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Science Education (MA) Program Details

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Purpose Our purpose is to prepare students to successfully interact within the society they will enter upon termination of their formal schooling. This purpose is served by offering the human physical resources required to support the opportunity to acquire deep understandings about important facts and issues. Higher order thinking skills are provided in an environment that promotes cooperation and tolerance. Students are prepared to enter the work force with adequate communication skills. Minimal training for the work force will be required. Goals and Objectives The Science Education Master’s Degree program is designed to provide a middle and senior high school science teachers with additional training in at least two science disciplines, as well s, in the methodologies and techniques appropriate to the teaching experience. The goals of this program are: To provide an exemplary program for the education of science teachers. To provide a contemporary methodological foundation in science education. To provide an opportunity for science teachers to broaden their understanding of concepts and issues related to their major discipline. To provide an interdisciplinary perspective of the relationship between science, technology, and society. To provide an opportunity to participate in the rigors of research and to appreciate its implications in classroom situations. Requirements This program requires the successful completion (3.0 grade point average) of thirty-six semester hours of graduate level courses including 15 hours of Science Education core courses, 15 hours of Science Electives and six hours of Science Education  electives. Capstone Options Students may choose one of the following options for completing the Capstone Requirement. Research Thesis:  Students selecting the thesis option must satisfactorily conduct an empirical research study and successfully defend the thesis before a faculty committee.  Scholarly research and multimedia presentation:  This option requires students to write a scholarly research paper and present the contents of the paper in a multi-media presentation to a faculty committee. Required Courses Course Descriptions: PSED-626. SCIENCE, TECHNOLGY, AND SOCIETY. This course is designed to investigate the linkages that exist among science, technology, and society. An interdisciplinary approach will be assumed to convey the interrelationships that exist among science, technology and the humanities, with a focus on various historic, current and ongoing ethical issues in science an social policy. 3 credits. PSED-627. RESEARCH EXPERIENCE IN SCIENCE. This course will provide a field experience for science teachers that are designed to present science as dynamic problem-solving endeavors. Students will work towards the resolution of a problem with a practicing scientist in his or her discipline. 3 credits. PSED-628. ANALYSIS OF RESEARCH ON TEACHING SCIENCE. This course provides the student with the means by which they may systematically evaluate current classroom teaching practices, and analyze the dynamics of student-teacher interactions. Methods of educational research in naturalistic settings will be examined. This course will consist of classroom instruction, field work in various school settings, and laboratory work, on the SPSS-X computer system at the college. 3 credits. PSED-629. CONTEMPORARY METHODS OF SCIENCE TEACHING. A survey of methodologies will be presented that research has indicated are most effective for teaching science. Methods will be presented from a constructed perspective. Contemporary curriculum and assessment philosophies and materials will also be discussed. 3 credits. PSED-630. INTERDISCIPLINARY SCIENCE. This is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of scientific principles. Common concepts and themes such as atomic theory, systems and energy will be studied in a context that relates the concept to multiple scientific disciplines. 3 credits. PSED-615. EDUCATIONAL MEASUREMENT AND STATISTICS. The nature of measurement and types of scales, unites, scores, norms, sampling, item analysis, batteries and profiles will be explored. Principles of reliability and validity and the use of test scores in decision making as well as descriptive and inferential statistics and the design of educational research are course topics. 3 credits. Course Descriptions/Electives PSED-625. MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENCE TEACHERS. This is a predominantly methods-based course in which various means of presenting mathematical concepts are developed/devised/researched. Application of math principles to science topics will be stressed. The concepts to be dealt with will include, but not be limited to: factor-label (unit-analysis), metrics, proportionalities, triangulation, graphing, data analysis, etc. The integration of NCTM standards with science instruction will be addressed. 3 credits. PSED-631. SELECTED TOPICS IN SCIENCE EDUCATION. This course is designed to allow flexibility in the selection of specific educational topics to meet students’ needs and interests, as well as professor expertise. Topics will be posted prior to the first class meetings. 1 credit. PSED-632. SELECTED TOPICS IN SCIENCE EDUCATION. As per above. 2 credits. PSED-633. SELECTED TOPICS IN SCIENCE EDUCATION. As per above. 3 credits. PSED-634. COMPUTERS AND OTHER TECHNOLOGIES IN SCIENCE TEACHING. This course is an introduction to the use of the computer and other technologies in interactive modes in the science classroom and laboratory. Emphasis will be placed upon the construction of inexpensive equipment and review of currently available software to accompany the equipment. 3 credits. PSED-636. THE SCIENCE OLYMPIAD AND OTHER COMPETITIONS. The course is designed to give science teachers background information needed to prepare an Olympiad team for competition within the individual classroom, school, state or nation. It consists of an overview of the activities, with emphasis upon specific curricular topics that will help the teacher better prepare their team. 3 credits. EDUC-614. HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. This course focuses upon the educational implications of human development throughout the life span. Students will survey research giving special attention to application to teaching and development of school programs. 3 credits. EDUC-611. THEORIES AND PRACTICES IN EXCEPTIONALITIES. This course is designed to identify exceptional learner and provide an understanding of their educational need. Specific teaching techniques will be explored as well as principles and practices of program development. 3 credits. EDUC-699. THESIS OPTION. 6 credits.

