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Master's Programs in Biological Sciences

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The Department of Biological Sciences prepares students for career opportunities in professional studies and further graduate studies in areas related to biological sciences and neuroscience.  Many graduates pursue careers in state and federal agencies, health care, private industry, research, and teaching. The program strives to develop a clear and unbiased method of critical and logistic thinking, an appreciation and understanding of the natural world, and knowledge of biological principles required to make intelligent and effective decisions.  We offer four different graduate degree programs: Master of Science (MS) in Biological Science Master of Arts (MA) in Biological Sciences MS in Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience MS in Biology Education Faculty The Department of Biological Sciences is comprised of dedicated and well‑prepared faculty with diverse educational backgrounds and areas of research specialization. Small class sizes for graduate courses ensure that students interact closely with faculty in the learning experience. All faculty have published in their respective fields, and they maintain active research involvement.  Scholarly involvement and continuous professional development in research keeps the faculty current and able to offer exciting research opportunities to the students in a variety of areas.  The Department’s faculty are involved not only with individual research projects but also participate in joint collaborative research themes, for example in neuroscience.  The students have the opportunity to select their projects from these various arenas. Facilities The Department of Biological Sciences is housed in the Science Center (original) and the Mishoe Science Center.  The Department consists of 11 active research laboratories, a common biotechnology-equipped laboratory, six laboratory classrooms with prep rooms, faculty offices, a science reading room, an animal room, and a research greenhouse.  These facilities provide strong support capabilities in teaching and research areas of modern Biology.  The faculty have active research programs that are funded by research grants in various areas of biology but especially in plant biotechnology, cancer, and neuroscience. In addition, the department is a cosponsor of the Claude E. Phillips Herbarium. The herbarium is the largest collection of preserved plant materials at any historically black institution in the country and the only such collection on the Delmarva Peninsula. The Department of Biological Science has a dedicated and well-prepared faculty with diverse backgrounds and areas of specialization. All faculty have published in their respective fields, and they maintain active research involvement. The faculty are serious and talented teachers. The small class size insures that students interact closely with faculty in the learning experience. Scholarly involvement in research keeps the faculty current and able to offer exciting research opportunities to the students in a variety of areas. Admission Requirements For admission to the graduate degree programs in Biology, applicants must have a Bachelor's degree in Biological Science or a related field from an accredited college or university. Applicants must have earned a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75 with 3.00 minimum in the major. Official scores (not be more than five years old) on the Graduate Record Examination (General Test) and two letters of reference must be submitted. Degree Requirements Master of Science (MS) Degree Program in Biological Sciences The MS Degree Program in Biological Sciences is designed to prepare students for further advanced study in biology.  Faculty with expertise in various areas (ranging from molecular and cellular biology to systemic biology and to ecological systems) have expanded the breadth of scientific backgrounds of students desiring to advance their careers in industry and government or to prepare themselves for other professional endeavors. The degree requirements include, and emphasize, a thesis based on mentored research that is conducted in an individual laboratory in the department, or an approved research laboratory. The program requires 30 DSU graduate credits and is designed for completion by full-time students within two years. Click here for the curriculum for a Master of Science Degree in Biological Sciences. Master of Science (MS) Degree Program in Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience The MS Degree Program in Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience is a specialty degree program designed to prepare students for advanced study in the area of neuroscience. The program capitalizes on the neuroscience expertise of a number of faculty who are active in this area of research. The degree requirements include and emphasize a neuroscience-based research thesis based on mentored research conducted in one of our neuroscience research laboratories. This program is supplemented by a partnership with Drexel University.  The program requires 33 graduate credits, including taking two classes at Drexel University, and is designed to allow completion over a two‑year period on a full‑time basis. Click here for the curriculum for a Master of Science Degree in Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience. Master of Arts (MA) Degree Program in Biological Sciences The MA Degree Program in Biological Sciences is designed to prepare students for expanded knowledge in the biological areas of interest to the student and is overseen by a faculty mentor within the Department.  The degree requirements emphasize a research-review thesis based on literature information.  This program is particularly of value to advance the competencies of secondary school teachers, and to advance the careers of persons in industry, government agencies, and related positions. The program requires 30 credits and is designed to allow completion over a three‑year period on a part‑time basis. Click here for the curriculum for a Master of Arts Degree in Biological Sciences. Master of Science (MS) Degree Program in Biology Education The MS Degree Program in Biology Education is designed for certified secondary or middle school teachers who desire a course of study which is strongly based in Biology, yet includes coverage of current areas of significance in Science Education. The program requires 36 DSU graduate credits and is designed for completion over a three‑year period on a part‑time basis. Click here for the curriculum for a Master of Science Degree in Biology Education. Doctoral Degree Program (PhD) in Neuroscience The PhD Degree Program in Neuroscience is a specialty degree program designed to prepare students for professional careers in the area of neuroscience.  The degree requirements include and emphasize a neuroscience-based research dissertation based on mentored research conducted in one of our neuroscience research laboratories.  To become a candidate for the PhD, the student must complete all courses and pass a qualifying exam.   Areas of Research for Current Faculty Name Research Area Dr. Leonard G. Davis RNA interference for targeted gene knock-out in invertebrates Dr. Harb Dhillon Chemotaxis and other odor-guided behaviors in  D. melanogaster and C elegans Dr. Vincent Fondong Plant Biotechnology Dr. Melissa Harrington Multielectrode physiology with invertebrate and mammalian model systems Dr. Fatma Helmy Lipid biochemistry Dr. Stan Ivey Structure and function of glycoproteins in cell membranes Dr. Andrew Lloyd Microbial systems Dr. Robert MacBride Development and apoptosis in muscle cells Dr. Sabrina McGary Stress effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis Dr. Princy Mennella Development of sexually dimorphic brain areas and behaviors Dr. Thomas Mennella Transcriptional regulation in neuronal differentiation Dr. Cynthia van Golen Growth factors in growth and metastasis of pediatric neuroblastoma Dr. Clytrice Watson Food safety and Forensic Biology Dr. Charlie Wilson Second messenger systems  
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Faculty Profile


