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Chemistry Education

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  Introduction Students in Delaware State’s Chemistry Education program often have jobs waiting for them upon graduation. They benefit not only from DSU’s reputation for excellence in teacher education, but also from the national shortage of middle- and high-school science teachers. Our Chemistry Education students are heavily recruited by school districts throughout Delaware, as well as in neighboring states. The program meets all standards of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. It features extensive hands-on laboratory experience, along with a full semester of student teaching experience in a real-world classroom. Graduates enter the work force with a teaching license, mastery of the subject matter, and the ability to make chemistry accessible, exciting, and relevant to 21st-century students. Professional Preparation The Chemistry Education program is recognized by the National Science Teachers’ Association (NSTA), as well as by NCATE. All graduates become licensed teachers in the state of Delaware, with professional teaching skills in core subjects such as organic chemistry, biochemistry, instrumental analysis, and physics cutting-edge areas such as genetics and renewable energy the use of advanced technology in the classroom lesson planning assessment multicultural classrooms Faculty Members of the Delaware State chemistry faculty are highly committed to undergraduate education. Because the department is small and intimate, instructors can provide individual attention to each student, acting as mentors and advisors as well as classroom educators. They help students discover their academic strengths and establish solid foundations for graduate school and career development. Research and Experience The Delaware State chemistry department encourages undergraduates to get involved in research. The university hosts nine chemistry research labs and three multipurpose labs, all equipped with high-end instrumentation and advanced computer technology. Undergraduates often play significant roles in the research process. Delaware State’s research emphases include hydrogen fuel cells, forensic chemistry, environmental chemistry, and pharmaceuticals. The department maintains a very active student chapter of the American Chemical Society (ACS). The chapter provides opportunities for students to present research findings, interact with professional chemists and researchers, take field trips to chemistry-related companies, and more.    

Pure Mathematics (M.S.)

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  Curriculum for Pure Mathematics (M.S.)  The masters programs in mathematical sciences are flexible enough to accommodate students with diversified background training. In consultation with the Graduate Committee, each student develops a course of study in mathematics areas most relevant to his or her professional and career objectives. Each student must take 15 credit hours of required courses, and complete an additional 18 hours either in the Thesis Option or the Non-Thesis Option.   Required Courses All of these five courses:     Course No. Course Name Credits MTSC-500 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Hours MTSC-511 Introduction to Abstract Algebra 3 Hours MTSC-561 Real Analysis I 3 Hours MTSC-562 Real Analysis II 3 Hours MTSC-571 Complex Analysis 3 Hours   Select one of the following two courses:          Course No. Course Name Credits MTSC-541 Advanced Probability Theory 3 Hours MTSC-521 General Topology 3 Hours Total:   18 Hours     THESIS OPTION: Pure Mathematics     1.      Electives of 6 credit hours from the Pure Mathematics Courses:             Course No. Course Name Credits MTSC-525 Logic 3 Hours MTSC-531 Number Theory 3 Hours MTSC-621 Introduction to Functional Analysis 3 Hours MTSC-504 Modern Geometry 3 Hours MTSC-611 Topics in Pure Mathematics 3 Hours   2.      MTSC-699 Thesis  (6 Hours)   3.      Electives from Pure Mathematics and/or applied Mathematics and/or Other Graduate level courses with the approval of the student’s advisor. (3 Hours)  Total:  15 Hours   The students who select thesis option must defend their thesis before the Department Graduate Committee. A student must complete a six-hour research thesis.     NON-THESIS OPTION   The student who selects either one of the following non-thesis options must pass a written examination within two attempts.   This written examination is administered in February. A student must pass the written exam by the beginning of his/her 6th semester of study. A second and final attempt is permitted in the following August. In this examination a student must choose 2 topics from Algebra, Analysis, and Applied Mathematics. The exam is based on both 25-561 for Analysis, 25-511 for Algebra, and (or) 25-651 and 25-643 for Applied Mathematics. Another topic, such as Ordinary Differential Equations, Partial Differential Equations, or Statistics, may be substituted for one of the above by petition to the graduate committee based on two graduate level courses and supported by a faculty member.   Pure Mathematics 1.         Electives from the Pure Mathematics Courses (9 Hours)   2.         Electives from Pure Mathematics and/or Applied Mathematics and/or Graduate level courses with the approval of the student’s advisor.  (6 Hours)                                                                                                  Total:  15 Hours  

Applied Mathematics (M.S.)