Concentration in Curriculum and Instruction

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The purpose of the Curriculum and Instruction (C&I) graduate program is to increase the knowledge and competence of educators and to prepare graduates for leadership roles as department chairs and curriculum directors.  The focus of the program is on development, improvement and assessment  of curricula, materials and instruction at all levels of the educational system. The program will provide opportunities to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes to understand the educational needs of individuals with differing economic, social, racial, ethnic, religious backgrounds and handicapping conditions. This program is a course of advanced study and does not lead to certification. Goals and Objectives The Master of Arts degree in Curriculum and Instruction goals are:  Provide opportunities for advanced study in the area of Curriculum and Instruction Prepare educators to assume leadership roles in improving the curriculum and design of instruction at all levels of schools and types of school (elementary, secondary, post-secondary, public and private, trade and professional schools). Prepare educators to assume leadership roles in improving the design of classroom instruction for special populations of  students (exceptional children, minorities, low-income). Requirements This program requires the completion of 36 graduate credits in the program of study. Capstone Options Students may choose one of the following options for completing the Capstone Requirement. Research Thesis:  Students selecting the thesis option must satisfactorily conduct an empirical research study and successfully defend the thesis before a faculty committee.  Scholarly research and multimedia presentation:  This option requires students to write a scholarly research paper and present the contents of the paper in a multi-media presentation to a faculty committee. Required Courses in the Program of Study Course Descriptions: EDUC-603. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF AMERICAN EDUCATION This course systematically explores the history of American education from colonial times to the present.  Students examine selected educational theories and philosophies with particular emphasis on their application to instruction. 3 credits. EDUC-640. DIVERSITY IN EDUCATION This  course explores the use of knowledge about culture in the schooling process.  It presents specific teaching strategies, classroom management techniques and communication strategies that have proven effective with culturally diverse student populations.  Students explore ways to identify and alleviate negative bias and prejudice in teaching materials, assessment instruments, school practices and school organization. 3 credits. EDUC-614. HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT Educational implications of human development over the life-span are examined.  Students will survey research with special attention to the applications to teaching and developmentally appropriate school programs. 3 credits. EDUC-625/688.  INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS AND RESEARCH METHODS/ACTION RESEARCH This course covers application of basic statistical techniques and research methodologies employed in qualitative and quantitative research in education.  The focus of the course is primarily on action research and students will develop an action research plan as a  course requirement. 3 credits. EDUC-604. THEORIES AND METHODS OF INSTRUCTION This course is a study of educational theories as applied to curriculum and instruction with emphasis on current trends and the identification of the instructional process, organizing operations and skills for teaching. 3 credits. EDUC-605. CURRICULUM ORGANIZATION AND DESIGN This course analyzes the historical, philosophical, sociological, epistemological and pedagogical bases of curriculum patterns with emphasis on relationships to contemporary designs.  Students explore models of curriculum organization by which to effect curriculum change.  3 credits. Course Descriptions/Elective Courses: EDUC-601. CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN AMERICAN EDUCATION This course analyzes current trends, problems and theories based upon examination of recent educational literature.  Students critically explore topics related to the formulation of curriculum, instructional policy and methodology in education.  3 credits. EDUC-602. IDENTIFICATION AND INSTRUCTION OF THE DISADVANTAGED This course identifies the school population classified as disadvantaged and explores the classroom, problems affecting instruction of the rural and urban disadvantaged.  