Chair:
Leonard Davis, Ph.D., University of Illinois Medical Center; Biochemistry/Neuroscience
 
Professor:
Fatma Helmy, Ph.D., Tulane; Cell Biology, Lipid Metabolism, Histochemistry
 
Associate Professors:
Vincent Fondong, Ph.D. WITS University, Johannesburg, South Africa, Molecular Virology
Melissa Harrington, Ph.D., Stanford University, Neuroscience / Neurophysiology
Stan Ivey, Ph.D., University of Denver, Molecular Biology
Andrew Lloyd Ph.D., University of Virginia; Microbiology
Robert MacBride, Ph.D., Case Western Reserve, Developmental Biology
Sabrina McGary, Ph.D., University of Maryland at College Park; Avian Physiology and Behavior
Charlie Wilson, Ph.D., University of Delaware, Biology
Assistant Professors:
Harb Dhillon, Ph.D., Rutgers University; Genomics, Behavior
Rick Driskill, University of Delaware, Behavior
Thomas Mennella, Ph.D., University of Albany, Biological Sciences
Princy Quadros-Mennella, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Neuroscience and Behavior
Cynthia van Golen, Ph.D., University of Michigan, Biological Sciences
Clytrice Watson, Ph.D., University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Microbiology

 

Bachelor's Programs

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    Dear new DSU student: WELCOME to the Department of Biological Sciences at Delaware State University! We look forward to helping you achieve your career goals by working with you to optimize your college experience and building a strong academic foundation for your future.  During orientation we will provide you with important departmental information and learn about your career goals so that your academic schedule for 2009-10 can be established.  Once you return to start classes in the fall, we will host you for faculty presentations on the exciting opportunities and resources available within Biological Sciences. The Department has a commitment to providing all undergraduate students with the scientific knowledge and research opportunities that are essential components of a strong education as you prepare for a professional career.  Our philosophy is to help each student develop integrative thinking, hands-on operational skills, and the broad-based knowledge needed for success in the global society.  One of the key components of your success will be your own commitment to the academic program and you taking full advantage of the opportunities available here at DSU from the very first day.  We utilize a variety of teaching styles ranging from larger lectures in the first year to smaller class sizes with integrated laboratories in advanced courses.  The common focus in all courses is to develop problem-solving and critically thinking through an understanding concepts, fact learning, and interactive discussions.  Our faculty is dedicated to supporting your goals and helping you succeed. The Department has recently upgraded its curricula into two majors – BS in Forensic Biology and a BS in Biological Sciences.  The BS in Biological Sciences has four tracks:  Health Professions  (typical for Medical, Dental, professional schools) Cell/Molecular/Biotechnology  (typical for research careers – graduate and professional schools) General Biology  (technical jobs and includes a sub-focus to prepare for teaching high school biology) This uniquely structured unified curriculum uses a common set of core courses for all curricula that is highly effective for preparing students for varied careers.  The new curriculum provides a strengthened set of core course to prepare our students for competitive careers while giving each student the flexibility to either in-depth study (specialize) or a diverse knowledgebase (generalize) as well as an easier transition to another biology curriculum-track if ones career goals change as they progress through college As the faculty in Biological Sciences have continued to expand their research programs, this allows participation in research projects, the centerpiece of successful scientific careers.  All students are required to do a Capstone research project, and are encouraged to become involved in research projects as early as possible to develop a strong base.  A key component of becoming an effective biologist and critical to successful preparation for a career is curricular enhancements.  The Department hosts scientific seminars by outside experts, workshops on learning, a Heath Professions Advising Committee that includes career information, as well as mentoring and tutoring.  Students who participate always do better. Welcome and best regards,    Leonard Davis, PhD    Chair, Department of Biological Sciences Back to College Home Page

