Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology

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Department of Biological Sciences

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Luna I. Mishoe Science Center
Room 122
Voice: 302.857.6510
Fax:     302.857.6512

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The Department of Biological Sciences provides a strong foundation in both traditional and modern areas of biology for students preparing for careers in the biological sciences. Careers for our typical graduates span the spectrum from professional study at graduate, medical, dental, or other health-related schools to technical positions in biology-related fields in industry or government. In partnership with the College of Education, we also prepare students for teaching careers in the field of biology. All majors in Biological Sciences are afforded the opportunity to focus their education on their specific career goals through the selection of elective courses while affording the flexibility to adjust that goal with all curricula having common core courses and requirements. Each student is expected to perform a research project as a graduation requirement (Capstone) and to participate in journal clubs, summer internships, and attend seminars. The goals of the Department enable students: To develop a clear and unbiased method of investigative thought; To develop an appreciation for and an understanding of the natural world; To develop a knowledge of biological principles that a modern citizen needs to make intelligent and effective decisions and adjustments to the demands of life; To be competent in communicating ideas and concepts; To succeed in advanced study and diverse careers requiring bioscience expertise. Curriculum Options in Biology BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJOR (BS): Biology is the study of living systems and includes how they are organized, how they function, how they grow, and how they interact with their surroundings. The organizational structure of our degree program provides the foundation for all our concentration areas and utilizes electives to provide the flexibility to prepare students for their specific career. The concentration areas include: Health Professions, Cell/Molecular/Biotechnology, and General Biology. A unique component of the BS degree in the General Biology concentration is our Biology Education concentration. This program is designed for students who plan to teach biology on the secondary level. At DSU, you complete your biology degree by selecting biology electives that meet the teacher preparation requirements so that you become "highly-trained" and then complete a one-year masters degree in teaching (student receives an MA degree). FORENSIC BIOLOGY MAJOR (BS): Forensic Biology is the application of the scientific principles, methods and techniques to situations of legal importance. The DSU Forensic Biology degree is a cross-campus partnership to provide the diverse skills required of an investigator and requires students to take 9 courses in biology, 4 courses related to criminal justice, 5 courses in chemistry, one course each of statistics, psychology and drawing in addition to their general education requirements. The DSU Forensic Biology degree will provide students with the theoretical background and basic laboratory skills needed to pursue a career or advanced study in related fields. *Note: All students in the Biological Sciences pursuing a bachelor's degree (BS) at DSU are required to complete the General Education program as required of all students. In addition, all majors in Biological Sciences must complete core courses in Biology 101-102, 210, 215, 310, a research project, and biology-based seminar courses. The specialization is in the flexibility of an additional 18 credits of student-selected advanced Biology courses (see specific degree concentrations). These elective courses are chosen with close faculty advisement. A grade of "C" or better is required in all Biology courses. In addition, the biology major must complete 5 courses in Chemistry, 2 in Physics, and meet Mathematics requirements.     MINOR in BIOLOGY: For a minor in biology, eighteen (18) hours are required, distributed as follows: Biology 101-102, 210 and six (6) hours of electives. MINOR in FORENSIC SCIENCE:  At DSU, a Minor in Forensic Science is available across most departments in the University. Depending on the student's major, a varied number of courses need to be taken. In principle, this minor will require students to take courses in biology, forensic science, courses related to criminal justice, a course in statistics, and courses in chemistry (the specific courses will depend on the student's major). DEPARTMENTAL CLUBS AND STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS:  The department has three student run clubs, each with different missions: Health Professions Student Organization, Forensic Biology Club, and Biology Club. All biology majors are encouraged to participate in at least one of these organizations.   Request for more information    
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Faculty Profiles

Chair:

Dr. Leonard G. Davis, Associate Dean for Student Services (pdf / profile)
SC 122
302-857-7370
ledavis@desu.edu

Graduate Program Director:

Dr. Sabrina McGary

Professors:
 
Dr. Vincent Fondong

SC 130
302-857-7377
vfondong@desu.edu
Bio
 
 
Dr. Melissa A. Harrington
SC 159
302-857-7117
mharrington@desu.edu
 

Associate Professors:

