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Senior Capstone Exhibtion in Art Center/Gallery

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Kelsey Cheatham (l) and Alicia Pinkett -- posing alongside their art pieces -- are two of the five artists going out in a creative blaze of glory with their respective works in the current Senior Capstone Exhibition at the DSU Art Center/Gallery.

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Trisha Calixte features clay expressionistic works.   The DSU Art Center/Gallery is currently featuring the Senior Capstone Art Exhibition of five students who will be graduating on Dec. 17. A reception in honor of the five graduating artists will be held from 5-7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 8 in the Arts Center Gallery in the William C. Jason Library on campus. The event is free and open to the public. The senior capstone artists include: Trisha Calixte, a studio art major from Milford, Del. In her exhibition, she has used clay to create figurative, ceramic, expressionistic works “with the intent of communicating and eliciting feelings of despondency, melancholy and depression." Kelsey Cheatham, a studio art/arts management double major from Camden, Del., is featuring an exhibition of nine photos is called “Perfect Imperfections,” a series that shows people’s flaws and insecurities from both external and internal viewpoints. “These flaws and insecurities are being shown both from external and internal viewpoints,” Ms. Cheatham said.” I want to show the models and the viewers that what we may think is insecurity or flaw is a work of beautiful art.” Mariel Essick has plans to show her works in future shows. Mariel Essick, a studio art/arts management major from Newark, Del. is exhibiting larger-than-life acrylic painting portraits of young black DSU women. "These large-scale figurative works are meant to emphasize the importance that young black women hold in our society,” Ms. Essick said. “It emphasizes the increasing importance of young black women as the demographics of our country and leadership change.” Beth Hakes says her art reflects her process of self-knowledge and discovery. Beth Hakes, a studio art major from Dover, Del., has created an installation work, which explores Chakras –a concept in yoga that is identified as pools of body energy in different that affect people physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually. “(It) is a very personal work of art that gives a physical documentation to my ongoing process of self-knowledge and discovery,” Ms. Hakes said. “Central to this installation are seven original photographs, which I have combined to make up one lenticular image – which appears differently depending how you look at it.” Alicia Pinkett, a studio art major from Washington, D.C., has created a series of watercolor paintings entitled “Colored Girls,” which is made up of numerous facial studies and more extended self-portraits. “I have created “Colored Girls” to show how the colors on the outside can speak for a women’s character on the inside,” Ms. Pinkett said. “I don’t want the viewer to think that their skin color is exempt from my painting, because my paintings acknowledge every race by acknowledging no race at all.” The 2016 Fall Semester Senior Capstone artist: (l-r) Beth Hakes, Alicia Pinkett, Trisha Calixte, Mariel Essick and Kelsey Cheatham.  

OSCAR Brightens the Christmas of Others

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Standing with the bags of toiletries and other items collected for patients of the Delaware Hospital for the Chronically Ill are OSCAR's Dr. Sokratis Makrogiannis, Dr. M. Amir Khan, Deborah Roussell, Julien McCray, Rohina Niamat, Jacquelyn Jones, Dr. Renu Tripathi, Alleesa Stewart and Dr. Matthew Bobrowski.

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The faculty and staff of DSU’s Optical Science Center for Applied Research recently refocused their efforts from scientific inquiry to making Christmas nice for some folks that needed someone to remember them. The OSCAR folks and other DSU individuals filled 10 Christmas bags with items such soap, lotion, socks, sweat clothes and other things that people need, to go to 10 patients at the Delaware Hospital for the Chronically Ill. “These are folks that either have no family or no family that visits them,” said Debbie Roussell, OSCAR administrative assistant. “It was a pleasure for us to be able to help those who would otherwise have been forgotten this holiday season.” She added that the OSCAR faculty and staff are already looking forward to next Christmas 2017, when they will set a goal of filling 20 bags for 20 patients. Missing from the above photo are Dr. Melissa Harrington, Dr. Qi Lu, Rasheem Frasier, Dr. Hacene Boukari, Dr. Thomas Planchon, Dr. Gour S. Pati, Dr. Deborah Santamore.

DSU Inks New Accord with University of Ibadan in Nigeria

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(From l-r) Christopher Maiyaki, director of Special Duties at the Nigerian Universities Commission; DSU President Harry L. Williams; and Dr. Lazarus A. Angbazo, president and CEO of GE Nigeria, pose for a photo after the completion of a GE-DSU Partners Network Forum that was held during the trip.

