News

You are here


A Statement from DSU President Harry L. Williams

Body: 
A STATEMENT FROM DSU PRESIDENT WILLIAMS CONCERNING THE OCT. 24 VEHICULAR ACCIDENT DURING HOMECOMING Dr. Harry L. Williams, president of Delaware State University, has released the following statement concerning the vehicular accident that took place on Oct. 24 that injured seven persons – including one seriously – during Homecoming activities on campus. “It was an unfortunate accident that took place on Saturday evening, and our thoughts and prayers are with all persons who suffered injuries in the incident,” said Dr. Williams. “Our primary priority continues to be the safety of our students, employees and visitors.”  “Staff from Student Health Services stand ready to provide support to our students during this difficult time.”  The accident took place on DSU's Dover campus at 7:28 p.m. where Homecoming activities were going on all day.  The Dover Police Department is the lead agency investigating the incident with assistance and full cooperation with the DSU University Police Department. 

Aiah Senesie and Tria Stallings Crowned Mr. & Miss DSU

Description: 

The 2015-2016 reigns of Mr. and Miss DSU Aiah Senesie and Tria Stallings will be focus on the empowerment and uplift of students, according to University's top royal representatives.

Body: 
Delaware State University launched the reign of the 2015-16 Mr. and Miss DSU with the crowning of Aiah Senesie and Donametria Stallings during an Oct. 18 Coronation Ceremony. For images from the Coronation, click on: https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157659649462908/show The ceremony was entitled “A Royal Encounter,” which included a plotline borrowed from the Eddie Murphy movie “Coming to America” which helped to highlight the historic selection of Mr. Senesie as the first-ever native-born African to be named as Mr. DSU. Mr. Senesie, nicknamed The Trendsetter, is a native of Sierra Leone. He is a senior English major with a minor in political science. He is planning to continue his education in law school and then become an international attorney. His platform is “Reclaiming Your Royal Roots.” “I want to awaken the kingship and queenship in all of us by motivating, inspiring and empowering everyone I can on campus,” said Mr. Senesie, who is also in his second year as the president of the Honors Students Association and is a member of the Men of Color Alliance. Ms. Stallings, who goes by the nickname “Tria,” is a native of Newark, Del., and describes herself as a “God-fearing woman.” She is a senior political science major and plans to pursue a master’s degree in either political science or women’s studies. Her platform is “Building Your Empire – Empowering You to be You.” “I want to empower the women on this campus to be themselves, know their worth and understand that they are all queens,” said Ms. Stallings, who conducts a bible study group on campus. She is also a member of the National Society of Leadership and Success.

DSU Exhibits "Alienated and Armed" in Art Center/Gallery

Description: 

Kyle Ripp's installation work addresses the challenging subject of bullying and violence. Her art will be on exhibition until Nov. 6 in the DSU Art Center/Gallery.

Body: 
Kyle Ripp's installation exhibition is inspired by her childhood experiences of being bullied. DSU’s Arts Center/Gallery is currently featuring the installation work “Alienated and Armed” by Wilmington mixed media artist Kyle Ripp. The installation work – which will be exhibited until Nov. 6 in the Arts Center/Gallery in the William C. Jason Library on campus – is free and open to the public. The public can meet the artist during a reception from 4:30-6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 22 at the Arts Center/Gallery The exhibition is reflective of Ms. Ripp’s personal childhood experiences of being bullied. The installation provocatively confronts the loss of innocence that occurs when children realize that the world isn't always "rainbows and sunshine." Her works also use familiar childhood images to confront our views on violence, fear, aggression, innocence, and the difficult realization that we live in a flawed society. “I know the installation will provoke many levels of discussion including violence in society and gun control,” said Jennifer Gunther, director of the Arts Center/Gallery. “We will have a reflective response component, our own evolving installation, which will allow the DSU community and the public to respond to the issues raised by Kyle's installation.” Ms. Ripp has a studio at the Delaware Center for Contemporary Art in Wilmington. Her work is known for being expressive, quite personal and often tackles challenging subject matter.

