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First Lady holds Tea for Graduating Seniors -- Photo Slideshow

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Dr. Robin Williams, wife of DSU President Harry L. Williams, held her semi-annual First Lady’s Tea at their residence to honor the seniors who will graduate on Dec. 14.   Dr. Williams shared food with the ladies, conversed with them, shared some professional etiquette tips, and presented them with some valuable gifts.   For images of the Dec. 14 First Lady’s Tea, click on the below photo slideshow:  
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Dr. Robin Williams (center seated in white) shares a group photo op moment with the graduating seniors who accepted her invitation to stop by the President's Residence for the First Lady's Tea she held in their honor.

President's Holiday Open House for Faculty, Staff -- Photos

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(L-r) Only DSU President Harry L. Williams, University First Lady Robin Williams and Dr. Teresa Hardee, vice president of Finance, know what the joke was at that moment of the President's Holiday Open House, but it certainly tickled their funny bones.

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DSU President Harry L. Williams and First Lady Robin Williams opened up their home on campus to faculty and staff on Dec. 11-12 for their annual Holiday Open House. For images from the President’s Holiday Open House, click on the below photo slideshow:

College of AHSS Bids Goodbye to Chinese Graduate Students

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DSU officials bid farewell to this group of Chinese students. Standing (l-r): Dean Marshall Stevenson, Hao Ou Yang, Xingchen Zhao, Yicong Wang, Provost Alton Thompson, Dr. Ladji Sacko; seated: Lina Tao, Chunxiao Ma, an unidentified student, Wenhui Yu, and Xiaolu Tang.

 

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On Dec. 5, DSU’s College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences said farewell to eight graduate students visiting during the fall semester on a cultural immersion connected with their Master’s Degree in Translation and Interpretation from Jilin Huaqiao Foreign Languages Institute.  The students each noted that their experience at DSU was one they would never forget in learning American culture--especially at an HBCU.

DSU Open for Regular Operations, Final Exams, Tues. Dec. 10

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Despite a mix of snow and rain that is projected to begin moving into Delaware between 8-9 a.m. this morning, all three sites of Delaware State University (Dover, Gerogetown and Wilmington) will be open for regular operations on today (Tuesday, Dec. 10). Final examinations will still be held as scheduled on Dec. 10 and all employees are expected to be at DSU at their regular reporting time. DSU officials will continue to monitor the snow/rain event throughout the day and will make the appropriate decision if necessary concerning any change in the work departure time..

Despite Snow, DSU Choirs Perform Dec. 8 Concert -- Photo Slideshow

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The DSU Choirs refused to let the weather stop their concert, much to the appreciation of the 70 people that attended the event.

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The Dec. 14 snowstorm threatened to cancel the scheduled DSU Choirs “Gloria” concert, but the choir decided that it could not disappoint the 70-some people that braved the icy road condition to attend the event. Despite the absence of the Phillos Brass group – who could not get out of Philadelphia on Sunday – the DSU Choirs performed what songs they could for the enjoyment of all in attendance at the EH Theater. For images from the DSU Choirs concert, click on the below photo slideshow.

The President's Open House for Students -- Photo Slideshow

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Dr. Harry L. Williams and his wife Dr. Robin Williams greet a young one from the Child Development Lab during their annual Christmas Open House for students.

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DSU President Harry L. Williams the University’s First Lady Robin Williams opened up their residence to students on Dec. 5 for their annual Christmas Open House. For images of the event at the President’s Residence, click on the below photo slideshow:

DSU's Dr. Eric Kmiec Named INBRE Program Director of Research

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Dr. Eric Kmiec, chair of the DSU Department of Chemistry in the DSU's College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology, becomes the first DSU scientist to be named as the director of Delaware INBRE Research.

