Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology

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Engineering Physics Option

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The Engineering Physics curriculum is based on core physics engineering courses plus physics electives within three (3) tracks: Electrical engineering (Link to curriculum) Bioengineering (Link to curriculum) Optical engineering (Link to curriculum) All students who select the Engineering Physics program major must complete the general education program as required of all students (See General Education Requirements). In addition, students must take Physics 191, 192, 201, 202, 220, 361, 362,401, 402, 418; Engineering 205, 210, 211, 212, 220, 221, 302, 309, 340; Mathematics 251, 252, 253; Chemistry 101, and technical electives specific to each track.  Back to Department Homepage Back to College Homepage  

DSU CMNST Web Policy & Copyright Statement

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  College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences & Technology Website Policy and Copyright Statement   Introduction Website Mission Management of the CMNST Website General Policies Responsibilities & Liabilities Visitors CMNST - Web Copyright Statement   INTRODUCTION The pages contained under www.desu.edu/cmnst are intended for the information of a variety of constituencies both internal and external to the Delaware State University College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology (CMNST) including: students, faculty, staff, alumni, parents, prospective students, and the general public. The content thereof is intended to support the mission and goals of the DSU College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology and to serve as a resource that engages the CMNST community and enhances the relationship between the College and its respective audiences.   The policies contained in this manual have been compiled for the purpose of governing and maintaining the College’s presence on the World Wide Web.  Any person using these pages must conform to the following policies and is responsible for complying with all applicable state and federal laws and regulations. Back to top  WEBSITE MISSION www.desu.edu/cmnstis the public presence of the College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology on the World Wide Web. As such, it reflects the academic excellence of our enterprise, the programmatic offerings, and the associated stories of faculty, students, and alumni, who have contributed to the vitality of our academic community and their own personal success.   The mission of the College’s website is to describe to a variety of interested constituencies, the success of the College, its programs, and its extended community, through compelling visual images and engaging written word. The website will serve as the most up-to-date location for pertinent information for external and internal audiences and will allow prospective students to make informed decisions and take the necessary steps towards their enrollment at the College. Back to top MANAGEMENT OF THE CMNST WEBSITE   Office of the Dean – contact vnesbit@desu.edu Oversees all content relating to the College’s web presence.   Content Area Managers A number of individuals representing areas associated with the College’s web property may also be designated as content area managers and are charged with the responsibility for maintaining content on the College’s website. As the needs of College’s website change over time, content areas and their managers may be reassigned to reflect current or anticipated usage. The number and function of content area managers will be reviewed and restructured by the College. Back to top   GENERAL POLICIES   The College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology (CMNST) upholds and subscribes to all policies and provisions as stated in the Digital Millennium Copyright Act 105 PL 304 (DMCA) and Title 17 of the US Code. In particular, as stated, it is unlawful to download, upload, or distribute in any fashion, copyrighted material in any form without permission or a license to do so from the copyright holder. The CMNST does not endorse or encourage the use of copyrighted material in ways not intended for such materials. The domain www.desu.edu/cmnst is the sole property of Delaware State University in Dover, Delaware. In addition, a number of related domains are also the property of the College. For a full list of domains owned by Delaware State University, please contact the Webmaster at webmaster@desu.edu. Also refer to DSU’s Privacy Statement at www.desu.edu/privacy-statement. All materials, including registered trademarks of the College, contained on the CMNST website, are protected under the copyright and intellectual property laws of the United States. These may include, but are not limited to: logos, images, taglines, marketing copy, and graphic designs. Any trademark of another institution contained on the CMNST website is used with the knowledge and consent of its owner. Any individual, department, or organization using information for which the copyright is held by another person or entity, must secure written permission in advance and keep it on file for the duration of the usage. Permission may be required for the following: text, images, photographs, graphic designs, audio files, video files, tables, charts, and graphs. Care must be taken that the copyrighted material is used only for the purpose and duration of the license or agreement. Scanned material may not be used on the CMNST Website unless permission has been granted in writing by the copyright owner. Links to external sites should be related to the College’s primary functions as described in its mission. The CMNST does not endorse the views, content, or opinions of any site linked to the College’s. In addition, the College may be unable to maintain connectivity to any site linked to the College’s and assumes no responsibility for continuous service to another Website. The sale or use of advertising on the CMNST website is prohibited. The College may identify the sponsor of any event or program with the name of the organization, its logo, and a link to its Website. The content area managers are representatives from the respective departments/units and must have approval of department/unit/college leadership representatives prior to submission for posting. All pages making up the CMNST web property must reside on a College owned or designated server and comply with the policies contained in this document. The graphic identity of the CMNST is important to the success of the College’s mission. All content found on the College website should conform to the requirements set forth by the Office of the Dean. All pages must contain the College’s logo, a link to the home page, and a reference to the College’s Web Policies & Copyright Statement. Back to top  RESPONSIBILITIES AND LIABILITIES The sole function of the CMNST website is to conduct the business of the College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology on the World Wide Web as provided in the mission of the College. For questions regarding the technology of this site, please contact the webmaster. For questions regarding the content of this site, please contact the Office of Integrated Marketing. Although the College takes great care to insure the accuracy and timeliness of the information contained on its website, the College makes no express or implied warranty on, or takes any responsibility for the information found at www.desu.edu/cmnst or for any other websites linked to this site. The College takes every reasonable precaution to prevent the proliferation of viruses or other harmful or disruptive entities on its website, however; the College makes no warranty on, or takes responsibility for any virus or harmful or disruptive entity encountered in the use of its website. The College may add, change, or delete any material or link contained on its website as it sees fit, at any time, and without notice or recourse. Back to top VISITORS Visitors to the CMNST website shall not: a. Engage in commercial activities or any other unauthorized use; b. Violate the rights of other institutions or individuals; c. Transmit viruses or other harmful or disruptive entities; d. Present images or language that are illegal or that may be considered to be obscene, abusive, threatening, slanderous, or malicious; e. Change, tamper with, or eliminate any content on this site. Visitors to the CMNST website must perform all procedures and provisions of the Campus Manager program and maintain these protocols for the duration of their association with the College. Visitors may not use any software or programs found or associated with the operation of this website. The College shall not incur any responsibility or be held liable for any direct or indirect loss or damage to any party as a result of the use of its website or its ability to maintain uninterrupted presence on the World Wide Web. The College makes no warranty as to the privacy or security of the information contained on its website. Back to top CMNST – WEB COPYRIGHT STATEMENT   The DSU CMNST makes no warranty, either implied or expressed, as to the accuracy of the content provided here. The College accepts no responsibility for any damages or inconvenience as a result of the use of this website or the inability of the College to maintain its continuous operation.   The College accepts no responsibility for the content found on any website linked to this web property and does not endorse the views or opinions contained therein. Back to top  