Dr. Teresa Hardee Completes Harvard's Ed Mgmt. Institute

Description: 

DSU Chief Operating Officer Dr. Teresa Hardee not only completed Harvard  University's prestigious Institute for Educational Management over the summer, but her photo is also featured in an advertisement about the Harvard Institutes for Higher Education published in a recent issue of the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Body: 
Dr. Teresa Hardee, DSU senior vice president and chief operating officer, recently completed Harvard University’s prestigious Institute for Educational Management (IEM) program. Held during the summer, the two-week IEM program consisted of intense study on management and leadership in higher education taught by Harvard’s world-renowned faculty at that institution’s Graduate School of Education. Amid a highly selective admission process, Dr. Hardee was one of about 100 higher education leaders selected from around the world. The IEM program is designed for senior-level administrators who have both the responsibility and authority to shape institution-wide policy, and/or for presidents, vice presidents, and other members of the executive cabinet who participate in strategic decision-making that shapes the future of the institution. The program’s objectives include developing skills in: 1) Leading successfully in a changing context, 2) balancing internal and external leadership roles, 3) working effectively as a member of the senior leadership team, 4) fostering and supporting organizational change, and 5) articulating a powerful institutional vision and enlisting others in pursuit of that vision. Dr. Hardee, who earned her doctorate in higher education management from the University of Pennsylvania, said that the educational experience was on for the top highlights of her career. “Being around educational leaders from around the world has given me a tremendous framework for applying the concepts that I learned at DSU,” she said. “In fact, I use the knowledge that I’ve gained every day.” Dr. Hardee also noted that based on the topics discussed at the IEM program, she received powerful confirmation that DSU is working on things that are at the forefront of the most current thinking in higher education leadership.

DSU and OSCAR Host 1st-ever Regional Optics Symposium

Description: 

DSU President Harry L. Williams and OSCAR Director Dr. Noureddine Melikechi (l-r to the right of the sign) pose with representatives of nine companies that took part in the Optics Symposium.

Body: 
Delaware State University's Optical Science Center for Applied Research (OSCAR) recently hosted the first-ever Delaware Optics Symposium, bringing together businessmen and scientists from nine companies, several institutions of higher education and three federal agencies. DSU optics Ph.D. candidate Harry Burton (r) explains his research poster to an attendee of the symposium. Held Oct. 8-9 in the MLK Student Center parlors, it was the first time such a symposium took place in the six-state Mid-Atlantic region (Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Virginia). The participants heard cutting-edge presentations on emerging topics in optics as well as the wide-ranging applications of optics in military defense and security, medical diagnostics, biological sciences, energy and environmental science. Dr. Noureddine Melikechi, OSCAR director, said it was a timely year to hold the symposium, as 2015 has been proclaimed by the United Nations as the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies. “The aim of this symposium was to provide a forum for interaction among scientists engaged in optics-related research in the Mid-Atlantic region,” Dr. Melikechi said. “With this being the first-ever regional symposium, we are looking forward to creating a regional force in optics and photonics that will spur economic development.” The symposium was attended by representatives of the following companies: SPIE, Zurich Instruments, Leica Microsystems, Coherent Inc., FEI, Ophir Photonics, Praxair, B&W Tek, Axiom Optics and Nikon Instruments. Also participating in the two-day event were researchers, scientists and officials from the Army Research Lab, the National Science Foundation, Old Dominion University, Princeton University, Hampton University, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Delaware.

"Colorful China" at DSU -- Photo Slideshow

Description: 

The "Colorful China" performance took place on Sept. 30 in DSU's Education and Humanities Theatre.

Body: 
DSU was enriched with “Colorful China,” a wonderful presentation of Chinese ethnic culture in a performance on Sept. 30 in the Education and Humanities Theatre. For images of the performance, click on https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157659176331728/show. “Colorful China” is a cultural exchange program organized by the Chinese National Museum of Ethnology under the guidance of the State Ethnic Affairs Commission.  Focusing on displaying Chinese ethnic custom culture of 56 ethnic groups in that Far East nation, the critically acclaimed presentation has been performed in numerous countries around the world.  

