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BBC Broadcasts Live from DSU, Interviews Del. Veterans

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Chloe Tilley (far left), host of the "BBC World Have Your Say" radio show, listens to a veteran's comments during a live segment aired from the lobby of DSU's Education and Humanities Building.

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The name of Delaware State University was aired several times all over the satellite radio world on Jan. 18, as the British Broadcasting Corporation, better known as the BBC, broadcasted from DSU a live one-hour segment of its show “BBC World Have Your Say” on the topic of veterans’ issues. Broadcasted live on Jan. 18 from the lobby of the Education and Humanities Building, the show’s host Chloe Tilley sat at a table with 11 veterans – many of whom were Delaware residents – for a live discussion on their perspectives on what improvements the country needs to make in veterans services. Many of the veterans expressed hope that the incoming Trump Administration will give more attention to veterans’ issues. “Some of the veterans expressed that they felt let down by the current (Obama) administration,” Ms. Tilley said. The BBC made te Del State a broadcast stop after doing live segments earlier in the week in Lancaster, Pa., and Baltimore, Md. On Jan. 20, Ms. Tilley and her BBC crew will be in Washington, D.C., to cover the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump. To hear the Jan. 18 show aired from DSU, visit http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04p2rnc.  

DSU's Georgetown Site to have 2-Hour Delay Monday Jan. 9

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DSU's main Dover campus and the DSU@Wilmington site will maintain regular operating hours on Monday.

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In the wake of Jan. 7 snowstorm in Delaware, DSU’s Georgetown location will have a two-hour delay in their operations on Monday, Jan. 9. DSU’s main campus in Dover and the DSU@Wilmington site will maintain its normal operating hours on that same date.

Dr. Williams Named Among Most Influential HBCU Presidents

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HBCU Digest has named Dr. Harry L. Williams among the top 10 influential presidents, citing DSU's work in STEM development and its diversity, while also noting that continues to maintain a strong HBCU identity.

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Dr. Harry L. Williams has been named among HBCU Digest’s “Top 10 Most Influential HBCU Presidents of 2016.” Dr. Williams – who is beginning his eighth year as the 10th president of Delaware State University – is listed as the fifth most influential HBCU president in the country. According to HBCU Digest, under Dr. Williams’ leadership “Delaware State has emerged as a national HBCU brand in STEM development and support for undocumented students seeking opportunities for higher education. The school also remains among the nation’s most diverse campuses, while maintaining a strong HBCU identity and increasing presence in federal and state opportunities for research and expansion.” The HBCU Digest’s Top 10 list also includes a former DSU administrator and a former faculty member. Claflin University President Henry Tisdale, whose 26-year tenure (1978-1994) culminated as the senior vice president and chief academic officer at DSU, is listed as the ninth most influential. In addition, Central State University President Cynthia Jackson-Hammond, who was a professor of education and the dean of the then-College of Education at DSU from 1998-2003, is listed as the sixth most influential. The HBCU Digest “Top 10 Influential HBCU Presidents” includes: Dr. Harold Martin – North Carolina A&T State University Dr. Tashni Dubroy – Shaw University Dr. Michael Sorrell – Paul Quinn College Dr. William Harvey – Hampton University Dr. Harry L. Williams – Delaware State University Dr. Cynthia Jackson-Hammond – Central State University Dr. James Clark – South Carolina State University Dr. Ronald Mason – University of the District of Columbia Dr. Henry Tisdale – Claflin University Dr. Glenda Baskin Glover – Tennessee State University.

DSU Postdoctorates, Graduate Top in Research Competition

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Dr. Sridhar Boppana recently took first place in the postdoctoral division in the Delaware Neuroscience Symposium Research Poster Competition.