Applied Mathematics and Mathematical Physics PhD

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Objectives This program is designed for students interested in research careers in mathematics in the military, industry or government. It also prepares individuals to teaching and/or do research at college.   Admission Requirement All applicants must submit to the Director of Graduate Programs, Department of Mathematical Sciences, their Graduate Record Examination scores, three letters of references from professionals in the area of interest of the applicant, and transcripts from all colleges attended. A minimum of 3.0 on a scale of 4.0 overall and in the courses related to the field of the Ph.D. is required.   APPLIED MATHEMATICS CONCENTRATION Students who desire to enter the Applied Mathematics concentration with Master’s degree must have successfully completed the following courses, by examination or by successfully completing the graduate courses with a grade of B or above: Abstract Algebra, Real Analysis, and Complex Analysis. Depending upon the student’s educational background, some students may also be required to take some master level graduate mathematics courses.   Students who desire to enter the Imaging Applied Mathematics concentration from baccalaureate degree must have successfully completed the following courses, by examination or by successfully completing the undergraduate courses: Advanced Calculus I, Linear Algebra, Statistics, Probability, and Algebraic Structures I. The plan of study for this scenario will be agreed upon by the student, his/her advisor, and the Graduate Committee, Department of Mathematical Sciences. Depending upon the student’s educational background, some students may also be required to take some undergraduate mathematics courses.   MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS CONCENTRATION Students who desire to enter the Mathematical Physics concentration with Master’s degree in physics or a related area must have successfully completed the following courses, by examination or by successfully completing the graduate courses with a grade of B or above: Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory, Classical Mechanics, Advanced Electromagnetic Theory, and Quantum Mechanics. Depending upon the student’s educational background, some students may also be required to take some masters level graduate mathematics and physics courses.   Students with baccalaureate degrees may enter the mathematical physics concentration with the approval of the Graduate Committee. Depending upon the student’s educational background, some students may also be required to take some undergraduate mathematics and physics courses.   Graduate Assistantship and Fellowship Graduate research or teaching assistantships and fellowships are available. Detailed information and application forms may be obtained from the Applied Mathematics Research Center, or the Department of Mathematical Sciences.    Curriculum The Ph.D. program in interdisciplinary applied mathematics and mathematical physics is flexible enough to accommodate students with diversified backgrounds. In consultation with the Director of Graduate Programs, each student develops a course of study in applied mathematics (Applied Mathematics concentration) or physics (Mathematical Physics concentration) whichever is most relevant to his/her professional and career objectives.    Ph.D. Requirements Courses and Qualifying Examinations      I. CONCENTRATION A: APPLIED MATHEMATICS    A student who enters the program with a baccalaureate degree must complete his/her Master’s degree in the related area. Students who have Master’s degrees with no prior Ph.D. graduate course work must complete 30 credit hours of graduate level courses listed below. In addition at least 9 credit hours of research on dissertation are required. A G.P.A. of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale or above must be maintained.   The program requires the Ph.D. candidate to have reading knowledge of at least one foreign language approved by the Director of Graduate Programs.   Required Courses (12 Credit Hours)   MTSC-863      Functional Analysis 3 Hours MTSC-861      Real Analysis 3 Hours MTSC-871      Complex Analysis 3 Hours   One of the following two courses:   MTSC-887     Image Processing 3 Hours MTSC-821     Scientific Computation I 3 Hours   Electives (18 credit hours) Students may take an additional 18 credit hours from the list of elective courses to satisfy the credit hours requirement with the approval of the student's advisor. Students must take any two of the following courses:   PHYS-657      Mathematical Methods 3 Hours MTSC-885      Computational Geometry 3 Hours PHYS-671      Advanced Electromagnetic Theory 3 Hours MTSC-883      Wavelet Analysis 3 Hours   Qualifying Examinations Upon completing the course requirement, each student must successfully pass two written examinations. One examination is based on two courses selected by the student from Functional Analysis, Real Analysis and Complex Analysis. The other examination is based on two courses selected by the student from Image Processing, Mathematical Methods, Advanced Electromagnetic Theory, Computational Geometry, Wavelet Analysis, Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computation I and courses approved by the Graduate Committee. A student must pass an oral examination on a subject area directly related to his/her dissertation.     