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Delaware State University recently signed a new agreement with the University of Ibadan (UI), an institution of higher education in the West African country of Nigeria that will facilitate a variety of possible collaborations and exchanges between the two schools. For slideshow images from the trip, click on the below link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157677512244205/show DSU President Harry L. Williams traveled to Nigeria during the week of Nov. 14 to finalize the agreements with UI Vice Chancellor Abel I. Olayinka and Registrar Olujimi I. Olukoya. The agreement paves the way for collaborations between the institution’s faculty and staff in the area of research, lectures and other academic pursuits. The accord also opens the door to future faculty and student exchanges as well as short study abroad programs. Within the initiative, DSU’s College of Agriculture and Related Sciences and the University’s Office of International Affairs will be engaged with UI in the partnership to also focus on solving distinct national and regional development challenges in and outside of Nigeria. This approach will capitalize on opportunities for a renewed presence of DSU, and by extension of Historically Black Colleges and Universities, in Africa. The strategy will develop a Collaborative Capacity Building-Nigeria Model that will contribute to institutional strengthening and technology development, which is expected to have a multiplier effect in Nigeria and that region of Africa. Using an evidence-based and multi-disciplinary approach, DSU will harness expertise from within its academic disciplines of Agriculture, Human Ecology, Biotechnology, Aviation, Nursing and Curriculum Strengthening in order to play critical roles in solving local human resource development challenges. During the trip, Dr. Williams and the DSU delegation -- which included Dr. Marikis Alvarez, associate dean for research; Dr. Samuel Besong, chair of the Department of Human Ecology; and Dr. Fengshan Liu, assistant vice president of International Affairs -- held meetings with private sector entities GE-Nigeria and Arik-Air, the internatonal organization of Institute of Tropical Agriculture, as well as with Benson Idahosa University, all to discuss potential collaborations in the future. This initiative is in accordance with DSU’s Strategic Plan goal of creating an exceptional learning environment that promotes challenging, high-quality curricular and co-curricular programs, engaged student learning, as well as local and global citizenship.

President's Christmas Open House for Students -- Photos

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Dr. Harry L. Williams and Dr. Robin Williams welcomed a host of students at the residents to celebrate the Christmas season with the annual Open House.

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DSU President Harry L. Williams and his wife Dr. Robin Williams held their annual Christmas Open House for Students on Dec. 6, treating them to hospitality, good food and warm fellowship. For the slideshow images from the event, click on the below link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157673557283513/show

DSU College of Business Dean Donna Covington Honored

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Donna Covington (l), dean of the College of Business, receives congratulations from Robert Martinelli, publisher of Delaware Today, during the Dec. 1 Women in Business recognition luncheon held at the Heritage Shore Club in Bridgeville, Del.

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Donna Covington poses with her framed recognition from Delaware Today.   Donna Covington, dean of DSU’s College of Business, was recently among a group of Delaware businesswomen who were honored by the Delaware Today magazine. In addition to being recognized in the current issue of Delaware Today, the magazine also held a luncheon in their honor on Dec. 1 at the Heritage Shore Club in Bridgeville, Del. Dean Covington is featured in the article “Women in Business” on page 70 of the December issue of the magazine (www.Delawaretoday.com). The article notes Dean Covington’s commitment to the mission of the College of Business to develop successful business professionals and her goals to integrate that College into the state’s business environment through partnerships with key companies. After a career as a corporate executive at companies such as Texas Instruments, IBM, Lexmark International Inc., Dean Covington came to DSU in 2014 to assume the leadership of the University’s internationally accredited College of Business. Since her arrival, Dean Covington has been focused on increasing internship opportunities that lead to viable post-undergraduate employment for College of Business students. To give a competitive edge to students, Dean Covington has spearheaded a partnership with SAP, a top market leader in enterprise resource planning and enterprise application software systems. In addition to her leadership in providing College of Business students an inside track to receive training on SAP’s widely used cutting-edge software, Dean Covington’s impact has gone beyond the DSU campus. Last June, the College and SAP co-hosted a training session for faculty representatives of a number of Historically Black Colleges and Universities to share that intellectual wealth with them as well. In the Delaware Today article, Dean Covington notes that her key to success is to “Love what you do and dream big.” A contingent of 12 women from DSU's faculty and administration ranks (along with one male photographer) traveled to Bridgeville in support of Dean Covington and in celebration of the honor bestowed on her. An entourage of DSU supporters followed Dean Donna Covington (center) down to the Delaware Today luncheon in Bridgeville, Del. where she was honored along with 34 other Delaware businesswomen.  

