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DSU Dover & Sussex to reopen on time 2/14; NCCo delayed.

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Kent County got a total of about seven inches of snow over the course of the snow event that began on Wednesday night.

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DSU's main campus in Dover and its Georgetown site will reopen at its regular start time on Friday, Feb. 14 (today). All employees should arrive at those locations at their regular reporting time. The DSU@Wilmington site will delay its reopening today until 11 a.m. All employees at that site should arrive at that time.

Several DSU Events Postponed Due to Forecasted Winter Storm

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Due to a winter snowstorm that is forecasted for the entire state of Delaware beginning on late Wednesday evening (tonight) and throughout the day on Thursday, Delaware State University has postponed the following events on campus: The Founder’s Day events originally scheduled from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13 in the MLK Student Center and at Loockerman Hall is rescheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 25.  The Make Your Mark Guest Speakers Series event on the book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13 in the E&H Theatre. The Hornet Days events on campus from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 14. The rescheduled dates for the above events will be announced later. The DSU Administration has not yet made a decision on the status of University operations for Thursday, Feb. 13. It is expected that a decision will be made by late Wednesday evening (sometime after 10:30 p.m.) and publicized on all University communication channels (website, email, DSU Snowline). 

DuPont CEO Ellen Kullman Gives Corporate Wisdom during DSU Visit

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DSU President Harry L. Williams and DuPont CEO Ellen Kullman discussed wide range of corporate topics during a 40-minute Open Forum before a packed Longwood Auditorium in the Bank of America Building.

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Ellen Kullman shared how she worked her way up through the ranks of DuPont to become its CEO. Ellen Kullman, CEO of DuPont and the chair of its Board of Directors, and DSU President Harry L. Williams engaged in a dialogue during a Feb. 11 Open Forum on the current emphasis of Delaware’s largest private employer, the importance of connecting science with the marketplace, and the important skills needed to work for the company. The discussion took place on stage in the Bank of America Building’s Longwood Auditorium before a standing-room-only crowd of students and faculty. As the DuPont CEO since 2009, Ms. Kullman is the 19th executive to lead the company since DuPont was founded in 1802. In overseeing the science company – which has 66,000 employees worldwide – Ms. Kullman has been ranked as #3 among the "50 Most Powerful Women in Business" by Fortune magazine, and also was named one of the 50 "World’s Most Powerful Women" by Forbes magazine. Prior to the Open Forum, Ms. Kullman paid a visit to the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center where she spoke with student and faculty scientists about the 14 research projects that were on display there in poster presentations. “It was very exciting to see these research projects,” Ms. Kullman said. “I enjoyed the passion that the researchers had for what they are doing.” The DuPont CEO shared that she is a native of Wilmington. After earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, she worked for Westinghouse and General Electric before joining  DuPont in 1988. On the way to DuPont, she earned a Master of Business Administration degree. In noting that DuPont is a market-driven global science company, Dr. Williams asked the CEO how DuPont “connects the dots” from science to the market. Ms. Kullman said that in the past, DuPont operated under the principal that if the company created the product, the marketplace would come. “Now we spend a lot of time creating cross-sectional teams that work to bring science and engineering to the market,” she said. “If we don’t connect the dots from our science to the market, we won’t be successful.” Ellen Kullman listens to Rita-Kusi Appiah, a plant science graduate student, who explains her epigenetics research. The CEO noted that DuPont has established 12 Innovation Centers around the world, which are places for scientists, marketers and customers to come together and talk about what can be. “It has globalized our company,” she said. Ms. Kullman said in order to stay relevant and successful, DuPont has had to “give up the past, look to the future and do it strategically.” In doing so, DuPont has let go of its longtime traditional paint products operation and also announced plans to spin-off its chemical division to become a standalone operation. “I ran one of those businesses, so it was hard,” Ms. Kullman said. “But at the end of the day, I had to think of the greater whole.” She said because it is a science company, innovation is essential. “If we stop being an innovator, we will stop growing,” she said. “If we make our customers more successful, then we will be more successful.” When Dr. Williams asked her if DuPont would support a public-private partnership to train scientists for the new agriculture revolution, Ms. Kullman said while DuPont believes such partnerships are important, it is equally important for the goals to be aligned. “It has got to be set up for the right kind of success,” she said. “It is more than just giving money, but the money should go to something that you value and that we value.” Ms. Kullman talked about the importance of  how leaders communicate. “I have learned that the consistency of message is important,” she said. “I have learned I need to spend 50 percent more time on communications than I would naturally do.” In talking about the skills DuPont is looking for in college graduates, she said the areas of finance, accounting, marketing, sales, engineering and science research are disciplines important to the company. But she also noted that students should become adept at soft skills. “With the interns we get, I am always interested in learning if they can work as a team,” Ms. Kullman said. “You have to work with people, and for that reason soft skills are important.” She also stressed the importance of finding good mentors. “Mentors helped me understand  my self-awareness, how I come across to people,” Ms. Kullman said. “I think you need to seek out people who will tell you the truth.”

