Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology

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Bachelor's Programs

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  Bachelor's Programs in the Department of Mathematical Sciences    Delaware State University's Department of Mathematical Sciences provides students with a course of study directed toward establishing a solid understanding of mathematical theory and its relation to other fields of study. Bachelor's degree program offerings are available in:   ⇒Mathematics ⇒Mathematics Education ⇒Mathematics with Computer Science        Back to College Home Page       (c) Copyright 2010 DSU CMNST, Dover, Delaware 19901. All rights reserved.       Back to Department Home Page

Curriculum for a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry/Pre-Professional

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  Pre-Professional Chemistry is designed for students who wish to acquire considerable chemical background in preparation for careers outside chemistry such as one of the health professions. Completion of this curriculum fulfills basic educational requirements for admission to most health professional programs such as dentistry, medicine, optometry, osteopathic medicine, pharmacy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine. First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 24-101 General and Elementary Analytical Chemistry I 4 24-191 University Seminar I 1 25-121 or 25-251 College Algebra or Calculus I 3-4 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3     16-17 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 24-102 General and Elementary Analytical Chemistry II 4 24-192 University Seminar II 1 25-122 or 25-252 Trigonometry or Calculus II 3-4 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     14-15 Second Year First Semester     24-201 Elementary Quantitative Analysis 4 24-301 Organic Chemistry I 4 25-251 or XX-XXX Calculus I or Elective 3-4 26-201 General Physics I 4     15-16 Second Semester     24-302 Organic Chemistry II 4 25-252 or XX-XXX Calculus II or Elective 3-4 26-202 General Physics II 4 31-395 Global Societies 3     14-15 Third Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 23-101 General Biology I 4 24-303 Physical Chemistry I 4 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3 XX-XXX Elective 3     17 Second Semester     23-102 General Biology II 4 24-304 Physical Chemistry II 4 24-306 Instrumental Analysis 3 24-308 Inorganic Chemistry 4     15 Fourth Year First Semester     01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 24-403 Biochemistry 4 24-XXX Senior Capstone 3 33-103 or 34-101 or 34-102 or 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 or 36-201 or 37-101 or 40-201 Introduction to Political Science or World Civilization to the Eighteenth Century or World Civilization from the Eighteenth Century or American Civilization to 1865 or American Civilization from 1865 or The African-American Experience to 1865 or The African-American Experience from 1865 or Introduction to General Psychology or Introduction to Sociology or Macroeconomics 3 XX-XXX Elective 3     16 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 01-113 or 03-105 or 03-201 or 03-202 or 05-101 or 06-100 or 06-101 Introduction to Theatre or Contemporary Moral Issues or Introduction to Philosophy or Ethics or Introduction to Art or African-American Music or Introduction to Music 3 XX-XXX Electives 6     12   Total Credit Hours: 122  

Bachelor's Programs

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Welcome to the Department of Chemistry!   The faculty and staff of the Chemistry Department strive to provide students with a sound foundation in fundamental principles of chemistry for those who wish to concentrate in chemistry. Students are prepared for professional careers in medical, dental, or other health professional schools; teaching; and future graduate study. The following tracks are available: ⇒Chemistry ⇒Chemistry Education ⇒Chemistry Pre-Professional   Back to Department Home Page Back to College Home Page (c) Copyright 2012, DSU CMNST, Dover, Delaware 19901. All rights reserved.
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For more information, contact the department office:

302-857-6530

 