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Dr. Eric B. Kmiec, professor and chair of the Department of Chemistry within the College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology at Delaware State University, has been named the director of research for the Delaware INBRE program, a statewide biomedical research initiative.   The purpose of the Delaware IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (INBRE) is to create an inter-institutional biomedical research capability, by developing a statewide pipeline of capable and competitive biomedical research personnel who can successfully compete for biomedical research grants, funded by NIH and other agencies.   Dr. Kmiec, who currently serves as the principal investigator of the Delaware State University INBRE grant, will assume this post immediately. He will be the first director of research for Delaware INBRE at an institution outside of the University of Delaware.   Widely-recognized as a pioneer of gene editing—a technique in which synthetic DNA molecules are used to patch or repair mutations in human chromosomes—Dr. Eric Kmiec is head of the Laboratory of Chemical Genomics at Delaware State University. Prior to his arrival at DSU in 2011, Dr. Kmiec served as the founding director and eminent scholar of the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research at Marshall University.   Dr. Kmiec’s research focus is molecular medicine and the development of molecular tools to diagnose human diseases, particularly orphan diseases. Since 1995, research in his laboratory has been supported by the National Institutes of Health in the form of R01 and R21 grants, respectively - the most widely-recognized and prestigious form of funding. He has also received funding from the High Q Foundation, the American Cancer Society, the March of Dimes, the Tobacco Research Institute, Pfizer, Napro Biotherapeutics and a variety of biotechnology companies.   He is a managing editor of Frontiers in Bioscience and is on the editorial boards of many journals including BioEssays. Dr. Kmiec has authored over 140 peer-reviewed journal publications in highly respected journals and has edited several books on gene therapy. He has more than 30 issued patents or patent applications to his credit and has founded several biotechnology companies. His most recent company, OrphageniX Inc., a biotechnology company located in Delaware, focuses on gene editing in inherited diseases such as Sickle Cell Disease.   Dr. Kmiec said he is honored to be chosen to lead this aspect of the Delaware INBRE program, and noted that he will strive to meet the high bar of excellence and achievement set by Dr. Stanhope.   “Biomedical research has evolved into a multi-disciplinary approach and as such, we will take advantage of and expand our expertise in biophysics and imaging by coupling them with the more traditional biological pathways of discovery,” Dr. Kmiec said. “Such confluence of expertise will create an exciting innovative environment for breakthrough research.”   “We are very fortunate to have Dr. Kmiec leading Delaware INBRE's Developmental Research Project Program,” commented Dr. Steven Stanhope, PI of the Delaware INBRE grant.   Dr. Nicholas Petrelli, member of the INBRE Steering Committee, had this to say of the appointment: “Dr. Kmiec's research experience and his track record in mentoring young investigators to be successful researchers will be a tremendous asset to INBRE. I know the INBRE Research Committee looks forward to working with him and getting INBRE to the next level."   “Delaware is very fortunate to have in Dr. Eric Kmiec a great scientist, a transformative leader, wealth of academic experience and an effective mentor,” said Dr. Noureddine Melikechi, DSU’s VP for Research, professor and dean for the College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences & Technology. “These attributes will serve the NIH INBRE program well and as a result all the DE institutions involved in it.  I am confident that the DE INBRE program is set to reach new highs.” Dr. Melikechi is also a member of the INBRE Steering Committee.  

College of Agriculture & Related Sci. Awarded $1.5M in USDA Grants.

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Dr. Jung-lim Lee, assistant professor of human ecology, received an almost $600,000 grant to help him develop new curriculum in genomics.

