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Curriculum for Physics Education

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.blueheader { color: #FFFFFF; background-color:#2984bd; text-align:center; font-weight:bold } .greyheader { background-color:#CCCCCC; color:#000000; font-weight: bold; } .double_right { border-right:double; } .grey_double_right { background-color:#CCCCCC; color:#000000; border-right:double; font-weight: bold; } #curriculum td { vertical-align:top; } #curriculum strong { font-weight:bold; } Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 26-191 University Seminar I* 1 26-192 University Seminar II* 1 26-202 General Physics I* 4 26-202 General Physics II* 4 25-251 Calculus I 4 25-252 Calculus II 4 23-100 Intro to Biology 3 12-204 Phil. Foundations of Education 3 01-101 English Composition I* 3 01-102 English Composition II* 3       16-100 Fitness and Wellness 2         Take the PRAXIS I Exam                 Total Credits 15   Total Credits 17 Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 26-261 Electronics for Scientists* 3 22-101 Descriptive Astronomy 3 25-253 Calculus III 4 25-351 Differential Equations 3 12-313 Intro to the Education of Children with Exceptional Needs 3 50-107 Physical Geology 4 36-201 Intro to General Psychology 3 12-207 Life Span Development 3 01-xxx World Literature* 3 xx-xxx Arts/Humanities Elective 3         Pass Praxis I & Apply to the           Teacher Ed Program (60 credits – GPA 2.5 minimum)                 Total Credits 16   Total Credits 16 Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 26-305 Thermal Physics* 3 26-316 Intro to Optics* 4 24-101 Gen & Analytical Chemistry I 4 24-102 Gen & Analytical Chemistry II 4 12-344 Instructional Technology in Education 3 26-418 Theoretical & Experimental Research* 3 34-xxx History Elective 3 12-322 Teaching Reading in Sec Ed 3 01-200 Speech 3 12-357 Effective Teaching Skills and Classroom Management 4               Total Credits 16   Total Credits 18 Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 26-361 Modern Physics 3 12-400 Pre-Service Teaching** 12 23-205 Ecology 4       12-210 Methods of Teaching Science 3       12-318/ 31-395 Multicultural Ed/Global Societies 3       12-416 Analysis of Student Teaching 1       xx-xxx Arts/Humanities Elective 3         Students must pass PRAXIS II before Pre-Service Teaching                       Total Credits 17   Total Credits 12 Total Credits: 127 ** Senior Capstone * Writing Intensive Course(s) Students must complete a course that addresses the African-American experience. This course may also satisfy an arts/humanities elective or the history elective. Please see your advisor.

Curriculum for Physics

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.blueheader { color: #FFFFFF; background-color:#2984bd; text-align:center; font-weight:bold } .greyheader { background-color:#CCCCCC; color:#000000; font-weight: bold; } .double_right { border-right:double; } .grey_double_right { background-color:#CCCCCC; color:#000000; border-right:double; font-weight: bold; } #curriculum td { white-space:nowrap; vertical-align:top; } #curriculum strong { font-weight:bold; } Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 26-201 General Physics I* 4 26-202 General Physics II* 4 25-251 Calculus I 4 25-252 Calculus II 4 24-101 Gen and Analytical Chemistry I 4 26-220 Scientific Programming 3 01-101 English Composition I* 3 01-102 English Composition II* 3 26-191 University Seminar I* 1 26-192 University Seminar II* 1               Total Credits 16   Total Credits 15 Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 26-313 Analytic Mechanics I 3 26-314 Analytic Mechanics II 3 26-316 Introduction to Optics* 4 50-309 Electronic Circuit Analysis I 4 25-351 Differential Equations 3 25-253 Calculus III 4 01-xxx World Literature Elective* 3 01-200 Speech 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 xx-xxx Arts and Humanities Elective 3               Total Credits 15   Total Credits 17 Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 26-361 Modern Physics 3 26-362 Quantum Mechanics 3 26-331 Math Methods of Physics I 3 26-332 Math Methods of Physics II 3 26-305 Thermal Physics 3 26-xxx Technical Elective 3/4 xx-xxx Technical Elective 3/4 31-395 Global Societies 3 34-xxx World History Elective 3 xx-xxx Social Science Elective 3               Total Credits 15-16   Total Credits 15-16 Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 26-401 Electricity and Magnetism I 3 26-402 Electricity and Magnetism II 3 26-407 Advanced Modern Physics 4 26-418 Theoretical & Experimental Research** 3 26-451 Introduction to Research* 3 26-xxx Technical Elective 3/4 26-xxx Technical Elective 3/4 xx-xxx Technical Elective 3/4 xx-xxx Arts and Humanities Elective 3                     Total Credits 16-17   Total Credits 12-14 Total Credits: 121-126 ** Senior Capstone *   Writing Intensive Course(s) Students will complete a course that addresses the African-American experience.  This course may also satisfy the arts & humanities elective, the social science elective or can be taken to fulfill a free elective