DSU Alum to Premiere Film "16th and Philly" Feb. 11 at DSU

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Isaiah Nathanial, Class of 2004, is a former four-year Hornet basketball player, has produced a documentary film about the famed 16th Street pick-up basketball in North Philadelphia that produced a number of players who would go on to compete in college and professionally, including in the NBA and overseas leagues.

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DSU alumnus and filmmaker Isaiah Nathaniel will make his alma mater a part of the premiere tour of his new documentary 16th and Philly when it screens on campus at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11 in the Longwood Auditorium of the Bank of America Building.   The screening is free and open to the public.   Mr. Nathaniel, who also played basketball for DSU from 2000-2004, has done a documentary on the famed North Central Philadelphia Basket League – known commonly in Philly as the 16th Street League, because its outdoor courts are located on the corner of 16th Street and West Susquehanna Ave. in North Philadelphia. During its prominent years of the early 1980s to the early 2000s, it was considered one of the top pick-up leagues on the East Coast.   The league produced a number of players who went on to compete in college, overseas and in professional leagues and the NBA such as Hank Gathers, Bo Kimball, Doug Overton, Lionel Simmons, Ronald “Flip” Murray, Cuttino Mobley, Aaron “AO” Owens, Rodney “Hot Rod” Odrick and many others.   Mr. Nathaniel said the documentary was made to honor the memory and legacy of the 16th Street League and preserve some of the stories.   “Anytime people talk about basketball in Philly, there’s always some who remember and talk about the 16th Street League,” Mr. Nathaniel said. “Whether you witnessed it as a player or a spectator, it never leaves you.”   Following the film, there will be a question-and-answer period between the audience and the filmmaker.

"The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" Comes to Life at DSU Mar. 5

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The critically acclaimed nonfiction book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks will come to life at Delaware State University where members of the Lacks Family will discuss the issues raised in the book during a guest speaker event at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Mar. 5 in the Education and Humanities Theater on campus. The event – which is part of the DSU Division of Student Affairs’ Make Your Mark Speaker Series – is free and open to the public. Henrietta Lacks’ daughter-in-law Shirley Lacks and her great-granddaughter Victoria Baptiste will speak at the event about the Lacks Family’s story and Henrietta Lacks’ legacy. The book by Rebecca Skloot tells the story of Henrietta Lacks (1920-1951), an African-American woman born in Roanoke, Va. and later an adult resident of Maryland.  After being diagnosed with cancer, without her knowledge she became the source of cells from her cancerous tumor that were cultured to create the first known human immortal cell line. Known as the HeLa cell line, since the 1950s it has been used for a wide variety of medical research, such as to test the first polio vaccine, numerous virus and cancer studies, the use of novel heptamethine dyes and many other projects. The book – which was selected to be DSU’s One Book, One Campus feature selection for the 2013-2014 school year – has been acclaimed for its accessible science writing and for dealing with the ethical issues of race and class in medical research.

Dover & Sussex classes to be held 2/3; Wilmington classes canceled

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The east side of the DSU@Wilmington looks nothing like this now, as a snow surrounds the building today and has prompted the canceling of classes tonight.

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All normal operations and classes at DSU’s Dover main campus and Georgetown site will be held as scheduled on Monday, Feb. 3, including evening classes. Individuals are urged to exercise caution when driving or walking on campus tonight.   Due to the snow storm that has hit New Castle County today, all classes for the DSU@Wilmington location have been canceled for Feb. 3.   DSU officials will continue to monitor the weather and conditions in New Castle County on Feb. 4 and will make a determination by noon on that day concerning the status of classes at the DSU@Wilmington location.  

DSU to open operations/classes at regular start time Feb. 3

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DSU officials will continue to monitor the weather throughout the day.

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DSU will open for regular operations/classes on Monday, Feb. 3. All employees are expected to report at their normal start time. University officials will continue to monitor the weather throughout the day.

