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DSU Dedicates New Food Pantry on Campus

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(L-r) Dr. Marsha Horton, dean of the DSU College of Ed., Health and Public Policy; DSU President Harry Williams; Patricia Beebe, Food Bank of Delaware CEO; Harry Keswani, founder of the Harry K Foundation; and Dr. Jacqueline Washington, Assoc. Dean, College of Ed., Health and Public Policy, take part in the DSU Food Pantry ribbon cutting.

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Funded by a generous donation from the Harry K. Foundation, and facilitated by the Food Bank of Delaware, a new food pantry was dedicated Nov. 2 at Delaware State University. Dr. Hazel Bradshaw-Beaumont (l), associate professor of art, stands in the Food Pantry in front the artistic work she created especially for that space. DSU Chaplain Pam Adams, who also helped with that facility, stands to the right. Through the DSU Food Pantry – located in the John R. Price Building on campus – food insecure Delaware State University students will be able to access emergency food and hygiene products by visiting the food pantry. The new pantry will offer a variety of nutritious food products and hygiene items. Students will select food based on their needs. Food for the pantry will be provided by the Food Bank of Delaware and school-wide food drives or community donations. While students residing on campus are required to purchase a meal plans, there are also students who live off campus and do not have a meal plan. Delaware State University President Harry L. Williams said that many people don’t realize that some higher education students have struggles that include getting proper nourishment on regular basis. “There are some students who are literally working their way through school,” Dr. Williams said. “And in paying for the cost of higher education, some cut corners on what they spend on food. The DSU Food Pantry makes it possible for the University to reach out and help such students.” In the United States, 14.4% of households experience some level of inadequate access to food. The same statistic is evident amongst our college students, and at DSU we wanted to do something about it," said Dr. Marsha Horton, dean of the DSU College of Education, Health and Public Policy. "We are excited about working with our partners -- the Food Bank of Delaware and the Harry K Foundation -- to offer this needed service to our University community. Dr. Horton said the idea for the DSU Food Pantry came from Amy Ash-Goote, a visiting instructor in her DSU College’s Dept. of Public and Allied Health Sciences, who learned from a number of her students that maintaining a nourishing diet was a challenge. Ms. Ash-Goote then began exploring the possibilities with Dr. Horton for a food pantry on campus – which led to conversations with the Food Bank of Delaware and then with the connection to the Harry K Foundation.  And the DSU Food Pantry became a reality. A refrigerated mobile pantry will also make a stop once a month at DSU with perishable items for students in need. “It began with us listening to our students and learning about their need in this area,” Dr. Horton said. “We know that hunger is present on our college campuses,” said Food Bank of Delaware President and CEO Patricia Beebe. “We have been working for years to implement school pantries on Delaware college campuses, and we are proud that Delaware State University was the first to step up to the plate. In order for today’s college students to be successful they not only need textbooks, educational supplies and quality professors, they need nutritious foods.”  “College students are an extension of the younger children who receive food from the Harry K Pantries located in elementary and middle schools,” said Harry K Foundation founder Harry Keswani. “Research confirms the important link between good nutrition and the availability of children to concentrate and to learn. For older students, working a job in order to eat is not always an option while pursuing a college education in hopes of ensuring a future without hunger.” The DSU Food Pantry with non-perishable foodstuffs in the Price Building will be opened four times a month on a schedule publicized to the student community. Once a month a mobile refrigerated pantry will also come to the campus to make perishable foods available to students in need. The Food Pantry at DSU is the first one to be established on a college campus in Delaware.

DSU's Pia Stokes Receives 2016 Rising Star Award

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Pia Stokes is an associate director in DSU's Office of Admissions, where she oversees the admission of international students. She received the award from the Delaware ACE Women's Network during its annual Fall Awards Dinner on Oct. 20.