Physics Course Descriptions

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PHYSICS (PHYS) PHYS-111. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS I 3:3:0 An introductory course in physics with emphasis on mechanics, sound, thermodynamics, optics, electricity, and magnetism. Three (3) lectures per week. Prerequisites: MTSC-121, MTSC-122 or consent of the Department. Credit, three hours each. PHYS-111L. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS LABORATORY I 1:0:2 Laboratory section taken in association with PHYS-111 and PHYS-112. One (1) two-hour laboratory period per week. Corequisites: PHYS-111, PHYS-112. Credit, one hour each. PHYS-112. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS II 3:3:0 An introductory course in physics with emphasis on mechanics, sound, thermodynamics, optics, electricity, and magnetism. Three (3) lectures per week. Prerequisites: MTSC-121, MTSC-122 or consent of the Department. Credit, three hours each. PHYS-112L. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS LABORATORY II 1:0:2 Laboratory section taken in association with PHYS-111 and PHYS-112. One (1) two-hour laboratory period per week. Corequisites: PHYS-111, PHYS-112. Credit, one hour each. PHYS-121. CONCEPTS OF PHYSICS I 3:2:2 Designed primarily for the non-science major. A descriptive treatment of the basic principles of classical physics. Motion, energy, properties of matter, and thermal physics are treated in a conceptual, largely non-mathematical format. There are no mathematics or science prerequisites. Two (2) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory period per week. Credit, three hours. PHYS-122. CONCEPTS OF PHYSICS II 3:2:2 Designed primarily for the non-Science major. A descriptive treatment of the basic principles of sound, electricity, magnetism, and optics is presented in a conceptual, largely non-mathematical, format. There are no mathematics or science prerequisites. Two (2) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory period per week. Credit, three hours. PHYS-123. CONCEPTS OF MODERN PHYSICS 3:2:2 A descriptive treatment of relativity, atomic structure, and nuclear physics primarily for the non-science major. In the laboratory period, selected topics of 20th century physics are investigated. There are no mathematics or science prerequisites. Two (2) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory period per week. Credit, three hours. PHYS-131. ENERGY 3:2:2 A course covering the scientific, technological, economic, political, and environmental factors associated with energy production and use. There are no mathematics or science prerequisites. Two (2) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory period per week.   Credit, three hours. PHYS-141. SOUNDS AND ACOUSTICS 3:2:2 An introductory course for the non-Science major which investigates the principles underlying hi-fidelity sound reproduction equipment and techniques. Topics covered include speaker design, radio transmission, receiver and amplifier operation, and tape and CD function. There are no mathematics or science prerequisites. Two (2) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory each week. Credit, three hours. PHYS-191. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR I PHYSICS AND PRE-ENGINEERING 1:2:0 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success. Academic skills will be developed. These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the internet, and word processing. Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed. Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals. Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution, and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. Students will also engage in analytical problem solving and learn about the process of science by designing investigations to answer scientific questions and implementing the use of technology to complete these investigations. Credit, one hour. PHYS-192. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR II PHYSICS AND PRE-ENGINEERING 1:1:0 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success. Academic skills will be developed. These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the internet, and word processing. Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed. Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals. Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution, and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. Students will also engage in analytical problem solving and learn about the process of science by designing investigations to answer scientific questions and implementing the use of technology to complete these investigations. Credit, one hour. PHYS-201. GENERAL PHYSICS I 4:3:2 An elementary treatment of mechanics, wave motion, hydrostatics, sound, heat, light, electricity, and magnetism. Some calculus concepts are employed, and the problem method is largely used. Three (3) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory period per week.Co-requisites: MTSC-251 Credit, four hours each. PHYS-202. GENERAL PHYSICS II 4:3:2 An elementary treatment of mechanics, wave motion, hydrostatics, sound, heat, light, electricity, and magnetism. Some calculus concepts are employed, and the problem method is largely used. Three (3) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory period per week.Pre-requisite: PHYS 201, Co-requisites:  MTSC-252. Credit, four hours each. PHYS-211. FUNDAMENTALS OF PHYSICS I 4:3:2 A calculus based general physics sequence intended to meet the needs of students enrolled in all science, math, and technology programs (except physics and engineering majors). The sequence will address the fundamental concepts in linear and rotational mechanics, fluids, thermodynamics and kinetic theory, electric fields and circuits, magnetic fields, geometric and wave optics, and topics in modern physics. The following Strands and Goals of the General Education Program will be addressed by this course: Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, Across the Curriculum, Critical Thinking / Problem Solving, Computer and Information Technology, and Moral / Ethical Issues. Co-requisites:  MTSC-251 Credit, four hours each. PHYS-212. FUNDAMENTALS OF PHYSICS II 4:3:2 A calculus based general physics sequence intended to meet the needs of students enrolled in all science, math, and technology programs (except physics and engineering majors). The sequence will address the fundamental concepts in linear and rotational mechanics, fluids, thermodynamics and kinetic theory, electric fields and circuits, magnetic fields, geometric and wave optics, and topics in modern physics. The following Strands and Goals of the General Education Program will be addressed by this course: Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, Across the Curriculum, Critical Thinking / Problem Solving, Computer and Information Technology, and Moral / Ethical Issues. Pre-Requisite: PHYS 211 Credit, four hours each. PHYS-220. SCIENTIFIC PROGRAMMING 3:3:0 An introduction to scientific software including program writing, data processing, and visualization. Software packages used for the class include C/C++, MATLAB, and Origin. Pre-Requisite: PHYS 201 Credit, three hours. PHYS-250. RADIOISOTOPES 3:2:2 A lecture and laboratory course designed to provide a theoretical and practical knowledge of radioisotopes. The lecture topics include properties of radiation, nuclear reactions, health physics, and applications of radioisotopes in research and industry. In the laboratory, emphasis is placed on radiation detection, and measurement with appropriate safety precautions. Two (2) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Completion of the Mathematics requirements under General Education. Credit, three hours. PHYS-261. ELECTRONICS FOR SCIENTISTS 3:1:4 The course includes the development of skills and understanding of basic principles of electronic instrumentations. Typical topics include the study and use of simple circuits and basic electronic devices like diodes and transistors, the measurement of characteristics of electronic signals and the use of basic instrumentation like oscilloscopes, amplifiers, signal generators, power supplies, detectors and others for conducting concrete physical experiments. One (1) laboratory period. Prerequisites: MTSC-252, PHYS-202. Credit, four hours. PHYS-302. SIGNAL PROCESSING I 3:3:0 An introduction to both the theory and applications in signals and systems. Discrete and continuous time signals and systems, sampling, and conversion between analog and digital signals.Prerequisites: ENGR-212. Credit, three hours. PHYS-305. THERMAL PHYSICS 3:3:0 An intermediate course on the thermal phenomena involving gases and solids. The topics included are thermometry, calorimetry, specific heat, expansion, heat transfer, introductory kinetic theory, laws of thermodynamics, and applications. Three (3) lectures per week. Prerequisites: PHYS-251, MTSC-252, PHYS-201, PHYS-202. Credit, three hours. PHYS-306. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS OF PHYSICS 3:3:0 Development and computer-assisted analysis of mathematical models in chemistry, physics, and engineering. Typical topics include reaction rates, particle scattering, vibrating systems, least square analysis, and quantum chemistry. One (1) class period and two (2) computer laboratory periods. Prerequisites: MTSC-251, MTSC-252, PHYS-201, PHYS-202, PHYS 220  Credit, three hours. PHYS-307. SOUND AND VIBRATION 3:2:2 An intermediate course in the fundamentals of periodic phenomena including wave motion in solid, liquid, and gaseous media, and introductory acoustics. Two (2) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: MTSC-251, PHYS-201, PHYS-202. Credit, three hours. PHYS-310. OPTICAL ELECTRONICS 3:3:0 An overview of laser and optical systems with emphasis on optical beams and resonant laser cavities, characteristics of typical lasers (gas, solid state, and semiconductor), and application of optical devices. Prerequisites: PHYS-351. Credit, three hours. PHYS-311. FIBER OPTICS COMMUNICATIONS 4:3:2 The course enables students to gain theoretical and practical background in both physics and engineering aspects of fiber optic communications including the fundamental principle of light propagation in optical fibers and waveguides, the critical components of fiber optic networks, and fiber optical network systems. Prerequisites: PHYS-316. Credit, four hours. PHYS-313. ANALYTICAL MECHANICS I 3:3:0 An intermediate level sequence of courses addressing the mechanics of single particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies. The effects of forces and moments are investigated first through the equilibrium of structures and then through the study of dynamic systems. The conservation principles will be emphasized, and Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics will be used to analyze a variety of mechanical systems. Four (4) lecture periods per week. Prerequisites: MTSC-251, MTSC-252, PHYS-201, PHYS-202. Credit, four hours each. PHYS-314. ANALYTICAL MECHANICS II 3:3:0 An intermediate level sequence of courses addressing the mechanics of single particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies. The effects of forces and moments are investigated first through the equilibrium of structures and then through the study of dynamic systems. The conservation principles will be emphasized, and Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics will be used to analyze a variety of mechanical systems. Four (4) lecture periods per week. Prerequisites: MTSC-251, MTSC-252, PHYS-201, PHYS-202. Credit, four hours each. PHYS-315. COMPUTER COMMUNICATIONS 3:3:0 An introduction, with an engineering emphasis, to the basic concepts of computer communication networks; network protocols, architecture, packet switching, LAN and WAN technologies, internet protocols, network performance, security, and management. Three (3) lectures per week. Prerequisites: PHYS-213. Credit, three hours. PHYS-316. INTRODUCTION TO OPTICS 4:3:2 An intermediate course in the fundamentals of physical optics. Topics included are theories of light, measurement of the speed of light, reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction, scattering, polarization, crystal optics, lasers and holography, optical instruments, and spectroscopy. Three (3) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: MTSC-251, MTSC-252, MTSC-201, MTSC-202. Credit, four hours. PHYS-317. FOUNDATIONS OF BIOENGINEERING 3:3:0 An overview of the structure and function of biological molecules. The course covers in depth the physical aspects of human anatomy, molecular, and cellular biology. Credit, three hours. PHYS-331. MATHEMATICAL METHODS OF PHYSICS I 3:3:0 An intermediate course covering applied differential equations, vectors, matrices, Fourier series, Laplace transformations, and boundary value problems in general. Three (3) lectures per week. Prerequisites: MTSC-251, MTSC-252. Credit, three hours. PHYS-332. MATHEMATICAL METHODS