Students examine techniques of classroom instruction that have been successful locally and nationally.  3 credits. EDUC-606. CAREER EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY CURRICULUM This course explores resources for career information, instruments for assessing career awareness curricula,, programs and centers and examines application of techniques for career education.  3 credits. EDUC-607/633. THEORIES AND PRACTICES OF CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT This course explores the application of theories, practices and identification of management skills, using the dynamics of interpersonal relations in planning and facilitating classroom instruction.  3 credits. EDUC-608. DIAGNOSTIC TEACHING OF READING This course consists of a review of current research and opinion, evaluation of materials techniques and programs for assessment and prescription of reading techniques.  A Practicum  provides students the opportunity to implement and evaluate a diagnostic-prescriptive reading program.  3 credits. EDUC-609. IDENTIFICATION AND INSTRUCTION OF THE GIFTED This course addresses the characteristics of the gifted and talented child.  Students will analyze national and state programs for the gifted and talented and explore techniques of instruction to meet the needs of the gifted and talented student.  2 credits. EDUC-610. DEVELOPMENT OF INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS This course reviews the theory and practice in selection and use of educational media, equipment and materials.  Students will review the research literature concerned with effective use of instructional materials.  Each student will complete an individualized instructional materials package to be presented to the class.  3 credits. EDUC-611. THEORIES AND PRACTICES OF EXCEPTIONALITIES This course is designed to identify exceptional learners and provide an understanding of their educational needs.  Specific teaching techniques will be explored, as well as principles and practices of program development.  3 credits. EDUC-614/683. USING TECHNOLOGY TO ENHANCE STUDENT LEARNING AND ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT. This course addresses current technologies from a practitioner’s point of view. The Internet, World Wide Web and production software are sued with the intent to make informed decisions both administratively and instructionally.  Advance students will have the opportunity to focus on emerging technologies in their applications from the viewpoint of planning, enhanced communications, managing information, delivery of instruction and the latest technologies used by professionals in their respective fields.  3 credits. EDUC-627. SURVEY OF PRE-COLLEGE SCIENCE INSTRUCTION This course reviews contemporary issues and trends in science instruction and explores the methodologies and philosophies of the teaching of science, including various interdisciplinary characteristics of science instruction.  3 credits. EDUC-641/682. Supervision and Evaluation of Staff/Assessment of Instruction This course emphasizes the role of assistant principals and principals as the instructional leaders of the school and the official in charge of promoting a safe, secure student environment to make possible student learning and staff professional growth.     Reflective assessment practices are thoroughly reviewed and discussed.  Research is conducted by advanced students on the following topics. (1) identifying effective models of instruction; (2) student achievement; and (3) frameworks for identifying and analyzing models of teaching, decision-making, and assessment.  Additionally, the course focuses on defining supervisor responsibilities, understanding and implementing controls, solving problems and making decisions, effective communications, effective leadership, motivational techniques, problem-solving, and the supervisor’s role in labor relations.  3 credits. EDUC-644. TECHNOLOGY IN TEACHING      This course presents current technological trends that will assist teachers in classroom instruction. Special emphasis is placed on the integration of multi-media software web-based materials. Students will plan and produce multi-media/Internet project in their content area using a systems approach.  3 credits. EDUC-699. THESIS OPTION : 6 credits.   Contact: Dr. N. K. Rathee Acting Director, Graduate Program nrathee@desu.edu Ext. 7170, Room 112 Dr. Richard Phillips Assistant Professor Program Coordinator rphillips@desu.edu Ext. 7569, Room 235

Administration And Supervision Certification Only