II. CONCENTRATION B: MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS   A student who enters the program with a baccalaureate degree must complete his or her Master’s degree in the related area. Students who have Master degrees with no prior Ph.D. graduate course work must complete 39 credit hours of graduate level courses listed below. In addition at least 9 credit hours of research on dissertation are required. A G.P.A. of 3.0 or above on a 4.0 scale must be maintained.   The program requires the Ph.D. candidate to have reading knowledge of at least one foreign language approved by the Graduate Committee. Each candidate is required to take a foreign language reading in mathematics or physics approved by Department of Mathematical Sciences.   A sequence of core courses required by all Ph.D. candidates includes the following: PHYS-665 Statistical Mechanics, PHYS-672 Advanced Electromagnetic Theory, PHYS-676 Quantum Mechanics, PHYS-655 Computational Methods, MTSC-863 Functional Analysis or MTSC-857 Integral Equations, and MTSC-871 Complex Analysis. Any student found deficient in any of these areas may be required to take appropriate courses to remove that deficiency.   Required Courses (18 credit hours)   PHYS-655      Computational Methods 3 Hours PHYS-665      Statistical Mechanics 3 Hours PHYS-672      Advanced Electromagnetic Theory 3 Hours PHYS-676      Quantum Mechanics 3 Hours MTSC-863      Functional Analysis 3 Hours MTSC-871      Complex Analysis 3 Hours Electives (12 credit hours)  Students may take an additional 12 credit hours from the list of elective courses to satisfy the credit hours requirement with the approval of the student's advisor. Qualifying Examinations  Each student must successfully pass the written general examination in physics which encompasses the area of Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory, Classical Mechanics, Advanced Electromagnetic Theory, and Quantum Mechanics. In addition, a student must pass an oral examination on a subject area chosen by his/her advisor.   Elective Courses:   MTSC-821      Scientific Computation I 3 Hours MTSC-822      Scientific Computation II 3 Hours MTSC-833      Stochastic Processes 3 Hours MTSC-853      Partial Differential Equations 3 Hours MTSC-867      Numerical Analysis 3 Hours MTSC-851      Ordinary Differential Equations 3 Hours MTSC-885      Computational Geometry 3 Hours MTSC-857      Integral Equations 3 Hours MTSC-875      Inverse Problems 3 Hours MTSC-887      Image Processing 3 Hours MTSC-811      Abstract Algebra 3 Hours PHYS-655      Computational Methods 3 Hours PHYS-665      Statistical Mechanics 3 Hours PHYS-671      Advanced Electromagnetic Theory I 3 Hours PHYS-672      Advanced Electromagnetic Theory II 3 Hours PHYS-652      Classical Mechanics 3 Hours PHYS-657      Mathematical Methods 3 Hours PHYS-661      Solid State Physics 3 Hours PHYS-675      Quantum Mechanics 3 Hours MTSC-883      Wavelet Analysis 3 Hours MTSC-889      Topics in Applied Mathematics 3 Hours Dissertation  Each student must select or have assigned by the Ph.D. Program Committee, two dissertation advisors, one in mathematics and one in physics or a related applied area. The most important requirement for the Ph.D. degree is the satisfactory completion of a scientific investigation, and the writing of a dissertation on that investigation represents a significant contribution to the research literature. Each student must complete a dissertation with his/her dissertation advisors and successfully defend the dissertation before his/her Ph.D. Program Committee of five members including one external examiner.   MTSC-890       Dissertation 3-9 Hours Sustaining Status Once a student has completed all the course requirements, passed the Qualifying Examinations, met the language requirements, and registered for 9 credits of dissertation (MTSC-890), but has not completed his/her dissertation, then the student is required to maintain his/her matriculation in the degree program by registering for Doctoral Sustaining (MTSC-899). A student must be registered in the semester in which the degree is awarded.    MTSC-899       Doctoral Sustaining 0 Hours         Department Homepage
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Faculty


