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1st Lady's Tea/Gentlemen's Brunch -- Photo Slideshow

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Although the First Lady's Tea for graduating females and the President's Gentlemen Brunch for graduating males were separate events, the two groups came together for a combined shot with their hosts -- Dr. Harry L. Williams and his wife Dr. Robin Williams.

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DSU President Harry L. Williams and his wife, University First Lady Robin Williams celebrated the Class of 2016 during the traditional First Lady’s Tea and the DSU President Gentlemen’s Brunch. The two events were held separately, but nonetheless adjacent to each other in the parlors of the MLK Jr. Student Center. At the events’ end, however, the graduating men and women came together to join the president and his wife for a symbolic group photo – (shown above) with the men encircling the women as their protectors, and the women inside the circle as the sustainers of the men who surrounded them. For images of both events, click on the below link:. https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157668065871235/show

Gov. Markell Signs DSU 125th Resolution

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Celebrating the signing of Senate Joint Resolution No. 8: (l-r) Dr. Vita Pickrum, Dr. Bradley Skelcher, State Sen. Brian Bushweller, State Rep. Timothy Dukes,  DSU President Harry L. Williams, State Rep. Ronald Gray, Gov. Jack Markell (seated), State Rep. Harvey Kenton, Dr. Stacy Downing, Rep Ruth Briggs-King, Rep Dave Wilson and Rep Lyndon Yearick

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On May 3, Gov. Jack Markell signed Senate Joint Resolution No. 8, which honors DSU in the observance of its 125th anniversary. Sponsored by State Sen. Brian Bushweller and State Rep. Sean Lynn, the below Senate Joint Resolution No. 8 reads:     DELAWARE STATE SENATE 148th GENERAL ASSEMBLY SENATE JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 8   HONORING DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY ON THE OCCASION OF THE 125TH ANNIVERSARY OF ITS FOUNDING ON 15 MAY, 1891, AND DESIGNATING 15 MAY 2016 AS “DSU DAY IN DELAWARE.”             WHEREAS, on the 15th Day of May, 1891, the Delaware General Assembly enacted legislation establishing an institution of higher learning to be known as “the State College for Colored Students”; and             WHEREAS, the legislature’s action came in response to the enactment by the U.S. Congress the year before of the Second Morrill Act, which provided for the establishment of land-grant colleges for African American students in states that maintained separate educational facilities for white and black students; and             WHEREAS, the new college first opened its doors for classes on the Second Day of February, 1892, with a total of twelve students, a number which had risen, by 1895, to 28 students, with the first class of degree candidates graduating in 1898; and             WHEREAS, when the college began, five courses of study leading to a baccalaureate degree were offered: Agricultural, Chemical, Classical, Engineering, and Scientific; with a Preparatory Department being established in 1893 for students who needed remedial education upon entering the college before pursuing a major course of study; and             WHEREAS, a three-year “normal course,” leading to a teacher’s certificate was initiated in 1897, which was extended to a full four-year bachelor’s degree course in 1911; and             WHEREAS, to provide an opportunity for its students who were preparing to become teachers, the college opened a “Model Grade School” during the 1916–1917 school year to provide a higher quality education for students in grades four through eight from both Delaware and out-of-state;  and WHEREAS, in 1921, at a time when Delaware public schools were segregated, with most Delaware African American students without ready access to the City of Wilmington—which then had the state’s only high school open to African American students—having to end their studies after completion of the Eighth Grade, Delaware State College also undertook the extremely important role of establishing a high school in the then-DuPont Building (which operated for the next 31 years) to provide downstate students with a full high school education, granting a high school diploma on successful completion of a four-year course of study, after which many of these students entered a regular course of college study; and             WHEREAS, in 1944, the college received provisional accreditation by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, followed in 1947 by an act of the Delaware General Assembly renaming the institution “Delaware State College”; and             WHEREAS, in November,1949, the continued existence of the college was threatened when its accreditation was revoked, leading to strong and concerted effort to maintain the existence of the institution and regain its accredited status, an effort led from 1953 to 1960 by Delaware State College President Jerome H. Holland, whose pivotal leadership is widely credited with guiding the institution to the point where it regained its Middle States accreditation in 1957, a status it has retained ever since, and, concurrently, has achieved and maintained national accreditations of its Teacher Education, Nursing, Social Work, Hospitality and Tourism Management, and Food and Nutritional Science degree programs, as well as the international accreditation of its College of Business; and             WHEREAS, since 1957, Delaware State has grown in stature as a center for teaching, research and public service and has broadened its programs and course offerings greatly; and             WHEREAS, while Delaware State—which, in 1993, officially became Delaware State University—has remained among the finest “Historically Black Colleges and Universities” in the United States, it now serves a diverse student population, with undergraduate studies organized into six colleges containing a total of 21 academic departments offering 53 bachelor’s degree programs, 25 master’s degrees and five doctoral degrees; and             WHEREAS, by the fall of 2014, Delaware State University’s student enrollment had grown to 4,644 students, and its campus had grown from a 95-acre property with three buildings to the present 356-acre pedestrian campus with over 40 buildings and four outdoor athletic fields, as well as two farm properties in the Kenton and Smyrna areas, subsidiary locations in Georgetown and Wilmington, and an Airway Science Program that maintains a fleet of aircraft and a base of operations at the Delaware Air Park in Cheswold; and             WHEREAS, throughout its history, Delaware State has been led by many outstanding educators and trustees, as well as ten presidents:  Wesley P. Webb (1891–1895); William C. Jason (1895–1923); Richard S. Grossley (1923–1942); Howard D. Gregg (1942–1949); Oscar J. Chapman (1950–1951); Jerome H. Holland (1953–1960); Luna I. Mishoe (1960–1987); William B. DeLauder (1987–2003); Allen L. Sessoms (2003–2008); and Harry L. Williams (January, 2010–Present); with Maurice E. Thomasson serving as acting president from 1949 to 1950 and again from 1951 to 1953, and Claibourne D. Smith serving in that capacity from 2008 until 2010; and             WHEREAS, Delaware State University remains today, as it has been throughout the past 125 years, a great treasure in the life of the First State, which has given its many thousands of students the keys to lives of success and accomplishment;             NOW, THEREFORE:             BE IT RESOLVED by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 148th General Assembly of the State of Delaware, with the approval of the Governor, that we do hereby extend to Delaware State University, its students, alumni, faculty, staff and administration, the heartfelt congratulations and best wishes of the State of Delaware on the occasion of the 125th Anniversary of this great educational institution, together with our thanks for the positive role the university has played in so many lives over the years.             BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the 15th Day of May, 2016 is hereby designated as “DSU Day in Delaware.”             BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that we also extend to them the sincere hope that Delaware State University will continue to prosper and serve as an important force for good in the State of Delaware for many more years to come.             BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that a suitably-prepared copy of this document be presented to Dr. Harry L. Williams, President of Delaware State University, upon its enactment.  