Curriculum in Chemistry Education

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  First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 24-191 University Seminar I 1 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 24-101 General and Elementary Analytical Chemistry I 4 25-121 or 25-251 College Algebra or Calculus I 3-4 34-104 History and Government of Delaware 1 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3     17-18 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 12-204 Philosophical Foundations of Education 3 24-102 General and Elementary Analytical Chemistry II 4 24-192 University Seminar II 1 25-122 or 25-252 Trigonometry or Calculus II 3-4 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     17-18   Required to take PPST/PRAXIS   Second Year First Semester     01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 24-301 Organic Chemistry I 4 25-251 or XX-XXX Calculus I or Elective 3-4 26-201 General Physics I 4 36-201 Introduction to General Psychology 3     18 Second Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 24-302 Organic Chemistry II 4 25-252 or XX-XXX Calculus II or Elective 3-4 26-202 General Physics II 4     17-18   Required to pass PPST/PRAXIS   Third Year First Semester     12-208 The Middle School Years 3 12-322 Teaching Reading in the Secondary School 3 23-101 General Biology I 4 24-303 Physical Chemistry I 4 27-101 Geology 4 XX-XXX Arts / Humanities Required Course 3     21 Second Semester     12-210 Methods of Teaching Middle and High School Science 3 12-313 Introduction to Education of Exceptional Children 3 24-304 Physical Chemistry II 4 24-306 Instrumental Analysis 4 24-308 Inorganic Chemistry 4 31-395 Global Societies 3     17 Fourth Year First Semester     12-309 Classroom Management / Behavior Modification for Teachers 3 12-318 Multicultural Education 3 23-205 Ecology 4 24-403 Biochemistry 4 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3     17 Second Semester     12-400 Preservice / Student Teaching and Senior Seminar (Senior Capstone) 12     12   Total credits 136-139

Curriculum in Chemistry

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  This curriculum in Chemistry is designed for students who desire to prepare for professional careers in Chemistry and for graduate study. This curriculum is approved by the American Chemical Society Committee on Professional Training. First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 24-101 General and Elementary Analytical Chemistry I 4 24-191 University Seminar I 1 25-121 or 25-251 College Algebra or Calculus I 3-4 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3     16-17 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 24-102 General and Elementary Analytical Chemistry II 4 24-192 University Seminar II 1 25-122 or 25-252 Trigonometry or Calculus II 3-4 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     14-15 Second Year First Semester     24-201 Elementary Quantitative Analysis 4 24-301 Organic Chemistry I 4 25-251 or XX-XXX Calculus I or Elective 3-4 26-201 General Physics I 4     15-16 Second Semester     01-200 Speech 3 24-302 Organic Chemistry II 4 25-252 or XX-XXX Calculus II or Elective 3-4 26-202 General Physics II 4     15-16 Third Year First Semester     01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 24-303 Physical Chemistry I 4 24-403 Biochemistry 4 31-395 Global Societies 3 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3     17 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 24-304 Physical Chemistry II 4 24-306 Instrumental Analysis 4 24-308 Inorganic Chemistry 4     15 Fourth Year First Semester     24-407 Seminar in Chemistry I 1 24-XXX Elective (Advanced Chemistry) 3 24-XXX Electives 6 24-XXX Senior Capstone 3 XX-XXX History / Social Science Elective 3     16 Second Semester     24-408 Seminar in Chemistry II 1 XX-XXX Elective (Advanced Chemistry, Mathematics, or Physics) 3 XX-XXX Arts / Humanities Electives 9     13   Total Credit Hours: 121-125