OF PHYSICS II 3:3:0 An intermediate treatment of mathematical topics including complex variables, linear vector spaces, and integral transforms. Prerequisites: MTSC-251, MTSC-252. Credit, three hours. PHYS-351. APPLIED PHYSICS LAB I 3:1:4 An intermediate level course sequence in which applications of basic principles to laboratory systems are stressed. Areas treated include signal processing, electro-optical devices, and automated laboratory systems. One (1) lecture and two (2) two-hour laboratory sessions per week. Prerequisites: ENGR-205. Credit, three hours. PHYS-352. APPLIED PHYSICS LAB II 3:1:4 An intermediate level course sequence in which applications of basic principles to laboratory systems are stressed. Areas treated include signal processing, electro-optical devices, and automated laboratory systems. One (1) lecture and two (2) two-hour laboratory sessions per week. Prerequisites: ENGR-205. Credit, three hours. PHYS-361. MODERN PHYSICS 3:3:0 A course covering an introduction to the special theory of relativity, wave-particle duality, the quantum theory and their application to the study of the structure of atoms, and the atomic nuclei. Prerequisites: MTSC-251, MTSC-252, PHYS-201, PHYS-202. Credit, three hours. PHYS-362. QUANTUM MECHANICS 3:3:0 A course in the basic principles of quantum mechanics covering the Schrodinger equation, operators and transformation theory, angular momentum, atomic structure, and perturbation theory. Three (3) lectures per week. Prerequisites: PHYS-313, PHYS-314, PHYS-361. Credit, three hours. PHYS-404. INTRODUCTION TO VLSI DESIGN 4:3:2 An introduction to the design and technology of very large scale integrated (VLSI) devices, circuits and systems including logic design fundamentals, graphics layout, clocking and timing, architecture, performance, limitations, packaging, and a required design project. Prerequisites: ENGR-309. Credit, four hours. PHYS-405. ELECTRONICS PHYSICS I 3:1:4 An intermediate course in applied electronics. One (1) lecture and two (2) two-hour laboratory periods per week. Credit, three hours each. PHYS-406. ELECTRONICS PHYSICS II 3:1:4 An intermediate course in applied electronics. One (1) lecture and two (2) two-hour laboratory periods per week. Credit, three hours each. PHYS-407. ADVANCED MODERN PHYSICS 4:3:2 New concepts of physics developed in the 20th century, namely quantum mechanics and relativity, are applied to study a variety of modern physics problems ranging from atomic and nuclear physics to molecular physics and nuclear physics. Three (3) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: MTSC-251, MTSC-252, PHYS-201, PHYS-202, PHYS-361. Credit, four hours. PHYS-408. MODERN OPTICAL TECHNIQUES 3:3:0 The course enables students to gain both physics and engineering aspects of various modern optical imaging, sensing, and detection techniques. Focus is given to applications in industry, defense and security, and life science. Prerequisites: PHYS-316. Credit, three hours. PHYS-409. BIOSENSORS AND BIOINSTRUMENTATION 4:3:2 Origins and characteristics of bioelectric signals, recording electrodes, biopotential amplifiers, basic sensors, chemical, pressure, sound, and flow transducers, noninvasive monitoring techniques, and electrical safety. Prerequisites: PHYS-317. Credit, four hours. PHYS-410. MOLECULAR ENGINEERING SYSTEMS 4:3:2 An overview of engineering biology with an emphasis on molecular systems. Topics include DNA nanotechnology, cell cloning, and gene therapy. Prerequisites: PHYS-317. Credit, four hours. PHYS-411. THEORY OF ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM I 3:3:0 An intermediate course in the theory of electricity and magnetism. Topics include electrostatics, electrodynamics, dielectric theory, magnetic properties of matter, and Maxwell‘s Equations. Three (3) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: MTSC-251, MTSC-252, PHYS-313, PHYS-314 or equivalent. Credit, three hours each. PHYS-412. THEORY OF ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM II 3:3:0 An intermediate course in the theory of electricity and magnetism. Topics include electrostatics, electrodynamics, dielectric theory, magnetic properties of matter, and Maxwell‘s Equations. Three (3) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory period per week. Co-requisites: Prerequisites: MTSC-251, MTSC-252, PHYS-313, PHYS-314 or equivalent. Credit, three hours each. PHYS-413. INTRODUCTION TO LASER PHYSICS 4:3:2 The course will develop understanding of the basic principles as well as the theory of different types of lasers. The topics will include fundamentals of quantum electronics, oscillator model, rate equations, stimulated transitions, population inversion, laser amplification, design of laser resonators, principles of Q-switching, mode locking, injection locking, and modern applications of lasers. Three (3) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: MTSC-251, MTSC-252, PHYS-316, PHYS-361, and consent of the Instructor. Credit, four hours. PHYS-418. THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH 3:1:4 A laboratory course for senior Physics majors covering selected topics on intermediate and advanced levels. One (1) lecture and two (2) two-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites: Consent of the Department. Credit, three hours. PHYS-421. INTRODUCTION TO SOLID STATE PHYSICS 3:3:0 A study of the fundamental properties of metals, semiconductors, and insulators: crystal structure, lattice vibrations and electron theory of metals and semiconductors. Prerequisites: MTSC-251, MTSC-252, PHYS-201, PHYS-202. Credit, three hours. PHYS-423. INTRODUCTION TO NONLINEAR OPTICS 4:3:2 The course will develop an understanding of the basic principles of light matter interaction and develop the fundamental concepts of various nonlinear optical processes in different type of materials. The topics will include an anharmonic classical oscillator model for nonlinear susceptibility, quantum mechanical treatment of nonlinear susceptibility, resonant and nonresonant nonlinearities, nonlinearities due to molecular orientation, optical phase conjugation, bistability, spontaneous and stimulated light scattering, and photorefractive phenomena and their applications. Prerequisites: MTSC-251, MTSC-252, PHYS-316, PHYS-361, PHYS-362, and consent of the Instructor. Credit, four hours. PHYS-441. SELECTED TOPICS IN PHYSICS I 3:3:0 An intermediate course covering subjects related to current developments in physics. Prerequisites: Consent of the Department. Three credit hours PHYS-442. SELECTED TOPICS IN PHYSICS II 3:3:0 An intermediate course covering subjects related to current developments in physics. Prerequisites: Consent of the Department. Credit, three hours each. PHYS-451. INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH 3:3:0 This course is an independent study course dealing with current research methodologies in physics. Prerequisites: PHYS-201, PHYS-202 Credit, three hours. PHYS-452. RESEARCH ETHICS 3:3:0 A discussion of the moral values, the attitudes and habits acceptable in research, and as exemplified in the process of the acquisition of scientific data, their analysis, and dissemination. Credit, three hours.  ENGINEERING (ENGR) ENGR-105. PROGRAMMING FOR ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS 3:3:0 Introduction to the computer language C/C++ and its use to solve elementary engineering problems using structured and object-oriented programming. Three (3) lectures per week. Credit, three hours. ENGR-106. PROGRAMMING FOR ENGINEERS 3:3:0 Introduction to the computer language FORTRAN 90 and its use to solve elementary engineering problems. Three (3) lectures per week. Credit, three hours. ENGR-107. GENERAL GEOLOGY FOR ENGINEERS 4:4:0 The nature of the Earth and of the processes that shape it: the Earth‘s external and internal energy, minerals and rocks, external processes and the evolution of the landscape, internal processes and the structure of the Earth, the Earth compared with other planets, sources of materials, and energy. Credit, four hours. ENGR-132. ENGINEERING GRAPHICS AND ANALYSIS 3:0:5 Fundamental concepts of multi-view projection drawing and application of drawing conventions. Includes sectional views, dimensioning, pictorial representation, fastener specifications, and drawings for various engineering disciplines. Computer applications include data structure for computer modeling, plotting routines for computer drawing, and an introduction to CAD principles. Five (5) hours laboratory per week. Credit, three hours. ENGR-202. INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL SYSTEMS 4:3:1 A unified overview of the interrelationship among the digital representation and processing of information, the analysis and design of combinational and sequential digital networks, and the application of stored program information processors. Three (3) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: PHYS-202. Credit, four hours. ENGR-205. ANALOG CIRCUITS I 4:3:3 Laws of the electric circuit, analysis of DC and AC circuits, network equations, and network theorems. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: MTSC-351, PHYS-202. Credit, four hours. ENGR-210. INTRODUCTION TO COMBINATIONAL LOGIC 2:2:2 Boolean algebra and its application to logic gates. Simplification of switching functions. Gate level logic design and design with MSI and LSI. Two (2) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory per week. Pre-Requisite: MTSC 121 Credit, three hours. ENGR-211. INTRODUCTION TO SEQUENTIAL CIRCUITS 2:2:2 Analysis and design of synchronous, asynchronous systems, and algorithmic state machines. Two (2) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: ENGR-210. Credit, three hours. ENGR-212. SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS 4:3:1 An introduction to both theory and applications in signals and systems with applications drawn from communications, automatic control, filtering, audio, and image processing. Discrete and continuous time signals and systems, sampling, convolution, Fourier series and transforms, conversion between analog and digital signals. modulation, and Laplace and Z-transforms. Three (2) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: MTSC-252. Credit, four hours. ENGR-220. MICROPROCESSOR-BASED SYSTEMS I 2:2:2 Introduction to small computing machines, architecture organization, and programming. One (1) lecture and one (1) two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: ENGR-211 and consent of the Department. Credit, two hours. ENGR-221. MICROPROCESSOR-BASED SYSTEMS II 2:2:2 Extension of the concepts of Electrical Engineering 220 with emphasis on I/O, interrupt systems, and interfacing. One (1) lecture and one (1) two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: ENGR-220. Credit, two hours. ENGR-225. LOGICAL DESIGN OF DIGITAL CIRCUITS 3:3:0 The logical properties of circuits based on two (2) valued devices; analysis and synthesis of combinational networks, optimization of combinational nets; sequential system organization and optimization; arithmetic algorithms, and languages for describing the behavior of automata. Prerequisites: ENGR-202. Credit, three hours. ENGR-270. INTRODUCTION TO DISCRETE SYSTEMS 3:3:0 An algorithmic, discrete signal approach to electrical systems. Topics include digital signal representation, digital filters, Z transforms, discrete Fourier systems, graphs, and flow network applied to electrical systems. Prerequisites: MTSC-252. Credit, three hours. ENGR-302. MATERIAL SCIENCE FOR ENGINEERS 4:3:3 Crystal binding and structure; energetic and structure of lattice defects; structures of inorganic and organic polymers; electronic and magnetic properties; elasticity, plasticity, and fracture; phase equilibria and transformations; reactions of structure, and treatment to properties. Three (3) one-hour lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory per week. Credit, four hours. ENGR-309. ELECTRONIC CIRCUIT ANALYSIS 4:3:3 Introduction to the physical principle of solid-state electronic devices. Quantitative study of elementary circuits including biasing, linear power amplifiers, low-frequency small signal analysis, multiple transistor circuits, and feedback. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: ENGR-205. Credit, four hours. ENGR-340. SOLID STATE ELECTRONICS 3:3:0 An introduction to basic semiconductor physics concepts and their application to the study of electronic and optoelectronic circuits. Applications to electronic and optoelectronic devices such as diodes, transistors, LED's detectors, photodiodes, and integrated circuits. Three (3) lectures per week. Prerequisites: MTSC-351. Credit, three hours. ASTRONOMY (ASTR) ASTR-101. DESCRIPTIVE ASTRONOMY I 3:2:2 An introductory course designed primarily for the non-Science major. Topics include the motion of celestial bodies, historical development of astronomy, structure of solar system members, and stellar evolution. Two (2) lectures and one (1) two-hour laboratory per week. Credit, three hours.  