Dr. Harry L. Williams Discusses Program Deactivations

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Dr. Harry L. Williams appeared on DSU Inside Perspective to explain the University's initiative to evaluate its degree programs.

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DSU President Harry L. Williams recently appeared on a segment of DSU to discuss the University’s Program Prioritization Initiative, which led the institution to deactivate 22 degree program: To see the interview with the DSU president, click on the below link: https://youtu.be/VNi5MO5nVOU

DSU's Diversity Featured on CNN

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DSU's diversity -- such as reflected by this group of May 2015 graduates -- attracted CNN to focus on Del State as well as Morehouse College in a segment that explored the phenomenon of the enrollment of non-African-Americans at HBCUs.

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DSU was recently featured by CNN in a segment that focused on the issue of diversity at Historically Black Colleges and Universities. To see the CNN segment, click on the below link: http://money.cnn.com/video/news/economy/2016/04/27/unstereotyped-hbcu-diversity.cnnmoney/index.html DSU President Harry L. Williams and women's tennis student athletes Colleen Beck and Maria Rachi were featured on the CNN segment was produced by Gayle Contessa and on-camera personality Tanzina Vega.

DSU 125th Kickoff -- Photo Slideshow

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About 200 students, faculty, staff and administrators -- including DSU President Harry L. Williams -- participated in the "125" formation on the Alumni Stadium football field on April 26.

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DSU has gotten an early start in celebrating its 125th anniversary by holding a kickoff event on April 22 in the MLK Student Center and then by forming a human “125” formation on the Alumni Stadium football field the following week. For images from those two events, click on the below link. https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157667116178590/show The April 22 event featured remarks by DSU President Harry L. Williams, followed by a group of students who blew bubbles as a climax to the kickoff event. On April 26 about 200 faculty, staff and students formed a 125 on the football field. Carlos Holmes, director of News Services, captured formation on camera while airborne in a DSU aircraft piloted by Hans Reigle, DSU aviation instructor. The actual anniversary date is May 15. On that date in 1891, the Delaware General Assembly and then-Gov. Robert J. Reynolds enacted legislation that established the State College for Colored Students. The 125th anniversary will be observed from May 15, 2016 to May 14, 2017.