Course Descriptions for Chemistry

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  CHEMISTRY (CHEM) (24)   CHEM-100. INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY 4:3:3 A course covering the basic concepts of chemistry. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-101. GENERAL AND ELEMENTARY ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY I 4:3:3 This course is the first in  two-semester  sequence in  a comprehensive study of the chemical and physical properties of matter including the fundamental principles of qualitative and quantitative analysis. Topics include atomic theory and bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and states of matter.  The course is designed for science and other majors which require a thorough understanding of the current content knowledge in the fundamentals of chemistry.   Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer 1 Corequisites: MTSC-121, MTSC-122 or MTSC-251 or MTSC-131. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-102. GENERAL AND ELEMENTARY ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY II 4:3:3 This course is the second  in  two-semester  sequence in  a comprehensive study of the chemical and physical properties of matter including the fundamental principles of qualitative and quantitative analysis. Topics include solutions, kinetics, equilibria, free energy, electrochemisty, and an introduction to specific areas in chemistry.  The course is designed for science and other majors which require a thorough understanding of the current content knowledge in the fundamentals of chemistry.   Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer 2 Prerequisites: CHEM-101. Corequisites: MTSC-121, MTSC-122. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-107. CHEMISTRY FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES 4:3:3 A unified study of the fundamentals of general chemistry and the elements of organic and biochemistry. (Not recommended for majors in the Biological Sciences, or for Pre-Medical students.) Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: High school Chemistry or its equivalent. Corequisites: MTSC-101, MTSC-102 or MTSC-103 or MTSC-121 and MTSC-122. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-191. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR I – CHEMISTRY 1:2:0 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success. Academic skills will be developed. These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the Internet, and word processing. Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed. Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals. Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution, and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. Credit, one hour.   CHEM-192. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR II – CHEMISTRY 1:1:0 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success. Academic skills will be developed. These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the Internet, and word processing. Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed. Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals. Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution, and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. Credit, one hour.   CHEM-202. FORENSIC CHEMISTRY 4:3:3 Theory and principle in the isolation and identification of drugs using chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-101, CHEM-102. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-203. WATER CHEMISTRY – BASIC PRINCIPLES 4:3:3 Essentials of water chemistry with emphasis on the principle methods of testing water and wastewater. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-101, CHEM-102, MTSC-121, MTSC-122 or MTSC-105 and MTSC-106. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-205. ELEMENTARY ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 4:3:3 A course covering nomenclature, properties and reactions of the simpler classes of organic compounds. (Not recommended for majors in the Biological Sciences or for Pre-Medical students.) Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-101, CHEM-102. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-301. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 4:3:3 Structure, synthesis, and reactions of the principle classes of organic compounds with stress on stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, and spectroscopic properties. Laboratory practice in the separation, identification, and synthesis of organic compounds. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-101, CHEM-102. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-302. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 4:3:3 Structure, synthesis, and reactions of the principle classes of organic compounds with stress on stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, and spectroscopic properties. Laboratory practice in the separation, identification, and synthesis of organic compounds. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-101, CHEM-102, CHEM-301. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-303. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I 4:3:3 A quantitative study of the fundamental physiochemical principles of matter as applied to gases, liquids, solids, and solutions, with illustrative laboratory experiments. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-301, CHEM-302, MTSC-251, MTSC-252, PHYS-201, PHYS-202. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-304. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II 4:3:3 A quantitative study of the fundamental physiochemical principles of matter as applied to gases, liquids, solids, and solutions, with illustrative laboratory experiments. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-301, CHEM-302, MTSC-251, MTSC-252, PHYS-201, PHYS-202. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-305. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 4:3:3 Principles of gravimetric, volumetric, potentiometric, and spectrophotometric analysis. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Eight (8) credit hours of General Chemistry, MTSC-121, MTSC-122 or MTSC-105, MTSC-106. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-306. INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS 4:3:3 Theoretical principles and chemical applications of instrumental methods of analysis. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-301, CHEM-302, and CHEM-305, MTSC-251, MTSC-252, PHYS-201, PHYS-202. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-308. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 4:3:3 A study and characterization of the fundamental concepts in inorganic chemistry which includes atomic structure, periodicity, and the nature of chemical forces and structure. The chemistries of transition metals, S fillers and P fillers, and organic metallic compounds. Laboratory practice in synthesis of pure inorganic substances. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Corequisites: CHEM-304. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-310. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY 4:3:3 The analyses of water, soil, plant, and animal tissues for various parameters including trace organics and metals using classical and instrumental methods of analysis. Prerequisites: CHEM-302. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-401. ORGANIC QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 3:2:3 Spectroscopic and chemical methods of identification of organic compounds in the pure state and in mixtures. Two (2) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-301, 24-302, 24-306. Credit, three hours.   CHEM-402. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3:3:0 Advanced study of the structures of organic compounds, organic reaction, and their mechanisms. Synthesis of selected organic compounds using advanced preparative methods. Three (3) lectures and per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-301, CHEM-302, CHEM-303, CHEM-304. Credit, three hours.   CHEM-403. BIOCHEMISTRY 4:3:3 The structural and metabolic relationship of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes, and coenzymes. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-301, CHEM-302, CHEM-303. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-404. ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 3:3:0 Advanced treatment of thermodynamics, the elements of quantum and statistical mechanics, chemical kinetics, and selected topics. Three (3) lectures per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-303, CHEM-304. Credit, three hours.   CHEM-405. INDEPENDENT STUDY AND RESEARCH 3:0:9 Independent investigation of a research problem under the supervision of a staff member. A research report and presentation is required. Three (3) three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites: Senior status in Chemistry. The course may be repeated with the consent of the Department Chair. Credit, three hours.   CHEM-406. SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY 3:3:0 Topics of current interest in analytical, organic, inorganic, physical, or biochemistry. Prerequisites: Senior status in Chemistry. The course may be repeated with the consent of the Department Chair. Credit, three hours.   CHEM-407. SEMINAR IN CHEMISTRY 1:1:0 Reports, study, and discussion of current literature in the fields of chemistry. An oral presentation is required. One hour per week. Credit, one hour.   CHEM-409. WATER CHEMISTRY – ADVANCED TECHNIQUES 4:3:3 Theory and application of modern chemical instrumentation to water analysis. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-203. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-460. CHEMICAL LITERATURE 1:1:0 Use of the chemical library, chemical journals, reference works, other technical publications, assembling and data use, and computer-assisted literature searches. One lecture per week. Credit, one hour.   CHEM-462. CHEMICAL TOXICOLOGY 3:3:0 A study of the adverse effects of chemical substances. Course includes the general principles of toxicology, the toxicology of systems, toxic agents, environmental toxicology, forensic toxicology, applications toxicology, and the effects of toxic substances on reproduction and the body. Credit, three hours.   CHEM-469. POLYMER CHEMISTRY 3:3:0 An introduction to the chemistry of macromolecules including biological molecules, plastics, and other important classes of industrial polymers. Prerequisites: CHEM-301,CHEM4-302. Credit, three hours.   Back to Department Homepage Back to College Homepage