DSU Archives Dedicated -- Article and Photo Slideshow

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(L-r) Longtime former Jason library employee Cassius Lewis, University Archivist Rejoice Scherry, DSU alumna Mary (Maloy) Scott, DSU President Harry Williams and Dr. Rebecca Batson, dean of University Libraries, cut the ribbon and dedicate the new University Archives' location within the William C. Jason Library on campus.

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Delaware State University took a big historical preservation step with its dedication of the new University Archives in the William C. Jason Library. To view images from the dedication of the new University Archives, click on the below photo slideshow link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157675594568222/show The University Archives has been relocated to a new location in the first floor of the library, where in addition to an archive room, there is also a front archive gallery that features a presidential timeline of DSU history and other Del State artifacts. For Dr. Rebecca Batson, the soon-to-retire dean of University Libraries, it was gratifying. “It was a goal of mine to have a viable University Archives,” the outgoing dean said. It was an especially proud moment for Rejoice Scherry, the University archivist. “Students don't normally come to the Archives unless they have a specific research question,” Ms. Scherry said. “I think that the new gallery will allow those who have more casual interests in the history of DSU to come and learn in a less intimidating environment.”  She also noted that the gallery brings a legitimacy to the Archives Department.  “The Archives are no longer hidden in a corner of the library, but rather have a place of prominence,” the University archivist said. “I hope that alumni will see that the University is serious about preserving history and ultimately consider contributing their treasures to the collections.”

DSU's Mia E. Jones is Crowned the 2017 Miss Delaware USA

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DSU junior Mia E. Jones is presented as the new 2017 Miss Delaware USA by the outgoing 2016 Miss Delaware USA Alexandra Vorontsova at the end of the pageant held Nov. 26-27 near Wilmington.

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DSU is once again represented at the top of a First State pageant as Mia E. Jones, a junior art education major, has won the 2017 Miss Delaware USA crown.    Mia E. Jones, the 2017 Miss Delaware USA Ms. Jones, of Bear, Del., won the title as the culmination of the Nov. 26-27 Miss Delaware USA Pageant held at the Doubletree Hotel near Wilmington. In addition to reigning as Miss Delaware USA, she will represent the state and compete in the Miss USA Pageant that will take place in the summer of 2017. It was the second pageant win for Ms. Jones – she was the 2014 Miss Delaware Teen USA, a reign she completed during her fall semester as a DSU freshman. But even with that accomplishment on her resume, she did not take her chances for this year’s pageant for granted. “I believe everyone is on an even playing field until the judges make their selection,” Ms. Jones said. “In the Miss Delaware USA Pageant, they wanted the top grown-up and mature woman.” The competition began with the interview round. Next was the swimsuit competition, in which she wore a lime green two-piece outfit. In the evening gown competition, she invoked ancient Rome by wearing a floor length toga gown. During last category – the final question – she was asked: If a girl came from a foreign country, what would you tell her?   “My answer was: America is the land of opportunity; so when you come to America, you can believe in your dream,” she said. Her previous success notwithstanding, she said that she was surprised when she won. “I thought the first runner-up (Carisa Palumbo of Greenville, Del.) was going to win, because this was her seventh time competing for the Miss Delaware USA crown,” Ms. Jones said. Contestants between the ages of 18-28 are eligible to compete in the Miss Delaware USA competition.  Ms. Jones has the distinction, however, of winning both the Miss Delaware Teen USA and Miss Delaware USA in her first tries. Mia E. Jones is crowned by the outgoing 2016 Miss Delaware USA Alexandra Vorontsova Competing in pageants requires discipline. She said, “You have to stay healthy and fit. You have to work on yourself,” she said. “You have to know who you are before you step on the stage.” Ms. Jones is the daughter of Erik and Nneka Jones – both DSU alumni from the classes of ’94 and ’96, respectively. In addition to the support of her parents, Ms. Jones has had other role models and supporters along the way. Ashley Coleman, a DSU alumna who was both Miss Teen Delaware USA and Miss Teen USA in 1999, was an early inspiration for Ms. Jones. She said that Dr. Francine Edwards, currently the chair of the DSU Department of Mass Communications and the interim dean of the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, was her interview coach as she prepared in 2013 for the Miss Teen Delaware USA competition that year. As an art education major, Ms. Jones said she aspires to be an art therapist. “People don’t always remember what you say or do, but they remember how you make them feel,” Ms. Jones said. “I want to touch everyone’s life; that’s why I want to be a teacher.” In addition to working with children, she said that she also wants to open her own community center for the fine arts. Outside of her pageant preparation and her DSU studies, Ms. Jones is a member of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., the National Society of Leadership and Success (Sigma Alpha Pi), the Limitless Fashion Club, and also works as a camp counselor at her home Cornerstone Church.