Dr. Leonard G. Davis

SCS 122
302-857-7370
ledavis@desu.edu
 
Dr. Harbinder Dhillon

SC 100
302-857-7374
hsdhillon@desu.edu
Bio
 

Dr. Andrew Lloyd
SCN 150
302-857-6518
alloyd@desu.edu

Dr. Robert MacBride
(photo unavailable)
SC 135
302-857-7376
rmacbride@desu.edu
 
Dr. Sabrina McGary
SC 122B
302-857-7464
smcgary@desu.edu
 
Dr. Cynthia van Golen

SC 110
302-857-6516
cvangolen@desu.edu
Bio
 
 
Dr. Clytrice Watson

SC 103
302-857-7485
cawatson@desu.edu
Bio
 
 
Dr. Charlie Wilson
(photo unavailable)
SC 148
cwilson@desu.edu
 

Assistant Professors: 

Dr. Michael Gitcho
(photo unavailable)
SC 156
302-857-6519
 
 
Dr. Y. Hwan Kim (pdf)
SC 109
302-857-6524
 
 
Dr. Hakeem Lawal
(photo unavailable)
SC 107
302-857-6507
 
 
Dr. Karl Miletti-Gonzalez
(photo unavailable)
SC 101
302-857-6893
 
Dr. Theresa M. Szabo-Maas (pdf)

SC 120
302-857-7739
tszabomaas@desu.edu
 
Dr. Murali Temburni
(photo unavailable)
SC 101
302-857-6510

Visiting Assistant Professors:

Dr. Anthea Aikins
SC 137
302-857-6407
 

Adjuncts:

Driskill, Jarrett, Kaur
Leva, Patel, Clendaniel

Departmental Assistants:
 
Ms. Diane Camper
Grossley Hall
302-857-6528
dcamper@desu.edu

Ms. Veronica Ernst
302-857-6527
vernst@desu.edu

Mr. Gabriel Jiminez
302-857-7375
gjiminez@desu.edu

Professor (Emeritus):

Dr. Gustav Ofosu
Library
302-857-7686
gofosu@desu.edu

 

Senior Secretary:

Ms. Tiffany Harris
 
SC 122
302-857-7217
tharris@desu.edu

 

Useful Links for Biology Majors

Undergraduate Internships (external to DSU)

Graduate Programs (external to DSU)

The Microscope (departmental newsletter)

Minor in IT

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  The core courses required of students who are seeking a minor in IT are as follows:   25-213 Discrete Mathematics I 3 35-261 Computer Science I 4 35-262 Computer Science II 4   and at least 12 additional hours of IT courses. 23       IT minor elective courses:   20-310 Data Mining 3 20-311 Data Warehousing 3 20-312 Programming Applications for Netscape Servers 3 20-313 Web Design and Implementation 3 20-314 Visual Basic 3 30-315 Multimedia Computing 3  

Minor in Computer Science

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    The core courses required of students who are seeking a minor in Computer Science are as follows: 25-213 or 25-251 Discrete Mathematics I or Calculus I 3 35-261 Elements of Computing 4 35-262 Data Structures and Algorithms I 3 35-263 Data Structures and Algorithms II 3 35-240 or 35-320 Applications of Fortran or File Structures 3   and 6 hours of computer science electives 22       CS minor elective courses 35-301 Introduction to Bioinformatics 3 35-320 File Structures 3 35-330 Machine Organization 3 35-340 Object Oriented Design 3 35-345 Computer Graphics 3 35-350 Theory of Operating Systems 3 35-351 Systems Programming 3 35-355 Principles of Programming Languages 3 35-360 Data Networks 3 35-370 Database Systems I 3 35-371 Database Systems II 3  