Graduate Course Descriptions

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    24-501. ADVANCED LABORATORY TECHNIQUES. Advanced techniques and sophisticated equipment used in the preparation and/or purification of chemical compounds. Two lectures and one 150 minute laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Chemistry 301-302, 306 and 308 or equivalent courses. Credit, three hours. 24-502. PHYSICAL METHODS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Advanced methods in inorganic preparations and compound analyses via physical methods. Two lectures and one 150 minute laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Chemistry 301-302, 303-304, 306 and 308 or equivalent courses. Credit, three hours. 24-503. PHYSICAL METHODS IN BIOCHEMISTRY. Advanced methods in the study of biochemical molecules and the use of physical methods in their investigations. Two lectures and one 150 minute laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Chemistry 301-302, 303-304, 306 and 403 or equivalent courses. Credit, three hours. 24-504. PHYSICAL METHODS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Advanced studies in organic preparations and reactions, and chemical analyses via physical methods. Two lectures and one 150 minute laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Chemistry 301-302, 303-304, 306 or equivalent courses. Credit, three hours. 24-505. INORGANIC SOLUTION CHEMISTRY. A study of the chemical kinetics of chemical forces and their effects on structure and reactivity of coordination compounds. Two 75 minute lectures per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 308 or equivalent. Credit, three hours. 24-506. STRUCTURAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Detailed discussions of the nature of chemical forces and their effects on structure and reactivity of coordination compounds. One 150 minute lecture per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 308 or equivalent. Credit, three hours. 24-507. THEORY AND APPLICATIONS OF SPECTROSCOPY. A presentation of molecular spectra and structure correlations demonstrating the use of IR, Visible UV, NMR, and AA. One 150 minute lecture per week. Credit, three hours. 24-508. THEORY AND APPLICATIONS OF CHROMATOGRAPHY. Investigations of the separation and identification of substances via packed and capillary column gas chromatography. HPLC and GLC using various detectors. One 150 minute lecture per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 306 or equivalent. Credit, three hours. 24-509. THE CHEMICAL BOND. The study of electronics in atoms, molecular orbitals bonding in organic compounds, and "d" valence orbitals. One 150 minute lecture per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 308 or equivalent. Credit, three hours. 24-510. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY. The analyses of water, soil, plant and animal tissues for various parameters including traces organics and metals using classical and instrumental methods of analysis. One lectures 150 minute per week. Credit, three hours. 24-511. SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY. Advanced topics in the various fields of chemistry. Topics may vary from year to year. One 150 minute lecture per week. Credit, three hours. 24-516. QUANTUM CHEMISTRY. The wave equation and approximate treatments of the hydrogen molecular ion, the hydrogen molecule, diatomic molecules, and polyatomic molecules. Two 75 minute lectures per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301-302, 303-304 or equivalent courses. Credit, three hours. 24-518. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCOPY. The use of molecular symmetry and group theory to study rotational, vibrational, and electronic spectra of molecules. One 150 minute lecture per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301-302 or equivalent. Credit, three hours. 24-519. APPLICATIONS OF SPECTROSCOPY. An introduction to chemical research. The use of spectroscopy as a research tool and a review of the literature in this area will be conducted. Projects may be assigned. Two 75 minute lectures per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 507 or equivalent. Credit, three hours. 24-520. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. An advanced study of reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and organic chemical bonding. One 150 minute lecture per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301-302. Credit, three hours. 24-521. BIOCHEMISTRY. An advanced study of biochemical reactions and reaction mechanisms. One 150 minute lecture per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 403 or equivalent. Credit, three hours. 24-540. ADVANCED METHODS OF TEACHING CHEMISTRY. Discussions and problem solving sessions concerning improved techniques of teaching high school chemistry. Two 75 minute lectures per week. Credit, three hours. 24-552. TECHNIQUES IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. A study of the use of physical measurements in determining composition, structures, and properties of matter. Two lectures and one 150 minute laboratory per week. Credit, three hours. 24-556 557. SEMINAR. Presentation of current topics and/or research by faculty and students. One lecture per week. Credit, one hour. 24-560. CHEMICAL LITERATURE. Use of the chemistry library, chemical journals, reference works, other technical publications, assembling and data use, and computer assisted literature searches. One lecture per week. Credit, one hour. 24-562. CHEMICAL TOXICOLOGY. A study of the adverse effects of chemical substances. Course includes the general principles of toxicology, the toxicology of systems, toxic agents, environmental toxicology, forensic toxicology, applications toxicology and the effect of toxic substances on reproduction and the body. One lecture per week. Credit, one hour. 24-569. POLYMER CHEMISTRY. An introduction to the chemistry of macromolecules including biologically molecules, plastics, and other important classes of industrial polymers. One 150 minute lecture per week. Prerequisites: Chemistry 301-302. Credit, three hours. 24-573. ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. An introduction to the thermodynamics of large molecular collections and the quantum statistics of these systems. One 150 minute lecture per week. Prerequisites: Chemistry 303-304. Credit, three hours. 24-590 591. RESEARCH AND THESIS. Publishable research work by students and the writing and defense of a thesis. Credit, three hours each.