Physics Graduate Course Descriptions

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PHYS-535. METHODS OF EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS I 3:3:0 Designed to acquaint students with the principles of basic experiments in all major branches of physics, stressing design of apparatus, procedures and analysis of projects involving mechanical, optical, electronic and thermal techniques, with microcomputers employed to collect and analyze experimental data. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-536. METHODS OF EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS II 3:3:0 Designed to acquaint students with the principles of basic experiments in all major branches of physics, stressing design of apparatus, procedures and analysis of projects involving mechanical, optical, electronic and thermal techniques, with microcomputers employed to collect and analyze experimental data. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-563. MATHEMATICAL METHODS OF PHYSICS III 3:3:0 An intermediate course in applied mathematics. Topics covered include the solution of differential equations, vector Calculus, Fourier series and Laplace transforms. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-565. THERMAL PHYSICS 3:3:0 Statistical inference is used to deduce the fundamental principles of thermodynamics and kinetic theory. These principles are applied to ideal and real gases, solids, closed and open systems, and black body radiation. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-567. INTERMEDIATE ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM I 3:3:0 A treatment of electrostatics, Dielectric Theory, magnetic phenomena, magnetic media, ac circuits and Maxwell's equations. Vector calculus is used throughout. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-568. INTERMEDIATE ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM II 3:3:0 A treatment of electrostatics, Dielectric Theory, magnetic phenomena, magnetic media, ac circuits and Maxwell's equations. Vector calculus is used throughout. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-574. SELECTED TOPICS FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS 3:3:0 A course that allows middle school teachers to pursue physics concepts as they relate to middle school science. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-577. SELECTED TOPICS I 3:3:0 A course allowing practicing teachers to pursue independent study of a topic in physics and physical science at the graduate level. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-578. SELECTED TOPICS II 3:3:0 A course allowing practicing teachers to pursue additional independent study of a topic in physics and physical science at the graduate level. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-579. SELECTED TOPICS III 3:3:0 A course allowing practicing teachers to pursue additional independent study of a topic in physics and physical science at the graduate level. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-600. MODERN OPTICS 4:4:0 Electromagnetic description of light and its interaction with matter. Topics include interference, coherence, diffraction, holography, dispersion, polarization, scattering, and confinement. Credit, four hours.   PHYS-601. NONLINEAR OPTICS 4:4:0 Principles of nonlinear interaction of light and matter based on the semi-classical approximation. Definition of nonlinear induced polarization and nonlinear susceptibility. Basic model of the coherent interaction of light with a two-level system is included. Main nonlinear optical effects are studied: harmonic generation, optical parametric amplification, saturation effects, Kerr effect, coherent effects, stimulated light scattering including stimulated Raman scattering, self-focusing and self-defocusing effects, multi-photon ionization, multi-photon ionization, and other nonlinear optical effects. The course also discusses practical applications of the nonlinear optical phenomena and related technology. Prerequisites: PHYS 600. Credit, four hours.   PHYS-602. BIOPHOTONICS I: PRINCIPLES OF LUMINESCENCE 4:4:0 A study of the physics behind light emitting molecules and their applications in biology. Credit, four hours.   PHYS-603. BIOPHOTONICS II: INSTRUMENTATION 3:3:0 An overview of microscopes and other optical instruments used in the biomedical field. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-604. APPLIED OPTICS IN BIOMEDICINE 3:3:0 A treatment of concepts of physics and optics applied to the medical field. Topics include DNA sequencing, in situ fluorescence, enzyme-based assays, glucose monitoring, HIV detection, and cancer diagnostics. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-605. PRINCIPLES OF LASERS AND OPTICAL DEVICES 4:4:0 Treatment of basic principles of lasers and their applications. Topics to be covered include, fundamentals of quantum electronics, oscillator model, rate equations, stimulated transitions, population inversion, laser amplification, design of laser resonators, principles of q-switching, mode locking, injection locking and modern applications of lasers. Credit, four hours.   PHYS-606. LABORATORY TECHNIQUES IN OPTICS AND SPECTROSCOPY 3:3:0 Modern spectroscopic methods. Human chromosomes, human leukocyte antigen (hla) haplotyping, enzyme-linked immuneassays (Elisa), diabetes testing and glucose monitoring, pregnancy testing, drug testing, HIV detection, and cancer diagnostics. Prerequisites: PHYS 602, PHYS 603. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-607. INTRODUCTION TO LABVIEW 3:3:0 A hands-on approach to the national instruments labview programming language. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-608. SELECTED TOPICS IN OPTICS AND SPECTROSCOPY I 3:3:0 Current research topics in optics and spectroscopy. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-609. SELECTED TOPICS IN OPTICS AND SPECTROSCOPY II 3:3:0 Current research topics in optics and spectroscopy. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-633. SELECTED TOPICS IN SCIENCE EDUCATION 3:3:0 Current developments in physics education. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-652. CLASSICAL MECHANICS 3:3:0 Lagrangian formulation, the Kepler problem, Rutherford scattering, rotating coordinate systems, rigid body motion, small oscillations, stability problems, and Hamiltonian formulation. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-655. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS 3:3:0 Designed to familiarize students with the use of computers in pursuing theoretical research. Numerical analysis techniques and computational methods employed in the study of physical models will be studied. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-661. SOLID STATE PHYSICS 3:3:0 An introductory study of the structure and physical properties of crystalline solids. Included are topics in crystal structure, lattice vibrations, thermal properties of solids, x-ray diffraction, free electron theory and energy based theory. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-665. STATISTICAL MECHANICS 3:3:0 Laws of thermodynamics, Boltzmann and quantum statistical distributions, with applications to properties of gases, specific heats of solids, paramagnetism, black body radiation and Bose-Einstein condensation. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-667. MATHEMATICAL METHODS OF PHYSICS IV 3:3:0 An advanced treatment of mathematical topics including operators, matrix mathematics, complex variables and eigenvalue problems. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-671. ADVANCED ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY I 3:3:0 Treatment of boundary value problems of electrostatics and magnetostatics, electromagnetic radiation, radiating systems, wave guides, resonating systems and multipole fields. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-672. ADVANCED ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY II 3:3:0 Treatment of boundary value problems of electrostatics and magnetostatics, electromagnetic radiation, radiating systems,wave guides, resonating systems and multipole fields. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-675. QUANTUM MECHANICS I 3:3:0 A study of the Schroedinger wave equation, operators and matrices, perturbation theory, collision and scattering problems classification of atomic states, and introduction to field quantization. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-676. QUANTUM MECHANICS II 3:3:0 Quantum Mechanics of molecules and solid state. Relastivistic quantum mechanics. Field quantization. Quantum theory of light. Basics of quantum electrodynamics. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-691. RESEARCH I 3:3:3 Independent student research or laboratory work in a specialized field of interest. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-692. RESEARCH II 3:3:3 Independent student research or laboratory work in a specialized field of interest. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-695. MASTER'S THESIS 6:6:6 A research problem in a selected physics topic resulting in a written thesis. Credit, one to six hours.   PHYS-800. MODERN LASER SPECTROSCOPIC METHODS 3:3:0 Basics of laser spectroscopic techniques and instrumentation. Topics include: ultra violet and visible (uv-vi) absorption spectroscopy; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; Raman, fluorescence, and saturation spectroscopy; polarization, correlation, and ultra-fast spectroscopy. Prerequisites: PHYS 600, PHYS 601, PHYS 605. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-801. QUANTUM THEORY OF LIGHT 3:3:0 Quantum mechanical description of light matter interaction. Presentation of basic quantum mechanics and quantum mechanical treatment of light and atoms. Prerequisites: Consent of the Instructor. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-802. THEORY OF LIGHT SCATTERING 3:3:0 An advanced electricity and magnetism course focused on light interactions with small particles. Topics include Raleigh and Mie scattering, optical properties of nanoparticles and surface plasmon resonance. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-803. MODERN LASER SPECTROSCOPIC METHODS 3:3:0 The laser revolution in spectroscopy. Absorption within the Doppler line, Doppler-free broadening spectroscopy, saturation spectroscopy, multiphoton spectroscopy, laser fluorescence, laser Raman, coherent stokes and antistokes Raman spectroscopy, photon echo and coherent spectroscopy. Ultrafast spectroscopy. Modern trends in spectroscopy. Credit, three hour.   PHYS-804. PRINCIPLES OF PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND PHOTOBIOLOGY 3:3:0 Review of the main phenomena related to the interaction of light with matter that results in chemical or biological activity. The study of inorganic and organic photochemistry, environmental aspects of photochemistry, atmospheric photochemistry, photosynthesis, visual processing, bio-luminescence, interaction of light with bio-organisms, photo-medicine, and phototherapy. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-805. PHOTOACOUSTIC AND THERMAL SPECTROSCOPY 3:3:0 Fundamentals of photo-acoustic and photo-thermal interaction of light with optical samples. Examination of basic instrumentations and their applications for characterization of complex samples including biological samples. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-806. MOLECULAR BIOPHYSICS 3:3:0 An overview of the physics of bio-molecular interactions. Topics will include physical models for DNA and protein systems. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-807. OPTICAL SOLITONS 3:3:0 Basic concepts of the mathematical aspects of optical solitons. Presentation of optical waveguides, the nonlinear Schrodinger‘s equation, laws of nonlinearity, soliton perturbation, soliton-soliton interactions, Stochastic perturbation of optical solitons, optical couplers, optical switching, magneto-optic waveguides and optical bullets. Prerequisites: PHYS 601, MTSC 853, MTSC 845. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-808. FIBER OPTICS AND FIBER OPTICS COMMUNICATION 3:3:0 Light propagation in fiber, its dispersion and nonlinear characteristics that play an important role in light communication. Types of fiber-optic devices and their applications to communication. Wavelength division multiplexing. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-809. PHOTONICS AND INFORMATION PROCESSING 3:3:0 Wave propagation in linear optical systems and optical information processing. Topics include: fundamentals of optical propagation, diffraction, optical imaging, Fourier transform, wave-front modulation, signal processing, and basics of optical processing devices. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-810. CURRENT TOPICS IN OPTICS I 3:3:0 Current topics in optics and spectroscopy. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-811. CURRENT TOPICS IN OPTICS II 3:3:0 Current topics in optics and spectroscopy. Credit, three hours.   PHYS-820. DISSERTATION RESEARCH 9:9:9 The course is for Ph.D. students in the optics program working on their dissertation research project. Credit, two to eight hours.   PHYS-890. DISSERTATION 9:9:0 Written work that describes the main research results obtained during the completion of the graduate program. The format must comply with the requirements of the College for thesis and dissertations. Credit, three to nine hours.   PHYS-999. DOCTORAL SUSTAINING 0:0:0 Public oral defense of the thesis that includes presentation of the main research results obtained during the completion of the graduate program. It takes place after evaluation of the written dissertation by the members of the corresponding academic committee. Credit, none.