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The Delaware ACE Women’s Network (DAWN) has honored DSU’s Pia Stokes with its 2016 Rising Star Award. Ms. Stokes – who is an associate director in DSU’s Office of Admissions – was one of three Delaware women selected to receive the honor. She has worked in higher education since 2009 and has been a part of DSU’s Admissions team since November 2012. According to DAWN, Ms. Stokes “has become a distinguished advocate who consistently climbs into executive leadership roles. She adds significant value to the Admissions team where her hard work, insight and strong communication skills have proved to be an asset. In particular, she is known for leading multiple diverse projects and for her innovative approach to devising solutions.” The award was presented to Ms. Stokes at DAWN’s annual Fall Awards Dinner on Oct. 20 at Wilmington University in Dover. Other recipients of that award were Kim Plusch, a career services counselor at Wilmington University, and Jennifer Tomassetti, assistant director for Fraternity and Sorority Life at the University of Delaware. Ms. Stokes has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Communications from Morgan State University and a Master of Business Administration from Wilmington University.

DSU Announces First Two Hercules Scholarship Recipients

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(L-r) Ian Terry Tcheliebou and Jamal M. Phillips are the first two recipients of the Hercules Scholarship Program as part of the Tom Joyner Foundation's School of the Month Program, which features Delaware State University as the selected school for the month of October.

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Two DSU students, Jamal M. Phillips and Ian Terry Tcheliebou, have each been awarded $1,500 scholarships from The Tom Joyner Foundation’s Hercules Scholar Program, which is designated for outstanding male students.  Selected by DSU and announced on the Tom Joyner Morning Show each week, the students must be full-time DSU students, have a grade point average of 3.5 or higher, demonstrate leadership skills, and have performed community service. Mr. Phillips, a senior finance and banking major from Bear, Del., currently has a 3.67 GPA. Following his upcoming graduation in May 2017, he will work as a financial analyst for JP Morgan. He also plans to pursue a real estate license. Mr. Tcheliebou, a sophomore aviation major from the Central African country of Cameroon, currently maintains a 3.57 GPA. He is focusing his major on the professional pilot concentration and has already earned his private pilot license. As one of the Tom Joyner Foundation ‘Schools of the Month’ for October, Delaware State University is promoted by the Tom Joyner Morning Show and will receive those funds raised from listeners, alumni and other interested parties that month. The show, aired in 115 markets around the country, reaches nearly eight million listeners every week. Founded in 1998 by nationally syndicated radio personality, Tom Joyner, the Tom Joyner Foundation supports Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) with scholarships, endowments, and capacity building enhancements.  It is the vision of the Tom Joyner Foundation to provide programming that affords diverse academic opportunities to students wanting and/or attending HBCUs regardless of social or economic status and means. Since its founding, the Tom Joyner Foundation has raised more than $60 million to help keep more than 29,000 students enrolled in HBCUs – which has included more than $900,000 for Delaware State University students.  For more information concerning how to support DSU through the School of the Month Program, visit www.tomjoynerfoundation.org.

Faculty Duo's Research Awarded $700,000 NSF Grant

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Dr. Melissa Harrington (second from right), and three post-doctorates -- Dr. Arumugarajah Tharaneetharan, Dr. Joseph Lombardo and Dr. Dwight Higgins --.are doing research on motor neurons. The project is supported by funding from the National Science Foundation.

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Dr. Melissa Harrington (l), the grant's principal investigator, and Dr. Tomasz Smolinski are collaborating on the NSF-funded research project. The National Science Foundation has awarded DSU’s Neuroscience Program a three-year $700,000 grant in support of a faculty collaborative research project pertaining to motor neurons. The research project is a collaboration between Dr. Melissa Harrington, professor of biological science, director of the Delaware Institute of Science and Technology and principal investigator of the grant, and Dr. Tomasz Smolinski, associate professor of computer and information science and co-PI of the grant. According to Dr. Harrington, the research focuses on how the efficiency of motor neurons in driving muscle contractions that can be altered depending on the previous activity of the motor system has been.   “We are mimicking the effect of endurance training and seeing how that affects the level of electrical excitability in motor neurons.  More excitable neurons can drive muscle contraction more easily,” Dr. Harrington said. “If we are ever going to have truly natural prosthetics that can be manipulated by commands from our nervous system, we need to understand in detail how the functioning of motor neurons is changed by increased and decreased activity.” Dr. Harrington and Dr. Smolinski are being assisted in the research by three post-doctorates – Dr. Dwight Higgins, Dr. Joseph Lombardo and Dr. Arumugarajah Tharaneetharan. While the grant award is administered by the NSF, it is actually a funding collaboration between the NSF, the National Institutes of Health, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, the French National Research Agency, and the U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation. Together the entities form the Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience Program, which supports activities that will advance the understanding of the nervous system structure and functions, mechanisms underlying nervous system disorders and computational strategies used by the nervous system.    