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Purpose The purpose of this program is to provide advanced courses of study for those who have completed a Master of Arts in Education degree program who wish to seek certification as school leaders and certification in the state of Delaware as Principals/Assistant Principals.  Goals & Objectives To provide advanced students with the coursework and associated knowledge and skills  for Principal/Assistant Principal certification. Requirements Completion of a Masters degree and Delaware Department of Education requirements for certification (18 credits). Capstone None required. Required Courses in Program of Study EDUC-605. CURRICULUM ORGANIZATION AND DESIGN This course analyzes the historical, philosophical, sociological, epistemological and pedagogical bases of curriculum patterns with emphasis on relationships to contemporary designs. Students explore models of curriculum organization by which to effect curriculum change. 3 credits. EDUC-639/681. HUMAN RELATIONS IN DIVERSE POPULATIONS This course examines how administrators must understand, react and respond to a changing society to foster a true sense of community in school. The course primarily addresses three dimensions: 1) developing academic partnerships with parents and the members of the community; 2) creating learning organizations (communities of practice)among teachers; and 3) nurturing the development of personalized learning environments for students. 3 credits. EDUC-641/686. SUPERVISON AND LEADERSHIP IN ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS This course focuses on the knowledge, dispositions and performance skills required of school principals that include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) development, articulation, implementation and stewardship of a vision of learning in a pluralistic society; (2) encouraging and achieving high standards of learning; (3) effective communication, consensus building and negotiation skills; (4) continuous school improvement; (5) involvement of the school community; (6) continuous staff professional growth; (7) effective instruction(learning theories, motivational theories, assessment strategies and recognizing student growth and development); (8) technology in promoting student learning and professional growth; (9) valuing student diversities and school cultures; (10) creating a safe and supportive learning environment; (11) implementing and evaluating curriculum and instruction; (12) management of school operations; and (13) selecting, supervising and evaluating staff. 3 credits. EDUC-643/684. LEGAL ISSUES, ETHICAL CONDUCT AND SOCIAL JUSTICE IN TODAY’S SCHOOLS This course examines the following: (1) prudent strategies, safe environments, ethical principles in decision making, and fair practices in a litigious society; 2) school district judicial policies and student/employee rights; (3) legal issues that impact today’s schools; and; (4) students’ and teachers practices. 3 credits. EDUC-645/685. SUPPORTING A SCHOOL VISION THROUGH EFFECTIVE BUSINESS AND FINANCE PRACTICES. This course provides advanced students with an understanding of the issues and challenges facing administrators with regards to the financing of education in an era of intense change. Some of the issues facing practicing school administrators, teachers, school board members, legislators and other interested parties include, but are not limited to: The No Child Left Behind Act; budget cuts at the federal, state, local and school levels; and changes in legislation allowing for school choice, voucher plans and charter schools. This course also addresses the various principles relating to the fiscal operations of a school’s management and the entrepreneurial acts required to support the continuous improvement of instruction and learning for all students. Strategic planning, budgeting, accounting, auditing, and human resource management at the school level will be discussed through case studies. 3 credits. EDUC-650/682. SUPERVISION AND EVALUATION OF STAFF/ASSESSMENT OF INSTRUCTION This course emphasizes the role of assistant principals and principals as the instructional leaders of the school and the official in charge of promoting a safe, secure student environment to make possible student learning and staff professional growth. Reflective assessment practices are thoroughly reviewed and discussed. Research is conducted by advanced students on the following topics: (1) identification of effective models of instruction; (2) student achievement; and (3) frameworks for identifying and analyzing models of teaching, decision-making, and assessment. Additionally, the course focuses on defining supervisor responsibilities, understanding and implementing controls, solving problems and making decisions, effective communications, effective leadership, motivational techniques, problem-solving, and the supervisor’s role in labor relations. 3 credits.  