DSU, Gov. Markell Formally Dedicate OSCAR Building

Description: 

With the OSCAR Building behind him, Gov. Jack Markell speaks during the dedication ceremony, noting that Delawareans "have a collective obligation to let people know about the research going in this building."

Body: 
Gov. Jack Markell joined DSU administrators, board members and scientists on Sept. 25 to formally dedicate the Delaware Institute for Science and Technology’s Optical Science Center for Applied Research (OSCAR) Building on campus. (L-r ) State Rep. Charles Potter Jr., DSU President Harry L. Williams, Dover Mayor Robin Christiansen, OSCAR scientist Dr. Matthew Bobrowski, Gov. Jack Markell and OSCAR Founding Director Dr. Noureddine Melikechi watch as the Delaware governor controls the laser that cuts the ribbon on Sept. 25, symbolizing the completion of the Optical Science Center for Applied Research at DSU. The $18 million OSCAR Building houses the University’s robust optics research program, which investigates a diverse range of novel applications of laser technologies. The research facility was made possible through the support of Gov. Markell, who persuaded the General Assembly to agree to contribute $10 million in state funding toward the building’s construction. “The state’s investment in this OSCAR Building will help to build on the years of progress made by the students and faculty of DSU’s Optics Program,” Gov. Markell said. “With this unique infrastructure in place, we are hopeful that OSCAR researchers will be better able to find solutions to some of the scientific challenges facing us today.” Much of the OSCAR work involves research that seeks to improve upon the use of current laser technologies and create new ones that can speed up the early diagnosis of many diseases, upgrade the ability of military soldiers in the field to detect dangerous threats, provide analysis of the Mars environment to understand its potential to sustain life, and be applied in many other areas.   The construction of the OSCAR Building began in November 2013 and was completed on June 1 of this year. The 28,000-square-foot, three-story building provides DSU Optics scientists and faculty with a facility specifically designed for optics research. As such, the laboratory side of the building sits atop a deep concrete foundation that eliminates the ground vibrations that can disrupt the accurate use of laser technology. The building’s completion highlights the 20-year work of Dr. Noureddine Melikechi, director of OSCAR, who founded DSU’s involvement in optics research in 1998 with the Center for Applied Optics Research. Through the diligent research of Dr. Melikechi and other optics scientists at DSU over the years, the program has attracted tens of millions of dollars in research grants from sources such as the National Science Foundation and NASA. In reflecting on the tremendous progress that DSU has made in the sciences and technologies of light, Dr. Melikechi said he is “hopeful and humbled” by the possibilities that the Optical Science Center for Applied Research Building will present.    DSU Optics Ph.D. candidate Alissa Mezzacappa (l) fields a question from Delaware Gov. Jack Markell as he takes a tour of the OSCAR Building. “This spectacular building is a convergence point where interdisciplinary science, technology, education and innovation will flourish together for the benefit of all.  OSCAR is about light,” Dr. Melikechi said. “Light is life. Light is in our past and present and I have no doubt that its impact on our lives will be even more profound in the future.”   DSU President Harry L. Williams said that visionary thinking and pursuits are what transformed optics into the prolific research program it has become at DSU. “Just as we have witnessed the development of optics research here over the last 20 years, DSU has other science disciplines such as neuroscience, chemistry and others that appear to be on a similar trajectory,” Dr. Williams said. “The mentality of limitless possibilities is a mindset that is being adopted by more and more of our faculty and portends an exciting future for this institution.” Among some of the research projects currently underway in the OSCAR Building: Dr. Noureddine Melikechi’s research focuses on developing sensitive optical techniques for the early detection of cancer, including prostate cancer and epithelial cancer. Dr. Yuri Markushin is working on the use of nanoparticles that can be used to tag specific proteins and help detect tumors that are smaller than one centimeter. The laboratory of Dr. Amir Khan is working with lasers and optics designs to develop a greenhouse gas sensor for methane and nitrous oxide. Dr. Tripathi and her team are developing next generation optical imaging systems such as LADAR – a remote sensing technology that measures distance and properties of an object by illuminating it with a laser and analyzing the reflected light. Dr. Deborah Santamore is working to resolve experimental problems that nanodiamond-based sensors currently face, and therefore help advance the development of ultra-high resolution imaging magnetometry. A team of researchers under Dr. Gour S. Pati is studying the interaction of light with matter in atomic vapor to explore a wide variety of atomic phenomena including slow and superluminal high propagation for sensing, detection and precision measurement applications. Dr. Sokratis Makrogiannis and his team are working on the development of mathematical techniques and computer algorithms for tissue identification and computer-aided diagnosis using MRI and CT imaging data. Dr. Qi Lu and her team are using an atomic force microscope to research how gold nanoparticles  affect the adhesive and elastic properties of cell membranes. Dr. Hacene Boukari and his team are utilizing a variety of high-resolution microscopes to assess changes in the shapes of sickle cells with the goal of developing an optical diagnostic tool. Dr. Thomas Planchon’s research group is working to develop novel instrumentation using the numerous properties of light. One of the projects focuses on developing novel optical microscopes for imaging of live specimens. Dr. Wafa Amir is working to develop novel optical imaging tools for biomedical applications.