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Dr. Joseph Lombardo took, 2nd place in post doctoral division. Two DSU post-doctoral scientists, a graduate student and two undergraduate students made their mark at the Delaware Neuroscience Symposium Research Poster competition, held in mid-December, by bringing back first and second place awards for their respective academic levels. Dr. Sridhar Boppana, a DSU post-doctorate from India, took first place in the postdoctoral division with his poster on the “Expression of the vesicular acetylcholine in the larval and adult Drosophila central nervous system.” For the first time, Dr Boppana research showed the expression of vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the antennal lobe of Drosophila larvae. Dr. Joseph Lombardo a DSU post-doctorate from Italy, took 2nd place with in poster on the “Non-reciprocal effects of KCNQ/Kv7 channel modulation on the excitability of spinal motoneurons in mouse neonates.” His research shed more light on this channel by demonstrating that it contributes to the alteration of axosomatic spinal motoneurons excitability. Deidre Carter took 1st place in the graduate category. Deidre Carter, a biological sciences graduate student, won 1st place for her poster presentation on “Alexander’s Disease: An Astrocyte Mouse Model of TDP-43 Proteinopathy.” It was the second 1st place award within a month for Ms. Carter; in early November she was took 1st place in the biological sciences category with her oral presentation on the same research at the Philadelphia AMP Research Symposium. In addition, two DSU students – Krushali Patel and Justin Sherard– tied for 2nd place in the undergraduate division. Mr. Patel presented a poster on "Modeling Parkinson’s disease from Synergistic Interaction with Commercially-used Pesticides,”  while  Mr. Sherard presented his project on the "Overexpression of HSP27 modulates TDP-43 localization and expression” Sherard and Carter's mentor is Dr. Michael Gitcho, assistant professor of biological sciences. Dr. Boppana and Patel's mentor is Dr. Hakeem Lawal, assistant professor of biological sciences; Dr. Lambardo's mentor is Dr. Melissa Harrington, professor of biological sciences.

Kent County State Legislators Meet With DSU Officials

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Kent County legislators participate in a photo opp moment with DSU Harry L. Williams, Board of Trustees Chairman David Turner and Vice Chairman Barry Granger along with other University officials.

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DSU President Harry L. Williams hosted Kent County state legislators on campus Dec. 19 for a luncheon and information session. Dr. Williams and other DSU officials updated the legislators on the University’s legislative priorities that the institution will focus on during the upcoming General Assembly session that begins in January 2017. The DSU president, who holds this meeting annually with the General Assembly’s Kent County delegation, said this was the best-attended gathering of the legislator group since his presidential tenure began in 2010. Dr. Williams noted that it was the first time that DSU’s top ranking Board of Trustees members – Chairman David Turner and Vice Chairman Barry Granger – were in attendance.  “It gave them an opportunity to see the support we get from our Kent County legislators,” the DSU President said. Pictured in the above photo are: (Seated, l-r) Rep. Dave Wilson, Sen Bruce Ennis, Sen. Brian Bushweller, DSU President Harry L. Williams DSU Board of Trustees David Turner (chairman) and Barry Granger (vice chairman),  Rep Trey Paradee, Rep Lyndon Yearick (Standing, l-r) Dr. Teresa Hardee, David Sheppard, Dr. Saundra DeLauder, Victor Santos, Rep Harvey Kenton, Senator Colin Bonini, Rep Bobby Outten, Rep Jeff Spiegelman, Sen Gary Simpson, Sen Dave Lawson, Rep Charles Postles, Dr. Stacey Downing, Dr. Vita Pickrum, Dr. Dyremple Marsh.

2016 Dec. Commencement -- Article and Photo Slideshow

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Gov. Jack Markell congratulates Adam Cardenas on his completion of a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Mass Communications, while David Turner (l)  chairman of the DSU Board of Trustees, and DSU President Harry L. Williams look on. Earlier in the Commencement, Gov. Markell was presented an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from DSU.