The Three Doctors at DSU -- Photo Slideshow

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(L-r) Dr. Sampson Davis, DSU's Michelle Fisher (director of the Heath Center), Dr. Rameck Hunt and Dr. George Jenkins take a photo opp moment during a reception in honor of The Three Doctors at the home of Drs. Harry and Robin Williams prior to their speaking engagement on campus.

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Delaware State University’s Make Your Mark Speaker Series featured “The Three Doctors” – Dr. Sampson Davis, Dr. Rameck Hunt and Dr. George Jenkins  on Thursday, Jan. 30 at the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center on campus.   For images from The Three Doctors event, click on the below photo slideshow: “The Three Doctors” has become a nationally-known story of three men from low-income areas of Newark, N.J., who became friends in high school and made a pact with each other to get through high school, college and medical school successfully. Dr. Davis, Dr. Hunt and Dr. Jenkins alternately shared with a full auditorium in the MLK Student Center how they overcame peer pressure, their own mistakes, life obstacles and the rigors of academics to stay the course of their education pact with each other and achieve their joint goal of becoming doctors.

Dr. Yaba Blay, Guest Speaker, to Discuss Colorism Politics Feb. 4

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Dr. Yaba Blay is been featured on CNN, The New York Times, and other media shows as one of the leading intellectual voices on colorism and global skin color politics. She is the daughter of Dr. Kofi Blay, chair of the DSU Department of Sociology.

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The College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences will present guest speaker Dr. Yaba Blay of Drexel University, who will discuss "Colorism in the African-American Community" based upon her recent book "One Drop" at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 4th in Parlor B of the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center. The event – which is one of several Black History Month events being held on campus in February – is free and open to the public. Dr. Blay is an assistant professor and co-director of Africana Studies at Drexel University. As one of the leading intellectual voices on colorism and global skin color politics, she has been featured on CNN’s Who’s Black in America 5, CNN Newsroom with Don Lemon, The New York Times, and the FX network show Totally Bias. She is the author of (1)ne Drop: Shifting the Lens on Race, a book in which she explores the interconnected nuances of skin color politics and Black racial identity, and challenges narrow perceptions of Blackness as both an identity and lived reality. IN 2012, Dr. Blay served as the consulting producer for the CNN Black in America segment “Who is Black in American?” – a television documentary inspired by the scope of her (1)ne Drop project. She is also producing a trans-media film project focused on the global practice of skin bleaching. Dr. Yaba Blay – who is also the publisher and editor-in-chief of BLACKprint Press – is the daughter of Dr. Kofi Blay, the chair of the DSU Department of Sociology.

DSU Senior Raequan Jones Serves as Legislative Fellow in Del. House

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Raequan D. Jones, a senior political science major, is the second DSU student to serve as a legislative fellow at the Delaware General Assembly.

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For senior political science major Raequan D. Jones, he would be hard pressed to come up with a better internship opportunity. Raequan Jones (r) gets some legislative wisdom from state Rep. Donald Blakey, who is one of two DSU alumni currently serving in the Delaware General Assembly (the other is state Rep. Stephanie Bolden).   Mr. Jones of New Castle, Del. is serving as a legislative fellow at the Delaware General Assembly. With aspiration to become an attorney, this internship represents an outstanding highlight to an undergraduate journey that will end in May with his graduation.   “It is a huge stepping stone toward my career goals,” Mr. Jones said. “It will give me access to see how government works and will guide me in what I really want to do and how I want to do it.”   Mr. Jones works on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday afternoons for the Delaware House of Representatives, where he does administrative work, types memos, and records meetings of the following House committees he is serving: Veterans Affairs, Correction, Labor, Sunset as well as Telecommunications, Internet and Technology.   While his work at the state General Assembly is certainly a high point in his undergraduate years, it is not the only highlight.   Mr. Jones, a native of Norfolk, Va. has taken advantage of DSU’s global opportunities through study abroad two trips. In Ghana, Mr. Jones studied agriculture and public policy; while in the course of that work he traveled throughout the entire country. Mr. Jones also did a study abroad stint in South Korea’s Jeju Island, where he studied business at the University of Jeju.   Also at DSU, Mr. Jones served as the president of the Young Democrats from 2012-2014, and represented the University as the Opportunity Scholar at the 2011 Opportunity Nation Summit in New York City. Mr. Jones was also a speaker at DSU’s inaugural Inspired Day of Service in 2012.   As for his post-DSU years, Mr. Jones knows what his next step will be.   “I plan to go to law school and major in constitutional law,” he said. “I am a humanitarian and a human rights activist, so I believe my future will include those areas.”

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