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DSU Housing & Residential Ed Donates Food for Needy

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The DSU Department of Housing and Residential Education shows off food it is donating to the Delaware Food Bank for Thanksgiving distribution to the needy. (L-r) Courtnei Parker-Morgan, RA; residential directors Schentel Jones and Robert Price; Shakira Sebastian, RA; and Director of Housing Phillip Holmes.

 

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There will be some Thanksgiving tables that will include food that came from DSU as a result of the Department of Housing and Residential Education’s second annual Thanksgiving Food Drive. The primary Food Drive organizer was Robert Price, University Village Apartments resident director, who enlisted other residential assistants from Nov. 9-13 to collect nonperishable food items from the students. The collected bounty was then donated to the Food Bank of Delaware to be distributed to the needy for Thanksgiving. “I’m proud to announce we had 100% participation this year, meaning every residence hall made a contribution,” Mr. Price said. “Altogether we were able to contribute about 500 items to the Food Bank of Delaware to feed hungry Delaware families. I know these families will be more than grateful to receive our helpful donations.” Phillip Holmes, director of Housing and Residential Education, said this was a great opportunity to demonstration DSU’s core values of outreach and community. “We are constantly telling our student staff who work within our department that we are about service to others,” Mr. Holmes said. “This is another example of our staff and DSU students coming together to serve the Delaware community in a positive way.”

DSU to Present "By The Way, Meet Vera Stark" Nov. 19-21

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Idalis Stamas and Olivia Manning rehearse their respective roles as Gloria Mitchell and Vera Starks in a production that explores the discriminatory practices of Hollywood toward black actresses in the 1930s.

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Delaware State University will present the student production of By the Way, Meet Vera Stark during three performances – 2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 19; and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Nov. 20-21 in the Education & Humanities Theatre. By the Way, Meet Vera Stark is a unique mixed media play that explores the racial tensions and limited roles for African-American women in the early years of Hollywood. This drama focuses on how the potential and talent of Vera Stark is never realized because of the extremely limited film roles available to African-American women in the 1930s and beyond. As a mixed media performance, part of the show has been filmed. The short film will reflect the cinematic choices and aesthetics of early Hollywood. The film was shot on location at the State Street Inn, located in historic Dover, Delaware. The cinematography and film editing was completed by students in the mass communications program under the direction of Vincent Ciammaichelli, instructor of mass communications. The show features students Olivia Manning as young Vera Stark, Dana Matthews as mature Vera Stark, Idalis Stamas as young Gloria, and Haley Clayton-Moyer as mature Gloria.  The show is directed by Dr. Amanda Anderson.  Tickets are $5 for the general public and can be purchased at the door. DSU students University ID will be admitted free.  

DSU Board Chair Receives APLU's Career Exemplar Award

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The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities has honored David G. Turner for his DSU Board of Trustees leadership and service as well as his highly successful career as a business executive with Fortune 500 companies.

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DSU Board of Trustees Chairman David G. Turner has been named by the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) among the 19 recipients of its inaugural 1890 Universities Career Exemplar Awards.  The recipients – distinguished alumni representing each of the 19 historically black land-grant universities – have achieved excellence in navigating their career pathways and providing mentorship to other traditionally underrepresented students pursuing similar career pathways.  In addition to the APLU’s recognition of Mr. Turner for his chairmanship of the Board of Trustees, the association also noted his work for IBM as a global analytics leader for banking and financial markets and Fortune magazine’s recognition of him as being among the "50 Most Powerful Black Executives in America." The awardees were nominated by their alma maters and evaluated on their commitment to institution, individual achievement, civic engagement and impact in providing access, opportunities and mentorship to current students and new alumni. The recipients were honored at the APLU’s Nov. 15-17 Annual Meeting in Indianapolis, Ind. “The first class of 1890 Career Exemplar Awards recipients are a testament to the tremendous contributions 1890 institutions make to our society through their instruction, research and community engagement,” said APLU President Peter McPherson.  “These alumni have not only achieved success in their own careers, but worked with their alma maters and current students to serve the institutions that had such a formative influence on them.” “The 1890 Career Exemplar Awards recipients reflect the broad diversity and great achievement of 1890 Universities and their alumni,” said Dr. RoSusan D. Bartee, interim vice president of Access and Success.  “As we celebrate the 125th anniversary of the Second Morrill Act, their stories remind us of the power of the 1890 land-grant community and the progress we can continue to drive through these institutions and their students.” Mr. Turner, who graduated in 1986 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics and Computer Science, in January 2015 became the first DSU graduate to be an elected chairman of the Board of Trustees, succeeding Dr. Claibourne Smith, who had been chair for 22 years.  Mr. Turner, who previously served as vice chair, has been a DSU board member since 2008. Along with his current executive position with IBM, Mr. Turner has enjoyed a highly successful career in executive posts with AT&T, Gateway, MBNA, and Bank of America. He has also been honored by U.S. Black Engineer and Information Technology in 2005 as one of the “50 Most Important Blacks in Technology.”  