Two New DSU Alumni Scholarship Endowments are Established

Description: 

(L-r) DSU President Harry L. Williams, Laurie Bickham Gray and Bryant Bell hold a display check symbolizing the $134,000 Scholarship Endowment established by the late Jane Virginia Waters Bickham (Ms. Bickham mother and Mr. Bell Aunt).

Body: 
DSU recently recognized two separate endowments that have been established by alumni during the Sept. 19 President’s Pre-Game Reception. (L-r) DSU President Harry L. Williams; Kristin Brinkley and Anthony Brinkley (daughter and husband of Peggy C. Brinkley) and Michael Miller, director of Major Gifts, all hold a display check for the endowed scholarship and named scholarship established in Mrs. Brinkley's name. A $134,000 endowed scholarship has been established  by the late Jane Virginia Waters Bickham, who made the decision to make a lasting gift to her alma mater prior to her death in December 2014. Mrs. Bickham, a native of Greenwood, Del., earned a bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education in 1961 from then-Delaware State College. Afterwards  she found joy in teaching and remained in the profession for 36 years, mostly as a kindergarten teacher in California’s Covina Valley School District. The Jane Waters Bickham Endowed Scholarship will benefit students majoring in education. A $10,000 endowed scholarship as well as an additional $5,000 scholarship, have both been established in the name of the late Peggy Cuffee Brinkley by her family. She passed away in June 2015. Mrs. Brinkley graduated with honors in 1979 from then-Delaware State College with a degree in Economics and Business Administration. She went on to enjoy a career with Pepco Holdings. According to her family, Mrs. Brinkley often credited the preparation she received at DSC as a key factor to her success in corporate America. The $5,000 scholarship will benefit Delmar High School students matriculating to DSU. The family of Brinkley – a 1975 Delmar High School graduate – said that it wanted to ensure that any intellectually gifted students from that school would have the opportunity to attend DSU. The $10,000 Peggy Cuffee Brinkley Memorial Endowed Scholarship will be available to any student attending DSU.

DSU's Leah Williams Introduces VP Biden at HBCU Conference

Description: 

Leah Williams (l) chats with Vice President Joe Biden off-stage before she introduced him at the HBCU Week Conference in Washington, D.C.