Concentration in Adult Education And Basic Literacy

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Purpose The purpose of the Adult Literacy and Basic Education Graduate Program is to increase the knowledge and competence of those who are working or will work with adult learners and lack a high school credential. The courses are designed to prepare highly qualified adult educators who will in a variety of settings such as business or industry, community recreation organizations, correctional facilities, religious education organization, human service organization, public schools and community-based programs. The program of study leads to certification in Adult Education. Goals and Objectives The goals of this program are to facilitate an understanding of the philosophy, theory and successful practices needed for productive teaching and administration in adult basic, adult secondary, and ESL education. The objectives of this program are to: Provide a balanced curriculum of theory, practice, research and issues that will improve adult education delivery system and the teaching-learning process. Provide self-directed learning experiences that prepare participants to assist adult learners with special needs and manage problems affecting learning. Complete the Delaware Department of Education requirements for certification in Adult Education. Requirements Students seeking the Masters of Arts Degree in Education with Concentration in Non-Traditional Adult Education at Delaware State University shall complete an approved program consisting of thirty-six (36) semester hours of credit. Capstone Options Students may choose one of the following options for completing the Capstone Requirement. Research Thesis:  Students selecting the thesis option must satisfactorily conduct an empirical research study and successfully defend the thesis before a faculty committee.  Scholarly research and multimedia presentation:  This option requires students to write a scholarly research paper and present the contents of the paper in a multi-media presentation to a faculty committee. Required Courses in the Program of Study EDUC-625.     RESEARCH METHODS IN EDUCATION Historical, descriptive, and experimental methods of research. Methods for locating evaluation, interpreting and reporting of data. Each student prepares a research prospectus. 3 credits. EDUC-640.     DIVERSITY IN EDUCATION Explores the use of knowledge about culture in the schooling process. Presents specific teaching strategies, classroom management techniques, and communication strategies that have proven to be effective with culturally diverse student populations. Explores way to identify and alleviate negative bias and prejudice in teaching materials, assessment instruments, school practices and school organizations.  3 credits. EDUC-658.     UTILIZING TECHNOLOGY IN ADULT EDUCATION The course will examine current trends in the use of technology to assist in adult instruction and programming. The major emphasis will be computers and computer software packages. An exploration of multi-media and supplemental audio-visual techniques will be included. Students will be required to submit lesson plans with an emphasis on using technology.  3 credits. EDUC-655.     PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATIONS OF ADULT EDUCATION The unique philosophical foundations/principles of adult basic/secondary education will be discussed. The reasons for Delaware’s model James H. groves Adult High School will be explored, as well as the current federal attitude toward adult literacy/education. 3 credits. EDUC-659.     ADULT LEARNING CHARACTERISTICS & ALTERNATIVE DELIVERY SYSTEMS This course is designed to describe and analyze three broad dimensions of adult learning: motivation, cognition and socio-cultural content. Teaching approaches that address these areas will be explored. Teachers will learn how to plan lessons that apply these three dimensions of adult learning. 3 credits. EDUC-657.     COUNSELING THE ADULT LEARNER This course will explore developmental characteristics through adulthood and relate those characteristics to adult students who are educationally at-risk. Counseling theories that are appropriate in the classroom with adult learners will be considered. Specific behaviors that help the teacher identify adult student with problems will be identifies and used to help determine when, and to who a student should be referred. 3 credits. Elective Courses in the Program of Study EDUC-660.     INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES IN ADULT BASIC EDUCATION This course will explore the process of helping adults learn basic academic and life skills. Topics covered will include: enhancing learning; assessing learner needs to set instructional objectives; choosing and implementing effective learning activities; building supportive and active learning environments; and strategies for improving instruction. 3 credits. EDUC-661.     APPROACHES TO ADULT ENGLISH FOR SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL INSTRUCTION) This course will consider the appropriate use of both structural and communicative ESL. ESL materials will be provided and reviewed. Model lessons (video) will be observed and analyzed. A variety of teaching strategies will be presented. 3 credits. EDUC-651.     OUTCOME-BASED CURRICULUM DESIGN IN ADULT EDUCATION This course will look at outcome-based instruction not just as a current trend, but as an efficient way to meet educational goals and to promote student interest. Participants will learn to look critically at classroom goals to determine educational and real-life relevancy. They will learn to develop appropriate goals that become outcome of the educational process. 3 credits. EDUC-662.      DEVELOPING HIGHER LEVEL THINKING/READING SKILLS IN ADULTS  This course will cover such areas as analyzing written materials to determine what higher order thinking/reading skills would be required to complete a task. The thinking/reading skills tested on the GED will receive special emphasis. Strategies for teaching and reinforcing these skills will be presented. 3 credits. EDUC-663.     