DSU Concert Choir to Perform With Philly Orchestra Nov. 13-15

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The DSU Concern Choir is led by Dr. Lloyd Mallory Jr., director of DSU Choral Activities -- shown here directing the choir during a 2013 performance at Delaware Legislative Hall. The Concert Choir will perform Nov. 13-15 with two other HBCU choirs and the Philadelphia Orchestra in the world premiere of Hannibal Lokumbe's One Land, One River, One People at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia.

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The DSU Concert Choir will join with the choirs of two other Historically Black Universities – Morgan State University and Lincoln University – to form a mass chorus for the Philadelphia Orchestra’s world premiere of Hannibal Lokumbe’s One Land, One River, One People Nov. 13-15 at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia.  In the world premiere of this emotionally charged work – which was commissioned exclusively by the Philadelphia Orchestra – Lokumbe explores the connection among communities and all those who live in them, utilizing a flowing river as a symbol. That Hannibal work is one of three compositions to be performed during the Philadelphia Orchestra’s Copeland Appalachian Spring Concert According to Dr. Lloyd Mallory Jr., director of DSU Choral Activities, it is first time the University Choir has been invited to sing with the Philadelphia Orchestra. “We are excited and are preparing vigorously to do a great job in representing DSU and ourselves well,” Dr. Mallory said. Tickets for any of the three performances can be purchased online at the Kimmel Center website (www.kimmelcenter.org).  The tickets are under Copland’s Appalachian Spring Concert.  The Kimmel Center is located at 300 S. Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19102. In addition to its performance with the Philadelphia Orchestra and the two other HBCUs, the DSU Concert Choir will go to Pine Forge Academy in Pine Forge, Pennsylvania to sing for students there on Saturday morning, Nov. 14  

Allstate Names DSU's Sharnada Martin as QFE Ambassador

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Sharnada Martin was selected as Allstate Quotes for Education Ambassador because of her academic excellence and her constructive extracurricular pursuits. Through the Allstate's QDF program -- which Ms. Martin is helping to promote -- the insurance provider donates $10 toward scholarships for HBCU students every time someone calls for a quote estimate.

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Sharnada Martin, a junior accounting major at Delaware State University, has been named by Allstate as its first-ever Quotes for Education Ambassador to help the insurance provider raise scholarship dollars for students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU). Ms. Martin was among a number of HBCU students who had received scholarships from Allstate and were considered for the honor. According to Allstate officials, Ms. Martin was selected because of her track record of academic excellence and her involvement in constructive extracurricular pursuits. To see an interview of Ms. Martin on DSU Inside Perspective, click on the below link: https://youtu.be/0QIgC-HTPGk The Philadelphia native is currently the vice president of the Women’s Senate as well as the Future Leaders in Progress (FLIP). She is also a member of the Educated Ladies Igniting True Essence (ELITE) and the National Society for Leadership and Success. She aspires to become a certified public accountant and also to possibly operate her own cosmetology business. She said Allstate is helping her achieve her dreams. “I believe any dream can come true through hard work and dedication,” Ms. Martin said. “So for students like me who come from poverty or an unfortunate background, it is possible to achieve your dreams.” Allstate has joined forces with the Tom Joyner Foundation to raise money for scholarships at HBCUs and has already donated more than $1 million, totaling more than 500 scholarships. In her role as Allstate ambassador, Ms. Martin is helping Allstate promote its Quote for Education (QFE) program. With every Allstate insurance quote requested and coupled with a mention of the QFE program, Allstate donates $10 toward its scholarship fund. Quotes can also be obtained online at www.allstate.com/hbcu. HBCU supporters can go to that same website and vote for their favorite HBCU up to Nov. 30. The top vote-getting school will get $50,000 from Allstate to go toward scholarships.  