Curriculum for a Bachelor's Degree in Information Technology

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    First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 03-202 Ethics 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-213 Discrete Mathematics I 3 20-107 Survey of Information Technology 3 35-191 University Seminar I 1     15 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 25-251 Calculus I 3 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3 35-261 Elements of Computer Programming 4 35-192 University Seminar II 1     15 Second Year First Semester     01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 25-241 Elementary Statistics 3 35-262 Data Structures and Algorithms I 3 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3 XX-XXX Natural Science I* 4     16   * One of Biology 101-102, Chemistry 101-102, or Physics 201-202 sequence must be completed.   Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 20-280 Computer Organization 3 35-263 Data Structures and Algorithms II 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3 XX-XXX Natural Science II* 4     16   * One of Biology 101-102, Chemistry 101-102, or Physics 201-202 sequence must be completed.   Third Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 20-300 Organization Theory 3 20-350 Operating Systems 3 20-XXX Specialization Elective 3 35-340 Object-Oriented Design 3     15 Second Semester     20-355 Communication and Networking 3 20-370 Database Management Systems 3 20-XXX Specialization Elective 3 31-395 Global Societies 3 40-201 Macroeconomics 3     15 Fourth Year First Semester     20-400 Data Mining and Warehousing 3 20-420 Systems Development Technique 3 20-XXX Restricted Elective (course must be from Math, Computer Science or IT) 3 20-XXX IT Elective (course must be from IT or Computer Science) 3 20-XXX Specialization Elective 3     15 Second Semester     20-425 Performance Analysis and Design in IT 3 20-495 Project Management (Senior Capstone) 3 20-XXX Restricted Elective (course must be from Math, Computer Science or IT) 3 20-XXX IT Elective (course must be from IT or Computer Science) 3 20-XXX Specialization Elective 3     15   Total credits 122  

Curriculum in Computer Science

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Year One : Fall Semester Course Number Course Title Credit Hours Minimum Grade     14   CSCI-191 University Seminar I 1 C ENGL-101 English Composition I 3 C MVSC-101 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 C CSCI-107 Survey of Computing 4 C MTSC-251 Calculus I 4 C     Year One : Spring Semester Course Number Course Title Credit Hours Minimum Grade     15   CSCI-192 University Seminar II 1 C ENGL-102 English Composition II 3 C HIS History 3 D CSCI-261 Elements of Computer Programming 4 C MTSC-252 Calculus II 4 C     Year Two: Fall Semester Course Number Course Title Credit Hours Minimum Grade     17   LT1 Literature I 3 C ENGR-210 Introduction to Combinational Circuits 2 C ENGL-200 Speech 3 C FR1 Foreign Language I 3 D CSCI-262 Data Structures and Algorithms I 3 C MTSC-213 Discrete Mathematics I 3 C Year Two: Spring Semester Course Number Course Title Credit Hours Minimum Grade     14   LT2 Literature II 3 C ENGR-211 Introduction to Sequential Circuits 2 C FR2 Foreign Language II 3 D CSCI-263 Data Structures and Algorithms II 3 C CSCI-220 Discrete Structures 3 C       Year Three: Fall Semester Course Number Course Title Credit Hours Minimum Grade     15   NS1 Natural Science I 4 C ENGR-220 Microprocessor Based Systems I 2 C CSCI-350 Theory of Operating Systems 3 C CSCI-310 Analysis of Algorithms 3 C CSCI-370 Database Systems 3 C Year Three: Spring Semester Course Number Course Title Credit Hours Minimum Grade     16   NS2 Natural Science I 4 C MTSC-341 Probability 3 C MTSC-313 Linear Algebra 3 C CSCI-310 Analysis of Algorithms 3 C CSCI-335 Principles of Programming Languages 3 C CSCI-355 Data Networks 3 C       Year Four: Fall Semester Course Number Course Title Credit Hours Minimum Grade     15   PHL Philosophy 3 D ECON-201 Macroeconomics 3 D CSCI-490 Software Engineering Design 3 C RSE Restricted Elective 3 C CSE Computer Science Elective 3 C Year Four: Spring Semester Course Number Course Title Credit Hours Minimum Grade     15   GLOB-395 Global Societies 3 C CSCI-461 Theory of Computation 3 C CSCI-495 Computer Science Project 3 C RSE Restricted Elective 3 C CSE Computer Science Elective 3 C   Total Credit Hours:       121  