Graduate Program in Physics

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Objectives The Master of Science Program in Physics seeks to provide each student with a thorough understanding of the discipline in preparation for employment in research and development programs, or to prepare for advanced degree (Ph.D.) in academic programs. The Master of Science Program in Physics Teaching is designed to provide a deeper understanding of physics principles and applications, as well as to stimulate creative classroom pedagogical techniques for the professional high school educator. Options And Requirements The Department of Physics and Engineering offers graduate study leading to the Master of Science in Physics and the Master of Science in Physics Teaching. Master of Science in Physics Admission Requirements: To be eligible for admission to the Physics Graduate Program, an applicant must have received a Bachelor's Degree in Physics or related area from an accredited college or university. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required. Entering graduate students are expected to have a sound background in intermediate level mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermal physics and mathematical methods of physics. Any student found deficient in any of these areas may be required to take appropriate courses to remove that deficiency. Course Requirements: The requirement for a Master of Science Degree in Physics is thirty (30) credit hours of course work with a minimum average grade of "B". Twenty-four (24) of these must be in graduate physics courses at the 600 level. A sequence of courses required by all candidates includes the following: 26-652, 26-665, 26- 667, 26-671, 26-672, 26-675. A maximum of six (6) credit hours of graduate credit may be granted for physics courses in the 500 level (above 500), or other graduate level courses in the sciences with the approval of the Physics Dept. For those students electing the Master's Thesis option, a maximum of six (6) credit hours towards a degree can be given for thesis work. Course descriptions Back to top^   Master of Science in Physics Teaching Admission Requirements: Admission to the Master of Science in Physics Teaching Program requires a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and a working knowledge of topics classically addressed by the discipline of physics. This level of proficiency is typically achieved through successful completion of a baccalaureate program in physics, physics education, or a related field, or through experience obtained by teaching physics or related courses at the secondary level. The degree, Master of Science in Physics Teaching, requires passing thirty-six (36) credit hours of courses as listed below, with a minimum average grade of "B". No more than nine (9) credit hours may be transferred from other institutions. Course Requirements: A maximum of six (6) credit hours of graduate level education courses. A minimum of twenty-four (24) credit hours of graduate level physics courses. A maximum of six (6) graduate level credits in other sciences with departmental   approval. Typically, most, if not all, of the physics courses will be taken from the 26-501 to 26-549 offerings. The course 26-695 is not available to participants of this program. Course descriptions Back to top^   A unique feature of the department is the harmonious cooperation of its members, faculty and staff towards one goal: the best education for the students. The performance of the majors has been tested by their success in prestigious graduate schools nationwide. This is complemented with a large inventory of laboratory and research grade equipment. In addition, the department has a network of PC's with modern hardware and software including word processors. These are used for computer-assisted instruction, data collection and analysis, and graphics. Request for more information.   Back to College homepage   (c) Copyright 2010 DSU CMNST, Dover, Delaware. All rights reserved.
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Faculty Profile 


Dr. Hacene Boukari, Physics of Soft matter
Director of the Graduate Program
SC 234
302-857-6511
 
Professors:
Dr. Gabriel Gwanmesia, Geophysics (Mineral Physics)
SC 202
302-857-6653

Dr. Noureddine Melikechi, Optical Physics, Laser Spectroscopy, Biophotonics
Dean CMNST / Dir. OSCAR Center
Dean's Suite, 6th flr,Wm. C. Jason Library
302-857-6656
 
Dr. Essaid Zerrad, Theoretical Atomic Physics
SC 241
302-857-7489
 
Associate/Research Associate Professors:
Dr. Aristides Marcano, Non-linear Optics, Laser Spectroscopy
SC 216A
302-857-6690
 
Dr. Gour S. Pati, Atomic & Molecular Optics
SC 239
302-857-6714
 
Dr. Thomas A. Planchon, Biophotonics
SC 204
302-857-6526
 
Dr. Renu Tripathi, Non-linear Optic, Optical Coherence Tomography
SC 241
302-857-6298
 
Assistant Professors:
Dr. M. Amir Khan, Laser Sensors and Systems
SC 207
302-857-6505
 
Dr. Qi Lu, Biophysics, Nano-materials
SC 208B
302-857-6806
 
Dr. Mukti Rana, Semi Conductor Fabrication MEMS based  Sensor Design
SC 205
302-857-6588

Visiting Assistant Professor:
Dr. Raymond Edziah, Non-linear Optics
SC 208A
302-857-7245
 
Imaging Facility:
Dr. Wafa Amir, Director
SC 237
302-857-6655
 
Senior Research Scientist:
Dr. Yuri Markushin
SC 146
302-857-6844
 
Post Doctoral Fellow:
Dr. Poopalasingam Sivakumar
SC144
302-857-7512

Curriculum in Forensic Biology

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.blueheader { color: #FFFFFF; background-color:#2984bd; text-align:center; font-weight:bold } .greyheader { background-color:#CCCCCC; color:#000000; font-weight: bold; } .double_right { border-right:double; } .grey_double_right { background-color:#CCCCCC; color:#000000; border-right:double; font-weight: bold; } #curriculum td { white-space:nowrap; vertical-align:top; } #curriculum strong { font-weight:bold; } Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 23-101 General Biology I 4 23-102 General Biology II 4 24-101 General and Analytical Chem. I 4 24-102 General and Analytical Chem. II 4 01-101 English Composition I 3 01-102 English Composition II 3 36-201 General Psychology (Social Science) 3 25-122 Trigonometry 3 23-191 University Seminar I 1 23-192 University Seminar II 1       23-194 Intro. to Biology Professions 1               Total Credits 15   Total Credits 16 Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 23-215 Cell Biology 4 23-210 Genetics* 4 24-301 Organic Chemistry I 4 24-302 Organic Chemistry II 4 16-100 Fitness and Wellness 2 37-104 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 23-261 Calculus for Life Sciences 4 23-321 Biostatistics 3 23-225 Survey of Forensic Science 3 23-255 Forensic/Investigative Biol. Lab 3               Total Credits 17   Total Credits 17 Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 23-310 Molecular Biology* 4 23-355 Forensic DNA Analysis 4 03-105/ 202/322 Ethics course (Humanities) 3 23-370 Human Anatomy 4   Literature 3 31-395 Global Societies 3 23-307 Principles of Physiology 4 01-200 Speech 3 05-425 Advanced Photography (Art) 3                     Total Credits 17   Total Credits 14 Research of Forensic Science Internship Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 26-211 Fundamentals of Physics I 4 26-212 Fundamentals of Physics II 4 30-466 Toxicology OR   24-403 Biochemistry OR   24-562 Chemical Toxicology 4 23-422 Biochemical Mechanisms 4 24-202 Forensic Chemistry 4 37-313 Courts and Criminal Justice 3 23-4xx Senior Research (Capstone I)** 2   History 3               Total Credits 14   Total Credits 14 Total Credits: 124 ** Senior Capstone *   Writing Intensive Course(s) BIOLOGY ELECTIVES:  The BS in Forensic Biology is a very specialized curriculum.  Students must follow curriculum carefully.  Electives can be taken from Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Mathematics as needed.  These should be requested and selected in consultation with your advisor, and approved by the Forensic Biology Committee.  If you are intending to obtain a post-graduate professional degree in Forensics, it is advisable for the student to check possible school requirements during their Junior year to ensure that satisfy expectations of their intended school choices. If you change to the BS in Biology and other curriculum Tracks note that acceptance of forensic curriculum courses that are not in that tract must be approved by your advisor and the Chair in writing and at the time of your change.  The other tracts are designed for the intended career goal, including anticipation of entrance examinations, so students should adhere to the suggested sequence. REQUIREMENTS:  Students can not take either 23-210 or 23-215 without first passing both 23-101 and 23-102 with a grade of "C" or better.  In order for a student to take any 300 or 400 level Biology Department course, they must also pass both 23-210 and 23-215 with a "C" or better.  These grade requirements take precedence over, and supersede any lesser specific prerequisites of all 300 or 400 level Biology electives. SPECIAL NOTES:    For all programs and tracks, a grade of “C” or better is required for all Biology and required Forensic courses (not bolded).     For the Cell/Molecular/Biotechnology and for the Health Professions tracks, a grade of “C” or better is also required in all CMNST courses.                                     All Biology majors must complete an independent research project.  Those who have completed a research project with a biology faculty member (e.g. 23-301 for credit, or via a paid stipend) prior to the beginning of their senior year, and especially if the project was an internship at another institution, the student must present their data to their advisor in order to be exempted from the required Senior Capstone I course.  If they have not completed a research project, or their internship is inadequate, then they must register for 23-451or 452 to complete a Capstone research project. If you take, 23-422 instead of 24-403, then you will need to take another Chemistry course if you want a minor in Chemistry – Instrumental Analysis (24-306) with lab is suggested. All Biology majors are required to successfully complete Senior Seminar (Capstone II, 23-499), no exceptions can be made. General Note:  The minimum University requirement for graduation is 121 hours; in Biology you will usually complete between 121-125 hours depending on selections.