GE of Nigeria and DSU Establish New Partnership

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(Seated l-r) Dr. Lazarus Angbazo, president of GE International, Nigeria, and DSU President Harry Williams sign a partnership accord. Standing (l-r): Donna Covington, College of Bus. dean; Dr. Dyremple Marsh, College of Ag dean, Dr. Marsha Horton, College of Ed., Health & Publ. Policy dean; Provost Alton Thompson; Pamela Hall, managing dir., GE Healthcare, Nigeria; Vita Pickrum, Instit. Adv. VP, Dr. Clytrice Watson, College of Math. Nat. Sci. & Techn. dean; and Dr. Teresa Hardee, DSU COO.

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Delaware State University today finalized an agreement with GE International Operations of Nigeria that will open the door to a number of academic and technical collaborations between the two parties. Pamela Hall, managing director of GE Healthcare in Nigeria and DSU alumna (Class of 1994), said she is proud that her company has established a partnership with her alma mater. DSU President Harry L. Williams and Dr. Lazarus Angbazo, CEO and president of GE International Operations of Nigeria, signed the agreements at the end of a morning ceremony held in the Claibourne D. Smith Administration Building. GE International has been operating in Nigeria for more than four decades, with businesses spanning the country’s key sectors such as aviation, energy, health care, transportation and other areas. Dr. Williams said DSU’s partnership with GE International is significant for the University. “With the signing of this memorandum of understanding today, Delaware State University will be able to join its academic forces with GE International to help improve the quality of life in Nigeria,” Dr. Williams said. “It will also make that country one among a number of other nations where DSU is making its mark.” The agreement facilitates a number of possible collaborations: Capacity development for Nigeria in nursing and engineering Assisting with the GE manufacturing strategy in Nigeria in the area of curriculum design and certificate programs Aviation pilot training and pilot pipeline development in the country GE internship opportunities for DSU students The MOU also opens up possibilities to explore other connections with the GE businesses as well as connect DSU with other institutions in that country for future potential partnerships. Dr. Angbazo said that DSU is a “perfect fit” for the type of partnerships GE in Nigeria is interested in. “We are very proud of the potential of this partnership we are forging with this great University,” Dr. Angbazo said.  “I am especially proud that this is an HBCU with major affiliations already in Africa.” The GE CEO noted that Pamela Hall, the managing director of GE Healthcare in Nigeria and an alumna of DSU (class of 1994), was instrumental in initiating the discussions with Dr. Williams that has led to the partnership. “It is because there is an expertise at DSU and there is a need on some of the projects we are doing in West Africa,” Ms. Hall said. “If we can create a partnership, then why not?”

3rd Annual Risky Business Week Held at DSU

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DSU Police Chief Harry Downes Jr. shares his perspective on risk and safety at DSU, while Dr. Stacey Downing, vice president of Student Affairs, listens. Both were among the panelists that participated in the "State of Risk Summit," one of a number of sessions that took place during Risky Business Week.