DSU, Cameroon's Catholic University Sign Agreement

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(L-r) Dr. Gabriel Gwanmesia, DSU professor of physics and engineering; Bishop Immanuel Bushu, chancellor of the Catholic University Institute of Buea, Cameroon; DSU President Harry L. Williams; Dr. Vincent Fondong, DSU professor of biological sciences; Ms. Pamela Khumbah, a representative of the Catholic University of Buea in the U.S., pose for a photo during a visit last summer to DSU.

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Delaware State University has signed a new agreement with The Catholic University Institute of Buea (CUIB), which is located in the southwest region of Cameroon. The memorandum of understanding recently signed by DSU President Harry L. Williams and the Catholic University president, Rev. Dr. George Nkeze establishes a new educational and cultural relationship between DSU and CUIB. The agreement facilitates between the two institutions: Exchange of faculty and students Collaborations in research programs Writing of joint grant proposals Establishment of joint program DSU mentoring of CUIB’s School of Agriculture and Natural Resources, as well as its School of Information Technology. The Catholic University Institute of Buea is an entrepreneurial university that was established in 2010. According to CUIB’s website, the university – which had a total enrollment of 1,670 students in 2015 – prepares Cameroonians and international students to be not only “Job Seekers,” but also “Job Creators.”

Civil Rights, Economics Conference at DSU Oct. 28-29

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The Civil Rights and Economic Empowerment Conference will be held in the Longwood Auditorium in the Bank of America Building.

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Delaware State University will be the site of a Civil Rights and Economic Empowerment Conference on Friday and Saturday, Oct. 28-29 in the Longwood Auditorium in the Bank of America Building on campus. The two-day conference will conduct a variety of discussions featuring panelists from the arenas of civil rights, economic development business and academia. The conference is free and open to the public. All sessions will be held  in the Longwood Auditorium The conference will begin at 6 p.m. Friday with a screening of the documentary Black Wall Street, followed by a discussion led by Dr. Kami Fletcher, DSU assistant professor of history and political science. The conference’s Saturday, Oct. 29 events will include: 8-8:30 a.m. – Continental breakfast and networking. 8:30 a.m. – Welcome statement, followed by the keynote speaker, Wayne R. Frazier, senior vice president of Mt. Washington Minority Contractor Association of Baltimore, Md. 9 a.m. – A presentation on “How to Create a Diversified Business Contact Portfolio” by Tanya Williamson, managing director, Vision Builders & Associates, LLC. 10:15 a.m.  – Plenary Session on “Historical Perspective of the nexus between Civil Rights and Economic Empowerment,” featuring Ezrah Aharone and Leandra Casson Marshall, both DSU adjunct instructors. 10:45 a.m. – Breakout sessions on 1.) “Community and Economic Development – What is it?” 2.) Controlling our Black Dollars, and 3.) Contracting Opportunities with State and Federal Government Procurement Offices. 11:30 a.m. – Networking lunch. 12:30 p.m. – A session on “Delaware Politics, Policy Formulation Advocacy & Strategy” lead by Dr. Sam Hoff, professor of History and Political Science, and Courtney Billups, Baltimore City Minority and Women’s Business Opportunity Office. 1:30 p.m. – A business roundtable on “Wealth Creation” featuring Christopher Smith of Edward Jones Investments, and Anthony Floyd Jr., CEO of Floyd Corporation Security Solutions, LLC. The conference is jointly sponsored by the DSU Center for Economic Development and International Trade, DSU Department of History, Political Science and Philosophy, and the Dover Community Action Forum.

DSU Hornet Flight Team Earns Bid to SAFECON Nationals

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The DSU Hornet flight team -- (l-r kneeling) Daeshawn Rose, Will Arters, Pruth Enugula, Amad Shammo; (l-r standing) Tevin Williamson, Chameron Chase, Maurice Ellis, Shannon Diaz, Paul Scherry and John Sherman (advisor).