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  Curriculum for Applied Mathematics (M.S.) The masters programs in mathematical sciences are flexible enough to accommodate students with diversified background training. In consultation with the Graduate Committee, each student develops a course of study in mathematics areas most relevant to his or her professional and career objectives. Each student must take 15 credit hours of required courses, and complete an additional 18 hours either in the Thesis Option or the Non-Thesis Option.   Required Courses All of these five courses:   Course No. Course Name Credits MTSC-500 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Hours MTSC-511 Introduction to Abstract Algebra 3 Hours MTSC-561 Real Analysis I 3 Hours MTSC-562 Real Analysis II 3 Hours MTSC-571 Complex Analysis 3 Hours   Select one of the following two courses:    Course No. Course Name Credits MTSC-541 Advanced Probability Theory 3 Hours MTSC-521 General Topology 3 Hours   Total: 18 Hours   THESIS OPTION: Applied Mathematics Electives of 6 credit hours from the Applied Mathematics Courses: MTSC-699 Thesis (6 Hours) Electives from Pure Mathematics and/or Applied Mathematics and/or other Graduate level courses with the approval of the student’s advisor. (3 Hours) Total: 15 Hours The students who select thesis option must defend their thesis before the Department Graduate Committee. A student must complete a six-hour research thesis.   NON-THESIS OPTION The student who selects either one of the following non-thesis options must pass a written examination within two attempts. This written examination is administered in February. A student must pass the written exam by the beginning of his/her 6th semester of study. A second and final attempt is permitted in the following August. In this examination a student must choose 2 topics from Algebra, Analysis, and Applied Mathematics. The exam is based on both 25-561 for Analysis, 25-511 for Algebra, and (or) 25-651 and 25-643 for Applied Mathematics. Another topic, such as Ordinary Differential Equations, Partial Differential Equations, or Statistics, may be substituted for one of the above by petition to the graduate committee based on two graduate level courses and supported by a faculty member. Applied Mathematics 1.  Electives from the Applied Mathematics Courses  (9 Hours) 2.  Electives from Pure Mathematics and/or Applied Mathematics and/or Graduate level courses with the approval of the student’s advisor. (6 Hours) Total: 15 Hours Department Homepage