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Delaware State University’s Office of Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) held its 3rd annual Risky Business Week Nov. 2-6. Risky Business Week activities are held each year in an effort to raise awareness of risk and safety to the University community. Michelle Shorter, DSU's chief risk officer, said this year's Risky Business Week was a success. The week began with a DSU campus emergency tabletop exercise in which a safety crisis situation ­was simulated. On Nov. 4, a breakfast meeting was held by ERM with the University’s Safety Committee in attendance for a keynote address by DSU President Harry L. Williams. Under the theme of “What Does Safety Mean at DSU,” Dr. Williams affirmed that the safety of students, faculty and staff is among the highest priorities of the institution. Throughout the week, there was active shooter training for faculty and staff along with sessions on cyber security, traveling risk and laboratory safety, as well as a “State of Risk Summit” that engaged attendees in a discussion with panelists that included David Sheppard, University general counsel; Jackie Malcolm, executive director of Marketing and Communications; DSU Police Chief Harry Downes, Jr.; and Dr. Stacy Downing, vice president of Student Affairs. Students also participated in Risky Business Week with a Nov. 4 “Play it Safe” event that featured multiple activities, games and prizes designed to educate them about risk and what can be done to make the campus safer. A particular highlight of the week was a Nov. 5 evening event that featured guest speaker Judy Smith, a crisis management expert whose career inspired the hit television series “Scandal.”  At the event, Ms. Smith spoke on the topic of “We are All Risk Champions.” “Risky Business Week was a success and we look forward to growing the event each year to reaffirm the University’s ongoing commitment to a well-established risk culture,” said Michelle Shorter, associate vice president and chief risk officer of ERM.  

College of Business Opens New Business Analytics Lab

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(L-r) Dr. Devdeep Maity, asst. professor of business admin.; Jim Waddington, Kent County Economic Dev. executive director; Judy Diogo, Central Del. Chamber of Commerce president; Leah Williams, DSU MBA graduate student; DSU President Harry L. Williams; Julian Vanderhost, DSU alumnus and SAP Product Specialist; Donna Covington, dean of the College of Business; Dr. Teresa Hardee, chief operating officer; and Vita Pickrum, vice president of Institutional Advancement.

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Julian Vanderhost, DSU alumnus (recently graduated) and product specialist for SAP, shows off some of the computer hardware and analytics software that are part of the College of Business' new Business Analytics Lab DSU President Harry L. Williams and the College of Business (COB) officially dedicated the new Business Analytics Lab that will be a premier research center for data analytics and as a cutting-edge workspace for the analysis of big data. Joined by Donna Covington, the dean of the College of Business, and other officials, Dr. Williams cut the symbolic ribbon at the new lab during a Nov. 6 ceremony. “I’m excited about this space and what it will do for our students,” Dr. Williams said. “With our priority on student success, this is a clear example of how we are here for our students.” The Business Analytics Lab, located in Room 309 of the Bank of America Building, is equipped with several mobile computer stations, curved monitors, a cabinet full of laptops with charging stations, the latest software and other tools. The dry erase painted walls promote creative thinking with its writable/erasable surfaces that allow thoughts and ideas to be jotted straight on the wall.   Dean Covington, who has led the integration of new analytics curriculum and technology in the undergraduate and graduate degree programs of the COB, noted that business analytics is one of the fastest growing skill sets in the world today. She said the ability to analyze data, predict outcomes and improve performance to guide decision making is now essential for all students in higher education to ensure that they graduate with a skill set that will allow them to be successful in the workplace. COB Dean Donna Covington said the Business Analytics Lab will be the classroom of choice for teaching business analytics. “In addition, ensuring our students are knowledgeable in examining big data to uncover patterns and predicting outcomes is not enough. We want to ensure our students are also well-versed in the application of analytics technology,” Dean Covington said. “We want them to have hands-on experience in using the leading-edge tools that can be used to make business, companies, organizations, government and academia help to anticipate and solve critical problems.” She added that that lab will be the classroom of choice for courses teaching concepts in business analytics and will be used to teach and instruct other HBCUs in the most current analytics software. The College of Business dean expressed appreciation to the DSU Office of Development for funding the purchase of 40 laptops for the lab, and also to SAP, which donated the analytics software as part of its partnership with DSU. “Of course none of this would be possible without the teaching, effort and direction of this great (COB) teaching staff,” Dean Covington said.