ORGANIZATION, ADMINISTRATION, AND SUPERVISION OF ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAMS This course will identify the current adult education programs, from the Secondary Initiative Alternative School and the unique James H. Groves Adult High School, to Literacy Volunteers, Adult Basic Education (ABE) and work place ESL programs. Planning supervising and the complex administration of these and other nontraditional education programs will be discussed and explored. 3 credits. EDUC-652.     PROGRAM EVALUATION AND OUTCOMES IN ADULT EDUCATION This course focuses on theoretical background and practical application of program evaluation in Adult Basic Education. Program providers will design and apply evaluation techniques and strategies to program management or teaching adults who are educationally disadvantaged. Participants will learn to determine the extent of program outcomes, quality and impact on success in ABE programs. 3 credits. EDUC-653.     PRACTICUM IN ADULT EDUCATION EVALUATION This course provides an opportunity for students who have taken 652 to apply their learning, in depth, by evaluating a part or an entire adult education program from start to finish. Students design instruments, conduct interviews, analyze and report the information collected. This authentic experience is designed to consolidate and extend their learning from the previous course. 3 credits. EDUC-699.     THESIS OPTION Students seeking the Masters of Arts Degree in Education with Concentration in Non-Traditional Adult Education at Delaware State University shall complete one of the following options: an approved program consisting of thirty-six (36) semester hours of credit; or a thesis plus an approved program consisting of (30) semester hours of credit. 6 credits. Contact for more information: Dr. N.K. Rathee  Acting Director, Graduate Program Ext. 7170, Room 112    

College of Health and Public Policy Directory

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Administration Delaware State University provides personal attention and recognition from a talented, dedicated staff—from coaches to counselors to police officers. Consider us your own support team, ready to help you succeed. Use the links below to find contact information for administrative staff throughout the university. You can also return to the top of the directory and find more detailed contact information for individuals and departments using the Campus Directory. College of Health and Public Policy Home Page  | Departments   College of Health and Public Policy 302-857-6700 Dr. Lisa C. BARKLEY M.D., Temple University B.S., Georgetown University Dean Medical Director, University Health Services 302-857-6700 lbarkley@desu.edu Dr. Warren A. RHODES Acting Associate Dean Director, Institute for Public Health & Policy 302-857-6700 wrhodes@desu.edu Mrs. C. Lynn McGINNIS M.B.A., Delaware State University B.S., Delaware State University A.A., University of Delaware Administrative Assistant 302-857-6700 lmcginni@desu.edu  

Doctorate in Education

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Concentration in Educational Leadership  Purpose This program is designed for the development and certification of educational leaders who can lead and manage private and public K-12 systems, higher education programs, and state, national and international educational organizations.  The program emphasizes the mastery of skills and processes for adapting to social, political and economic influences when faced with human, financial and structural demands.  The program requires the completion and defense of a dissertation research project. The cohort program is scheduled around an accelerated weekend format to accommodate the schedules of working adults. The weekend scheduling provides opportunities for concentrated, in-depth study of course topics. Courses integrate “real-world” field experiences. Cohort members complete a six credit, full semester internship on a project with a mentor in the area they wish to pursue after degree completion.  The dissertation process is treated as an integral part of the program, enabling students to complete the program, including defense of the dissertation, within three years. Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISSLC) accreditation standards provide the base model for the program. The program is designed to meet the State of Delaware certification requirements for School Leader II (Superintendent/Assistant Superintendent).* NOTE: Students without an earned master’s degree in Educational Leadership may have course requirements in addition to those for the Ed.D. to meet the State of Delaware’s academic requirements for School Leader II certification. Requirements The Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership (Ed.D.) is a 51 credit hour, three year program, including a 6 credit hour Applied Educational Internship. Courses are conducted in an accelerated weekend format.  Courses span six weeks.  Class sections are normally held the first, third and sixth weekends of a six week session.  Normally a two week break is provided between courses, so that students can prepare for the next course.  Sessions are held Friday nights from 5:00-9:00pm; Saturdays from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Sundays from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Capstone Doctoral candidates must complete and orally present and defend a doctoral research dissertation.  Candidates are also responsible for presenting a professional portfolio reflecting their experiences and skills related to ISSLC standards. All of the following courses are required in this program of study EDUC-800. The Superintendent as CEO- Effective Management and Executive Skills. This course gives an overview and provides the foundation for developing and cultivating the leadership skills and values that superintendents will find helpful to move from a theoretical base to becoming an effective practicing CEO.  This course addresses district vision, school culture, politics and governance, internal and external communication, organizing for high performance, curriculum design and delivery, and human resource management for student learning.  