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Curriculum in Computer Science

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Year One : Fall Semester Course Number Course Title Credit Hours Minimum Grade     14   CSCI-191 University Seminar I 1 C ENGL-101 English Composition I 3 C MVSC-101 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 C CSCI-107 Survey of Computing 4 C MTSC-251 Calculus I 4 C     Year One : Spring Semester Course Number Course Title Credit Hours Minimum Grade     15   CSCI-192 University Seminar II 1 C ENGL-102 English Composition II 3 C HIS History 3 D CSCI-261 Elements of Computer Programming 4 C MTSC-252 Calculus II 4 C     Year Two: Fall Semester Course Number Course Title Credit Hours Minimum Grade     17   LT1 Literature I 3 C ENGR-210 Introduction to Combinational Circuits 2 C ENGL-200 Speech 3 C FR1 Foreign Language I 3 D CSCI-262 Data Structures and Algorithms I 3 C MTSC-213 Discrete Mathematics I 3 C Year Two: Spring Semester Course Number Course Title Credit Hours Minimum Grade     14   LT2 Literature II 3 C ENGR-211 Introduction to Sequential Circuits 2 C FR2 Foreign Language II 3 D CSCI-263 Data Structures and Algorithms II 3 C CSCI-220 Discrete Structures 3 C       Year Three: Fall Semester Course Number Course Title Credit Hours Minimum Grade     15   NS1 Natural Science I 4 C ENGR-220 Microprocessor Based Systems I 2 C CSCI-350 Theory of Operating Systems 3 C CSCI-310 Analysis of Algorithms 3 C CSCI-370 Database Systems 3 C Year Three: Spring Semester Course Number Course Title Credit Hours Minimum Grade     16   NS2 Natural Science I 4 C MTSC-341 Probability 3 C MTSC-313 Linear Algebra 3 C CSCI-310 Analysis of Algorithms 3 C CSCI-335 Principles of Programming Languages 3 C CSCI-355 Data Networks 3 C       Year Four: Fall Semester Course Number Course Title Credit Hours Minimum Grade     15   PHL Philosophy 3 D ECON-201 Macroeconomics 3 D CSCI-490 Software Engineering Design 3 C RSE Restricted Elective 3 C CSE Computer Science Elective 3 C Year Four: Spring Semester Course Number Course Title Credit Hours Minimum Grade     15   GLOB-395 Global Societies 3 C CSCI-461 Theory of Computation 3 C CSCI-495 Computer Science Project 3 C RSE Restricted Elective 3 C CSE Computer Science Elective 3 C   Total Credit Hours:       121  