Mathematical Sciences Graduate Course Descriptions

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  COURSE DESCRIPTIONS MTSC-500. FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS 3:3:0 This course is specifically designed to bridge undergraduate and graduate study in mathematics. It is an introduction to abstract ideas, proofs, set theory, relations, and number systems and their connections.   Prerequisites: MTSC-252. Credit, three hours. MTSC-503. MATHEMATICS TEACHING METHODS I 3:3:0 This course is the first of a two (2) part sequence designed to provide weighty consideration of some of the major topics in middle and secondary school mathematics education. Emphasis will be on epistemological, pedagogical, social, psychological, effective teaching, classroom management, and cultural concerns as well as the teaching profession. This course is also a study of methods and materials used in teaching mathematics and will expose students to current educational theory and reform organizations. Through research, practice, and presentations, students will take an active role in the instruction and development of materials for this course.   Prerequisites: MTSC-252, MTSC-313, MTSC-341, MTSC-241 and MTSC-203.   Credit, three hours. MTSC-504. MODERN GEOMETRY 3:3:0 The course covers Menelaus and Ceva’s Theorem, Cross Ratio, Elementary Transformations, Euclidean Constructions, and Non-Euclidean Geometry. The course illustrates to the students the strength of deductive reasoning in proofs involving Euclidean axioms and transformation theory. The student will also be familiar with Non-Euclidean Geometry.   Prerequisites: MTSC-303 with minimum grade of .C..   Credit, three hours. MTSC-505. MATHEMATICAL LOGIC 3:3:0 The course is designed to examine the logical foundations of mathematics. Formal systems are shown to model real life relationships, and these formal systems are studied and analyzed using mathematical methods and rigor. The results of the study show both the inherent limitation of reasoning and at the same time the richness of what can be expressed and proven.   Prerequisites: MTSC-251, MTSC-313.   Credit, three hours. MTSC-511. INTRODUCTION TO ABSTRACT ALGEBRA 3:3:0 The course is concerned with the basic theory of some of the important algebraic systems such as groups, rings and fields with emphasis on homomorphism, isomorphism, integral domain, extension fields, and Galois groups.   Credit, three hours. MTSC-521. GENERAL TOPOLOGY 3:3:0 The purpose of the course is to give the students the basic concepts of topology and lead them to algebraic topology. The course also presents as a related discipline to the proper understanding of various branches of analysis and geometry. The students should become familiar with topological spaces, point-set topology and homotopy theory.   Prerequisites: MTSC-451, MTSC-452.   Credit, three hours. MTSC-531. NUMBER THEORY 3:3:0 The course, Number Theory, is an introduction to the study of basic properties of integers which allows one to demonstrate how various areas of mathematics play a role in the study of properties of natural numbers. The course is flexible and fundamental enough to be taken by Math and Math Ed Majors.   Credit, three hours. MTSC-541. ADVANCED PROBABILITY THEORY 3:3:0 The course covers the mathematical structure of probability theory with applications of the theory from a wide variety of experimental situations.   Prerequisites: MTSC-253 with a minimum grade of .C..   Credit, three hours. MTSC-551. ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 3:3:0 The purpose of the course is to present techniques of solving ordinary differential equations. The students should become familiar with Boundary Value Problems, Systems of Ordinary Differential Equations, Phase Diagrams, and Stability.   Prerequisites: MTSC-351.   Credit, three hours. MTSC-561. REAL ANALYSIS I 3:3:0 The purpose of the course is to cover the basic material that every graduate should know in the classical theory of functions of a real variable and in measure and integration theory. To provide the students with the background in those parts of modern mathematics which have their roots in the classical theory of functions of a real variable. These include the classical theory of functions of a real variable itself, measure and integration, point-set topology, and the theory of normed linear space.   Prerequisites: MTSC-402 with a minimum grade of .C., or its equivalent.   Credit, three hours. MTSC-562. REAL ANALYSIS II 3:3:0 This course is the extension of real analysis I. The purpose of the course is to further provide students the background of modern mathematics. The course is to cover the theories of (improper) Riemann integrals and a brief introduction of Lebesgue integrals, the theories of pointwise and uniform convergence of sequences of functions, and the theories of infinite series of functions.   Prerequisites: MTSC-561 with minimum grade of .C., or its equivalent.   Credit, three hours. MTSC-571. COMPLEX ANALYSIS 3:3:0 This is a first-semester course at the graduate level, in the field of Functions of one (1) Complex Variable. The rigorous approach adopted herein will set a firm foundation for leading the students to the next level of Complex Analysis. To prepare the student for further studies in the field of Complex Analysis. To provide the students with sufficient background for various applications of Complex Analysis physical and engineering disciplines.   Prerequisites: MTSC-471.   Credit, three hours. MTSC-621. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS 3:3:0 The course gives students an introduction to Metric Spaces, Hilbert Spaces, and Banach Spaces with emphasis on Hilbert Spaces.   Prerequisites: MTSC-561.   Credit, three hours. MTSC-631. OPERATIONS RESEARCH 3:3:0 The course is designed to expose students in computer science to linear, nonlinear, and integer programming, simplex method, duality theorem, transport and other application problems, and different optimization methods and techniques. The topics to be covered include: Optimization problems; the subject of Operations Research; Linear programming; Simplex method and duality theorem; Integer programming; Nonlinear programming; Optimization techniques; Applications; and MATLAB Optimization Toolbox.   Credit, three hours. MTSC-641. COMBINATORICS 3:3:0 The student will be introduced to the theory involved in combinatorial reasoning. The two (2) combinatorial theories of enumeration and graph theory will be developed. Students will apply combinatorial reasoning to problems in the analysis of computer systems, in discrete operations research and in finite probability.   Credit, three hours. MTSC-643. STATISTICS 3:3:0 The course provides students with the fundamental theory of statistics. The students will be familiar with descriptive and inferential statistical methods, theory, and applications.   Prerequisites: MTSC-541 with minimum grade of .C..   Credit, three hours. MTSC-651. PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 3:3:0 The course is designed to acquaint students to Classifications of Partial Differential Equations, Methods of Solution for the Wave Equation, Laplace’s Equation, and the Heat Equation.   Prerequisites: A second course in Ordinary Differential Equations.   Credit, three hours. MTSC-661. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS 3:3:0 The student should become familiar with advanced techniques for solving numerically large problems in Linear Algebra. In particular, students should become familiar with the effects of ill conditioning, and of ways in which special information about matrices, such as sparsity can be used. An important part of all of this is the consideration of error from various sources and ways of controlling its accumulation.   Prerequisites: MTSC-313.   Credit, three hours. MTSC-699. THESIS OR DIRECTED PROJECT 6 3:3:0 A student may register three (3) or six (6) hours thesis with the approval of his/her thesis advisor.   Credit, three to six hours.    Back to Dept Home   Back to College Homepage    (c) Copyright 2010 DSU CMNST, Dover, Delaware 19901. All rights reserved.  