DSU Neuroscience Program Receives $535,000 Grant

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(L-r) Dr. Melissa Harrington, principal investigator, and Dr. Murali Temburni, co-principle investigator, will use the five-year grant to establish an undergraduate summer research program in neuroscience.

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Dr. Melissa Harrington and Dr. Murali Temburni have been awarded a five-year, $535,000 grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to establish an undergraduate research program in neuroscience. The summer program, offered in partnership with the DSU-headquartered Delaware Center for Neuroscience Research, will be focused on recruiting undergraduates from underrepresented groups and integrating them into a vibrant community of neuroscience researchers across the state of Delaware. Each year, 12 undergraduate students from Delaware State University, Delaware Technical and Community College and Wesley College will spend 10 weeks over the summer carrying out neuroscience research with faculty researchers at DSU, the University of Delaware and the Nemours, A.I. duPont Hospital for Children. The students will also have the opportunity to travel to present their research at a national conference such as the Annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience or the Emerging Researchers National Conference in STEM, an undergraduate research conference sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, as well as the Delaware Neuroscience Symposium. Dr. Harrington, the principal investigator of the grant, said that it is documented that the best way to get students excited about science and focused on becoming part of the next generation of scientific researchers is to give them hands-on experience  working in a research lab tackling a real scientific problem. “That is why we are so excited about our new program. It will give students at DSU, DTCC and Wesley the chance to be a part of our Delaware Center for Neuroscience Research by working on a research problem in neuroscience with the supervision and mentorship of the neuroscience researchers affiliated with our center,” Dr. Harrington said. “Our expectation is that our program is going to give these students the desire to go onto graduate school in neuroscience, as well as give them the skills and experience so that they can succeed there.” The Delaware Center for Neuroscience Research is an interdisciplinary, inter-institutional, virtual center founded in 2012 with support from a grant from the National Institutes of Health.   Information and application forms for interested students will be available through the Neuroscience Center website (www.delawareneuroscience.org) in early November.  Students will be selected for the program in April and over the following month will have the opportunity to meet with prospective mentors, hear about their research and tour their labs.  By the time the program starts in late May, the students will have selected a faculty mentor and identified the research project that they will work on full time for the 10 weeks of the summer program. In addition to work in the lab, the program includes twice-weekly sessions on bioethics and the responsible conduct of research, career seminars and professional skills, as well as how to think like a scientist. By combining a high-quality research experience with participation in a neuroscience-focused community and skill-building activities designed to help students think like a scientist, the program will help build the students’ preparation and enthusiasm for graduating with a STEM bachelor’s degree and pursuing a doctorate in an area related to biomedical research.

DSU Finalizes New Accords with Two Asian Universities

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DSU President Harry L. Williams and Dr. Yang Huamin, president of Changchun University of Science and Technology (seated l-r), pose after signing an accord that will facilitate students of the Chinese institution to study at DSU and then continue those studies online while working in Orlando, Fla., as part of the Disney Theme Parks and Resorts College Program. Officials from both institutions stand behind the two university presidents.

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DSU President Harry L. Williams shakes hands with Dr. Ho Sung Lee, president of Yeungnam University College of South Korea after a new agreement was signed by the two institutions. Delaware State University recently formalized new agreements with two Asian institutions of higher education. DSU and Yeungnam University College of South Korea have agreed to establish a joint bachelor’s degree program in accounting and management. Yeungnam students will complete the first two years of the degree program in South Korea and the last two at DSU. Both institutions will issue diplomas to students who complete the joint program. The University also recently acquired a new Chinese institutional partner. DSU and Changchun University of Science and Technology have reached a three-year formal agreement that will also include the Disney Theme Parks and Resorts College Program. Changchun students will study for four weeks at DSU and then travel to Orlando, Fla., where they will spend six months as part of the Disney program. While in Orlando, the students will continue to study the DSU curriculum online. DSU also recently received a visit from officials from Ningbo University of Technology of China. DSU President Harry L. Williams and other administrators and faculty met with the Ningbo officials to discuss the institutions’ joint accounting program and potential future programs.  

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