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The DSU Department of Aviation’s Hornet Flight Team represented themselves well at the National Intercollegiate Flying Association (NIFA) Region 7 Competition, finishing in 3rd place in the overall standings and earning a bid in the National SAFECON Flight Competition in the spring of 2017. During the regional competition – held in Schenectady, N.Y. Oct. 14-17 – the Hornets won 1st place in the Safety Category in the team competition. DSU was among seven regional flight schools that competed in the regional competition. The regional also featured outstanding performances by several DSU Hornet aviators. In addition to the team’s 3rd place finish, the top individual performances included: 1st place, Aircraft Preflight Inspection – Paul Scherry, a senior from Stone Ridge, N.Y. 2nd place, Message Drop – Amad Shammo, a junior from Centreville, Va., and William Arters, a senior from Honey Brook, Pa. 4th place, Navigation – Shannon Diaz, a sophomore from Gloucester, Va., and Pruthvinath Enugula, a senior from Hyderabad, India. 4th place, Aircraft Recognition – William Arters. 5th place, Ground Trainer – DaeShawn Rose, a senior from Philadelphia, Pa. Paul Scherry, Hornet flight team captain, said he and the seniors on the team will sacrifice their participation in the May Commencement Ceremony, and instead compete in the SAFECON nationals, which is schedule to take place on the same weekend.   The nine-member Hornet Flight Team will travel to the Ohio State University Airport in Columbus, Ohio for the national competition on the weekend of May 9-14. Unfortunately for the five seniors on the flight team, that is the same weekend of the DSU May Commencement Ceremony. Paul Scherry, the flight team captain and one of the seniors, said while it has given rise to an unfortunate conflict, the seniors will sacrifice the graduation ceremony and instead represent DSU at the national competition in Ohio. “We are all disappointed, but as much as we would like to walk at Commencement, we have a responsibility to the team and the University to go and finish the job,” Mr. Scherry said. “We have an opportunity to show the country that we have a competitive flight school.” Mr. Scherry said the Hornet flight team’s current success achieves a goal he has hoped for since he first entered the Aviation Program in 2013. This year is the first time the entire team has earned a national competition bid. “We had the strongest year the Hornet flight team has ever had,” Mr. Scherry said. “We have pulled ourselves by our own bootstraps to reach the nationals.” The National Intercollegiate Flying Association (NIFA) was formed for the purposes of developing and advancing aviation education; to promote, encourage and foster safety in aviation; to promote and foster communications and cooperation between aviation students, educators, educational institutions and the aviation industry; and to provide an arena for collegiate aviation competition.  Every year, NIFA hosts regional Safety and Flight Evaluation Conferences (SAFECON), where teams representing the various Colleges and University Aviation Programs in their region compete against each other for a spot at the National SAFECON event and title.    

DSU Honors "Over/Under 40" Successful Alumni

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DSU President Harry L. Williams (bottom left seated) and First Lady Dr. Robin Williams (bottom right seated) take part in a photo opp with the Over/Under 40 Alumni honorees during the 125th Anniversary Celebration at Dover Downs on Oct. 15.