DSU Concert Choir Spring Concert, April 29

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The concert is free and open to the public.

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The DSU Concert Choir will present their Spring Concert at 7 p.m. Friday, April 29 in the Education and Humanities Theatre on campus. The concert is free and open to the public. The choir, under the direction of Dr. Lloyd Mallory Jr., will perform repertoire from its Spring Tour, which will include hymn arrangements, sacred choral anthems and Negro spirituals.

DSU Celebrates Earth Day; Tree Campus USA Reaffirmed

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Dr. Arthur Tucker, DSU professor emeritus; Shawn Garvin, administrator EPA Region III; Dr. Susan Yost, retired DSU professor; DSU President Harry Williams; Dr. Michael Valenti, forestry administrator, Del. Forestry Serv.; Alexandra Davis, DSU Tree Campus rep.; Dr. Cynthia Hong-Wa, DSU Herbarium curator; and Dr. Vita Pickrum, VP of DSU Institutional Advancement, stand with DSU's Tree Campus USA plaque.

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DSU held its annual Earth Day observance on April 22 and celebrated the University’s reaffirmed designation as a Tree Campus USA. Joining DSU President Harry L. Williams for the observance program were Shawn Garvin, administrator of the EPA Region III, and Dr. Michael A. Valenti, forestry administrator, Delaware Forest Service of the Delaware Department of Agriculture. For images from the event held in the MLK Jr. Student Center, click on the below link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157665153633233/show Originally awarded the designation in 2012, the Tree Campus USA status has now been held by DSU for five consecutive years. The designation goes to schools that have an implemented plan for tree care that is supported by school allocations, an established Campus Tree Advisory Committee, related education outreach, as well as an annual observance of Arbor Day. While being among 255 schools in the country to have the Tree Campus USA designation, DSU is the only school in Delaware with that title. In 2012, DSU was the first Historically Black College or University (HBCU) to earn the designation; it has since been joined by four other HBCUs (Tennessee State University, Texas State University, Virginia State University and West Virginia State University). The DSU main campus in Dover currently has hundreds of trees that are represented by 130 different species.

Clinton presents Mother of the Movement April 22 at DSU

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The Mothers of the Movement will share why Hillary Clinton should be supported in her presidential bid.

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The Hillary for Delaware presidential campaign will present a town hall meeting at DSU featuring the Mothers of the Movement – all who have had a son, daughter or fiancé killed by a questioned police action – at 3 p.m. Friday, April 22 in the Longwood Auditorium in the Bank of America Building on campus. The event is free and open to the public. The Mothers of the Movement will include: Gwen Carr – the mother of Eric Garner, a 43-year-old Staten Island man who died after NYPD police officers tried to arrest him for selling single cigarettes on the street. In an attempt to apprehend him an officer administered a chokehold, which proved to be fatal. Geneva Reed-Veal – whose 28-year-old daughter Sandra Bland was found hanged in a Waller County, Texas, jail cell after she was arrested for a minor traffic violation. Marta Hamilton – the mother of Dontre Hamilton, a 31-year-old man with a history of mental health issues, who was fatally shot by a Milwaukee, Wis., police officer who was subsequently fired but never charged in connection with the death. Nicole Bell – whose 23-year-old fiancé Sean Bell was fatally shot 50 times by a team of undercover NYPD officers after a confrontation on Nov. 25, 2006, on the morning before his wedding. The Mothers of the Movement group will share their individual stories and discuss why they believe that Hillary Clinton should be the next president of the United States. Although this is event is presented by the Hillary for Delaware presidential campaign, the former first lady and secretary of state will not be in attendance. The event is free and open to the public.

College of Arts, Humanities & SS wins Battle of the Colleges

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DSU's five colleges raised $25,365 during the 2016 Battle of the Colleges fundraising competition. Each college will be able to use the money they raise as discretionary funds to supplement its budget.