IT-Computer Science Course Descriptions

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  IT and Computer Science Courses Information Technology (20) 20-101. APPLYING COMPUTERS. 3:3:0 This course provides computer literacy and productivity training. The course will provide a familiarization with various operating systems and file management capabilities. It will also show how to leverage open source software to increase work efficiency. The course will cover creation and querying of simple database tables and productivity software that access these tables. Network security issues related to legal, privacy and ethical issues in computer security will be discussed. Searching and evaluating information found on the internet will be covered. Prerequisite: None. Credit: three hours. 20-107. SURVEY OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY. 3:3:0 This course provides computer literacy training, through a discussion of the usefulness and limitations of hardware and software. The course should provide an overview on the computer impact on society and the role of computers in everyday life and business. Students will learn the various aspects of problem solving using computers and how computer programming is a large and important part of this problem solving process. A paradigm of a dumb robot will be used to introduce the idea behind programming the dumb computer. Prerequisite: None. Credits: three hours. 20-270. VISUAL BASIC. 3:3:0 The commands, methods, properties, objects statements, events, functions in Visual Basic,  and applications in business. Prerequisite: Computer Science 262. Credits: three hours. 20-280. COMPUTER ORGANIZATION. 3:3:0 Analysis and synthesis of combinational and sequential circuits; Computer systems organization; Processor and control logic design; Concepts of computer architecture; Introduction to an assembly programming language. Prerequisite: Computer Science 262. Credits: three hours. 20-300. ORGANIZATION THEORY. 3:3:0 This course provides an understanding of organizational concepts, structures, issues, and models. The course introduces the contextual dimensions, such as goals, environment, technology, size and life cycle, required to make judgments about organizational structures. How organizational processes such as culture, information processing for decision making and politics affects the organization will be discussed. Prerequisite: None. Credits: three hours. 20-350. OPERATING SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 Principles underlying the design and implementation of operating systems; Treatment of process, storage, and processor management techniques; Analytic modeling and performance evaluation of operating systems. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263, Information Systems 280. Credits: three hours. 20-355. COMMUNICATION AND NETWORKING. 3:3:0 This course provides students with the conceptual, logical and physical concepts of computer networks including application, transport, network and data link layers and basics of multimedia and security. Prerequisite: Information Systems 350, Math 241. Credits: three hours. 20-360. WEB DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION. 3:3:0 This course provides an overview of web design concepts, including usability, accessibility, information design, and graphic design in the context of the web will be covered. Introduction to web site technologies, including cascading style sheets, DHTML, and computational tools for creating and working with interactive information resources will also be explored. Prerequisite: Computer Science 262. Credits: three hours. 20-362. BUILDING WEB APPLICATIONS. 3:3:0 This course provides an introduction to the architecture and programming of web applications using Java technologies. In particular, the course will cover setting up a web server, program for web servers, design and implementation of multi-tier applications along with database access for information persistence. Prerequisite: Computer Science 340, Information Systems 360. Credits: three hours. 20-370. DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 This course introduces the conceptual, logical and physical organizations of large set of related data, to database descriptions, data models, data definition and manipulation languages, query languages, relational algebra and database application-oriented projects. Prerequisite: Computer Science 340, Information Systems 350. Credits: three hours. 20-371. ADVANCED DATABASE SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 Advanced study of the internals of a database management system, non-relational data models and database frontiers. Topics include Logic design of databases, Internals of database systems, Data models and architectures of database systems, multimedia databases. Prerequisite: Information Systems 370. Credits: three hours. 20-385. NETWORK SECURITY. 3:3:0 This course introduces fundamental techniques and principles for modeling and analyzing Security. The course covers encryption and security in programs as well as managing and administering security. It discusses security policies and their role in computing. The course also covers the legal, ethical, and privacy issues related to computer security. 20-390. MULTIMEDIA SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 This course will introduce students to the creation, storage, retrieval and transmission of multimedia content. Most current communication techniques are a single medium. Multimedia technologies, through the use of more than one media, allow more natural communication. Though this course will be technical, it is expected that non-computer science majors such as mass communications, criminal justice and education will also benefit from this course. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263 or Permission of Instructor. Credits: three hours. 20-400. DATA MINING AND WAREHOUSING. 3:3:0 This course provides a student introduction to data mining and warehousing techniques. Special emphasis is put on integration of database technology with algorithms for efficient and non-trivial querying. Prerequisite: Information Systems 370, Math 241. Credits: three hours. 20-410. DESIGN AND PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION. 3:3:0 This course provides an introduction to the principles of designing high-quality user interfaces for interactive systems. Students will apply HCI principles and professional practices in analyzing collaborative software, multimedia, and ubiquitous computing. Students will participate in designing and implementing aspects of interfaces for  collaborative software. Prerequisite: Computer Science 340. Credits: three hours. 20-420. SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT TECHNIQUES. 3:3:0 This course provides the concepts, skills, methodologies, techniques, and tolls of systems development and design. It emphasizes project management and formal analysis, design, implementation, and evaluation techniques. Use of various software engineering analysis and design tools and techniques are covered, including information gathering for defining system requirements, Unified Modeling Language (UML), data flow diagrams, data dictionaries, and prototyping. The course will also present current topics, such as extreme programming, rapid application development (RAD), and the capability maturity model (CMM). Prerequisite: Computer Science 340. Credits: three hours. 20-425. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS IN IT. 3:3:0 This course provides an introduction in techniques used to analyze and understand the performance of computer systems. The emphasis is on practical methods of measurement, simulation, and analytical modeling. Prerequisite: Information Systems 420, Math 241, Math 251. Credits: three hours. 20-440. WIRELESS AND MOBILE NETWORKS. 3:3:0 The benefit of mobility due to wireless systems and devices is well organized. However, there are several challenges in deploying effective mobile networks and associated technologies to deal with these challenges. This course will provide an overview of such technologies. Prerequisite: Information Systems 355. Credits: three hours. 20-450. CLIENT SERVER COMPUTING. 3:3:0 This course provides coverage of client/server architecture and programming techniques. The evolution of the computing environment, standards and open systems, client and server platform specialization, client-server communication in local and wide area networks and major communication protocols are used as a foundation. Prerequisite: Computer Science 340, Information Systems 355. Credits: three hours. 20-455. DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 The course provides an introductory background in distributed computing and its use in client/server and real-world computing applications. Concepts will include the design of distributed systems (two, three and n-tier architectures), inter-process communication (asynchronous vs. synchronous, concurrent vs. parallel, and sockets), principles of object-oriented middleware, security, and performance. Prerequisite: None. Credits: three hours. 20-495. PROJECT MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 Project planning and selection of appropriate process model; project scheduling and milestone. Project organization, management, principles, concepts and issues. Work breakdown structures and scheduling. Project staffing consideration. Project control. Managing multiple projects. Systems documentation and metrics. User documentation. Configuration management. System development quality assurance. Computer Science (35) 35-107. SURVEY OF COMPUTING. 3:3:0 This course provides students with information about the field of computer science and its pervasiveness and impact on society. The course provides an overview of computing in everyday life and business and discusses the job prospects in the field. Students will learn the various aspects of problem solving using computers and how computer programming is a large and important part of this problem solving process. A paradigm of a dumb robot will be used to introduce the idea behind programming the dumb computer. The focus will be on a step-by-step problem solving approach with minimal emphasis on syntax. Credits: three hours. 35-240. APPLICATIONS OF FORTRAN. 3:3:0 Scientific and engineering applications of FORTRAN in problem solving; Introduction to numerical errors; Decision, iterative, data abstraction, function, subroutine, I/O, and complex operations in FORTRAN; Applications in the areas of computation of zeros of functions, systems of equations, numerical differentiation, and integration. Prerequisite: Consent of Advisor. Credits: three hours. 35-261. ELEMENTS OF COMPUTER PROGRAMMING. 4:4:0 This course presents fundamental software development and computational methods. It explores the use of a programming language as a tool to implement algorithms that solve computing problems. The course introduces important concepts and principles in programming and lays the foundations for achieving advanced programming skills. The course covers various concepts in programming including variables, decision statements, loops, function, and arrays. Prerequisite: Computer Science 107. Credits: four hours. 35-262. DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS I. 3:3:0 The study of computer science includes the study of how information is organized in a computer, how it can be manipulated, and how it can be utilized. The efficiency of programming and data processing is directly linked to the structure of the data being processed and algorithms used. This course presents fundamental computing algorithms and their associated data structures and abstraction. It combines the concepts of information organization, information manipulation and algorithms. Prerequisite: Computer Science 261, Math 213. Credits: three hours. 35-263. DATA STRUCTURES & ALGORITHMS II. 3:3:0 The study of computer science includes the study of how information is organized in a computer, how it can be manipulated, and how it can be utilized. This continues with introducing more advanced computing algorithms and data structures. It also introduces the mathematical framework for the analysis of algorithm efficiency. Prerequisite: Computer Science 261, Math 214. Credits: three hours. 35-301. INTRODUCTION TO BIOINFORMATICS. 3:3:0 Theoretical and practical concepts of bioinformatics, with emphasis on algorithms and their implementation in bioinformatics software. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. Credits: three hours. 35-320. FILE STRUCTURES. 3:3:0 Logical and physical organizations of large sets of related data in files for performance. Topics include secondary storage and system software, managing files of records, indexing and multi-level indexing using binary tree structures, B-trees and their derivatives, hashing and extendible hashing, and sorting. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263. Credits: three hours. 35-330. MACHINE ORGANIZATION. 3:3:0 Analysis and synthesis of combinational and sequential circuits; Computer systems organization; Processor and control logic design; Concepts of computer architecture; Introduction to an assembly programming language. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263. Credits: three hours. 35-340. OBJECT ORIENTED DESIGN. 3:3:0 Introduces the philosophy and methodology of object-oriented software design and the techniques of object-oriented programming; Discusses the design and implementation of individual classes and the trade offs in designing collections of classes; Introduces class libraries and application frameworks; Examines simple design patterns; Compares object-oriented design to other software design paradigms. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263. Credits: three hours. 35-345. COMPUTER GRAPHICS. 3:3:0 This course introduces programming concepts in rendering of graphics primitives, shading, lighting, geometric transformations, clipping, depth, ray tracing, texture mapping and antialiasing, interaction, perspective, and stereo viewing. Prerequisite: Computer Science 340, Math 313. Credits, three hours. 35-350. THEORY OF OPERATING SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 Principles underlying the design and implementation of operating systems; In-depth treatment of process, storage, and processor management techniques; Analytic modeling and performance evaluation of operating systems. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263, Pre-Engineering 220. Credits: three hours. 35-351. SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING. 3:3:0 This course provides students with fundamental skills necessary to develop system based applications in a particular environment. Topics include development tools, creating and using libraries, process models, I/O handling, signal processing, and job control. Prerequisite: Computer Science 350. Credits: three hours. 