Mathematics Education

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  Curriculum for Mathematics Education (M.S.)   ADMISSIONS PROCESS Students applying for admission must provide the following documents: college Transcripts, GRE scores, application to the graduate program, and professional resume/vita. Upon receipt of these materials, the Department of Mathematical Sciences Committee will evaluate the candidate and decide if he/she is to be admitted into the program. If the student is accepted, he/she will immediately be assigned an advisor. The advisor and candidate will collaborate to determine a schedule and plan of study. This plan will then be submitted to the Graduate Committee for approval. Once approved, the student will be allowed to begin his/her coursework.   A student may opt to begin the program provisionally, prior to applying to enter the program. In which case, the student could take no more than six graduate credits prior to being fully accepted into the program. Taking graduate courses provisionally does not guarantee future admission into the graduate program.     CURRICULUM The masters programs in mathematical sciences are flexible enough to accommodate students with diversified background training. In consultation with the Graduate Committee, each student develops a course of study in mathematics areas most relevant to his or her professional and career objectives. Each student must take 36 credit hours of coursework as depicted below.   Required Mathematics Education Courses – 9 credits – All of these courses:   MTSC-503 Mathematics Teaching Methods I 3 Hours MTSC-603 Mathematics Teaching Methods II 3 Hours MTSC-691 History & Philosophy of Math/Math Educ. 3 Hours     Required Mathematics Content Courses – 12 Credits    These three courses:   MTSC-500 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Hours MTSC-504 Modern Geometry 3 Hours MTSC-511 Introduction to Abstract Algebra   3 Hours      And one of these two courses:   MTSC-513 Discrete Mathematics 3 Hours MTSC-531 Number Theory 3 Hours      Required Computers and Technology Courses – 3 Credits   MTSC-507 Computers and Technology in Mathematics 3 Hours      Required Education Courses – 6 Credits   EDUC-604 Theories and Methods of Instruction 3 Hours EDUC-XXX One course from the following: 3 Hours   EDUC-605 Curriculum Organization and Design     EDUC-610 Development of Instructional Materials     EDUC-614 Human Growth and Development     EDUC-607/633 Theories and Practices of Classroom Management       RESEARCH – 6 credits – Students must complete one of the following options   Option I – Take the following two courses:   MTSC-697 Research Methods in Mathematics Education 3 Hours MTSC-699 Thesis or Directed Project 3 Hours     Option II -  Take two additional graduate courses:   MTSC-5XX/6XX – one of the following:   MTSC-521 General Topology 3 Hours MTSC-525 Logic 3 Hours MTSC-531 Number Theory 3 Hours MTSC-541 Advanced Probability Theory 3 Hours MTSC-551 Ordinary Differential Equations 3 Hours MTSC-561 Real Analysis I 3 Hours MTSC-562 Real Analysis II 3 Hours MTSC-571 Complex Analysis 3 Hours MTSC-581 Operations Research 3 Hours MTSC-611 Topics in Pure Mathematics 3 Hours MTSC-621 Introduction to Functional Analysis 3 Hours MTSC-641 Combinatorics 3 Hours MTSC-643 Statistics 3 Hours MTSC-651 Partial Differential Equations 3 Hours MTSC-661 Numerical Analysis 3 Hours  MTSC-663 Topics in Applied Mathematics 3 Hours               MTSC-5XX/6XX – A graduate education course as agreed upon by student, advisor,                                       and graduate committee.   Option III – For students considering the future pursuits in a Ph.D. in Mathematics Education– 9 credits   MTSC-697 Research Methods in Mathematics Education 3 Hours MTSC-699 Thesis or Directed Project 6 Hours   If this option is selected, the student will be required to take only 3 credits, rather than 6 credits, from the Education courses listed above.  

Chemistry M.S.

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  Introduction   The Master’s program in Chemistry is designed for graduate students and working chemists who seek to develop advanced professional skills. Through a combination of classroom study and hands-on laboratory work, students develop advanced skills and knowledge to prepare them for doctoral studies, careers in science education, or leadership positions in chemistry-related professions. Delaware State’s program stands out for its emphasis on independent research. All master’s candidates design their own research study, conduct the laboratory trials and analysis, write up the results, and present their findings to department faculty. Students have great freedom to choose their area of inquiry, as well as the opportunity to demonstrate their creativity, problem-solving ability, and ingenuity in the lab. Professional Preparation Students in the Master’s program in Chemistry establish marketable credentials that advance their career prospects. Graduates who choose to further their studies compete very successfully for Ph.D. placements. Those who enter the work force (or are already in it) find many opportunities for employment in industries such as medical research drug manufacturing renewable energy environmental protection and restoration biotechnology law enforcement Faculty The Delaware State chemistry faculty boasts a number of accomplished researchers. Faculty members have secured major grants from the National Science Foundation, National Institute of Health, Department of Energy and other national funders to do ground-breaking research in areas such as hydrogen fuel cells, forensic chemistry, environmental chemistry, and pharmaceuticals. In addition to offering research opportunities and guidance, DSU professors help graduate students establish professional and academic networks to support their careers. Research and Experience Delaware State has nine chemistry research labs and three multipurpose labs, all equipped with high-end instrumentation and advanced computer technology. Students have access to equipment such as gas chromatographs with a variety of detectors a head space auto sampler for gas chromatograph a gas chromatograph /mass selective detector/infrared detector/computer system nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers instrumentation for flame and flameless atomic absorption, dispersion infrared and FTIR ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometers capillary electrophoresis unit microwave digestion/extraction system high performance liquid chromatograph with data collection system electroanalytical system X-ray powder diffraction unit Thermal gravimetric analyzers Laser light scattering spectrometer  