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V. Bozeman of "Empire" performed at the 125th Anniversary Celebration. DSU honored 40 alumni as part of its “Over/Under 40 Club” as part of the 125th Anniversary Celebration event held on Oct. 16 at Dover Downs. The Over/Under 40 Club recognizes successful graduates who have demonstrated a high level of excellence in their professional careers as well as a commitment to serving their communities. Based upon DSU’s Core Values – Community, Integrity, Diversity, Scholarship and Outreach – this club focuses on building a culture for philanthropy while recognizing the importance of alumni outreach. The 125th Anniversary Celebration include performances by V. Bozeman, a singer and actress of the hit television drama "Empire," as well as the electrifying group the Panama Band. The alumni selected for the Over/Under 40 Club include: Dr. Donald and Dolores Blakey, Classes of 1958 and 1962 respectively; educators, community theatre actors and producers. Halvin Blocksom, Class of 1961, educator The Honorable Stephanie T. Bolden, Class of 1969; educator and state legislator. Latisha Bracy, Class of 2004; government and community relations professional, campaign manager. Ned W. Brown, Jr., Class of 1971; educator, past DSUAA New Castle Co. chapter president. LeFeisha D. (Williamson) Cannon, Class of 2003; associate controller in DSU’s Finance & Administration Division, consultant. Ernest “Sammy” Congo, Class of 1967; owner of Congo Funeral Home in Wilmington. Ernest M. “Trippi” Congo II, Class of 1998, funeral director of family owned Congo Funeral Home in Wilmington. Greg Coverdale, Class of 1999; CEO of Real Estate, LLC, financial planner Dr. Corrie L. Davis, Class of 1998; associate professor of educational research, Kennesaw State University. Robert G. Draine, Sr., Class of 1960; educator Dr. Martin A. Drew and Sharon Dixon-Drew, Classes of 1965 and 1966, respectively; educators. Steven Ewing, Class of 1983; president and owner of Wade Ford Inc. in Smyrna, Ga. Schlonn Hawkins, Class of 2010; public relations professional. Carolyn Golden Hebsgaard, Class of 1965, executive director of the Boston Lawyers Group and Lawyers Collaboration for Diversity. Drs. Berlin and Reba Hollingsworth, Class of 1967 and 1949, respectively; educators and parliamentarians. Matthew W. Horace, Class of 1985; internationally recognized law enforcement, homeland security and leadership expert. Dr. Jamar H. Jeffers, Classes of 2002 and 2003; vice president of development for 100 Black Men of America. Chris Joyner, Class of 1976; insurance professional The Honorable Rochelle S. Knapp, Class of 2004; Justice of the Peace judge. Dr. Emmanuel Lalande, Class of 2005; vice president/dean of Student Success at Harris-Stowe State University James F. and Mary Jane Marshall, Classes of 1962 and 1975; real property officer at DAFB, owners and operators of family business. Darnerien McCants, Class of 2001; multimedia artist, former NFL wide receiver. Jermain Miller, attended DSU 1998-1999; New York City real estate professiona. Isaiah Nathaniel, Class of 2004; entrepreneur, film director. Norman Oliver, Class of 1985; entrepreneur, business owner. Jerome Pinkett, Class of 1961; educator, guidance counselor Maurice Pritchett, Class of 1965; educator, education consultant John Ridgeway, Class of 1975, John Ridgeway, Toyota Finance Services corporate manager, DSU Board of Trustees member Philip G. Sadler, Jr., Class of 1962; tax accountant, former DSUAA chapter president. Monica Scott, Class of 2002; nursing program director. Taunita Stephenson, Class of 2009; assistant commissioner of championships, Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. Jimmie and Tina Strong, Classes of 1966 and 1965 respectively; CEO of the Strong Company and educator. Leroy A. Tice, Esq., Class of 2002; attorney Cathleen Trigg-Jones, Class of 1992; broadcast journalist, talk show host, actress. David G. Turner, Class of 1986; founder of Sovereign Partners Consulting LLC and chairman of the DSU Board of Trustees. Robert P. Vanderhost, Class of 1972; entertainment manager, athlete/coach, mentor. Enid Wallace-Simms, Class of 1974; senior public affairs manager, Delmarva Power Leah Williams, Clas of 2015, 2016; first winner of both the DSU Presidential Academic Award and the Presidential Leadership Award, supply chain analyst for the Northrop Grumman Corporation. Herman L. Wood, Class of 1973; director of Business Development and Supply Chain Management, Commercial & Government Services, U.S. Facilities, Inc.

Six DSU Seniors Awarded M&T Scholarships

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Dr. Vita Pickrum (left), DSU vice president of Institutional Advancement, stands with (l-r) Kashana Robinson, JayVaun Young, Jamal Phillips, Brandon Lewis and Aubrey Fournoy, who are recipients of a $2,500 scholarship. To their right is Bryant T. Bell, DSU director of Major Gifts. 