35-355. PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES. 3:3:0 A formal comparative study of programming languages; Syntactic and semantic issues in the design and implementation of a programming language; Data structures, operations, processors, data control, and storage management in alternative programming languages; Formal proof of program correctness. Prerequisite: Computer Science 340. Credits: three hours. 35-360. DATA NETWORKS. 3:3:0 Conceptual, logical and physical concepts of computer networks. Topics include application, transport, network and data link layers and basics of multimedia and security. Prerequisite: Computer Science 350, Math 341. Credits, three hours. 35-370. DATABASE SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 This course introduces the conceptual, logical and physical organizations of large sets of related data, to database descriptions, data models, data definitions and manipulation languages, query languages, relational algebra and database application-oriented projects. Prerequisite: Computer Science 320, Credits: three hours. 35-371. DATABASE SYSTEMS II. 3:3:0 Advanced study of the internals of a database management system, non-relational data models and database frontiers. Topics include Logic design of databases, Internals of database systems, Data models and architectures of database systems, multimedia databases. Prerequisite: Computer Science 350, Computer Science 370. Credits: three hours. 35-415. PARALLEL PROCESSING. 3:3:0 Design and applications of interacting processors. Concurrency and synchronization; architectural support; programming language constructs for parallel computing; parallel algorithms and complexity. Prerequisite: Computer Science 360, Math 313. Credits: three hours. 35-420. SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING. 3:3:0 Exposes student to various aspects of scientific computing. Topics include numerical techniques in solving linear, nonlinear and differential equations, symbolic computing, curve fitting and presentation of experimental results. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263, Math 313, Math 341. Credits: three hours. 35-425. SIMULATION. 3:3:0 Basic concepts in queuing systems and modeling. An introduction to a simulation language and elements of probability distributions. Applications of simulation in real life problems such as banking, the physical and life sciences, multi-server queuing systems, risk analysis, and production planning. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263, Math 341. Credits: three hours. 35-430. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE. 3:3:0 Introduce students to the field of artificial intelligence. Topics include state spaces, production systems, search, knowledge representation, rule-based systems, statistical reasoning and learning. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263, Math 252 . Credits: three hours. 35-431. EXPERT SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 Introduce students to structure and concepts of expert systems, knowledge representation and knowledge engineering. Topics include knowledge representation of expert systems, rule-based systems, predicate logic, reasoning under uncertainty, case study of an expert system, expert systems tools. Prerequisite: Computer Science 430. Credits: three hours. 35-435. MACHINE LEARNING. 3:3:0 Expose students to theoretical and practical aspects of machine learning. Topics include classification techniques, unsupervised learning, computational learning theory, ensemble methods, and coverage of machine learning software. Prerequisite: Computer Science 430. Credits: three hours. 35-437. GENETIC ALGORITHMS. 3:3:0 Expose students in emerging field of genetic algorithms and genetic programming. Topics include simple genetic algorithms, theory of genetic algorithms (schema theory. effects of selection, crossover, and mutation operators, etc.). Prerequisite: Computer Science 430, Math 341. Credits: three hours. 35-440. DATA MINING. 3:3:0 The course is designed to introduce students to various aspects of data mining as novel and emerging technology, with special emphasis on various potential applications. Topics include classification algorithms, regression techniques, clustering, association rules, and other advanced topics. Prerequisite: Computer Science 340, Math 313. Credits: three hours. 35-450. TECHNIQUES IN OPTIMIZATION. 3:3:0 This course will expose students in computer science to linear programming, non-linear programming, different optimization techniques and selected applications including software development. Topics include allocation, blending, operations planning, shift scheduling, numerical search and simplex method, duality and sensitivity, unconstrained nonlinear search and genetic algorithms in search. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263, Math 252, Math 341. Credits: three hours. 35-455. GRAPH THEORY. 3:3:0 Graph theory algorithms and applications to the areas of computer science. Prerequisite: Computer Science 263, Math 252, Math 341. Credits: three hours. 35-461. THEORY OF COMPUTING. 3:3:0 An introduction to the theoretical aspects of computing. Elements and applications of algebraic group structures, coding theory, finite automata, formal linguistic, machine design and construction, computability, and computational complexity. Prerequisites: Computer Science 355 and senior standing. Credit: three hours. 35-465. COMPILER CONSTRUCTION. 3:3:0 Principles and practices for design and implementation of compilers and interpreters. Topics: lexical analysis, parsing theory (LL, LR, and LALR parsing), symbol tables, type systems, scoping, semantic analysis, intermediate representations, runtime environments, and code generation. Prerequisite: Computer Science 461. Credits: three hours. 35-470. INTRODUCTION TO GAME PROGRAMMING. 3:3:0 This course provides practical hands-on approach to game programming. It is intended to be a first course introduction for students who may be interested in finding out about the gaming industry and gain an understanding of the complexities and the immense tasks required to develop an electronic game. Topics such as 2D and 3D game engines, sprite animation, tile-based game design, collision detection, sound, music and more will be utilized to create a game prototype. Prerequisite: Computer Science 345, Math 313. Credits: three hours. 35-490. SOFTWARE ENGINEERING DESIGN. 3:3:0 This course presents particular methods for the systematic development of large software systems. Topics include requirements analysis, definition, specification including formal methods, prototyping, and design including object and function oriented design. Prerequisite: Computer Science 355, Computer Science 360, Computer Science 370. Credits: three hours. 35-495. COMPUTER SCIENCE PROJECT. 3:3:0 (This is a senior capstone course.) Research papers and reports will be selected for review and presentation. All students in this course will participate in a group project. The subject area is at the discretion of the instructor. Both formal and informal teaching methods will be used. Guest speakers may be invited. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Credits: three hours. 35-497. TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE. 3:3:0 This course will introduce elements, techniques, and principles governing an innovative computer science area such as symbolic computation and advanced artificial intelligence. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Credits: three hours.