Body: 
Leah Williams, DSU College of Business graduate student, represented Del State greatly on Sept. 22 at the HBCU Week Conference in Washington, D.C., where she was selected to introduce Vice President With Vice President Joe Biden to her left, DSU College of Business graduate student Leah Williams introduced him before he spoke at the HBCU Week Conference in Washington D.C. In her introduction, she told the gathering that Vice President Biden "is a very family-oriented and charismatic man, and through all of his accolades has always remembered to build others up along the way, to help them live with purpose, live to inspire and live to elevate others for generations to come." Joe Biden, who spoke on the last day of the event. In addition to introducing Vice President Biden, Ms. Williams also shared with the conference gathering her appreciation of DSU with the conference attendees. “I have had an awesome HBCU experience thanks to my DSU president, Dr. Harry L. Williams; my College of Business dean,  Donna Covington; my band director Randolph J. Johnson, and all members of the esteemed Delaware State University family,” said Ms. Williams. “I believe that HBCUs give students the chance to enhance themselves as they find themselves while working toward their dreams.” Ms. Williams was presented with the prestigious opportunity at the conference as the result of her induction as a 2015-2016 HBCU All-Star Ambassador. The conference – held at the Washington Marriott Hotel –  was sponsored by the White House Initiative on HBCUs. Afterwards, Ms. Williams said she was blown away by the conference. “The Class of 2015-2016 All-Stars is so inspiring and powerful; I had a wonderful time and left so excited about the future,” Ms. Williams said. “The attorney for the Trayvon Martin case actually spoke to us and told us his story with the message of making sure you make the right choice when no one is looking and when God puts you in the situation to do so.” Ms. Williams, who in May graduated Summa Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Science degree in Management, was the 2015 recipient of DSU’s Presidential Academic and Leadership Awards. She has chosen to remain at DSU to earn her MBA. She is also working for SAP, a global technology company, on a new SAP-DSU initiative called Project Propel, to provide HBCU students with opportunities in the corporate sector.

DSU Receives $2.6M First in the World Grant

Description: 

The funding supports DSU's Access to Success initiative that seeks to increase the applications, enrollments and retention in higher ed of at-risk and underrepresented students who are from low-income families. DSU was one of 17 recipients of the First in the World grants; and those grant awardees were selected out of more than 300 applicant institutions.

Body: 
The U.S. Department of Education announced this week that Delaware State University has been selected among 17 colleges and universities to be awarded funding under the First in the World grant program. As part of that program, DSU will receive $2,647,764 that will be used in support of its Access to Success initiative, which seeks to increase the applications, enrollment and retention in postsecondary education of at-risk and underrepresented students who are from low-income families and would be first-generation college students. "A major part of the land-grant legacy of Delaware State University is to provide access to underrepresented students," said DSU President Harry L. Williams. "This grant demonstrates that DSU and the Obama Administration are on the same page when it comes to better preparing first-generation and at-risk students for higher education, as well as helping them to stay in school and graduate." DSU was one of 17 recipients of the First in the World grants; and those grant awardees were selected out of more than 300 applicant institutions. DSU’s Access to Success program partners the University with the American College Application Campaign, ACT (a nonprofit education organization), and the National Student Clearinghouse. The partnership will develop a college match and fit tool and implement a postsecondary enrollment model that high school guidance counselors can use to assist at-risk students in determining a list of institutions from which they are most likely to be enroll and graduated following high school. Delaware's Congressional delegation -- U.S. Sen. Tom Carper and U.S. Sen. Chris Coons and U.S. Rep. John Carney -- helped DSU get the grant through letters of support for the Access to Success initiative. "As a parent and as someone who has had the honor to serve Delawareans at both the federal and state level, few issues have been more important to me-and continue to be more important to me-than raising student achievement," said Sen. Carper. "Outside factors, including the cost of higher education, can force students to give up on their dreams of a diploma. While I believe education is a shared responsibility among the student, parents, schools and government, this federal grant will go a long way toward keeping our students on track to graduate." U.S. Rep. John C. Carney, Jr., agrees that improving access to higher education is one of the most critical challenges facing our country today. “DSU has long been a leading force in our state for providing educational opportunities to disadvantaged students,” Rep. Carney said. “Through the Obama Administration’s First in the World program, DSU will have the chance to build upon their efforts and to implement new, innovative ways to expand access to young people who need it most.” The First in the World grant program is part of the Obama Administration’s ambitious agenda to drive innovation and keep a higher education within reach for all Americans. “We all know that innovation can take many forms and as a key part of the Administration’s goal to promote college access and affordability, the First in the World program aims to support a wide range of innovation to improve student outcomes,” said U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. "We are pleased to support these educational leaders who are driving exciting innovations to achieve those goals.”

Pages