IT-Computer Science Course Descriptions

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  IT and Computer Science Courses Information Technology (20) 20-101. APPLYING COMPUTERS. 3:3:0 This course provides computer literacy and productivity training. The course will provide a familiarization with various operating systems and file management capabilities. It will also show how to leverage open source software to increase work efficiency. The course will cover creation and querying of simple database tables and productivity software that access these tables. Network security issues related to legal, privacy and ethical issues in computer security will be discussed. Searching and evaluating information found on the internet will be covered. Prerequisite: None. Credit: three hours. 20-107. SURVEY OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY. 3:3:0 This course provides computer literacy training, through a discussion of the usefulness and limitations of hardware and software. The course should provide an overview on the computer impact on society and the role of computers in everyday life and business. Students will learn the various aspects of problem solving using computers and how computer programming is a large and important part of this problem solving process. A paradigm of a dumb robot will be used to introduce the idea behind programming the dumb computer. Prerequisite: None. Credits: three hours. 20-270. VISUAL BASIC. 3:3:0 The commands, methods, properties, objects statements, events, functions in Visual Basic,  and applications in business. Prerequisite: Computer Science 262. Credits: three hours. 20-280. COMPUTER ORGANIZATION. 3:3:0 Analysis and synthesis of combinational and sequential circuits; Computer systems organization; Processor and control logic design; Concepts of computer architecture; Introduction to an assembly programming language. Prerequisite: Computer Science 262. Credits: three hours. 20-300. ORGANIZATION THEORY. 3:3:0 This course provides an understanding of organizational concepts, structures, issues, and models. The course introduces the contextual dimensions, such as goals, environment, technology, size and life cycle, required to make judgments about organizational structures. How organizational processes such as culture, information processing for decision making and politics affects the organization will be discussed. Prerequisite: None. Credits: three hours. 20-350. OPERATING SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 Principles underlying the design and implementation of operating systems; Treatment of process, storage, and processor management techniques; Analytic modeling and performance evaluation of operating systems. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263, Information Systems 280. Credits: three hours. 20-355. COMMUNICATION AND NETWORKING. 3:3:0 This course provides students with the conceptual, logical and physical concepts of computer networks including application, transport, network and data link layers and basics of multimedia and security. Prerequisite: Information Systems 350, Math 241. Credits: three hours. 20-360. WEB DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION. 3:3:0 This course provides an overview of web design concepts, including usability, accessibility, information design, and graphic design in the context of the web will be covered. Introduction to web site technologies, including cascading style sheets, DHTML, and computational tools for creating and working with interactive information resources will also be explored. Prerequisite: Computer Science 262. Credits: three hours. 20-362. BUILDING WEB APPLICATIONS. 3:3:0 This course provides an introduction to the architecture and programming of web applications using Java technologies. In particular, the course will cover setting up a web server, program for web servers, design and implementation of multi-tier applications along with database access for information persistence. Prerequisite: Computer Science 340, Information Systems 360. Credits: three hours. 20-370. DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 This course introduces the conceptual, logical and physical organizations of large set of related data, to database descriptions, data models, data definition and manipulation languages, query languages, relational algebra and database application-oriented projects. Prerequisite: Computer Science 340, Information Systems 350. Credits: three hours. 20-371. ADVANCED DATABASE SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 Advanced study of the internals of a database management system, non-relational data models and database frontiers. Topics include Logic design of databases, Internals of database systems, Data models and architectures of database systems, multimedia databases. Prerequisite: Information Systems 370. Credits: three hours. 20-385. NETWORK SECURITY. 3:3:0 This course introduces fundamental techniques and principles for modeling and analyzing Security. The course covers encryption and security in programs as well as managing and administering security. It discusses security policies and their role in computing. The course also covers the legal, ethical, and privacy issues related to computer security. 20-390. MULTIMEDIA SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 This course will introduce students to the creation, storage, retrieval and transmission of multimedia content. Most current communication techniques are a single medium. Multimedia technologies, through the use of more than one media, allow more natural communication. Though this course will be technical, it is expected that non-computer science majors such as mass communications, criminal justice and education will also benefit from this course. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263 or Permission of Instructor. Credits: three hours. 20-400. DATA MINING AND WAREHOUSING. 3:3:0 This course provides a student introduction to data mining and warehousing techniques. Special emphasis is put on integration of database technology with algorithms for efficient and non-trivial querying. Prerequisite: Information Systems 370, Math 241. Credits: three hours. 20-410. DESIGN AND PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION. 3:3:0 This course provides an introduction to the principles of designing high-quality user interfaces for interactive systems. Students will apply HCI principles and professional practices in analyzing collaborative software, multimedia, and ubiquitous computing. Students will participate in designing and implementing aspects of interfaces for  collaborative software. Prerequisite: Computer Science 340. Credits: three hours. 20-420. SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT TECHNIQUES. 3:3:0 This course provides the concepts, skills, methodologies, techniques, and tolls of systems development and design. It emphasizes project management and formal analysis, design, implementation, and evaluation techniques. Use of various software engineering analysis and design tools and techniques are covered, including information gathering for defining system requirements, Unified Modeling Language (UML), data flow diagrams, data dictionaries, and prototyping. The course will also present current topics, such as extreme programming, rapid application development (RAD), and the capability maturity model (CMM). Prerequisite: Computer Science 340. Credits: three hours. 20-425. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS IN IT. 3:3:0 This course provides an introduction in techniques used to analyze and understand the performance of computer systems. The emphasis is on practical methods of measurement, simulation, and analytical modeling. Prerequisite: Information Systems 420, Math 241, Math 251. Credits: three hours. 20-440. WIRELESS AND MOBILE NETWORKS. 3:3:0 The benefit of mobility due to wireless systems and devices is well organized. However, there are several challenges in deploying effective mobile networks and associated technologies to deal with these challenges. This course will provide an overview of such technologies. Prerequisite: Information Systems 355. Credits: three hours. 20-450. CLIENT SERVER COMPUTING. 3:3:0 This course provides coverage of client/server architecture and programming techniques. The evolution of the computing environment, standards and open systems, client and server platform specialization, client-server communication in local and wide area networks and major communication protocols are used as a foundation. Prerequisite: Computer Science 340, Information Systems 355. Credits: three hours. 20-455. DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 The course provides an introductory background in distributed computing and its use in client/server and real-world computing applications. Concepts will include the design of distributed systems (two, three and n-tier architectures), inter-process communication (asynchronous vs. synchronous, concurrent vs. parallel, and sockets), principles of object-oriented middleware, security, and performance. Prerequisite: None. Credits: three hours. 20-495. PROJECT MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 Project planning and selection of appropriate process model; project scheduling and milestone. Project organization, management, principles, concepts and issues. Work breakdown structures and scheduling. Project staffing consideration. Project control. Managing multiple projects. Systems documentation and metrics. User documentation. Configuration management. System development quality assurance. Computer Science (35) 35-107. SURVEY OF COMPUTING. 3:3:0 This course provides students with information about the field of computer science and its pervasiveness and impact on society. The course provides an overview of computing in everyday life and business and discusses the job prospects in the field. Students will learn the various aspects of problem solving using computers and how computer programming is a large and important part of this problem solving process. A paradigm of a dumb robot will be used to introduce the idea behind programming the dumb computer. The focus will be on a step-by-step problem solving approach with minimal emphasis on syntax. Credits: three hours. 35-240. APPLICATIONS OF FORTRAN. 3:3:0 Scientific and engineering applications of FORTRAN in problem solving; Introduction to numerical errors; Decision, iterative, data abstraction, function, subroutine, I/O, and complex operations in FORTRAN; Applications in the areas of computation of zeros of functions, systems of equations, numerical differentiation, and integration. Prerequisite: Consent of Advisor. Credits: three hours. 35-261. ELEMENTS OF COMPUTER PROGRAMMING. 4:4:0 This course presents fundamental software development and computational methods. It explores the use of a programming language as a tool to implement algorithms that solve computing problems. The course introduces important concepts and principles in programming and lays the foundations for achieving advanced programming skills. The course covers various concepts in programming including variables, decision statements, loops, function, and arrays. Prerequisite: Computer Science 107. Credits: four hours. 35-262. DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS I. 3:3:0 The study of computer science includes the study of how information is organized in a computer, how it can be manipulated, and how it can be utilized. The efficiency of programming and data processing is directly linked to the structure of the data being processed and algorithms used. This course presents fundamental computing algorithms and their associated data structures and abstraction. It combines the concepts of information organization, information manipulation and algorithms. Prerequisite: Computer Science 261, Math 213. Credits: three hours. 