Dr. Matthew Tanzy
Director of Graduate Studies
Department of Mathematical Sciences
 

 

Chemistry Program Information Request Form

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Physics

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  The study of physics must be rigorous, but it doesn’t have to be intimidating — and it’s not at Delaware State. Our Bachelor of Physics degree combines first-rate academics with a spirit of mentorship and inclusion. We welcome undergraduates into the community of scientists, offering plenty of face time with full professors and support from peers and graduate students. Students get an opportunity to participate in research projects work with high-level instrumentation such as spectrometers, cryogenic systems, lasers, and high-pressure systems use sophisticated computer modeling and simulation programs pursue a wide range of specialized interests, including atomic physics, high-pressure physics, solid-state physics, and optics receive peer instruction and tutoring innovate and pursue their own ideas under the direction of a faculty member Our program is designed to provide graduates with the competence, as well as the confidence, to pursue careers or advanced degrees in physics. Professional Preparation Physics graduates from Delaware State have an outstanding track record, both in the job market and in advanced degree programs. Those who choose to go directly into the work force can market a range of professional skills that include research experience critical/analytical thinking excellent computing skills familiarity with current technology and instrumentation Our graduates find good opportunities in such industries as telecommunications, fiber optics, manufacturing, aerospace, and health sciences. Faculty Physics faculty at Delaware State are fully committed to undergraduate education. Our professors teach their own courses and spend many hours in direct, one-on-one interactions with students. They also are accomplished researchers engaged in high-level research for major funding agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and the National Institute of Health (NIH). The physics faculty is diverse, uniting scholars from Asia, Europe, Africa, and North America. Research and Experience All physics majors perform an independent, self-directed research project as part of their senior capstone course (titled “Theoretical and Experimental Research”). They also have the opportunity to gain research experience by working in a support role at the Center for Research and Education in Optical Sciences and Applications (CREOSA), a top-flight research facility housed on the Delaware State University campus. Throughout their four-year education, students in the Physics department have the opportunity to interact with physicists from academia, industry, and the nonprofit sector via guest seminars,  job fairs,  etc.    