Curriculum in Optical Engineering

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(Left) Student working with lasers in the lab

 

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Optical Engineering Track All students who select the Engineering Physics program major must complete the general education program as required of all students (See General Education Requirements). In addition, students must take Physics 191, 192, 201, 202, 220, 361, 362,401, 402, 418; Engineering 205, 210, 211, 212, 220, 221, 302, 309, 340; Mathematics 251, 252, 253; Chemistry 101, and technical electives specific to each track.   Technical Elective Selection Students who desire to major in Engineering Physics in the Optical Engineering track will choose a minimum of 12 credits from technical electives from among the following:     Course Course Name Credits 26-316 Introduction to Optics 4 26-331 Mathematical Methods of Physics I 3 26-332 Mathematical Methods of Physics II 3 26-302  Signal Processing I 3 26-311 Fiber Optics Communication 4 26-310 Optical Electronics 3 26-406 Modern Optical Techniques 4   Back to Department Homepage Back to College Homepage (c) Copyright 2010 DSU CMNST Dover, Delaware 19901. All rights reserved.

Curriculum in Bioengineering

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(Left - right) Faculty instructor with graduate student at work in the lab.

 

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Bioengineering Track All students who select the Engineering Physics program major must complete the general education program as required of all students (See General Education Requirements). In addition, students must take Physics 191, 192, 201, 202, 220, 361, 362, 401, 402, 418; Engineering 205, 210, 211, 212, 220, 221, 302, 309, 340; Mathematics 251, 252, 253; Chemistry 101, and technical electives specific to each track. Technical Elective Selection Students who desire to major in Engineering Physics in the Bioengineering track will choose a minimum of 12 credits from technical electives from among the following: Course Course Name Credits 26-316 Introduction to Optics 4 21-303 Topics in Bioinformatics 3 26-331 Mathematical Methods of Physics I 3 26-332 Mathematical Methods of Physics II 3 26-313 Analytical Mechanics I 3 26-314 Analytical Mechanics II 3 26-317 Foundations in Bioengineering 4 26-410 Molecular Engineering Systems 4 26-409 Biosensors & Bioinstrumentation 3 26-406 Modern Optical Techniques 4 Back to Department Homepage Back to College Homepage (c) Copyright 2010 DSU CMNST Dover, Delaware 19901. All rights reserved.