Minor in Mathematics

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    Twenty-one (21) hours distributed as follows: the three courses listed below and nine (9) additional hours selected from Mathematics courses at the 300 level or higher excluding Math 403. 25-251 Calculus I 4 25-252 Calculus II 4 25-253 Calculus III 4 25-xxx Nine (9) additional hours selected from Mathematics courses at 300 level or higher excluding 403 9   Total Credits 21  

Curriculum in Mathematics with Computer Science

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Curriculum in Mathematics Education

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Curriculum in Mathematics

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Mathematics Course Descriptions

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  25-050. MATHEMATICAL CONCEPTS. 3:3:0 This course provides students with mathematical tools and problem- solving skills needed to move comfortably and confidently into Mathematics 075, 101 and 105. The concepts explored include Number Systems, Ratio, Proportion, Percent, Measurement, Algebra, Graphing and Geometry. This course does not carry credits toward graduation. 25-075.INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA. 3:3:0 The course provides students with a solid foundation in algebra and problem-solving skills needed to move comfortably and confidently into College Algebra, Survey of Mathematics, or Mathematics for Primary and Middle Grade Teachers. Topics include the applications of linear and quadratic equations and inequalities to real world problems, graphing, rational and radical expressions, and systems of linear equations. This course does not carry credits toward graduation. 25-101. SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS I. 3:3:0 A course designed to acquaint students with problem-solving strategies, sets and applications, logic, arithmetic in different bases, real number system, and algebra. Prerequisite: Two units of high school mathematics. Credit: three hours. 25-102. SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS II. 3:3:0 A course designed to acquaint students with consumer mathematics, geometry, mathematical systems, introduction to probability and statistics, and an introduction to computers. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101. Credit: three hours. 25-105. MATHEMATICS FOR TEACHERS I. 3:3:0 This course is designed to acquaint prospective PK-8, vocational and special education teachers with the structure of the real numbers system, its subsystems, properties, operations, and algorithms. Topics include problem solving, logic, number theory, and mathematical operations over the natural, integer and rational numbers. The course emphasizes heuristic instruction of students with different learning styles. Prerequisite: Two years of high school Mathematics, including Algebra and Trigonometry. Credit: three hours. 25-106. MATHEMATICS FOR TEACHERS II. 3:3:0 A course designed to introduce problem-solving skills and heuristic instruction to prospective PK-8, vocational and special education teachers. Topics include real numbers, percents and interest, radicals, rational exponents, probability, statistics, geometry and measurement. Prerequisite: Mathematics 105. Credit: three hours. 25-121. COLLEGE ALGEBRA. 3:4:0 A course designed to expose students to polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, complex numbers, rational exponents, radicals, solutions of equations, linear and quadratic inequalities, functions and graphs, and synthetic division. A graphing calculator is used for learning and discovery in this course. Prerequisite: a minimum of three (3) units of college preparatory mathematics. Credit: three hours; four contact hours. 25-122. TRIGONOMETRY. 3:3:0 A course designed to prepare students for calculus. Topics include exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions and graphs, trigonometric identities, trigonometric equations, inverse trigonometric functions, laws of sines and cosines and applications, matrices and determinants, and systems of equations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 121. Credit: three hours. 25-125. FINITE MATHEMATICS. 3:3:0 The course is designed to prepare students for business calculus and quantitative business data analysis. Topics include counting techniques and series, systems of linear equations and inequalities, matrix algebra, linear programming, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisite: Mathematics 121. Credit: three hours. 25-203. COLLEGE GEOMETRY. 3:3:0 A course designed to prepare teachers in geometry. Topics include: axiomatic systems, methods of proof, formal synthetic Euclidean geometry, measurement, transformations, introduction to non-Euclidean geometries, and geometry within art and nature. Course emphasis will additionally be placed upon geometry education, problem-solving heuristic, and pedagogy. Prerequisite: Mathematics 122 or its equivalent. Credit: three hours. 25-204. NON-EUCLIDEAN GEOMETRY. 3:3:0 A treatment of Euclid's parallel postulate, nature of proof, characteristics of a mathematical system, Lobachevskian Geometry, and Riemannian Geometry. Prerequisite: Mathematics 203. Credit: three hours. 25-205. MATHEMATICS FOR TEACHERS III. 3:3:0 This course is designed to prepare prospective PK-8, vocational and special education teachers for solving mathematical problems originating from different disciplines. Topics include techniques and modes of operation in geometry, measurement, algebra, trigonometry and calculus. Prerequisite: Mathematics 106. Credit: three hours. 25-213. DISCRETE MATHEMATICS I. 3:3:0 An introduction to discrete mathematical structures for computer science with emphasis on logic, counting techniques, set theory, mathematical induction, relations, functions, and matrix algebra. Prerequisite: Mathematics 122. Credit: three hours. 25-214. DISCRETE MATHEMATICS II. 3:3:0 Principles and applications of discrete mathematical structures in computer science. Topics include Boolean algebra and switching functions, finite state machines, graph theory, trees and mathematical techniques for algorithmic analysis. Prerequisites: Mathematics 213 and 251. Credit: three hours. 25-225. CALCULUS FOR BUSINESS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES I. 3:3:0 An introduction to functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, marginal functions, maxima/minima, integrals and fundamental theorems of calculus, applications of differentiation and integration in Business and Economics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 125. Credit: three hours. 