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Dean Marshall Stevenson and members of the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences stand proudly with their third Battle of the College trophy. For the third time in the last four years, the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences has won DSU’s “Battle of the Colleges” friendly fundraising competition.  The purpose of the battle is to secure funds from friends of the various colleges at DSU to assist with tuition, books, study abroad trips, attendance to conferences and other academic related activities.  Every college is really a winner in this event in that they keep all the funds raised to help DSU students. “Nonetheless, the CAHSS is proud to house the beautiful trophy indicating that it is the ‘best of the best” for 2016,” said Dr. Marshall Stevenson CAHSS dean.  "The college has already begun the process of awarding students funding for a study abroad trip this summer and partial tuition to worthy students in need for next fall." Below are the fundraising totals and faculty and staff participation percentages for the fourth annual Battle of the Colleges: College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences                     $9,396 (1st),   30.7% College of Business                                                                   $7,365           66.7% (1st) College of the Education Health and Public Policy                    $4,062           55.6% College of Agriculture and Related Sciences                            $3,277           11.2% College of Mathematics, Natural Sci. & Technology                 $1,275            34.3%   While coming in second in funds raised, the College of Business took first place for the highest percentage of faculty and staff who participated in the fundraising effort. Although the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences was the top fundraising college three out of four years in the competition, the COB of Business -- due to its Battle of the College-record $17,261 it raised in 2015 -- has raised the most over the four-year period -- $39,254. The College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences has raised the second-most over that period -- $36,737. 

New Appointments -Aviation, Institutional Advancement, HR

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Lt. Col. (Ret.) Michael A. Hales is the new director of the DSU Aviation Program. There are also two new appointments in Institutional Advancement.

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DSU recently announced new appointments in its Aviation Program and the Division of Institutional Advancement:    Lt. Col. (Ret.) Michael A. Hales Lt. Col. (Ret.) Michael A. Hales  has been appointed as the new director of DSU’s Aviation Program. He is a 25-year veteran of the U.S. Army, in which he served as an aviation officer at multiple levels of key leadership positions and responsibility. He is an FAA Commercial Pilot who is dual rated in both airplanes and helicopters. Lt. Col. Hales now oversees the University’s Aviation Program that offers Bachelor of Science Degrees in the concentration of Professional Pilot and Aviation Management. He leads the faculty and instructors who serve more than 100 students and personnel who maintain the fleet of 11 University-owned planes. The new director of the Aviation Program possesses a Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts  from Excelsior College in Albany, N.Y., and a Master of Arts degree in Procurement and Acquisition Management from Webster University in Webster Groves, Mo.   Pamela Mosley Gresham is DSU’s new director of Human Resources. She will lead talent acquisition activities, implement HR programs, maintain classification/compensation systems and oversee labor relations, among other managerial responsibilities. She will report to Irene Chapman-Hawkins, vice president of Human Resources.        Pamela Mosley Gresham Ms. Gresham is an attorney with bar admissions in the states of New Jersey, New York and Connecticut as well as the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. Prior to her arrival at DSU, Ms. Gresham served 2½ years as the associate director of Human Resources for Kean University in Union, N.J. She previously served eight years as a deputy attorney general and assistant section chief in the New Jersey Attorney General’s Office specializing in employment litigation. She also practiced labor and employment law as a legal counsel for the City of Newark, N.J., and  Essex County, N.J. Ms. Gresham has a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice from the State University College at Buffalo, N.Y., and a Juris Doctor from the University of Buffalo, School of Law.   Tracye Williams is the new executive director of Alumni Relations in the Division of Institutional Advancement. In incorporating more than ten years of career development experience, her key focus is to create a lifelong engagement continuum with DSU alumni that encourages and fosters their involvement with their alma mater.  Before joining DSU, Ms. Williams was the managing principal of CT Williams & Associates, a fundraising and engagement consulting firm, which served a host of Delaware nonprofit clients and focused on continuing their missions.  Prior to starting her own firm, Ms. Williams worked in health care philanthropy at MedStar, Washington Hospital Center in the District of Columbia as the director of Sustained Giving. Ms. Williams also had a professional chapter as a member of the development staff at the Bayhealth Foundation in Dover. Ms. Williams earned her MBA and B.S. in Marketing from Delaware State University. She is a native Delawarean and is active in the community with nonprofits like the Delaware Multicultural & Civic Organization (DEMCO, Inc.).                      Jovoni Simmons and Tracye Williams Jovoni Simmons has been appointed as the new manager of Alumni Engagement in the Division of Institutional Advancement. In the post, she will implement new initiatives for the young alumni community. Prior to assuming this post, Ms. Simmons was an admissions counselor in the DSU Office of Admissions where she spent two years recruiting students in the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia. Ms. Simmons has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Liberal Studies from Wesley College in Dover. She would go on to work for five years in her alma mater’s Office of Institutional Advancement, severing as an advancement service coordinator and assistant to Alumni Relations and Annual Giving. She also worked as the Cultural Infusion Liaison for the Office of Student Affairs during her time at Wesley College.

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