Curriculum in Health Professions

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II 4 01-101 English Composition I 3 01-102 English Composition II 3   Social Science 3 25-122 Trigonometry 3 23-191 University Seminar I 1 23-192 University Seminar II 1       23-194 Intro. to Biology Professions 1               Total Credits 15   Total Credits 16 Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 23-215 Cell Biology 4 23-210 Genetics 4 24-301 Organic Chemistry I 4 24-302 Organic Chemistry II 4 16-100 Fitness and Wellness 2   Literature 3 23-261 Calculus for Life Sciences 4 23-321 Biostatistics 3 01-200 Speech 3 23-299 Soph. Seminar – Sci. Literature 1               Total Credits 17   Total Credits 15 Summer Clinical Experience Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 23-310 Molecular Biology 4 24-403 Biochemistry OR   23-307 Principles of Physiology 4 23-422 Biochemical Mechanisms 4   History 3 31-395 Global Societies 3 26-211 Fundamentals of Physics I 4 26-212 Fundamentals of Physics II 4       23-399 Junior Seminar-Sci. Writing* 1       23-370 Human Anatomy 4               Total Credits 15   Total Credits 16 Summer Research Internship Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 03-105/ 202/322 Ethics course (Humanities) 3   Arts and Humanities 3 23-xxx Biology Elective 4 23-xxx Biology Elective 4 23-xxx Biology Elective 4   Open Elective 3-4 23-301 Problems in Biology OR     Open Elective 3-4 23-451 Senior Research (Capstone I)** 2 23-499 Senior Seminar (Capstone II)** 1               Total Credits 13   Total Credits 14-16 Total Credits: 121-123 ** Senior Capstone *   Writing Intensive Course(s)   BIOLOGY ELECTIVES: Students must not take less than 18 credits of Biology courses from the course elective list below. These are the only ones that can satisfy the Biology elective requirement for this track.  Substitutions can be requested, under special circumstances, but require written approval of advisor and Chair in advance. The Curriculum Tracks are designed for the intended career goal, including anticipation of entrance examinations, so students should adhere to the suggested sequence.  It is advisable for the student to check possible post graduate school requirements during their Junior year to ensure that satisfy expectations of intended graduate/profession choices. REQUIREMENTS:  Students can not take either 23-210 or 23-215 without first passing both 23-101 and 23-102 with a grade of "C" or better.  In order for a student to take any 300 or 400 level Biology Department course, they must also pass both 23-210 and 23-215 with a "C" or better.  These grade requirements take precedence over, and supersede any lesser specific prerequisites of all 300 or 400 level Biology electives.  All students must pass the Biology Comprehensive Assessment (BCA) examination of core courses given to all students in 23-399.  If they do not pass, then the student must take 23-498 and pass the BCA, which is required for successful completion of this course, and the biology program. SPECIAL NOTES:    For all programs and tracks, a grade of “C” or better is required for all Biology courses.     For the Cell/Molecular/Biotechnology and for the Health Professions tracks, a grade of “C” or better is also required in all CMNST courses. All Biology majors must complete an independent research project.  Those who have completed a research project with a biology faculty member (e.g. 23-301 for credit, or via a paid stipend) prior to the beginning of their senior year, and especially if the project was an internship at another institution, the student must present their data to their advisor in order to be exempted from the required Senior Capstone I course.  If they have not completed a research project, or their internship is inadequate, then they must register for 23-451or 452 to complete a Capstone research project. If you take, 23-422 instead of 24-403, then you will need to take another Chemistry course if you want a minor in Chemistry – Instrumental Analysis (24-306) with lab is suggested.  Another set of courses the student can consider is Physics-317 (Foundations of Bioengineering) and Physics 409 (Biosensors and Bio-instrumentation) as electives with advisor, instructor, and Biology Chair approval. All Biology majors are required to successfully complete Senior Seminar (Capstone II, 23-499), no exceptions. General Note:  The minimum University requirement for graduation is 121 hours; in Biology you will usually complete between 121-125 hours depending on selections. Health Professions Biology Electives: Open Electives: 23-305 Developmental Biology 25-252 Calculus II 23-311 Neuroscience 36-208 Health Psychology 23-322 Microbiology 36-316 Developmental Psychology 23-352 Histology 36-402 Abnormal Psychology 23-411 Pharmacology 37-206 Cultural Anthropology 23-420 Immunology 16-355 Physiology of Exercise 23-317 Principles of Virology 16-356 Biomechanics 23-302 Comp. Vertebrate Anatomy.   23-315 Behavior  