25-226. CALCULUS FOR BUSINESS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES II. 3:3:0 A continuation of Mathematics 225 covering a more general treatment and business applications of integration, partial derivatives, optimization problems and LaGrange multipliers, and multiple integration. Credit: three hours. 25-241. ELEMENTARY STATISTICS. 3:3:0 A course designed to introduce students to descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, statistical inference, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisite: Mathematics 121. Credits: three hours. 25-251. CALCULUS I. 4:4:0 An introduction to limits, continuous functions, rate of change, derivatives, implicit differentiation, maximum and minimum points, and their applications, and development and application of the definite integral. Prerequisite: Mathematics 122. Credits: four hours. 25-252. CALCULUS II. 4:4:0 A continuation of Mathematics 251 covering logarithmic, exponential, trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, Taylor's formula and infinite series. Prerequisite: Mathematics 251. Credit: four hours. 25-253. CALCULUS III. 4:4:0 A continuation of Mathematics 252 to include polar coordinates, vectors and parametric equations, solid analytic geometry and the calculus of several variables. Prerequisite: Mathematics 252. Credit: four hours. 25-313. LINEAR ALGEBRA. 3:3:0 A treatment of linear equations, matrices and determinants, vector spaces, inner product spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Prerequisite: Mathematics 252. Credit: three hours. 25-341. PROBABILITY. 3:3:0 This course is a treatment of probability theory with stochastic processes. Topics include sample spaces, probability measures, discrete and continuous random variables, sums of independent random variables, law of large numbers, and the Central Limit Theorem. Markov chain models and their applications in the social and natural sciences are included. Prerequisite: Mathematics 251, and 313. Credit: three hours. 25-351. ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 3:3:0 A treatment of the solutions and applications of first order linear, homogenous and non-homogenous linear nth order differential equations. A presentation of the power series solutions, Laplace transform, linear systems of ordinary differential equations, and methods of numerical solutions. Prerequisites: Mathematics 252, and 313. Credit: three hours. 25-403. METHODS OF TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOLS. 3:3:0 A study of the methods and materials used in teaching high school mathematics. This course introduces current educational theory, reform organizations and research methodologies. Topics include NCTM standards, effective teaching models, lesson plans, classroom management, professionalism, technology in the classroom, and current issues and trend. Prerequisite: Mathematics 252. Credit: three hours. 25-411. ALGEBRAIC STRUCTURES I. 3:3:0 A study of set theory, functions, integers, groups, matrices, permutation and symmetric groups, LaGrange theorem, normal and factor groups, and homomorphisms. Prerequisite: Mathematics 252 and 214 or its equivalent. Credit: three hours. 25-412. ALGEBRAIC STRUCTURES II. 3:3:0 A continuation of Mathematics 411 covering rings, integral domains, ideals, polynomial rings, principal ideal domains, and unique factorization domains. Prerequisite: Mathematics 411. Credit: three hours. 25-431. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS. 3:3:0 An introduction to the solutions of equations in one variable, direct methods and matrix techniques for solving systems of equations, interpolation and polynomial approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, and the initial value problems for ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 252 and Computer Science 240 or 262 or other programming language. Credit: three hours. 25-451. ADVANCED CALCULUS I. 3:3:0 A treatment of vector spaces, differentiation of vector valued functions, and functions of several variables, partial derivatives, maximum and minimum of functions of several variables, Taylor's formula and applications, line and double integrals, Prerequisite: Mathematics 253. Credit: three hours. 25-452. ADVANCED CALCULUS II. 3:3:0 A continuation of Mathematics 451 covering curve and double integrals, Green's Theorem, triple and surface integrals, Divergence Theorem in 3-D space, Stoke's Theorem, Differentiability and the Change of Variable Theorem for functions from Rn into Rm, the Jacobian Matrix, the inverse mapping and implicit function theorem. Prerequisite: Mathematics 451. Credit: three hours. 25-461.INTRODUCTION TO REAL ANALYSIS. 3:3:0 An introduction to ordered and Archimedean fields, the theory of limits and continuity of functions, topological concepts, properties of continuous functions, the theory of differentiation and integration, and selected topics from power series and functions of several variables. Prerequisite: Mathematics 451. Credit: three hours. 25-471. COMPLEX ANALYSIS. 3:3:0 An introduction of complex numbers, Cauchy-Riemann equations, analytic and harmonic functions, elementary functions and their properties, branches of logarithmic functions, inverse trigonometric functions, the Cauchy-Goursat theorem, the Cauchy integral formula, Monera's theorem, Maximum Modula of functions, Taylor and Laurent series, residues and poles, linear fractional transformations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 452. Credit: three hours. 25-491. HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS. 3:3:0 A study of the evolution of mathematics. Topics include the scope and history of the Egyptian geometry, Greek and Arabic mathematics, the mechanical world, probability theory, number theory, non-Euclidean geometry, and set theory. Prerequisite: Mathematics 203 and 253. Credit: three hours. 25-498. TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS. 3:3:0 A treatment of selected topics in mathematics. (This is a senior capstone course.) Prerequisite: Approval of the Department of Mathematics. Credit: three hours. 25-499. SEMINAR IN MATHEMATICS. 3:3:0 A treatment of selected topics in mathematics augmented by invited guest speakers and student presentations. Prerequisite: Approval of the Department of Mathematics. Credit: three hours.         Department Homepage