35-263. DATA STRUCTURES & ALGORITHMS II. 3:3:0 The study of computer science includes the study of how information is organized in a computer, how it can be manipulated, and how it can be utilized. This continues with introducing more advanced computing algorithms and data structures. It also introduces the mathematical framework for the analysis of algorithm efficiency. Prerequisite: Computer Science 261, Math 214. Credits: three hours. 35-301. INTRODUCTION TO BIOINFORMATICS. 3:3:0 Theoretical and practical concepts of bioinformatics, with emphasis on algorithms and their implementation in bioinformatics software. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. Credits: three hours. 35-320. FILE STRUCTURES. 3:3:0 Logical and physical organizations of large sets of related data in files for performance. Topics include secondary storage and system software, managing files of records, indexing and multi-level indexing using binary tree structures, B-trees and their derivatives, hashing and extendible hashing, and sorting. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263. Credits: three hours. 35-330. MACHINE ORGANIZATION. 3:3:0 Analysis and synthesis of combinational and sequential circuits; Computer systems organization; Processor and control logic design; Concepts of computer architecture; Introduction to an assembly programming language. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263. Credits: three hours. 35-340. OBJECT ORIENTED DESIGN. 3:3:0 Introduces the philosophy and methodology of object-oriented software design and the techniques of object-oriented programming; Discusses the design and implementation of individual classes and the trade offs in designing collections of classes; Introduces class libraries and application frameworks; Examines simple design patterns; Compares object-oriented design to other software design paradigms. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263. Credits: three hours. 35-345. COMPUTER GRAPHICS. 3:3:0 This course introduces programming concepts in rendering of graphics primitives, shading, lighting, geometric transformations, clipping, depth, ray tracing, texture mapping and antialiasing, interaction, perspective, and stereo viewing. Prerequisite: Computer Science 340, Math 313. Credits, three hours. 35-350. THEORY OF OPERATING SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 Principles underlying the design and implementation of operating systems; In-depth treatment of process, storage, and processor management techniques; Analytic modeling and performance evaluation of operating systems. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263, Pre-Engineering 220. Credits: three hours. 35-351. SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING. 3:3:0 This course provides students with fundamental skills necessary to develop system based applications in a particular environment. Topics include development tools, creating and using libraries, process models, I/O handling, signal processing, and job control. Prerequisite: Computer Science 350. Credits: three hours. 35-355. PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES. 3:3:0 A formal comparative study of programming languages; Syntactic and semantic issues in the design and implementation of a programming language; Data structures, operations, processors, data control, and storage management in alternative programming languages; Formal proof of program correctness. Prerequisite: Computer Science 340. Credits: three hours. 35-360. DATA NETWORKS. 3:3:0 Conceptual, logical and physical concepts of computer networks. Topics include application, transport, network and data link layers and basics of multimedia and security. Prerequisite: Computer Science 350, Math 341. Credits, three hours. 35-370. DATABASE SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 This course introduces the conceptual, logical and physical organizations of large sets of related data, to database descriptions, data models, data definitions and manipulation languages, query languages, relational algebra and database application-oriented projects. Prerequisite: Computer Science 320, Credits: three hours. 35-371. DATABASE SYSTEMS II. 3:3:0 Advanced study of the internals of a database management system, non-relational data models and database frontiers. Topics include Logic design of databases, Internals of database systems, Data models and architectures of database systems, multimedia databases. Prerequisite: Computer Science 350, Computer Science 370. Credits: three hours. 35-415. PARALLEL PROCESSING. 3:3:0 Design and applications of interacting processors. Concurrency and synchronization; architectural support; programming language constructs for parallel computing; parallel algorithms and complexity. Prerequisite: Computer Science 360, Math 313. Credits: three hours. 35-420. SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING. 3:3:0 Exposes student to various aspects of scientific computing. Topics include numerical techniques in solving linear, nonlinear and differential equations, symbolic computing, curve fitting and presentation of experimental results. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263, Math 313, Math 341. Credits: three hours. 35-425. SIMULATION. 3:3:0 Basic concepts in queuing systems and modeling. An introduction to a simulation language and elements of probability distributions. Applications of simulation in real life problems such as banking, the physical and life sciences, multi-server queuing systems, risk analysis, and production planning. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263, Math 341. Credits: three hours. 35-430. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE. 3:3:0 Introduce students to the field of artificial intelligence. Topics include state spaces, production systems, search, knowledge representation, rule-based systems, statistical reasoning and learning. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263, Math 252 . Credits: three hours. 35-431. EXPERT SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 Introduce students to structure and concepts of expert systems, knowledge representation and knowledge engineering. Topics include knowledge representation of expert systems, rule-based systems, predicate logic, reasoning under uncertainty, case study of an expert system, expert systems tools. Prerequisite: Computer Science 430. Credits: three hours. 35-435. MACHINE LEARNING. 3:3:0 Expose students to theoretical and practical aspects of machine learning. Topics include classification techniques, unsupervised learning, computational learning theory, ensemble methods, and coverage of machine learning software. Prerequisite: Computer Science 430. Credits: three hours. 35-437. GENETIC ALGORITHMS. 3:3:0 Expose students in emerging field of genetic algorithms and genetic programming. Topics include simple genetic algorithms, theory of genetic algorithms (schema theory. effects of selection, crossover, and mutation operators, etc.). Prerequisite: Computer Science 430, Math 341. Credits: three hours. 35-440. DATA MINING. 3:3:0 The course is designed to introduce students to various aspects of data mining as novel and emerging technology, with special emphasis on various potential applications. Topics include classification algorithms, regression techniques, clustering, association rules, and other advanced topics. Prerequisite: Computer Science 340, Math 313. Credits: three hours. 35-450. TECHNIQUES IN OPTIMIZATION. 3:3:0 This course will expose students in computer science to linear programming, non-linear programming, different optimization techniques and selected applications including software development. Topics include allocation, blending, operations planning, shift scheduling, numerical search and simplex method, duality and sensitivity, unconstrained nonlinear search and genetic algorithms in search. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263, Math 252, Math 341. Credits: three hours. 35-455. GRAPH THEORY. 3:3:0 Graph theory algorithms and applications to the areas of computer science. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263, Math 252, Math 341. Credits: three hours. 35-461. THEORY OF COMPUTING. 3:3:0 An introduction to the theoretical aspects of computing. Elements and applications of algebraic group structures, coding theory, finite automata, formal linguistic, machine design and construction, computability, and computational complexity. Prerequisites: Computer Science 355 and senior standing. Credit: three hours. 35-465. COMPILER CONSTRUCTION. 3:3:0 Principles and practices for design and implementation of compilers and interpreters. Topics: lexical analysis, parsing theory (LL, LR, and LALR parsing), symbol tables, type systems, scoping, semantic analysis, intermediate representations, runtime environments, and code generation. Prerequisite: Computer Science 461. Credits: three hours. 35-470. INTRODUCTION TO GAME PROGRAMMING. 3:3:0 This course provides practical hands-on approach to game programming. It is intended to be a first course introduction for students who may be interested in finding out about the gaming industry and gain an understanding of the complexities and the immense tasks required to develop an electronic game. Topics such as 2D and 3D game engines, sprite animation, tile-based game design, collision detection, sound, music and more will be utilized to create a game prototype. Prerequisite: Computer Science 345, Math 313. Credits: three hours. 35-490. SOFTWARE ENGINEERING DESIGN. 3:3:0 This course presents particular methods for the systematic development of large software systems. Topics include requirements analysis, definition, specification including formal methods, prototyping, and design including object and function oriented design. Prerequisite: Computer Science 355, Computer Science 360, Computer Science 370. Credits: three hours. 35-495. COMPUTER SCIENCE PROJECT. 3:3:0 (This is a senior capstone course.) Research papers and reports will be selected for review and presentation. All students in this course will participate in a group project. The subject area is at the discretion of the instructor. Both formal and informal teaching methods will be used. Guest speakers may be invited. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Credits: three hours. 35-497. TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE. 3:3:0 This course will introduce elements, techniques, and principles governing an innovative computer science area such as symbolic computation and advanced artificial intelligence. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Credits: three hours.

Minor in Mathematics

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    Twenty-one (21) hours distributed as follows: the three courses listed below and nine (9) additional hours selected from Mathematics courses at the 300 level or higher excluding Math 403. 25-251 Calculus I 4 25-252 Calculus II 4 25-253 Calculus III 4 25-xxx Nine (9) additional hours selected from Mathematics courses at 300 level or higher excluding 403 9   Total Credits 21  

Curriculum in Mathematics with Computer Science

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Curriculum in Mathematics Education

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Curriculum in Mathematics

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