Bachelor's Programs

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  Bachelor's Programs in the Department of Mathematical Sciences    Delaware State University's Department of Mathematical Sciences provides students with a course of study directed toward establishing a solid understanding of mathematical theory and its relation to other fields of study. Bachelor's degree program offerings are available in:   ⇒Mathematics ⇒Mathematics Education ⇒Mathematics with Computer Science  Click here to view the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook  for more information on career options related to mathematics.      Back to College Home Page       (c) Copyright 2010 DSU CMNST, Dover, Delaware 19901. All rights reserved.       Back to Department Home Page

Curriculum for a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry/Pre-Professional

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  Pre-Professional Chemistry is designed for students who wish to acquire considerable chemical background in preparation for careers outside chemistry such as one of the health professions. Completion of this curriculum fulfills basic educational requirements for admission to most health professional programs such as dentistry, medicine, optometry, osteopathic medicine, pharmacy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine. First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 24-101 General and Elementary Analytical Chemistry I 4 24-191 University Seminar I 1 25-121 or 25-251 College Algebra or Calculus I 3-4 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3     16-17 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 24-102 General and Elementary Analytical Chemistry II 4 24-192 University Seminar II 1 25-122 or 25-252 Trigonometry or Calculus II 3-4 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     14-15 Second Year First Semester     24-201 Elementary Quantitative Analysis 4 24-301 Organic Chemistry I 4 25-251 or XX-XXX Calculus I or Elective 3-4 26-201 General Physics I 4     15-16 Second Semester     24-302 Organic Chemistry II 4 25-252 or XX-XXX Calculus II or Elective 3-4 26-202 General Physics II 4 31-395 Global Societies 3     14-15 Third Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 23-101 General Biology I 4 24-303 Physical Chemistry I 4 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3 XX-XXX Elective 3     17 Second Semester     23-102 General Biology II 4 24-304 Physical Chemistry II 4 24-306 Instrumental Analysis 3 24-308 Inorganic Chemistry 4     15 Fourth Year First Semester     01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 24-403 Biochemistry 4 24-XXX Senior Capstone 3 33-103 or 34-101 or 34-102 or 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 or 36-201 or 37-101 or 40-201 Introduction to Political Science or World Civilization to the Eighteenth Century or World Civilization from the Eighteenth Century or American Civilization to 1865 or American Civilization from 1865 or The African-American Experience to 1865 or The African-American Experience from 1865 or Introduction to General Psychology or Introduction to Sociology or Macroeconomics 3 XX-XXX Elective 3     16 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 01-113 or 03-105 or 03-201 or 03-202 or 05-101 or 06-100 or 06-101 Introduction to Theatre or Contemporary Moral Issues or Introduction to Philosophy or Ethics or Introduction to Art or African-American Music or Introduction to Music 3 XX-XXX Electives 6     12   Total Credit Hours: 122  

Bachelor's Programs

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Welcome to the Department of Chemistry!   The faculty and staff of the Chemistry Department strive to provide students with a sound foundation in fundamental principles of chemistry for those who wish to concentrate in chemistry. Students are prepared for professional careers in medical, dental, or other health professional schools; teaching; and future graduate study. The following tracks are available: ⇒Chemistry ⇒Chemistry Education ⇒Chemistry Pre-Professional   Back to Department Home Page Back to College Home Page (c) Copyright 2012, DSU CMNST, Dover, Delaware 19901. All rights reserved.
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Curriculum in Chemistry Education

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  First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 24-191 University Seminar I 1 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 24-101 General and Elementary Analytical Chemistry I 4 25-121 or 25-251 College Algebra or Calculus I 3-4 34-104 History and Government of Delaware 1 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3     17-18 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 12-204 Philosophical Foundations of Education 3 24-102 General and Elementary Analytical Chemistry II 4 24-192 University Seminar II 1 25-122 or 25-252 Trigonometry or Calculus II 3-4 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     17-18   Required to take PPST/PRAXIS   Second Year First Semester     01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 24-301 Organic Chemistry I 4 25-251 or XX-XXX Calculus I or Elective 3-4 26-201 General Physics I 4 36-201 Introduction to General Psychology 3     18 Second Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 24-302 Organic Chemistry II 4 25-252 or XX-XXX Calculus II or Elective 3-4 26-202 General Physics II 4     17-18   Required to pass PPST/PRAXIS   Third Year First Semester     12-208 The Middle School Years 3 12-322 Teaching Reading in the Secondary School 3 23-101 General Biology I 4 24-303 Physical Chemistry I 4 27-101 Geology 4 XX-XXX Arts / Humanities Required Course 3     21 Second Semester     12-210 Methods of Teaching Middle and High School Science 3 12-313 Introduction to Education of Exceptional Children 3 24-304 Physical Chemistry II 4 24-306 Instrumental Analysis 4 24-308 Inorganic Chemistry 4 31-395 Global Societies 3     17 Fourth Year First Semester     12-309 Classroom Management / Behavior Modification for Teachers 3 12-318 Multicultural Education 3 23-205 Ecology 4 24-403 Biochemistry 4 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3     17 Second Semester     12-400 Preservice / Student Teaching and Senior Seminar (Senior Capstone) 12     12   Total credits 136-139