Curriculum in General Biology with Education

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.blueheader { color: #FFFFFF; background-color:#2984bd; text-align:center; font-weight:bold } .greyheader { background-color:#CCCCCC; color:#000000; font-weight: bold; } .double_right { border-right:double; } .grey_double_right { background-color:#CCCCCC; color:#000000; border-right:double; font-weight: bold; } #curriculum td { white-space:nowrap; vertical-align:top; } #curriculum strong { font-weight:bold; } Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 23-101 General Biology I 4 23-102 General Biology II 4 24-101 General and Analytical Chem. I 4 24-102 General and Analytical Chem. II 4 01-101 English Composition I 3 01-102 English Composition II 3   Social Science 3 25-122 Trigonometry 3 23-191 University Seminar I 1 23-192 University Seminar II 1       23-194 Intro. to Biology Professions 1               Total Credits 15   Total Credits 16 Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 23-215 Cell Biology 4 23-210 Genetics 4 24-301 Organic Chemistry I 4 24-302 Organic Chemistry II 4 16-100 Fitness and Wellness 2   Literature 3   Statistics 3   History 3 01-200 Speech 3 23-299 Soph. Seminar – Sci. Literature 1               Total Credits 16   Total Credits 15 Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 23-310 Molecular Biology 4 24-403 Biochemistry OR   23-205 Ecology 4 23-422 Biochemical Mechanisms 4 23-xxx Biology Elective 4 31-395 Global Societies 3 26-111 Introduction to Physics I 4 26-112 Introduction to Physics II 4       23-399 Junior Seminar-Sci. Writing* 1       23-xxx Biology Elective 4               Total Credits 16   Total Credits 16 Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr   Arts and Humanities 3   Arts and Humanities 3 23-xxx Biology Elective 4 23-xxx Biology Elective 4 23-xxx Biology Elective 4   Open Elective 3-4 23-301 Problems in Biology OR     Open Elective 3-4 23-451 Senior Research (Capstone I)** 2 23-499 Senior Seminar (Capstone II)** 1               Total Credits 13   Total Credits 14-16 Total Credits: 121-123 Enroll in 5th year in the Department of Education’s one year MAT program to also receive a Masters of Arts in Teaching, which is required and provides vehicle for certification. ** Senior Capstone *   Writing Intensive Course(s) BIOLOGY ELECTIVES: Students must not take less than 18 credits of Biology courses from the course elective list below. These are the only ones that can satisfy the Biology elective requirement for this track.  Substitutions can be requested, under special circumstances, but written approval of advisor and Chair is needed.   The Curriculum Tracks are designed for the intended career goal, including anticipation of entrance examinations, so students should adhere to the suggested sequence.  It is advisable for the student to check possible post graduate school requirements during their Junior year to ensure that satisfy expectations of intended graduate/profession choices. REQUIREMENTS:  Students can not take either 23-210 or 23-215 without first passing both 23-101 and 23-102 with a grade of "C" or better.  In order for a student to take any 300 or 400 level Biology Department course, they must also pass both 23-210 and 23-215 with a "C" or better.  These grade requirements take precedence over, and supersede any lesser specific prerequisites of all 300 or 400 level Biology electives.  All students must pass the Biology Comprehensive Assessment (BCA) examination of core courses given to all students in 23-399.  If they do not pass, then the student must take 23-498 and pass the BCA, which is required for successful completion of this course, and the biology program. SPECIAL NOTES:    For all programs and tracks, a grade of “C” or better is required for all Biology courses.     For the Cell/Molecular/Biotechnology and for the Health Professions tracks, a grade of “C” or better is also required in all CMNST courses. All Biology majors must complete an independent research project.  Those who have completed a research project with a biology faculty member (e.g. 23-301 for credit, or via a paid stipend) prior to the beginning of their senior year, and especially if the project was an internship at another institution, the student must present their data to their advisor in order to be exempted from the required Senior Capstone I course.  If they have not completed a research project, or their internship is inadequate, then they must register for 23-451or 452 to complete a Capstone research project. If you take, 23-422 instead of 24-403, then you will need to take another Chemistry course if you want a minor in Chemistry – Instrumental Analysis (24-306) with lab is suggested.  Another set of courses the student can consider is Physics-317 (Foundations of Bioengineering) and Physics 409 (Biosensors and Bio-instrumentation) as electives with advisor, instructor, and Biology Chair approval. All Biology majors are required to successfully complete Senior Seminar (Capstone II, 23-499), no exceptions. General Note:  The minimum University requirement for graduation is 121 hours; in Biology you will usually complete between 121-125 hours depending on selections. General Biology –Teaching High School Biology Biology Electives needed: (from all at least one in groups I, II, III) Open Electives needed: 23-200 Invertebrate Zoology (III) 36-201 General Psychology 29-212 General Botany (III) 36-316 Developmental Psychology 23-322 Microbiology (II) 27-101 Geology     OTHER Possible Electives: 29-205 Plant Physiology 23-302 Comp. Vertebrate Anatomy (I) 29-213 Systematic Botany 23-305 Developmental Biology (I) 30-311 Mammalogy 23-315 Behavior (III) 30-312 Ornithology 23-352 Histology (II) 30-314 Ichthyology 23-420 Immunology (I) 30-456 Wetlands Biology 23-421 Microbial Physiol and Ecology (II) 30-465 Marine Biology