Curriculum in Cell/Molecular/Biotechnology

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.blueheader { color: #FFFFFF; background-color:#2984bd; text-align:center; font-weight:bold } .greyheader { background-color:#CCCCCC; color:#000000; font-weight: bold; } .double_right { border-right:double; } .grey_double_right { background-color:#CCCCCC; color:#000000; border-right:double; font-weight: bold; } #curriculum td { white-space:nowrap; vertical-align:top; } #curriculum strong { font-weight:bold; } Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 23-101 General Biology I 4 23-102 General Biology II 4 24-101 General and Analytical Chem. I 4 24-102 General and Analytical Chem. II 4 01-101 English Composition I 3 01-102 English Composition II 3   Social Science 3 25-122 Trigonometry 3 23-191 University Seminar I 1 23-192 University Seminar II 1       23-194 Intro. to Biology Professions 1               Total Credits 15   Total Credits 16 Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 23-215 Cell Biology 4 23-210 Genetics 4 24-301 Organic Chemistry I 4 24-302 Organic Chemistry II 4 16-100 Fitness and Wellness 2   Literature 3 23-261 Calculus for Life Sciences 4 23-321 Biostatistics 3 01-200 Speech 3 23-299 Soph. Seminar – Sci. Literature 1               Total Credits 17   Total Credits 15 Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 23-310 Molecular Biology 4 24-403 Biochemistry OR   23-xxx Biology Elective 4 23-422 Biochemical Mechanisms 4   History 3 31-395 Global Societies 3 26-211 Fundamentals of Physics I 4 26-212 Fundamentals of Physics II 4       23-399 Junior Seminar-Sci. Writing* 1       23-471 Nucleic Acids Biotechnology 4               Total Credits 15   Total Credits 16 Summer Research Internship Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 03-105/ 202/322 Ethics course (Humanities) 3   Arts and Humanities 3 23-472 Protein Biotechnology 4 23-410 Advanced Molecular Biology 4 23-415 Advanced Cell Biology 4 23-xxx Biology Elective 4 23-301 Problems in Biology OR     Open Elective 3-4 23-451 Senior Research (Capstone I)** 2 23-499 Senior Seminar (Capstone II)** 1               Total Credits 13   Total Credits 15-16 Total Credits: 122-123 ** Senior Capstone *   Writing Intensive Course(s) BIOLOGY ELECTIVES: Students must not take less than 18 credits of Biology courses from the course elective list below. These are the only ones that can satisfy the Biology elective requirement for this track.  Substitutions can be requested, under special circumstances, but require written approval of advisor and Chair in advance. The Curriculum Tracks are designed for the intended career goal, including anticipation of entrance examinations, so students should adhere to the suggested sequence.  It is advisable for the student to check possible post graduate school requirements during their Junior year to ensure that satisfy expectations of intended graduate/profession choices. REQUIREMENTS:  Students can not take either 23-210 or 23-215 without first passing both 23-101 and 23-102 with a grade of "C" or better.  In order for a student to take any 300 or 400 level Biology Department course, they must also pass both 23-210 and 23-215 with a "C" or better.  These grade requirements take precedence over, and supersede any lesser specific prerequisites of all 300 or 400 level Biology electives.  All students must pass the Biology Comprehensive Assessment (BCA) examination of core courses given to all students in 23-399.  If they do not pass, then the student must take 23-498 and pass the BCA, which is required for successful completion of this course, and the biology program. SPECIAL NOTES:    For all programs and tracks, a grade of “C” or better is required for all Biology courses.     For the Cell/Molecular/Biotechnology and for the Health Professions tracks, a grade of “C” or better is also required in all CMNST courses. All Biology majors must complete an independent research project.  Those who have completed a research project with a biology faculty member (e.g. 23-301 for credit, or via a paid stipend) prior to the beginning of their senior year, and especially if the project was an internship at another institution, the student must present their data to their advisor in order to be exempted from the required Senior Capstone I course.  If they have not completed a research project, or their internship is inadequate, then they must register for 23-451or 452 to complete a Capstone research project. If you take, 23-422 instead of 24-403, then you will need to take another Chemistry course if you want a minor in Chemistry – Instrumental Analysis (24-306) with lab is suggested.  Another set of courses the student can consider is Physics-317 (Foundations of Bioengineering) and Physics 409 (Biosensors and Bio-instrumentation) as electives with advisor, instructor, and Biology Chair approval. All Biology majors are required to successfully complete Senior Seminar (Capstone II, 23-499), no exceptions. General Note:  The minimum University requirement for graduation is 121 hours; in Biology you will usually complete between 121-125 hours depending on selections. Cell/Molecular/Biotechnology Biology Electives: Open Electives: 23-305 Developmental Biology 41-105 Management Processes 23-322 Microbiology 41-325 Organizational Behavior 23-375 Mol. Genetics and Genomics 41-341 Business Ethics 23-420 Immunology 41-435 Entrepreneurship 23-317 Principles of Virology 46-300 Principles of Marketing 23-405 Cell Morphogenesis 35-301 Introduction to Bioinformatics 23-307 Principles of Physiology 25-252 Calculus II  23-370 Human Anatomy 23-411 Pharmacology   23-311 Neuroscience