Curriculum in Chemistry

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  This curriculum in Chemistry is designed for students who desire to prepare for professional careers in Chemistry and for graduate study. This curriculum is approved by the American Chemical Society Committee on Professional Training. First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 24-101 General and Elementary Analytical Chemistry I 4 24-191 University Seminar I 1 25-121 or 25-251 College Algebra or Calculus I 3-4 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3     16-17 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 24-102 General and Elementary Analytical Chemistry II 4 24-192 University Seminar II 1 25-122 or 25-252 Trigonometry or Calculus II 3-4 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     14-15 Second Year First Semester     24-201 Elementary Quantitative Analysis 4 24-301 Organic Chemistry I 4 25-251 or XX-XXX Calculus I or Elective 3-4 26-201 General Physics I 4     15-16 Second Semester     01-200 Speech 3 24-302 Organic Chemistry II 4 25-252 or XX-XXX Calculus II or Elective 3-4 26-202 General Physics II 4     15-16 Third Year First Semester     01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 24-303 Physical Chemistry I 4 24-403 Biochemistry 4 31-395 Global Societies 3 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3     17 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 24-304 Physical Chemistry II 4 24-306 Instrumental Analysis 4 24-308 Inorganic Chemistry 4     15 Fourth Year First Semester     24-407 Seminar in Chemistry I 1 24-XXX Elective (Advanced Chemistry) 3 24-XXX Electives 6 24-XXX Senior Capstone 3 XX-XXX History / Social Science Elective 3     16 Second Semester     24-408 Seminar in Chemistry II 1 XX-XXX Elective (Advanced Chemistry, Mathematics, or Physics) 3 XX-XXX Arts / Humanities Electives 9     13   Total Credit Hours: 121-125