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Six high achieving DSU seniors have been rewarded for their academic excellence with M&T Bank Scholarships to help them cover the cost of their last year at Delaware State University. The M&T Scholars include Aubrey Fourney, a nursing major; Brandon Lewis, an education major, Jamal Phillips, a business major; Kashanna Robinson, a chemistry major; Keiosha Shelton, a nursing major; and JayVaun Young, a computer science major. The six students – who have a combined grade point average of 3.27 – each received an award of $2,500 for the 2016-2017 academic year. Recipients of the scholarship must have at least a 2.5 GPA and be a native of the United States. The students were also Inspire Scholarship recipients during their first three years at DSU. Because the Inspire Scholarship does not extend to the senior year, the M&T Scholarship has provided these students with some financial support to help cover their final undergraduate year. Like the other recipients, Mr. Phillips said he is very thankful for M&T’s generosity. “This scholarship is a motivator for other students,” he said. “I view it as a mechanism to drive students to achieve academically and serve in their communities.” The scholarships are part of a $50,000 donation presented to DSU recently by M&T Bank.

Homecoming Alumni and Check Presentations -- Photos

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Several alumae got into the act as former cheerleaders and joined DSU's current cheerleading squad to provide some inspiration to the Homecoming crowd and the Hornet football team during their game against Florida A&M.

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U.S. Sen. Tom Carper (r) never misses a DSU Homecoming game and this year was no exception. He is shown sharing DSU President Harry L. Williams' box seat. Thousands of DSU young and not-so-young graduates of Delaware State University returned to their alma mater on the weekend of Oct. 14-17 to be a part of the 2016 Homecoming events. In addition to gathering Oct. 16 for the President’s Reception and the annual Homecoming football game, a number of alumni came bearing financial gifts. In addition to alumni members establishing several new endowed scholarships, there were others who gave contributions to DSU as the University status being the Tom Joyner Foundation’s School of the Month in October. For images of the alumni fellowship during the reception and the game, click on the first link below. For images of the check presentations, click on the second below link. https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157675199685406/show https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157675295419505/show The Saturday Homecoming activities also attracted elected officials, including U.S. Sen. Tom Carper, Lt. Gov. John Carney, state Sens. Colin Bonini and Margaret Rose Henry, state Rep. Trey Paradee, state Rep. Charles Potter, Dover Mayor Robin Christiansen Among the financial support announced during the President’s Reception was an anonymous contribution of $450,000,  as well as five endowed scholarships and a scholarship/department support contribution. In addition, Tom Joyner Jr., son of the nationally known radio personality Tom Joyner, came to the annual Homecoming festivities and presented a check of $78,000 to the University from the Tom Joyner Foundation. In total, the University received alumni and friends contributions of $600,485 that will be used for scholarships. The below endowed scholarships were announced: The Joseph H. Sr., and Leona M. Pinkett Endowed Scholarship, begun with $21,250 in the name of the patriarch and matriarch, whose included two children, 10 grandchildren and other great-grandchildren who are graduates of DSU. Wine  Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., and Beta Phi Burgundy Sorority, Inc. Endowed Scholarship, begun with $10,235 by the two organizations, which were inspired by DSU President Harry L. Williams raise money for DSU scholarships. The John and Sherri Ridgeway Endowment, begun with $10,000. Mr. Ridgeway a corporate manager of Toyota Financial Services in Owings Mills, Md., is a 1975 DSC (Delaware State College) graduate who was appointed to serve on the DSU Board of Trustees this past summer. Mrs. Ridgeway is a 1977 DSC graduate. The Steven R. Ewing Endowed Scholarship, begun with $10,000. Mr. Ewing, who is the president and owner of Wade Ford, Inc., in Smyrna, Ga., is a 1983 DSC graduate who also starred on the Hornet football team. The Phillip E. and Deborah Scott Endowed Scholarship, begun with $10,500. Mr. Scott is a retired chief tax compliance officer with BNY Mellon. The Kailyn Lowry Scholarship/Department Support, begun with $10,000 (half to go toward a Kailyn Lowry Scholarship for Mass Communications students and the other half to go in support of DSU’s Department of Mass Communications). Ms. Lowry, who is a junior mass communications major, is regular featured subject on the MTV series “Teen Mom 2,” and is a published author. “Early on in my tenure as president, the University made it a priority to develop a much stronger culture of giving,” said Dr. Williams. “With each passing year we have been seeing more fruits of that ongoing effort from alumni and friends who are adopting this vision. Their understanding of the importance of investing in our students is making DSU a greater institution.”  

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