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DSU held its 2016 December Commencement on Dec. 17 in the Memorial Hall Gymnasium where more than 250 graduates received their diplomas recognizing the completion of bachelor, master and doctoral degrees. For slideshow images from the Commencement Ceremony, click on the below link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157676338943931/show Among the undergraduates receiving their diplomas, eight completed their academic journey as Summa Cum Laude (3.75 GPA and above), 16 as Magna Cum Laude (3.5 to 3.74), 21 as Cum Laude (3.25 to Jennifer Seibert (center) poses with DSU President Harry L. Williams and Gov. Jack Markell after she received the Presidential Academic Award. 3.49), and three as Honorable Mention (transfer students with 60 or more credit hours at DSU and 3.5 GPA or above). DSU President Harry L. Williams presented the Presidential Academic Award to Jennifer Seibert. An Elementary Education major from Dover, Del. , Ms. Seibert maintained a 4.0 GPA throughout her entire undergraduate Summa Cum Laude journey. During the ceremony, Dr. Williams presented Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters to Delaware Gov. Jack Markell and Johnny C. Taylor, president and CEO of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund, who also served at the commencement keynote speaker. In his address to the graduating class of December 2016, Dr. Taylor noted that he often has to field media questions about the “relevancy” of Historically Black Colleges and Universities. He told the graduates that they are the most compelling case for why HBCUs matter. Dr. Taylor said that DSU now needs its graduates to show up and be successful. “You got to show up in the work place and show them that all the contributions you have received from the faculty have paid off,” Dr. Taylor said. “You have got to show that you’re are ready, willing, able and prepared to do their work and be promoted.” The keynote speaker said that DSU needs its graduates to become alumni that give back of their “time and treasurers.” He also told them that when enter the work world, graduates have to learn how to deal win the “isms”, whether it be racism, sexism, ageism or other types. He said don’t let the wrong action of one person cause them quit their job. Keynote speaker Johnny C. Taylor Jr. told the graduates it is within their power to prove the relevancy of HBCUs through their success and support of their alma mater. “Never, ever succumb to the “isms,” because they don’t matter. If it were that simple, then all of this would be a waste of time,” Dr. Taylor said. “You put of all your energy into this. And your parents, grandparents, colleagues will have sacrificed so much. Don’t let it happen.” He added,” It is your job to be successful in spite of it.” The 2016 December Commencement was produced under the leadership of DSU Commencement Committee co-chairs, Dr. Bradley Skelcher, associate provost, and Brenda Farmer, director of University Ceremonies and Events.

1st Lady's Tea/Gentlemen's Brunch -- Photo Slideshow

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DSU President Harry L. Williams and his wife Dr. Robin Williams held their traditional Gentlemen's Brunch and 1st Lady's Tea, where they treated at 25 soon-to-be graduates to food, fellowship, gifts as well good advice to take with them as the begin the next chapter of their lives.

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A number of graduates who will receive the diplomas on Dec. 17 were celebrated by DSU President Harry L. Williams and First Lady Robin Williams as they hosted them at their traditional Gentlemen’s Brunch and 1st Lady’s Tea at their residence. To see slideshow images from the event, click on the below link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157674021028833/show

President's Open House for Faculty/Staff -- Photos

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Dr. Germaine Cheatham (center) was one of many faculty and staff members welcomed by DSU President Harry L. Williams and his wife Dr. Robin Williams during their Dec. 12-13 Christmas Open House.

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DSU President Harry L. Williams and his wife Dr. Robin Williams opened up their campus residence to faculty and staff on Dec. 12-13 for their annual Christmas Open House. For images from the Dec. 13 Open House, click on the below link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157677759259936/show

Dr. Luna Mishoe, Honored As An Original Tuskegee Airmen

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Wilma Mishoe and Rev. Rita Paige stand with a military photo of their father, former DSC President Luna I. Mishoe, and hold a Congressional Gold Medal that was recently presented posthumously after it was discovered that he had been one of the original Tuskegee Airmen during World War II.