Ph.D. Program in Applied Chemistry

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  Introduction Delaware State offers one of the few Applied Chemistry Ph.D. programs nationwide, and the only one in the state of Delaware. Students have an opportunity to stand out in a specialized field, developing marketable expertise that advances their career prospects. Doctoral candidates immerse themselves in research, taking advantage of the department’s advanced lab facilities and technology, as well as the experience of our high-achieving faculty. Delaware State’s traditional research emphases lie in hydrogen storage, polymer chemistry, biochemistry, and environmental chemistry. However, each doctoral candidate is encouraged to pursue his or her own interest. Students get every opportunity to shine, establishing their credentials as independent researchers, writers, and analysts. Professional Preparation The Applied Chemistry Ph.D. opens the door to leadership positions in a wide range of industries. Graduates possess superior laboratory, research, and analytical skills, along with a track record of independent research. This extremely marketable degree can lead to employment in professions such as medical research drug manufacturing renewable energy environmental protection and restoration biotechnology Faculty The Delaware State chemistry faculty boasts a number of accomplished researchers. Faculty members have secured major grants from the National Science Foundation, National Institute of Health, Department of Energy and other national funders to do ground-breaking research in areas such as hydrogen fuel cells, forensic chemistry, environmental chemistry, and pharmaceuticals. In addition to offering research opportunities and guidance, DSU professors help graduate students establish professional and academic networks to support their careers. Research and Experience Delaware State has nine chemistry research labs and three multipurpose labs, all equipped with high-end instrumentation and advanced computer technology. Students have access to equipment such as gas chromatographs with a variety of detectors a head space auto sampler for gas chromatograph a gas chromatograph /mass selective detector/infrared detector/computer system nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer instrumentation for flame and flameless atomic absorption, dispersion infrared and FTIR ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometers high performance liquid chromatograph with data collection system electroanalytical system X-ray powder diffraction unit Thermal gravimetric analyzers  

Department of Biological Sciences

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Luna I. Mishoe Science Center
Room 122
Voice: 302.857.6510
Fax:     302.857.6512

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The Department of Biological Sciences provides a strong foundation in both traditional and modern areas of biology for students preparing for careers in the biological sciences. Careers for our typical graduates span the spectrum from professional study at graduate, medical, dental, or other health-related schools to technical positions in biology-related fields in industry or government. In partnership with the College of Education, we also prepare students for teaching careers in the field of biology. All majors in Biological Sciences are afforded the opportunity to focus their education on their specific career goals through the selection of elective courses while affording the flexibility to adjust that goal with all curricula having common core courses and requirements. Each student is expected to perform a research project as a graduation requirement (Capstone) and to participate in journal clubs, summer internships, and attend seminars. The goals of the Department enable students: To develop a clear and unbiased method of investigative thought; To develop an appreciation for and an understanding of the natural world; To develop a knowledge of biological principles that a modern citizen needs to make intelligent and effective decisions and adjustments to the demands of life; To be competent in communicating ideas and concepts; To succeed in advanced study and diverse careers requiring bioscience expertise. Curriculum Options in Biology BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJOR (BS): Biology is the study of living systems and includes how they are organized, how they function, how they grow, and how they interact with their surroundings. The organizational structure of our degree program provides the foundation for all our concentration areas and utilizes electives to provide the flexibility to prepare students for their specific career. The concentration areas include: Health Professions, Cell/Molecular/Biotechnology, and General Biology. A unique component of the BS degree in the General Biology concentration is our Biology Education concentration. This program is designed for students who plan to teach biology on the secondary level. At DSU, you complete your biology degree by selecting biology electives that meet the teacher preparation requirements so that you become "highly-trained" and then complete a one-year masters degree in teaching (student receives an MA degree). FORENSIC BIOLOGY MAJOR (BS): Forensic Biology is the application of the scientific principles, methods and techniques to situations of legal importance. The DSU Forensic Biology degree is a cross-campus partnership to provide the diverse skills required of an investigator and requires students to take 9 courses in biology, 4 courses related to criminal justice, 5 courses in chemistry, one course each of statistics, psychology and drawing in addition to their general education requirements. The DSU Forensic Biology degree will provide students with the theoretical background and basic laboratory skills needed to pursue a career or advanced study in related fields. *Note: All students in the Biological Sciences pursuing a bachelor's degree (BS) at DSU are required to complete the General Education program as required of all students. In addition, all majors in Biological Sciences must complete core courses in Biology 101-102, 210, 215, 310, a research project, and biology-based seminar courses. The specialization is in the flexibility of an additional 18 credits of student-selected advanced Biology courses (see specific degree concentrations). These elective courses are chosen with close faculty advisement. A grade of "C" or better is required in all Biology courses. In addition, the biology major must complete 5 courses in Chemistry, 2 in Physics, and meet Mathematics requirements.     MINOR in BIOLOGY: For a minor in biology, eighteen (18) hours are required, distributed as follows: Biology 101-102, 210 and six (6) hours of electives. MINOR in FORENSIC SCIENCE:  At DSU, a Minor in Forensic Science is available across most departments in the University. Depending on the student's major, a varied number of courses need to be taken. In principle, this minor will require students to take courses in biology, forensic science, courses related to criminal justice, a course in statistics, and courses in chemistry (the specific courses will depend on the student's major). DEPARTMENTAL CLUBS AND STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS:  The department has three student run clubs, each with different missions: Health Professions Student Organization, Forensic Biology Club, and Biology Club. All biology majors are encouraged to participate in at least one of these organizations.   Request for more information    
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Faculty Profiles