Mathematics Program Information Request Form

Information Technology

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The Information Technology (IT) major involves more creativity than you might think. Students prepare for careers as technology design and management professionals, learning to integrate hardware, software, network components, and other technology into information systems. The program offers a balance of theoretical knowledge and practical, hands-on experience. Students develop critical thinking and communication skills, as well as an appreciation for the social implications of computing. They graduate with an ability to devise creative IT solutions that empower scientists, artists, inventors, and organizations. Professional Prep IT majors gain hands-on experience with installation, configuration, maintenance, and security. They can use up to 12 credit hours on industry-approved certification courses that improve their marketability. The program prepares students to become effective, confident professionals with outstanding problem-solving skills and an ability to work well within diverse groups.  Faculty The department maintains a very low student to faculty ratio (about 10 to 1), so students enjoy a lot of direct interaction with their professors. Faculty come from many academic backgrounds — not only computing but also areas such as applied physics and mathematics. Some of the current areas of research include networking with application to virtual machine migration; data mining with application in both information and homeland security; development of methods to use image-based biomarkers to assess breast cancer risks; digital compression with application in video transmission over low-bandwidth media; and specialized domains in scientific computing. Research and Experience IT majors have excellent opportunities to engage in internships and get research training in many different fields. Recent students have interned with developers in the commercial sector, federal agencies such as the Department of Transportation and the National Science Foundation, and scientific institutions such as NASA and Oak Ridge National Labs. Students also have opportunities to secure cooperative work-study arrangements that last a year or run through the summer and fall semesters.    

Computer Science

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  Computer science majors at Delaware State learn more than how to write code. They also develop career-advancing skills such as communication, critical thinking, and creative problem-solving. Students are encouraged to explore new ideas and technologies, as well as to find new uses for existing computer science technologies. Small class sizes ensure that students can work closely with faculty and tailor their education to their own interests. The senior capstone project enables computer science majors to broaden their horizons and apply their expertise in fields such as business, science, education, social services, or entertainment. Nearly every industry relies on computers, so graduates from this major enjoy a wide range of job opportunities. Professional Prep Computer Science majors work with standard technology that is widely used across many industries and disciplines. Students learn to program in multiple languages using multiple paradigms design and integrate all elements of computer systems, including networks, hardware, and software work with databases, algorithms, and operating systems participate in off-campus internships explore cutting-edge areas such as data mining, digital compression, and virtual machine migration design computing-based solutions to problems in various disciplines conduct computing-based research evaluate the social implications of computing Faculty Delaware State’s computer science faculty draw upon a wide range of national, ethnic, and professional diversity. Professors have extensive experience not only in computing but also in areas such as applied physics and mathematics. They are dedicated teachers who take a personal interest in each student, offering mentorship and career guidance. They also are active researchers with contacts in business, health care, defense, aerospace, multimedia, and other disciplines. Research and Experience Computer science majors have excellent opportunities to engage in internships and get research training in many different fields. Recent students have interned with developers in the commercial sector, federal agencies such as the Department of Transportation and the National Science Foundation, and scientific institutions such as NASA and Oak Ridge National Labs. Students also have opportunities to secure cooperative work-study arrangements that last a year or run through the summer and fall semesters.    