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1st Lt. Luna I. Mishoe, who also served in the Tuskegee Airmen's 99th Army Air Force Squadron. A previous unknown chapter of the life of former President Luna I. Mishoe has come to light, as recent research has determined that the seventh president of Delaware State University previously served during World War II as one of the original Tuskegee Airmen. After his first professional academic chapter as a professor of mathematics and physics at Kittrell College in North Carolina, the future president of then-Delaware State College was a Tuskegee Airman from 1942-1945 during World War II. It was during that conflict that he served as a photographic intelligence and communications officer for the all-black Army Air Force 99th Squadron, the legendary Tuskegee Airmen squadron that served with distinction in the WWII European Theater of Operations. The Tuskegee Airmen part of Dr. Mishoe’s life story was uncovered over the last year by Andre Swygert, the son of DSC alumni Arnold (deceased) and Peggy Swygert (classes of ’78 and ’62, respectively). An avid student of aviation and Tuskegee Airmen history, during the course of his ongoing research Andre Swygert discovered the name “Mishoe” in connection with the 99th Squadron and later substantiated that Dr. Luna I Mishoe was indeed a part of that legendary aviation group. Apparently Dr. Mishoe was so reticent about that aspect of his World War II service, Mr. Swygert’s discovery was also news to his surviving family. "We didn't know he was one of the original Tuskegee Airmen," said his daughter Dr. Wilma Mishoe. "He never told us about that." Mr. Swygert notes that was not unusual. “Some Tuskegee Airmen treated that as just another part of their life story and didn’t talk much about it,” Mr. Swygert said. On Dec. 10, 2016, the John H. Porter First State Chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen held a luncheon celebration in honor of Dr. Mishoe and his newly discovered connection. In addition to receiving numerous posthumous recognitions from the City of Dover, the state governor the Delaware Senate, among others, the Mishoe family also received on behalf of their late patriarch a Congressional Gold Medal that other Tuskegee Airmen had been given in 2007. In addition to Dr. Wilma Mishoe (who is currently a DSU Board of Trustees member), also in attendance at the luncheon were the rest of his children -- Bernellyn Mishoe Carey, Luna I. Mishoe II, Rev. Rita Paige, as well Henry C. Mishoe, a cousin who was raised by Dr. Mishoe and his wife Hattie at the President's Residence. “This is important biographical information about Dr. Mishoe, because it reveals a developmental chapter of his life that contributed to making him the leader that then-Delaware State College would need him to be during his 27-year tenure,” said current DSU President Harry L. Williams. After his Tuskegee Airmen service ended, he was introduced to Delaware State College for the first time when he was hired to teach mathematics and physics from 1946-1948. He moved on to join the faculty at then-Morgan State College in Baltimore from 1948-1960. During that period, he earned a Ph.D. in mathematics from New York University in 1953 (only the 17th African American to do so in math) and did postdoctoral research at Oxford University in England during the 1955-1956 academic year.                           Dr. Luna I. Mishoe Following his postdoctorate work, Dr. Mishoe returned to Morgan State where he was promoted to full professor and appointed chair of the college’s Division of Natural Sciences. In addition, from 1952-1957, Dr. Mishoe worked during the summers as a research mathematician at the Aberdeen Proving Ground’s Ballistic Research Laboratory; he would then serve from 1957 to 1960 as a consultant in math and ballistics for the same laboratory. It was in this work that he made a name for himself by creating mathematical methods for solving some of the problems faced initially by the United States in developing its first satellites.  He also developed equations for missiles. Dr. Mishoe left Morgan State in 1960 to become the president of Delaware State College, where he would build greatly on the pivotal leadership of his predecessor Dr. Jerome Holland, who is credited with saving the College from closure in the 1950s. Dr. Mishoe served as the DSC president for the next 27 years. During his long DSC tenure, the institution would experience the greatest growth ever achieved under any presidential tenure in its history. Dr. Mishoe led a transformation that included greatly improving the relationship between DSC and state government; the construction 10 new buildings on campus and the upgrading of existing ones; and the significant expansion of the academic offerings including an increase in undergraduate degree programs from 18 to 70, as well as the  establishment of the first three master degree programs. All of those developments contributed to and supported the prolific expansion of the enrollment from 368 to 2,327 students prior to his retirement. With the recent revelations concerning Dr. Mishoe’s service as an original Tuskegee Airman, Delaware State University historians now know of an additional force that contributed greatly to his leadership molding and worked with other life factors to produce one of the institution’s greatest presidents.

2016 President's Scholarship Ball -- Photo Slideshows

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The 2016 DSU Community Partners Awardees: (l-r) former state Rep. Darryl Scott, alumna Carolyn Golden Hebsgaard, DSU Alumni Association President Sheila Davis, state Sen. Brian Bushweller and Dr. Rebecca Batson, recently retired dean of University Libraries, along with DSU President Harry L. Williams who presented the honors during the ball. Not pictured is Dr. U.S. Washington, retired and longtime director of the then-Delaware State College Agriculture Program.

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Another successful President’s Scholarship Ball took place on Dec. 10 at the Dover Downs Hotel and Casino as Delaware State University raised funds to help students financially stay in school. For slideshow images of many of the people who financially supported the evening event, click on the first link below. https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157673926153483/show For slideshow images of the performance of BeBe Winans during the ball, click on the second link below. https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157673848824883/show The 2016 President’s Scholarship Ball featured a soulful and engaging performance by gospel/R&B artist and songwriter BeBe Winans. The singer was having so much fun on stage, he extended the performance an additional half-hour beyond the previously agreed upon 45-minute set. Following the performance, DSU President Harry L. Williams presented Mr. Winans with the 2016 President’s Legacy Award. Dr. Williams also presented DSU Community Partner Awards to former state Rep. Darryl Scott, alumna Carolyn Golden Hebsgaard, DSU Alumni Association President Sheila Davis, state Sen. Brian Bushweller and Dr. Rebecca Batson, recently retired dean of University Libraries.

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