Chair:

Dr. Leonard G. Davis, Associate Dean for Student Services (pdf / profile)
SC 122
302-857-7370
ledavis@desu.edu

Graduate Program Director:

Dr. Sabrina McGary

Professors:
 
Dr. Vincent Fondong

SC 130
302-857-7377
vfondong@desu.edu
Bio
 
 
Dr. Melissa A. Harrington
SC 159
302-857-7117
mharrington@desu.edu
 

Associate Professors:

Dr. Leonard G. Davis

SCS 122
302-857-7370
ledavis@desu.edu
 
Dr. Harbinder Dhillon

SC 100
302-857-7374
hsdhillon@desu.edu

 

Dr. Andrew Lloyd
SCN 150
302-857-6518
alloyd@desu.edu

Dr. Robert MacBride
(photo unavailable)
SC 135
302-857-7376
rmacbride@desu.edu
 
Dr. Sabrina McGary
SC 122B
302-857-7464
smcgary@desu.edu
 
Dr. Cynthia van Golen

SC 110
302-857-6516
cvangolen@desu.edu
Bio
 
 
Dr. Clytrice Watson

SC 103
302-857-7485
cawatson@desu.edu
Bio
 
 
Dr. Charlie Wilson
(photo unavailable)
SC 148
cwilson@desu.edu
 

Assistant Professors: 

Dr. Michael Gitcho
(photo unavailable)
SC 156
302-857-6519
 
 
Dr. Y. Hwan Kim (pdf)
SC 109
302-857-6524
 
 
Dr. Hakeem Lawal
(photo unavailable)
SC 107
302-857-6507
 
 
Dr. Karl Miletti-Gonzalez
(photo unavailable)
SC 101
302-857-6893
 
Dr. Theresa M. Szabo-Maas (pdf)

SC 120
302-857-7739
tszabomaas@desu.edu
 
Dr. Murali Temburni
(photo unavailable)
SC 101
302-857-6510

Visiting Assistant Professors:

Dr. Anthea Aikins
SC 137
302-857-6407
 

Adjuncts:

Driskill, Jarrett, Kaur
Leva, Patel, Clendaniel

Departmental Assistants:
 
Ms. Diane Camper
Grossley Hall
302-857-6528
dcamper@desu.edu

Ms. Veronica Ernst
302-857-6527
vernst@desu.edu

Mr. Gabriel Jiminez
302-857-7375
gjiminez@desu.edu

Professor (Emeritus):

Dr. Gustav Ofosu
Library
302-857-7686
gofosu@desu.edu

 

Senior Secretary:

Ms. Tiffany Harris
 
SC 122
302-857-7217
tharris@desu.edu

 

Affiliated Websites

 

www.delawareneuroscience.org

www.sfn.org

Useful Links for Biology Majors

Undergraduate Internships (external to DSU)

Graduate Programs (external to DSU)

The Microscope (departmental newsletter)

Minor in IT

Body: 
  The core courses required of students who are seeking a minor in IT are as follows:   25-213 Discrete Mathematics I 3 35-261 Computer Science I 4 35-262 Computer Science II 4   and at least 12 additional hours of IT courses. 23       IT minor elective courses:   20-310 Data Mining 3 20-311 Data Warehousing 3 20-312 Programming Applications for Netscape Servers 3 20-313 Web Design and Implementation 3 20-314 Visual Basic 3 30-315 Multimedia Computing 3  

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