Applied Mathematics Research Center

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Applied Mathematics Research Center
ETV Building 116
Phone: 302.857.7516
Fax: 302.857.7517

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  Delaware State University Applied Mathematics Research Center (AMRC) was initially funded by the Department of Defense (DoD) in 2003. AMRC is designed to create a research environment where multidisciplinary groups work together to solve applied mathematics problems in military and other areas. The research center consists of faculty of Mathematics, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, and Biotechnology, research associates, visiting professors and an administrative assistant. The major goals are: to establish a permanent research base at Delaware State University which produces new knowledge and quality, publishable, peer-reviewed research relevant to DoD research goals to enhance participation and substantial involvement of minority graduate (M.S. and Ph.D.) and undergraduate students and faculty in Science and Mathematics research to provide additional training in mathematics and sciences to minority female high school students by involving them a summer program (GEMS), and therefore to prepare more minority students (especially women) in sciences and mathematics to foster long-term research collaboration among scientists with Army Research Laboratories, and other national government and academic institutions; and 5) to ensure long term sufficient research funding   MAIN RESEARCH AREAS Ground Penetrating Radar Imaging   Buried object detection using GPR has attracted tremendous attention in the past decades because of its important military, such as mine detection, and commercial applications. Our current work aims to use vector multiresolution representation for the antenna array receiving data in multifrequency ground penetrating radar (GPR), and solves the inverse scattering problem, and then uses the hidden Markov model (HMM) in the wavelet transform domain for the target detection. We plan to expand our GPR imaging research in three aspects: continuing to investigate our current research targets; developing algorithms for 3-D GPR imaging; and processing real land mine GPR data with new algorithms.    The NURBS methods of Computer geometric design in automatic representing 3D objects NURBS is the most popular and widely used method and tool in the field of computer geometric design in representing and manipulating 3D objects. The objectives of the project are to study the following problems in reconstruction of smooth surfaces, which are: producing polygonal model from scattered and unstructured 3D data, and/or even from 2D data; mesh quadrilaterization of the polygonal model; and the representation of the parametric surfaces on each quadrilateral patch, and the construction of NURBS surface model.   Image Registration   The research task is to develop software in C or MATLAB that will create a unified image from a sequence of smaller images. The dyadic combination of images is the basic operation; the recursive implementation of this combination will constitute the desired algorithm. A data set of the Blossom Point test range will be used as the data source. We will identify relevant features that allow images to be merged. It is expected that these features will also be applicable to similar images. This software will be developed with the expectation that it will be enhanced to include problems associated with scaling, and then 3D image reconstruction.   Signal Processing in Data Mining The ultimate goal of the proposed research is to provide advances in technology towards successful development, testing, refinement and application of intelligent, self-adaptive software systems. The approaches integrate computer vision systems, soft computing and evolutionary computational paradigms, complex adaptive software structures and robust machine learning algorithms. In addition, we aim towards practical design, development, prototyping and evaluation of a knowledge-based software system that will integrate theoretical aspects of the proposed techniques into user-friendly application equipped by advanced user interface and enhanced data base management capabilities.   Biotechnology The research focuses on nucleotide sequence and chromatin structure requirements for integration. We will also deal with the scientific, social, and ethical issues related to the field of Biotechnology, present the elements of biostatics and numerical methods needed for quantitative data analysis and interpretation, and provide practical experience with the use of software and databases in the investigation of problems critical to biotechnology and molecular biology to our undergraduate students.   Other Research Areas Inverse Ill-Posed Problems, Numerical Analysis, Partial Differential Equations, Integral Equations, Wavelets and Image Analysis, Scientific Computation, and Mathematical Physics.   Outreach   Delaware State University (DSU) will conduct the pre-college program Girls Explorations in Mathematics and Science (GEMS). GEMS is a three-week summer residential program involving hands-on explorations in mathematics, biology, and information technology with research activities. This project will offer 20 motivated high-potential female high school students entering tenth and eleventh grades an opportunity to integrate and apply concepts from these disciplines to problem solving. GEMS program is designed to stimulate and extend students’ interest in these fields and encourage them to investigate careers in mathematics, biology, and information technology. This addresses the problem of under-representation of women, in particular minorities, in these fields. Three college professors and three high school teachers, who are assisted by six undergraduate/ graduate female students, conduct the project. The curriculum has been carefully designed to expose students to research methodology, to enable them to see the connections between mathematics, biology, and information technology. The participants work in small groups and use computers extensively to explore and discover mathematical and biological concepts.   Department Homepage
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Faculty


Program Director:
Dr. Fengshan Liu

Department of Mathematical Sciences

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ETV Building Room 107
Ph:   302-857-7051
Fax: 302-857-7054

 