Course Descriptions for Chemistry

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  CHEMISTRY (CHEM) (24)   CHEM-100. INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY 4:3:3 A course covering the basic concepts of chemistry. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-101. GENERAL AND ELEMENTARY ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY I 4:3:3 This course is the first in  two-semester  sequence in  a comprehensive study of the chemical and physical properties of matter including the fundamental principles of qualitative and quantitative analysis. Topics include atomic theory and bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and states of matter.  The course is designed for science and other majors which require a thorough understanding of the current content knowledge in the fundamentals of chemistry.   Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer 1 Corequisites: MTSC-121, MTSC-122 or MTSC-251 or MTSC-131. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-102. GENERAL AND ELEMENTARY ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY II 4:3:3 This course is the second  in  two-semester  sequence in  a comprehensive study of the chemical and physical properties of matter including the fundamental principles of qualitative and quantitative analysis. Topics include solutions, kinetics, equilibria, free energy, electrochemisty, and an introduction to specific areas in chemistry.  The course is designed for science and other majors which require a thorough understanding of the current content knowledge in the fundamentals of chemistry.   Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer 2 Prerequisites: CHEM-101. Corequisites: MTSC-121, MTSC-122. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-107. CHEMISTRY FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES 4:3:3 A unified study of the fundamentals of general chemistry and the elements of organic and biochemistry. (Not recommended for majors in the Biological Sciences, or for Pre-Medical students.) Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: High school Chemistry or its equivalent. Corequisites: MTSC-101, MTSC-102 or MTSC-103 or MTSC-121 and MTSC-122. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-191. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR I – CHEMISTRY 1:2:0 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success. Academic skills will be developed. These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the Internet, and word processing. Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed. Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals. Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution, and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. Credit, one hour.   CHEM-192. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR II – CHEMISTRY 1:1:0 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success. Academic skills will be developed. These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the Internet, and word processing. Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed. Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals. Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution, and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. Credit, one hour.   CHEM-202. FORENSIC CHEMISTRY 4:3:3 Theory and principle in the isolation and identification of drugs using chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-101, CHEM-102. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-203. WATER CHEMISTRY – BASIC PRINCIPLES 4:3:3 Essentials of water chemistry with emphasis on the principle methods of testing water and wastewater. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-101, CHEM-102, MTSC-121, MTSC-122 or MTSC-105 and MTSC-106. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-205. ELEMENTARY ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 4:3:3 A course covering nomenclature, properties and reactions of the simpler classes of organic compounds. (Not recommended for majors in the Biological Sciences or for Pre-Medical students.) Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-101, CHEM-102. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-301. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 4:3:3 Structure, synthesis, and reactions of the principle classes of organic compounds with stress on stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, and spectroscopic properties. Laboratory practice in the separation, identification, and synthesis of organic compounds. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-101, CHEM-102. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-302. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 4:3:3 Structure, synthesis, and reactions of the principle classes of organic compounds with stress on stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, and spectroscopic properties. Laboratory practice in the separation, identification, and synthesis of organic compounds. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-101, CHEM-102, CHEM-301. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-303. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I 4:3:3 A quantitative study of the fundamental physiochemical principles of matter as applied to gases, liquids, solids, and solutions, with illustrative laboratory experiments. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-301, CHEM-302, MTSC-251, MTSC-252, PHYS-201, PHYS-202. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-304. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II 4:3:3 A quantitative study of the fundamental physiochemical principles of matter as applied to gases, liquids, solids, and solutions, with illustrative laboratory experiments. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-301, CHEM-302, MTSC-251, MTSC-252, PHYS-201, PHYS-202. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-305. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 4:3:3 Principles of gravimetric, volumetric, potentiometric, and spectrophotometric analysis. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Eight (8) credit hours of General Chemistry, MTSC-121, MTSC-122 or MTSC-105, MTSC-106. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-306. INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS 4:3:3 Theoretical principles and chemical applications of instrumental methods of analysis. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-301, CHEM-302, and CHEM-305, MTSC-251, MTSC-252, PHYS-201, PHYS-202. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-308. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 4:3:3 A study and characterization of the fundamental concepts in inorganic chemistry which includes atomic structure, periodicity, and the nature of chemical forces and structure. The chemistries of transition metals, S fillers and P fillers, and organic metallic compounds. Laboratory practice in synthesis of pure inorganic substances. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Corequisites: CHEM-304. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-310. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY 4:3:3 The analyses of water, soil, plant, and animal tissues for various parameters including trace organics and metals using classical and instrumental methods of analysis. Prerequisites: CHEM-302. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-401. ORGANIC QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 3:2:3 Spectroscopic and chemical methods of identification of organic compounds in the pure state and in mixtures. Two (2) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-301, 24-302, 24-306. Credit, three hours.   CHEM-402. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3:3:0 Advanced study of the structures of organic compounds, organic reaction, and their mechanisms. Synthesis of selected organic compounds using advanced preparative methods. Three (3) lectures and per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-301, CHEM-302, CHEM-303, CHEM-304. Credit, three hours.   CHEM-403. BIOCHEMISTRY 4:3:3 The structural and metabolic relationship of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes, and coenzymes. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-301, CHEM-302, CHEM-303. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-404. ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 3:3:0 Advanced treatment of thermodynamics, the elements of quantum and statistical mechanics, chemical kinetics, and selected topics. Three (3) lectures per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-303, CHEM-304. Credit, three hours.   CHEM-405. INDEPENDENT STUDY AND RESEARCH 3:0:9 Independent investigation of a research problem under the supervision of a staff member. A research report and presentation is required. Three (3) three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites: Senior status in Chemistry. The course may be repeated with the consent of the Department Chair. Credit, three hours.   CHEM-406. SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY 3:3:0 Topics of current interest in analytical, organic, inorganic, physical, or biochemistry. Prerequisites: Senior status in Chemistry. The course may be repeated with the consent of the Department Chair. Credit, three hours.   CHEM-407. SEMINAR IN CHEMISTRY 1:1:0 Reports, study, and discussion of current literature in the fields of chemistry. An oral presentation is required. One hour per week. Credit, one hour.   CHEM-409. WATER CHEMISTRY – ADVANCED TECHNIQUES 4:3:3 Theory and application of modern chemical instrumentation to water analysis. Three (3) lectures and one (1) three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHEM-203. Credit, four hours.   CHEM-460. CHEMICAL LITERATURE 1:1:0 Use of the chemical library, chemical journals, reference works, other technical publications, assembling and data use, and computer-assisted literature searches. One lecture per week. Credit, one hour.   CHEM-462. CHEMICAL TOXICOLOGY 3:3:0 A study of the adverse effects of chemical substances. Course includes the general principles of toxicology, the toxicology of systems, toxic agents, environmental toxicology, forensic toxicology, applications toxicology, and the effects of toxic substances on reproduction and the body. Credit, three hours.   CHEM-469. POLYMER CHEMISTRY 3:3:0 An introduction to the chemistry of macromolecules including biological molecules, plastics, and other important classes of industrial polymers. Prerequisites: CHEM-301,CHEM4-302. Credit, three hours.   Back to Department Homepage Back to College Homepage