Curriculum in General Biology

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.blueheader { color: #FFFFFF; background-color:#2984bd; text-align:center; font-weight:bold } .greyheader { background-color:#CCCCCC; color:#000000; font-weight: bold; } .double_right { border-right:double; } .grey_double_right { background-color:#CCCCCC; color:#000000; border-right:double; font-weight: bold; } #curriculum td { white-space:nowrap; vertical-align:top; } #curriculum strong { font-weight:bold; } Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 23-101 General Biology I 4 23-102 General Biology II 4 24-101 General and Analytical Chem. I 4 24-102 General and Analytical Chem. II 4 01-101 English Composition I 3 01-102 English Composition II 3   Social Science 3 25-122 Trigonometry 3 23-191 University Seminar I 1 23-192 University Seminar II 1       23-194 Intro. to Biology Professions 1               Total Credits 15   Total Credits 16 Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 23-215 Cell Biology 4 23-210 Genetics 4 24-301 Organic Chemistry I 4 24-302 Organic Chemistry II 4 16-100 Fitness and Wellness 2   Literature 3   Statistics 3   History 3 01-200 Speech 3 23-299 Soph. Seminar – Sci. Literature 1               Total Credits 16   Total Credits 15 Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 23-310 Molecular Biology 4 24-403 Biochemistry OR   23-205 Ecology 4 23-422 Biochemical Mechanisms 4 23-xxx Biology Elective 4 31-395 Global Societies 3 26-111 Introduction to Physics I 4 26-112 Introduction to Physics II 4       23-399 Junior Seminar-Sci. Writing* 1       23-xxx Biology Elective 4               Total Credits 16   Total Credits 16 Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr   Arts and Humanities 3   Arts and Humanities 3 23-xxx Biology Elective 4 23-xxx Biology Elective 4 23-xxx Biology Elective 4   Open Elective 3-4 23-301 Problems in Biology OR     Open Elective 3-4 23-451 Senior Research (Capstone I)** 2 23-499 Senior Seminar (Capstone II)** 1               Total Credits 13   Total Credits 14-16 Total Credits: 121-123 ** Senior Capstone *   Writing Intensive Course(s) BIOLOGY ELECTIVES: Students must not take less than 18 credits of Biology courses from the course elective list below. These are the only ones that can satisfy the Biology elective requirement for this track.  Substitutions can be requested, under special circumstances, but written approval of advisor and Chair is needed. The Curriculum Tracks are designed for the intended career goal, including anticipation of entrance examinations, so students should adhere to the suggested sequence.  It is advisable for the student to check possible post graduate school requirements during their Junior year to ensure that satisfy expectations of intended graduate/profession choices. REQUIREMENTS:  Students can not take either 23-210 or 23-215 without first passing both 23-101 and 23-102 with a grade of "C" or better.  In order for a student to take any 300 or 400 level Biology Department course, they must also pass both 23-210 and 23-215 with a "C" or better.  These grade requirements take precedence over, and supersede any lesser specific prerequisites of all 300 or 400 level Biology electives.  All students must pass the Biology Comprehensive Assessment (BCA) examination of core courses given to all students in 23-399.  If they do not pass, then the student must take 23-498 and pass the BCA, which is required for successful completion of this course, and the biology program. SPECIAL NOTES:    For all programs and tracks, a grade of “C” or better is required for all Biology courses.     For the Cell/Molecular/Biotechnology and for the Health Professions tracks, a grade of “C” or better is also required in all CMNST courses. All Biology majors must complete an independent research project.  Those who have completed a research project with a biology faculty member (e.g. 23-301 for credit, or via a paid stipend) prior to the beginning of their senior year, and especially if the project was an internship at another institution, the student must present their data to their advisor in order to be exempted from the required Senior Capstone I course.  If they have not completed a research project, or their internship is inadequate, then they must register for 23-451or 452 to complete a Capstone research project. If you take, 23-422 instead of 24-403, then you will need to take another Chemistry course if you want a minor in Chemistry – Instrumental Analysis (24-306) with lab is suggested.  Another set of courses the student can consider is Physics-317 (Foundations of Bioengineering) and Physics 409 (Biosensors and Bio-instrumentation) as electives with advisor, instructor, and Biology Chair approval. All Biology majors are required to successfully complete Senior Seminar (Capstone II, 23-499), no exceptions. General Note:  The minimum University requirement for graduation is 121 hours; in Biology you will usually complete between 121-125 hours depending on selections. General Biology Biology Electives:  (at least one from each group I, II, III) Open Electives: 23-200 Invertebrate Zoology (III) 30-311 Mammalogy 23-302 Comp. Vertebrate Anatomy (I) 30-312 Ornithology 23-305 Developmental Biology (I) 30-314 Ichthyology 23-315 Behavior (III) 30-465 Marine Biology 23-322 Microbiology (II) 30-456 Wetlands Biology 23-352 Histology (II) 29-205 Plant Physiology 23-420 Immunology (I) 29-212 General Botany 23-421 Microbial Physiol and Ecology (II) 29-213 Systematic Botany 23-205 Ecology (III)  