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Overview The objectives of the Mathematical Sciences Department are to provide opportunities for students to develop functional competence in mathematics; an appreciation for the contributions of mathematics to science, engineering, business, economics, and the social sciences; and the power of critical thinking. The Department strives to prepare students to pursue graduate study and for careers in teaching, government, and industry. The Department aims to provide the student with a course of study directed toward an understanding of mathematical theory and its relation to other fields of study. This study includes an emphasis on precision of definition, reasoning to precise conclusions, and an analysis and solution of problems using mathematical principles. Students who select a major in the Department must complete the general education program which is required of all students. Request more information     Curriculum Options for Majors MATHEMATICS: The requirements for a major in Mathematics are: Mathematics 191,192, 213, 214, 251, 252, 253, 313, 341, 351, 411, 451, and 498; One of 412, 452; Physics 201 and 202; and a minimum of six (6) hours selected from Mathematics courses numbered 300 or higher, excluding 403. With departmental approval, three hours may be submitted from Physics 311-312 and 404. MATHEMATICS WITH COMPUTER SCIENCE: The requirements for a major in Mathematics with Computer Science are: Mathematics 191,192, 213, 214, 251, 252, 253, 313, 341, 351, 431 and 498; Physics 201, 202; Computer Science 240, 261, 262, 360, 461 and 495; and a minimum of twelve (12) hours selected from Mathematics courses numbered 300 or higher, excluding 403. MATHEMATICS EDUCATION: The requirements for a teaching major in Mathematics are: Mathematics 191,192, 203, 213, 241, 251, 252, 253, 313, 341, 403, 411 and 491; Education 204, 313, 318, 322, 357, and 412; Physics 201 and 202; Psychology 201; and Computer Science 261. Students must take and pass PRAXIS I and apply for admission to the TPE prior to the start of their junior year. Students must pass PRAXIS II prior to student teaching. OPTION FOR MINORS To provide an opportunity for students to obtain a minor concentration in mathematics, the Department of Mathematical Sciences offers the following option: Minor in Mathematics: Twenty-one (21) hours distributed as follows: Mathematics 251, 252, 253; and nine (9) additional hours selected from Mathematics courses at the 300 level or higher, excluding 403.     Back to College Home Page
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Free Tutoring Resources

The Department offers free mathematics tutoring in the Mathematics Laboratory (ETV 128). 

  • Tutors are responsible students with a 3.3 GPA or higher
  • Tutoring is available for any student who needs assistance in their math courses
  • Session times are flexible to accommodate any student's schedule 
  • Tutoring hours are Mon - Fri with times varying from 9 a.m. - 8 p.m. Check the schedule in the Mathematics Laboratory. 

Contact the Department at ext. 7051 with questions. 
 

Faculty Profile


Chair:
 
Dr. Hanson Umoh
ETV Rm 103
302-857-6550
 
 
Professor: 

Dr. Fengshan Liu
ETV Rm 124
302-857-6646
 
Dr. Dawn Lott
ETV Rm 219
302-857-7059
 
Dr. Mazen Shahin
ETV Rm 136
302-857-7055
 
Dr. Xiquan Shi
ETV Rm 112
302-857-7052
 
 
Associate Professor:
 
Dr. Anjan Biswas (pdf / profile)
ETV Rm 220
302-857-7913
 
Dr. Nicola Edwards-Omolewa (pdf)
ETV Rm 104
302-857-6645
 
Dr. Paul Gibson
ETV Rm 115
302-857-6643
 
Dr. Rodney McNair
ETV Rm 103
302-857-6501
 

Assistant Professor:
 
Dr. Delayne Johnson
ETV Rm 114
302-857-6603
 
Dr. Jinjie Liu
ETV Rm 222
302-857-7041
 
Dr. Pablo Suarez
ETV Rm 225
302-857-7583
 
Dr. Sokratis Makrogiannis
ETV Rm 221
302-857-7058
 
Dr. Matthew Tanzy
ETV Rm 220
302-857-5716
 
Visiting Assistant Professor:
 
Dr. Udita Katugampola
 
 
Lecturer:
 
Dr. Yi Ling
ETV Rm 227
302-857-7049
 
 
Computer Lab Technician:
 
Mrs. Min Gibson
ETV Rm 126
302-857-7056
 
 
Senior Secretary:

Mrs. Cinnell Clark-Tolson
ETV Rm 107
302-857-7051
 
 
Director of Graduate Studies:
 

 

Curriculum in Electrical Engineering

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(Left) Student working on electrical engineering project in laboratory

 

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Electrical Engineering Track All students who select the Engineering Physics program major must complete the general education program as required of all students (See General Education Requirements). In addition, students must take Physics 191, 192, 201, 202, 220, 361, 362,401, 402, 418; Engineering 205, 210, 211, 212, 220, 221, 302, 309, 340; Mathematics 251, 252, 253; Chemistry 101, and technical electives specific to each track.   Technical Elective Selection Students who desire to major in Engineering Physics in the Electrical Engineering track will choose a minimum of 12 credits from technical electives from among the following:   Course Course Name Credits 26-316 Introduction to Optics 4 26-331 Mathematical Methods of Physics I 3 26-332 Mathematical Methods of Physics II 3 26-302  Signal Processing I 3 26-311 Fiber Optics Communication 4 26-315 Computer Communications 3 26-310 Optical Electronics 3 26-404 Introduction to VLSI Design 4   Back to Department Homepage Back to College Homepage (c) Copyright 2010 DSU CMNST Dover, Delaware 19901. All rights reserved.

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