PhD Program in Optics

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Delaware State University is one of only about a dozen institutions nationwide to offer a Ph.D. in Optics — and it is the only HBCU to do so. Our doctoral candidates enjoy extraordinary research opportunities at the Center for Research and Education in Optical Sciences and Applications (CREOSA), an NSF-funded lab housed on campus. Ph.D. candidates collaborate with world-class researchers at CREOSA on groundbreaking work in such areas as laser spectroscopy biophotonics experimental quantum optics optical interferometry nanophotonics data mining (in collaboration with the Department of Information Sciences) In this unusually robust research environment, doctoral students can produce high-caliber original research that leads to publications, funding opportunities, industry partnerships, patents, and academic recognition. Professional Preparation Ph.D. candidates at Delaware State University engage in a full range of activities to prepare them for careers in academia, industry, and/or the nonprofit sector. These include conducting independent research working with state-of-the-art technology and instrumentation developing professional academic networks via conferences, publications, and research partnerships establishing industry contacts submitting papers for publication applying for grants and other sources of funding Faculty Faculty at Delaware State University are superior researchers and highly committed educators. Our professors spend many hours in direct, one-on-one interactions with students. They also are accomplished investigators engaged in high-level inquiries for major funders such as NASA, the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and NIH. Research and Experience Established in 2006 through a National Science Foundation CREST grant, CREOSA conducts high-level research with applications in areas such as medicine, homeland security, telecommunications, the environment, and computer science. Current research projects underway at the Center include Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Photothermal Lens Spectroscopy Optical Solitons (in collaboration with the Department of Mathematical Sciences) Single-Molecule Spectroscopy Electromagnetically Induced Transparency, and Slow & Fast Light Optical coherence tomography Data Mining of Spectroscopy Data Nanophotonics Biomedical Electronics The Ph.D. in Optics Program will have a deep focus in the areas of laser spectroscopy, biophotonics and nanophotonics, and develop many challenging and exploratory projects based on optical nanotechnology and its applications to aid the health related sciences. Students in the Ph.D. program will be required to complete a dissertation and an oral defense of it. The Ph.D. Program in Optics has a typical duration of four to seven years for full-time students. The program will be the first of its kind in the State of Delaware and the region and amongst about a dozen institutions in the nation that offer a Ph.D. in optics. Furthermore, it is designed to be linked with other related research and academic programs in the region, as well as the biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies in and around Delaware. The foundations for the Ph.D. Program in Optics — which was established in 2008 — were laid by the DSU Center for Research and Education in Optical Sciences and Applications (CREOSA). Given the interdisciplinary opportunities that optics presents, students in the Ph.D. Program in Optics will have the same opportunities. Interested students, researchers and engineers can obtain more information by contacting the DSU Department of Physics at 302.857.6659

MS Degree in Applied Optics

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Delaware State University houses one of the region’s premier research facilities in applied optics — the Center for Research and Education in Optical Sciences and Applications (CREOSA). Students in our Master’s degree program in Applied Optics collaborate directly with CREOSA researchers, who conduct groundbreaking work in areas such as laser spectroscopy atomic and molecular optics optical interferometry biophotonics nanophotonics data mining In this unusually robust research environment, Master’s candidates work with faculty on team-based projects, while designing and executing independent, self-directed research. The program culminates in a research thesis and oral defense.   Professional Preparation Master’s degree candidates at Delaware State University engage in a full range of activities to prepare them for careers in academia, industry, and/or the nonprofit sector. These include conducting independent research working with state-of-the-art technology and instrumentation developing professional networks with other academic researchers establishing contacts with potential employers in industry Faculty Optics faculty at Delaware State are superior researchers and highly committed educators. Our professors spend many hours in direct, one-on-one interactions with students. They also are accomplished investigators engaged in high-level inquiries for major funders such as NASA, the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and NIH. Research and Experience Established in 2006 through a National Science Foundation CREST grant, CREOSA conducts high-level research with applications in areas such as spectroscopy, atomic and molecular optics, biomedical imaging, homeland security, telecommunications, the environment, and computer science. Current research projects underway at the Center include Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Photothermal Lens Spectroscopy Optical Solitons Single-Molecule Spectroscopy Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Slow & fast Light Optical coherence tomography Data Mining of Spectroscopy Data Nanophotonics The Master of Science in Applied Optics will focus on the emerging areas of laser spectroscopy, biophotonics and nanophotonics which play a critical role in advancing technologies such as telecommunications, homeland security, computing, medical diagnosis, environmental sciences and disease management and treatment. In addition to placing particular emphasis on the emerging areas of nano- and bio-photonics, and student in this MS program will take part in many challenging and exploratory projects based on optical nanotechnology and its applications to aid the health related sciences. Students in the MS on Optics Program will be required to complete a research thesis an oral defense of it. The MS in Applied Optics has a typical duration of two to three years for full-time students. The foundations for the M.S. Program in Applied Optics — which was established in 2008 — were laid by the DSU Center for Research and Education in Optical Sciences and Applications (CREOSA). Given the interdisciplinary opportunities that optics presents, students in the MS Program in Applied Optics will have the same opportunities. Interested students, researchers and engineers can obtain more information by contacting the DSU Department of Physics at 302.857.6659

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