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The DSU College of Agriculture and Related Sciences has announced the recent awarding of about $1.5 million from USDA’s Capacity Building Grants (SBG)program. These competitive awards will either create new or enhance existing programs in support of the land-grant mission, which integrates teaching, research and extension activities. “USDA is a major partner of the land-grant university system nationally,” says Dr. Dyremple Marsh, dean of the College of Agriculture and Related Sciences. “The CBG funding will help DSU train students to become future food and agricultural scientific professionals that the nation will need.” The CBG program also aims to strengthen partnerships among the 1890 institutions, other colleges and universities, USDA, and private industry; and to enhance the quality of land-grant programs at the 1890 institutions to more readily establish them as full partners in the U.S. food and agricultural sciences higher education system. The grants were awarded for teaching, extension and research at DSU are as follows: Teaching $599,993 awarded to Jung-lim Lee, assistant professor of human ecology, for his grant titled, Empowering the Next Generation of Food and Nutrition Scientists through  Genomics. This grant will fund the development of new curriculum that will teach genomics. $149,959 awarded jointly to Qian Jia, assistant professor of human ecology and Carol Giesecke, Didactic Program director and State FCS Extension Program Leader, for their grant titled, Developing a Coordinated Program in Dietetics at DSU. The funding will provide scholarships for students engaged in this discipline, assist in the implementation of a recruitment strategy for undergraduate students, and enable the exploration of practice opportunities necessary for the program. Cooperative Extension $237,199 awarded to Andy Wetherill, Small Farm educator, for his grant titled, Expanding Agribusiness Opportunities to Underserved Urban Communities using Cooperative Extension Programs $249,974 awarded to Dennis McIntosh, State Aquaculture specialist, for his grant titled, Delaware State University Mobile Meat Processing Lab (Mmpl) Curriculum Development and Implementation. Research $299,938 awarded to Stephen Lumor, assistant professor of human ecology, for his granttitled, Optimization Of Physicochemical and Sensory Properties Of Reduced-Cholesterol Butter and Cheese. The studies in this area will ehance the research capability of the Food Chemistry program, as the funds will enable the purchase of additional lab equipment and give student more hands-on experience.

Roy Klein Education Foundation Donates $2,500 to DSU JET Program

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Posing for the check presentation are: Vita Pickrum, DSU associate vice president of Development; Audrey Scott-Hynson, JET instructor; Lillie Crawford, director of the DSU Center for Enterprise Development; and from the Roy Klein Educational Foundation, Marion Klein, Barbara Rafte, and Ed Wilchinski.

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The Roy Klein Education Foundation recently donated $2,500 to go toward DSU’s Center Center for Enterprise Development’s Junior Entrepreneurs-in-Training Summer Camp Program.   The donation is a continuation of the foundation’s support for the youth program. Over the last five years, the foundation has donated $10,000 in support of the camp.   The JET Summer Camp is a two-week youth entrepreneurship day camp designed to inspire  middle school youth, primarily from low- to moderate-income households, to consider entrepreneurship as an option.  The camp is taught with a combination of curricula from “Chasing the Dream” (CG International), the National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE) and the Kauffman Foundation, and is instructed by a certified facilitator.    The students form teams and are given seed money to start mini-businesses.  A component of the camp is Market Day when students sell their products to the campus community.  At the end of the camp, the students participate in a business plan competition with an opportunity to win prizes and awards.   The Roy Klein Foundation issues grants to strengthen educational opportunities and resources in Kent County, Del., with an emphasis on economic development. In addition to supporting DSU’s JET Program, the foundation has funded scholarships in entrepreneurism at Delaware Technical and Community College and the nursing program at PolyTech Adult Programs. It has also supported programs in connection with Wesley College, Junior Achievement and the Delaware AeroSpace Education Program.

Newly formed iStep Team takes 1st in Virginia Step Competition

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The iStep Team -- a University-sanctioned student organization (pictured left) -- has won a 1st place honor in only its first semester in existence.

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A new student organization that has just been established this semester has wasted no time in making its mark. The new group, iStep (pronounced I-Step), is the first University-sanctioned (non-Greek) Step Team at DSU. Saturday, Nov. 16, the organization competed in the 7th annual Best of Both Worlds Dance & Step Competition in Charlotteville, Va., and won first place in the Step Category. The teams were judged on creativity, level of difficulty, showmanship, precision and energy. Held in the city’s Paramount Theater, iStep also finished 2nd in the overall competition, bested only by the first place dance team. The organization notes that iStep’s written purpose is to bring together a diverse population of students at Delaware State University and to entertain through the expression of stepping.  Its mission is to step in formation and unison while making rhythms with the stomping of feet, the clapping of hands, chanting and the use of other creative objects. The group collaborates as one unit to practice creativity and unity to bring entertainment as well as positive influence to all audiences. “Not only do we perform, but we love participating in community service endeavors and focusing on our academics to be well-rounded students,” said Lindsey Hyppolite, iStep coach. “Our first semester has been exhilarating and we've have grown and progressed in such a short period of time. We are extremely excited and ready for what's in store next.” As the 1st place winners in the Step Category, iStep won a trophy and $750.

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