DSU Student Scientists Make their Mark at AMP Conference

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Edward Addison, a junior chemistry/biological sciences double major, took 1st place in the Physical Sciences category for his research poster, of which he did much of the work in the late spring during a research abroad trip with nine other DSU students to the University of Science and Technology in Poland.

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Sandra Suarez, a senior agriculture (pre-veterinarian) major, took 2nd place for her Agriculture Science category research poster. DSU graduate and undergraduate students recently represented Del State well at the 18th Annual Philadelphia AMP Research Symposium and Mentoring Conference in Philadelphia, where two students won 1st place prizes for their research presentations and others also won awards. Thirteen DSU undergraduate students and 10 graduate students attended the conference. All of the undergraduate awardees took part last summer in the International Science and Technology Academy for Research Scholars trip from May 22 to June 21, in which they conducted research at the University of Science and Technology (UTP) in Bydgoszcz, Poland. Their research mentors were faculty members from UTP who worked with them on their research projects during the trip. The winning undergraduate students included: Edward Addison, a junior chemistry/biological sciences major, took 1st place in the Physical Science category for his research poster presentation on the “Synthesis, Spectroscopy and Polymerization Kinetics’ Studies of Selected Difluoroborate Derivatives and their Precursors.” His winning poster earned him a $350 monetary award. His research mentor was Dr. Borys Osmialowski of UTP. Sandra Suarez, a senior agriculture (pre-veterinarian) major, took 2nd place in the Agriculture Science category for her poster presentation on the “Characterization of Growth Kinetics of Quail Oviduct Cells in Vitro.” Her 2nd place finish earned her a $250 monetary award. Her research mentor was Dr. Katarzyna Stadnicka of UTP. Others recognized for their poster were Taylor Worrell-Stith, 3rd place in Agriculture Science category; Briana Reaves, honorable mention in the Life & Biological Sciences category; and Jamila Davis, honorable mention in the Physical Sciences category. The graduate students were from DSU’s Bridge to the Doctorate Program and competed in oral competitions during the conference. The awardees included: Deidra Carter and Alexis Shelton, two DSU biological sciences graduate students, brought home 1st and 2nd place awards, respectively, from the AMP Conference. Deidra Carter, a biological sciences graduate student, won 1st place in the Biological Sciences category for her oral presentation on “Alexander’s Disease: An Astrocyte Mouse Model of TDP-43 Proteinopathy.” Her winning presentation earned her a $500 monetary award. Her research mentor was Dr. Michael Gitcho, DSU assistant professor of biological sciences. Alexis Shelton, a biological science graduate student, won 2nd place in the Life & Biological Sciences category for her oral presentation on “CD44 – Associated Response to Hydrogen Peroxide-Mediated Oxidative Stress in MCF-7 Cells." Her presentation earned her a $350 monetary award. Her research mentor was Dr. Karl E. Miletti, DSU assistant professor of biological sciences.   Other graduate students who won awards included: Michael D. Hughes Jr., 3rd place in the Agriculture Science category; Omar Melton, honorable mention in the Physical Sciences category; Daniel White, honorable mention in the Life & Biological Sciences category; and Michael R. Peays, honorable mention in the Math/Computer Sciences category. The AMP Research Symposium was held on Oct. 29 in the Sheraton University City Hotel, Philadelphia, Pa.

Three Mass Comm Majors Win $$$ in Newseum Video Contest

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(L-r) Lorren Perry and Tiana Proctor teamed up together to win $500 for their video submission in a recent Newseum Institute competition. They were among three DSU students to win monetary awards in the contest.

