delaware State University, upon its enactment.  

Dr. Harry L. Williams Discusses Program Deactivations

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Dr. Harry L. Williams appeared on DSU Inside Perspective to explain the University's initiative to evaluate its degree programs.

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DSU President Harry L. Williams recently appeared on a segment of DSU to discuss the University’s Program Prioritization Initiative, which led the institution to deactivate 22 degree program: To see the interview with the DSU president, click on the below link: https://youtu.be/VNi5MO5nVOU

DSU's Diversity Featured on CNN

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DSU's diversity -- such as reflected by this group of May 2015 graduates -- attracted CNN to focus on Del State as well as Morehouse College in a segment that explored the phenomenon of the enrollment of non-African-Americans at HBCUs.

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DSU was recently featured by CNN in a segment that focused on the issue of diversity at Historically Black Colleges and Universities. To see the CNN segment, click on the below link: http://money.cnn.com/video/news/economy/2016/04/27/unstereotyped-hbcu-diversity.cnnmoney/index.html DSU President Harry L. Williams and women's tennis student athletes Colleen Beck and Maria Rachi were featured on the CNN segment was produced by Gayle Contessa and on-camera personality Tanzina Vega.

DSU 125th Kickoff -- Photo Slideshow

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About 200 students, faculty, staff and administrators -- including DSU President Harry L. Williams -- participated in the "125" formation on the Alumni Stadium football field on April 26.

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DSU has gotten an early start in celebrating its 125th anniversary by holding a kickoff event on April 22 in the MLK Student Center and then by forming a human “125” formation on the Alumni Stadium football field the following week. For images from those two events, click on the below link. https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157667116178590/show The April 22 event featured remarks by DSU President Harry L. Williams, followed by a group of students who blew bubbles as a climax to the kickoff event. On April 26 about 200 faculty, staff and students formed a 125 on the football field. Carlos Holmes, director of News Services, captured formation on camera while airborne in a DSU aircraft piloted by Hans Reigle, DSU aviation instructor. The actual anniversary date is May 15. On that date in 1891, the Delaware General Assembly and then-Gov. Robert J. Reynolds enacted legislation that established the State College for Colored Students. The 125th anniversary will be observed from May 15, 2016 to May 14, 2017.

DSU Concert Choir Spring Concert, April 29

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The concert is free and open to the public.

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The DSU Concert Choir will present their Spring Concert at 7 p.m. Friday, April 29 in the Education and Humanities Theatre on campus. The concert is free and open to the public. The choir, under the direction of Dr. Lloyd Mallory Jr., will perform repertoire from its Spring Tour, which will include hymn arrangements, sacred choral anthems and Negro spirituals.

DSU Celebrates Earth Day; Tree Campus USA Reaffirmed

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Dr. Arthur Tucker, DSU professor emeritus; Shawn Garvin, administrator EPA Region III; Dr. Susan Yost, retired DSU professor; DSU President Harry Williams; Dr. Michael Valenti, forestry administrator, Del. Forestry Serv.; Alexandra Davis, DSU Tree Campus rep.; Dr. Cynthia Hong-Wa, DSU Herbarium curator; and Dr. Vita Pickrum, VP of DSU Institutional Advancement, stand with DSU's Tree Campus USA plaque.

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DSU held its annual Earth Day observance on April 22 and celebrated the University’s reaffirmed designation as a Tree Campus USA. Joining DSU President Harry L. Williams for the observance program were Shawn Garvin, administrator of the EPA Region III, and Dr. Michael A. Valenti, forestry administrator, Delaware Forest Service of the Delaware Department of Agriculture. For images from the event held in the MLK Jr. Student Center, click on the below link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157665153633233/show Originally awarded the designation in 2012, the Tree Campus USA status has now been held by DSU for five consecutive years. The designation goes to schools that have an implemented plan for tree care that is supported by school allocations, an established Campus Tree Advisory Committee, related education outreach, as well as an annual observance of Arbor Day. While being among 255 schools in the country to have the Tree Campus USA designation, DSU is the only school in Delaware with that title. In 2012, DSU was the first Historically Black College or University (HBCU) to earn the designation; it has since been joined by four other HBCUs (Tennessee State University, Texas State University, Virginia State University and West Virginia State University). The DSU main campus in Dover currently has hundreds of trees that are represented by 130 different species.

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