Biology Course Descriptions

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    100. INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY. - 3:2:2 A one-semester course dealing with biological principles and designed primarily for the non-major.  Topics include organization of living matter, metabolism, reproduction, genetics, evolution and ecology. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. This course is designed for non-biology majors and can satisfy the General Education Natural Science requirement and can not be used as an elective for Biology majors.  Students may not take both Biology 100 and Biology 101 or 102 for the Natural Science requirement. Three (3) credits. 101-102. GENERAL BIOLOGY. - 4:3:3 An introduction to the study of life with emphasis on basic concepts: energy relationships, cell biology, physiology, genetics, development, ecology, and evolution. Also, some attention is given to taxonomy and morphology of organisms. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory each week. Must be taken in sequence. Students may not take both Biology 100 and Biology 101 for the Natural Science requirement. Credit, four hours each semester. 103. HUMAN BIOLOGY. - 3:2:2 This course introduces fundamental biological and scientific principles to non-science majors by studying the structures, actions and processes of the human body. Attention will be paid to structure and function of organs and organ systems as well as diseases of the human body such as cancer, heart disease and infections. Credit, four hours. Three hours of lecture and one 2-hour lab per week. This course is designed for non-biology majors and can satisfy the General Education Natural Science requirement and can not be used as an elective for Biology majors. Three (3) credits. 105. BASIC ECOLOGY. - 3:2:2 The study of the fundamental relationships between the living and non-living worlds, with special emphasis on man's place in nature. This course is designed for non-biology majors and can satisfy the General Education Natural Science requirement and can not be used as an elective for Biology, Agriculture, or Natural Resources majors.  Two lectures and one 2-hour lab per week. Three (3) credits. 107. HUMAN HEREDITY. - 3:2:2 An exploration of the principles of genetics as they apply to human beings. Includes patterns of inheritance, population genetics and the impact of genetic engineering on society. This course is designed for non-biology majors and can satisfy the General Education Natural Science requirement and can not be used as an elective for Biology majors. Three hours of lecture and one 2-hour lab per week. Three (3) credits. 110. ESSENTIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY. - 4:3:3 This course exposes students to elements of Biology that are critical for understanding the fundamental concepts that are required for K-8 educators. Instructional methods will emphasize critical thinking and development of reasoning skills in addition to mastery of content areas and understanding science as an active process. Investigative laboratory exercises will reinforce lecture topics; additionally, they will provide elements directly applicable in a K-8 educational setting. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory each week. Credit, four hours. 111. HUMAN DISEASES. - 3:2:2 A survey of the types and causes of human diseases.  The course will cover both acute and chronic disease states.  Three hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week.  This course is designed for non-biology majors and can satisfy the General Education Natural Science requirement and can not be used as an elective for Biology majors. Three (3) credits. 191-192 UNIVERSITY SEMINAR IN BIOLOGY. - 1:1:0 University Seminar is a two semester, general education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success. Academic skills will be developed. These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the Internet and word processing. Values clarification, coping with peer pressures and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed.  Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals. Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution, and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. 194 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY PROFESSIONS. - 1:1:0 This course will introduce students to the wide variety of professions open to students with Biology or Forensic Biology degrees.  Students will examine their strengths and talents and explore possible career paths.  The course will utilize presentations, guest lecturers and reflective assignments to help students determine their optimal educational path.  One classroom hour per week. One credit. 200. INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. - 3:2:2 A course designed to introduce the student to the major invertebrate phyla with attention given to taxonomy, morphology, physiology, ecology, and evolution. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: Biology 101-102. Credit, three hours. 205. ECOLOGY. - 4:3:3 The study of organisms in relation to their environment. Three one-hour lectures plus one three-hour lab per week.  The course includes weekend field trips. Prerequisites: Biology 101 102, or consent of instructor. Credit, four hours. 207-208. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II & I. - 4:2:4 A course designed to provide students with basic knowledge of the structure and function of the human body. Four one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: demonstrated knowledge (grade of B or higher) in high school biology and chemistry. Must be taken in sequence. A grade of "C" or better in 207 is required to enroll in 208. Primarily designed for pre-Nursing majors, not an acceptable Biology elective. Credit, four hours each semester. 210. GENETICS. - 4:3:3 A study of the fundamental principles of inheritance and their application to plants, animals, and microorganisms. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Biology 101-102. Credit, four hours. 215. CELL BIOLOGY. - 4:2:4 A study of basic and essential processes of cells with emphasis on the correlation of structure and function at the organelle and cellular levels. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. Pre-requisites: General Biology 101-102. Credit, 4 hours. 221. FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY.  - 4:2:4 A study of the taxonomy, physiology, morphology, and cultivation of microorganisms with special emphasis on the relation of bacteria to the health of humans, animals, and plants. Primarily designed for pre-Nursing majors, not an acceptable Biology elective.  Must be eligible for acceptance into Nursing program (GPA = 2.8) and passed both 207 and 208 with grade of C or better. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. Credit, four hours. 225. SURVEY OF FORENSICS. - 3:3:0 This serves as a gateway course for the students who are interested in pursuing a major or minor in Forensic Biology.  The course will employ hands on learning activities, group work and the traditional lecture format to convey the course material.  This course will begin with an overview on the field of Forensic Science and specialty areas in the field, i.e. Forensic pathology, entomology, etc.  The general principles of crime scene investigation, collection and handling of evidence and chain of custody will be discussed in detail as students need to understand the basic legalities of forensic investigation.  This course will also explore the different field and career opportunities in forensic. Credit, four hours. 250. FORENSIC AND INVESTIGATIVE BIOLOGY LAB.  - 3:2:4 This course is a hands-on lab that will introduce students to the biological and laboratory aspects of forensic and investigative science including blood typing, DNA extraction and fingerprinting, hair and fiber analysis, time of death determination, the use of the microscope, drug/alcohol and toxicology testing. Labs include DNA fingerprinting, hair and fiber analysis, blood and saliva testing, human bone and muscle identification. Prerequisites: Biology 101,102,210. Credit, three hours. 261. CALCULUS FOR LIFE SCIENCES. - 4:4:0 Topics include biological and physical applications requiring the knowledge of functions, graphing functions, an introduction to limits, continuous func­tions, rate of change, derivatives, implicit differentiation, maximum and minimum points, and their applications, exponential and logarithmic functions and development and ap­plication of the definite integral, trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, and techniques of integration. Includes an Extended Life Science Connection and use of the computer package, Maple, to perform symbolic, numerical and graphical analysis. Prerequisite: Math 122. Credit, four hours. 299. SOPHOMORE SEMINAR - SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE. - 1:1:0 A required course for all Biology majors, this seminar course exposes students to scientific literature and emphasizes comprehension and oral presentation of the material in scientific papers.  One hour class per week.  Prerequisites: Biology 101, 102, 191, 192. Sophomore standing. Credit, one hour. 301. PROBLEMS IN BIOLOGY. - “Variable” credit. An opportunity to pursue independent study and research. May be elected in any semester with consent of the instructor. Credit, one to three hours per semester. Can be used to substitute for Senior Capstone I (23-451) at 1 credit when taking a summer internship. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. 302. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY. - 4:2:4 A comparative study of the vertebrate classes with emphasis upon structure development, evolution of the organs, and organ systems. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. Credit, four hours. 305. DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY. - 4:3:3 A study of embryonic development with special emphasis on the frog, chick, pig and human showing the dynamic relationship between genetics and tissue environment in forming a complete multi-cellular organism of differing tissues from a single cell. Credit, four hours. 307. PRINCIPLES OF PHYSIOLOGY. - 4:3:3 This class presents an in depth overview of the principles of human physiology with a focus on the mechanisms of physiological processes. This course is designed for students who are planning careers in biology or the health professions, and who are preparing for entry exams such as the MCAT or GRE. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Credit, four hours. 310. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY. - 4:3:3 A basic study of the principles of molecular biology including recombinant DNA technology and other approaches and methodologies used in investigating prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular structure, development, chromosome organization, gene expression, and gene regulation. One three-hour lecture, one three-hour laboratory per week.  Credit, four hours. 311. NEUROSCIENCE. - 4:3:3 A basic study of the nervous system for students who are preparing for careers in biological, medical, or psychological sciences. Topics include: central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), peripheral and autonomic nervous systems, neurons, nerve pathway, transmission of information, and reflexes. Three lectures and one three hour laboratory period per week. Credit, four hours. 315. BEHAVIOR. - 4:3:2 An exploration of the diversity of behaviors exhibited by organisms including the physiological bases, the role of heredity and learning, and the ecological and evolutionary significance of behaviors. Three one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Credit, four hours. 317. PRINCIPLES OF VIROLOGY. - 3:2:4 A comprehensive course covering the involvement of plant and animal viruses in disease processes and includes: classification of viruses, differences between animal and plant viruses, virus cultivation, virus replication, virus entry, virus assembly, and virus vectors. Two one-hour lectures and one 2- hour lab per week. Credit, three hours. 321. BIOSTATISTICS. - 3:3:0 A study of the application of mathematics and statistics to the life sciences. Three one-hour lectures per week. Prerequisites: One year of college mathematics. Credit, three hours. 322. MICROBIOLOGY. - 4:3:3 A comprehensive course covering the involvement of microorganisms in disease processes. This includes coverage of the relationship between host and pathogen, opportunism, the basic functions of the immune system, molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis and a significant section on the biology of viruses. Three hours lab and three hours lecture per week. Credit, four hours. 352. HISTOLOGY. - 4:2:4 A detailed study of the microscopic anatomy of vertebrate tissues and organs including laboratory practice in the preparation of histological slides. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. 355. FORENSIC DNA INVESTIGATIONS. - 4:2:4 This course will examine the theories and current practices used in criminal investigations and legal proceedings to collect, analyze and interpret biological evidence using molecular biology with emphasis on forensic DNA analysis.  Prerequisites:  23-101, 23-102, 23-210, 23-215    Credit 4 hours 370. HUMAN ANATOMY. - 3:3:3 Human Anatomy is designed to provide students in pre-professional and paraprofessional health fields with a background for further study toward their health profession. This course will lay a foundation of the structure of the human body as well as familiarity with the medical terminology relevant to function in the health industry. It is highly recommended to be accompanied with the “sister” course of Principles of Physiology to provide a comprehensive view of human body functions. 399. JUNIOR SEMINAR – SCIENTIFIC WRITING. - 1:1:0 A required course for all Biology majors, this seminar course exposes students to basic elements of scientific writing and gives them the opportunity to practice writing basic scientific papers and reports.  Prerequisites: 23-299 and Junior standing. Credit, one hour. 405. CELL MORPHOGENESIS. - 4:3:3 A study of the latest developments in developmental biology with regard to cellular and molecular effects.  Laboratories using sea urchin, frog, and chick embryos for experimental procedures will reinforce the discussion. Credit, four hours. 410. ADVANCED MOLECULAR GENETICS. - 4:3:3 An advanced course focusing on the biotechnical aspects of molecular biology. Topics include: recent advances in cloning, PCR, DNA sequencing, genetic engineering using recombinant plasmids, and the isolation and screening of genomic libraries. The laboratory portion will focus on DNA manipulation techniques. Prerequisite: Biology 310.  Credit, four hours. 411. PHARMACOLOGY .- 4:3:4 A study of how drugs are used to achieve therapeutic benefits. The mechanism of action of various drug types at the molecular, cellular and interactive-system levels will be addressed. Topics will include the basis for rationale uses of medically relevant drugs in biological systems and detailing their effectiveness in various diseases and disorders.  Focus will be on understanding the balance between pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and toxicological side effects that underlie effective treatments. Three-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.  Credit, four hours. 415. ADVANCED CELL BIOLOGY. - 4:2:4 An advanced study of basic and essential processes of eukaryotic cells with the emphasis on the correlation of structure and function at the organelle and cellular level as related to their biochemical properties and physiology.  Topics covered will include cell cycle regulation, cell signaling pathways, and control of apoptosis. Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry or Biochemistry. Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Credit, four hours. 420. IMMUNOLOGY. - 4:2:4 An introduction to general immunology focusing on principles of immunobiology, serological techniques, and immunodeficiency diseases. Three-hour lecture and three hour laboratory each week. Credit, four hours. 421. MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY & ECOLOGY. - 4:3:3 A detailed study of microbial physiology, ecology, and involvement in biogeochemical cycles. Roles of bacteria fungi, algae and protozoa in various ecosystems will be studied. Bacterial genetics and the role of bacterial viruses will also be included. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Credit, four hours. 422. BIOCHEMICAL MECHANISMS. - 4:3:3 This course is an integration of study of the molecular and cellular functions of a cell from the perspective of biochemistry. The course will focus on protein biochemistry, enzymatic activity and function, carbohydrate and lipid structure and function, and metabolism.  Life is a chemical phenomenon but, for the most part, the chemistry of life is governed by the actions of proteins. Therefore, our focus will be on these proteins, what they do, and how they do it. 451-452. SENIOR RESEARCH. CAPSTONE I. - 3:0:6 An opportunity to undertake or complete a mentored research project in biology. A thesis or report is required. Open to students with a 3.25 cumulative average in biology and an overall cumulative average of 2.75. Prerequisite: Senior standing in biology. Credit, three hours per semester. 471. NUCLEIC ACIDS BIOTECHNOLOGY. - 4:2:6 This lab course will survey applications in recombinant DNA methodology. Some topics covered will include enzymology of DNA manipulation; construction and isolation of recombinants; plasmid and bacteriophage vectors; structural analysis of cloned DNA. Prerequisite: Molecular Biology. Credit, four hours. 472. PROTEIN BIOTECHNOLOGY. - 4:2:6 This lab course will be a continuation of Biotechnology Lab I. The course will focus on gene expression and protein isolation and function. Prerequisite: Molecular Biology. Credit, four hours. 498. REVIEW OF BIOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES. - 1:1:0 This course will allow students to review essential content and concepts prior to retaking the Biology Comprehensive Assessment.  It is required for all Biology majors who do not satisfactorily complete this assessment in their junior year.  One classroom hour per week. One credit. 499. SENIOR SEMINAR: BIOLOGICAL PRESENTATION. CAPSTONE II. - 1:1:0 The third in a required series of biological skills seminars. The course is designed to provide the senior student with instruction and practice in the oral, poster and written presentation of research data. Topics will include preparation of figures, slides, posters, and organization of the presentation. Students are required to provide their own data from independently conducted research either within the Biology Department (e.g. 23-301, 23-451) or external to DSU (e.g. internship). Prerequisites: 299, 399, senior standing. Credit, one hour.  

Curriculum for (MA) in Biological Sciences

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The Master of Arts Degree Program in Biological Sciences is designed to expand the scientific backgrounds and competencies of secondary school teachers and to advance the careers of persons in industry, government agencies, and other related positions. The degree course requirements are the same as the MS degree, however, in place of a laboratory research thesis an extensive literature review article is required. 23-505 Experimental Design and Bio-Statistics 3 23-520 Cell Biology 3 23-521 Molecular Biology 3 23-635 Methods in Experimental Biology II 3 23-650 Biological Mechanisms 3 23-689 Literature Research Project I 3 23-689 Literature Research Project II 3 23-xxx Three electives 9     30  

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