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Cierra Sutton's winning project focused on the issue of sexuality. Three DSU mass communications majors recently earned monetary awards for video projects that were recognized among the top six submitted in the Newseum Institute’s ‘Free Expression On Campus’ video contest. Cierra Sutton, a sophomore from Prince George's County, Md., won a $500 award for her video submission that focused on the issue of sexuality and finding oneself. Lorren Perry and Tiana Proctor, two freshmen both from Charles County, Md., respectively, teamed together to produce a winning video that featured interviews with different DSU students and members of specific organizations to find out how the University encouraged their freedom of speech, especially with respect to tackling certain issues. In the competition, the competing students were given an issue – such as race, gay rights, sexual assault and others. Each student or team had to demonstrate how his or her campus championed such issues while protecting freedom of speech and expression. There were more than 50 video entries submitted for the competition from large to small colleges and universities across the country. “I learned a lot about issues that other students are facing on different campuses and that as students we need to protect our First Amendment rights,” said Ms. Proctor. “I learned that free expression is very important and is a right all students should have,” Ms. Perry said. “I like that Delaware State has a lot of things that are student driven because it's a lot easier to talk to your peers, and if I do have a problem that needs to go to the administration, I know the administration is very welcoming about problems or issues that students face on campus.” In addition to receiving the monetary award, the three DSU students joined the other winners for an all-expenses-paid trip to the Newseum Institute in Washington, D.C., Nov. 17-18, where the public was able to view their video and hear personally from each one of them how their works were produced. Photography and article by Michael Brooks, DSUNews Services student intern

DSU Group Visits DC's African-American Museum -- Photos

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This group of DSU students, faculty and staff were able to get one of hottest tickets in the nation's capital and visit the new National Museum of African American History and Culture, the 19th Smithsonian museum to be opened in Washington, D.C.

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A bus and a passenger van traveled on Nov. 11 from Dover to Washington, D.C., with about 50 students, along with a few more faculty, staff and alumni members to become among the first members of the DSU community to experience the new National Museum of African American History and Culture in the nation’s capital. For a wealth of images of the museum and some of the DSU folks that went on the trip, click on the below photo slideshow link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/48216028@N03/sets/72157676531300076/show Several DSU students make their way up an escalator in the National Museum of African-American History and Culture to see more of the extensive collection.   The National Museum of African-American History and Culture (NMAAHC) is the newest addition to the Smithsonian collection of museums and is the only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African-American life, history, and culture. Its grand opening took place on Sept. 24 and its tickets have been in high demand ever since. Lori Crawford, DSU associate professor of visual arts, made the trip for the group possible as she was able to obtain some tickets that were set aside for educational institutions such as DSU. Once there, the DSU group entered the NMAAHC and realized that the few hours that they would be there would not be long enough to see the four above-ground floors and three below-ground concourse levels. Those floors house more than 36,000 objects as well as countless multimedia exhibitions in a collection that reflects African-American history in community activism, family, the arts, sports, religion, civil rights, slavery and segregation. Alicia Pinkett, a DSU senior studio art major, grew up in Washington D.C. and had visited several of the other Smithsonian museums throughout her life. “Out of all the Smithsonian museums, (the NMAAHC) has more floors and history,” Ms. Pinkett said. “It made me even prouder to be an African-American, because of all of the accomplishments that are on display there.” Duane Grimes, a freshman mass communications major from Wilmington, noted that part of the rich experience was coursing through the museum among thousands of other predominantly African-American people and being a part of the collective pride of the visitors who filled the museum. “I really liked how there were a lot of older people there,” Mr. Grimes said. Camille Kaye, a junior criminal justice major from New Jersey, noted that while the museum captured the entire African America story, it was mostly uplifting. “It brought more of your attention on the successes than the hardship,” Ms. Kaye said. “There was more of the culture than the slavery.” When it comes to the power of the NMAACH, Jannah Williams, a junior art major from Camden, Del., said it best for the DSU students who went there. “It let me know that we as a people can be great, and it made me want to be great as well,” Ms. Williams said. “It is very motivational.”   The museum was established by Act of Congress in 2003, following decades of efforts to promote and highlight the contributions of African-Americans. To date, the museum has collected more than 36,000 artifacts and nearly 100,000 individuals have become charter members. The museum opened to the public on September 24, 2016, as the 19th and newest museum of the Smithsonian Institution. The NMAAHC is a public institution open to all, where anyone is welcome to participate, collaborate, and learn more about African-American history and culture. In the words of Lonnie G. Bunch III, founding director of the museum, “there are few things as powerful and as important as a people, as a nation that is steeped in its history.”   Photos and article by Carlos Holmes

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