Graduate Course Descriptions

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    24-501. ADVANCED LABORATORY TECHNIQUES. Advanced techniques and sophisticated equipment used in the preparation and/or purification of chemical compounds. Two lectures and one 150 minute laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Chemistry 301-302, 306 and 308 or equivalent courses. Credit, three hours. 24-502. PHYSICAL METHODS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Advanced methods in inorganic preparations and compound analyses via physical methods. Two lectures and one 150 minute laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Chemistry 301-302, 303-304, 306 and 308 or equivalent courses. Credit, three hours. 24-503. PHYSICAL METHODS IN BIOCHEMISTRY. Advanced methods in the study of biochemical molecules and the use of physical methods in their investigations. Two lectures and one 150 minute laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Chemistry 301-302, 303-304, 306 and 403 or equivalent courses. Credit, three hours. 24-504. PHYSICAL METHODS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Advanced studies in organic preparations and reactions, and chemical analyses via physical methods. Two lectures and one 150 minute laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Chemistry 301-302, 303-304, 306 or equivalent courses. Credit, three hours. 24-505. INORGANIC SOLUTION CHEMISTRY. A study of the chemical kinetics of chemical forces and their effects on structure and reactivity of coordination compounds. Two 75 minute lectures per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 308 or equivalent. Credit, three hours. 24-506. STRUCTURAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Detailed discussions of the nature of chemical forces and their effects on structure and reactivity of coordination compounds. One 150 minute lecture per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 308 or equivalent. Credit, three hours. 24-507. THEORY AND APPLICATIONS OF SPECTROSCOPY. A presentation of molecular spectra and structure correlations demonstrating the use of IR, Visible UV, NMR, and AA. One 150 minute lecture per week. Credit, three hours. 24-508. THEORY AND APPLICATIONS OF CHROMATOGRAPHY. Investigations of the separation and identification of substances via packed and capillary column gas chromatography. HPLC and GLC using various detectors. One 150 minute lecture per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 306 or equivalent. Credit, three hours. 24-509. THE CHEMICAL BOND. The study of electronics in atoms, molecular orbitals bonding in organic compounds, and "d" valence orbitals. One 150 minute lecture per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 308 or equivalent. Credit, three hours. 24-510. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY. The analyses of water, soil, plant and animal tissues for various parameters including traces organics and metals using classical and instrumental methods of analysis. One lectures 150 minute per week. Credit, three hours. 24-511. SELECTED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY. Advanced topics in the various fields of chemistry. Topics may vary from year to year. One 150 minute lecture per week. Credit, three hours. 24-516. QUANTUM CHEMISTRY. The wave equation and approximate treatments of the hydrogen molecular ion, the hydrogen molecule, diatomic molecules, and polyatomic molecules. Two 75 minute lectures per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301-302, 303-304 or equivalent courses. Credit, three hours. 24-518. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCOPY. The use of molecular symmetry and group theory to study rotational, vibrational, and electronic spectra of molecules. One 150 minute lecture per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301-302 or equivalent. Credit, three hours. 24-519. APPLICATIONS OF SPECTROSCOPY. An introduction to chemical research. The use of spectroscopy as a research tool and a review of the literature in this area will be conducted. Projects may be assigned. Two 75 minute lectures per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 507 or equivalent. Credit, three hours. 24-520. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. An advanced study of reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and organic chemical bonding. One 150 minute lecture per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301-302. Credit, three hours. 24-521. BIOCHEMISTRY. An advanced study of biochemical reactions and reaction mechanisms. One 150 minute lecture per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 403 or equivalent. Credit, three hours. 24-540. ADVANCED METHODS OF TEACHING CHEMISTRY. Discussions and problem solving sessions concerning improved techniques of teaching high school chemistry. Two 75 minute lectures per week. Credit, three hours. 24-552. TECHNIQUES IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. A study of the use of physical measurements in determining composition, structures, and properties of matter. Two lectures and one 150 minute laboratory per week. Credit, three hours. 24-556 557. SEMINAR. Presentation of current topics and/or research by faculty and students. One lecture per week. Credit, one hour. 24-560. CHEMICAL LITERATURE. Use of the chemistry library, chemical journals, reference works, other technical publications, assembling and data use, and computer assisted literature searches. One lecture per week. Credit, one hour. 24-562. CHEMICAL TOXICOLOGY. A study of the adverse effects of chemical substances. Course includes the general principles of toxicology, the toxicology of systems, toxic agents, environmental toxicology, forensic toxicology, applications toxicology and the effect of toxic substances on reproduction and the body. One lecture per week. Credit, one hour. 24-569. POLYMER CHEMISTRY. An introduction to the chemistry of macromolecules including biologically molecules, plastics, and other important classes of industrial polymers. One 150 minute lecture per week. Prerequisites: Chemistry 301-302. Credit, three hours. 24-573. ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. An introduction to the thermodynamics of large molecular collections and the quantum statistics of these systems. One 150 minute lecture per week. Prerequisites: Chemistry 303-304. Credit, three hours. 24-590 591. RESEARCH AND THESIS. Publishable research work by students and the writing and defense of a thesis. Credit, three hours each.

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