Maximizing Access to Research Careers (MARC U*STAR)

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  MARC U*STAR Maximizing Access to Research Careers Undergraduate Student Training in Academic Research Sponsored by the National Institutes of Health What is MARC U*STAR? MARC U*STAR is an honor, scholarship program that provides support for undergraduate students who are underrepresented in the biomedical and behavioral sciences to improve their preparation for high-caliber graduate training at the Ph.D. level.   2010 MARC Trainees, photographed from left-to-right:  Jasmine Smith (Chemistry/Biology major); Iymaan Pinkman (Biology major); Brittany Williams (Biology major); Phontaye Sorrell (Psychology major); Williann Garber (Psychology major); and Charles Eke (Biology Major). Eligibility: Be a full-time student at DSU Major in the STEM disciplines (Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Physics & Pre-Engineering, Computer and Information Sciences, Mathematical Sciences, Psychology, and Human Ecology) or an approved Interdisciplinary Studies major Have a minimum of 60 college credits and have no less than 24 months until degree completion Possess an outstanding academic record (cumulative g.p.a. of 3.25 on a 4.0 scale) Must have the goal of pursuing a Ph.D. in the biomedical sciences. Scientific fields including biology, biochemistry, biophysics, bioinformatics, bioengineering, computational biology (molecular modeling), genomics, behavioral sciences, and nutrition will be considered as suitable areas for graduate study Be a U.S. citizen, non-citizen national or permanent resident of the United States who is of an underrepresented group Requirements: Participate in intramural research project with an approved mentor from DSU and complete an extramural summer internship Attend workshops for: laboratory safety, ethics in science, career development, how to complete an application, presentations and public speaking, leadership and service, critical thinking and problem solving, working with scientific literature Make an oral or poster presentation at the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS) The Award 60% paid tuition and fees Paid stipend Paid travel to attend ABRCMS Application procedure: Complete application Obtain and submit official transcript Write and submit a personal statement Obtain and submit two (2) letters of recommendation from faculty members   For more information, please contact   MARC U*STAR Program Delaware State University 1200 DuPont Highway Dover, DE 19901 (302) 857-7863 chwatson@desu.edu Back to College Home Page
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Research Ethics

Dr. Stephen Taylor

 
 

 

MARC U*STAR Trainees are eligible to participate in the Summer Research Experience (SRE), a paid summer internship allowing them to work in some of the most prestigious labs and research programs in the country.

Benefits:

  • Receive MARC stipend throughout the summer (no stipend cost to host research mentor)
  • Up to a 10-week internship experience in some of the nation's most prestigious laboratories
  • Eligibility for housing and/or meal plan financial support*  for duration of summer program
  • Travel funds assistance* to summer research site and return

*subject to funds availability

 

Resources

GRE Registration and practice tests

Fund graduate school for Biomedical Research thru the NIH

MARC U*STAR Participating Schools

 

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