ISLLC Standards 1-6, NCATE and AASA professional standards for the superintendency are used to define the role of a superintendent as CEO.  3 credits. EDUC-801. Contemporary Issues in American Education. This course assists advanced students to further analyze current trends, problems and theories based upon an examination of recently surfacing educational events and/or topics from a historical perspective.  Discussions focus on a critical exploration of topics related, but not limited to, the formation of curriculum, instructional policy and methodology, and assessment of student success in education.  Additionally, current issues that involve students with challenges, No Child Left Behind, state standards and teacher certification, state testing, the state student testing program (DSTP), full inclusion, school choice, charter schools, and accreditation are typical topics of discussion.  Components that relate to administrative handling of current issues and challenges in the educational system, found in ISLLC Standards 4 and 6, are addressed. 3 credits. EDUC-888. Action Research in Education. This course addresses the role of action research in studying the underlying problems that occur in educational organizations.  The types of action research, their advantages and disadvantages, the action research process, and the similarities and differences between action research and formal quantitative and qualitative research are examined in detail.  3 credits. EDUC-803. Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration. This course addresses the role and functions, strategic planning, information technology, recruitment, selection, and induction of employees, staff development, performance appraisal, compensations, employment continuity, and unionism from the human resource administrator’s standpoint.  Additionally, this course addresses the human relations aspects intrinsically involved in and through the human resource parameters.  The relationship of the human resources office to the effective, safe, and efficient operation of an educational organization’s vision for the promotion of student success are further examined.  3 credits. EDUC-804. Effective Administration, Staff Development, School Plant and Facilities. This course explores the major issues that impact administrative policies, decisions, and one’s effectiveness as a school leader.   The following topics are examined: district vision and school culture: developing a staff development/in-service program that addresses the improvement of the educational program and assesses its effectiveness; strategic planning for future plant and facility needs; politics and school governance; internal and external communication; organizational processes for effective and efficient performance; curriculum design and delivery; human resource management for student learning; and leadership values and skills.   3 credits. EDUC-805. Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods. This course is designed to prepare doctoral students to understand, interpret, evaluate and design qualitative and quantitative research and to develop the ability to select and use appropriate research methods. This course integrates the major concepts and practices of qualitative and quantitative research methodology and introduces descriptive and inferential statistics. This course focuses on the development and application of research for the purpose of writing the doctoral capstone. Topics addressed in this course include choice of research methods, developing a problem statement and proposal, preparing questionnaires, conducting research, tabulating data, and reaching conclusions from qualitative and quantitative data. Additionally, this course includes readings on methodology, lectures, discussions, presentations, and in-class exercises that are designed to highlight various issues. 3credits. EDUC-806. Educational Policy:  Political, Social, Economic, Legal, and Cultural Issues.          This course provides the framework and content by which the doctoral student as an aspiring administrator can affect school governance and policy.  Major issues influencing administrative practices are addressed, including, but not limited to, school autonomy versus government control, state legislated learning effects on the teaching profession, democratic versus professional authority in the teaching profession, lack of minorities in administration, the effects of economics on the educational system, society’s cultural views, desires, and ramifications, and comprehending the diverse theories of school change.  In this course, doctoral students have opportunities to develop their skill sets that will enable them, as aspiring administrators, to build the requisite interlocking and collaborative relationships among school personnel, the community, and state and federal agencies for the purpose of creating better schools.   Advanced students will focus upon current issues and challenges that impact the formation of educational policy in today’s ever changing society.  3 credits. EDUC-807. Leading School Change at a Time of Increasing Demands, Pressures, and Societal Change. This course focuses on a review and discussion of current methods used to change school cultures, curriculums, and parent/community involvement.  The course is used to enhance collegiality, professionalism, instructional strategies, classroom management techniques, effective classroom designs, student motivational techniques, and to create a safe and orderly environment.  Additionally, the course focuses on making staff development a worthwhile endeavor and using systems thinking as the key to continuous improvement.  It focuses on envisioning desired results, defining reality through data, developing action plans while welcoming accountability.  3 credits. EDUC-808. Strategic Planning and Program Analysis. This course explores the steps of the strategic planning process in educational organizations.  The benefits of involving a broad range of personnel in the process are discussed.  The doctoral student will examine the following strategic planning steps: the development of a mission statement; completion of an environmental scan; development of key objectives and initiatives; design of programs and activities to accomplish the key objectives; and determination of performance measures to monitor and evaluate the organization’s progress toward accomplishing its key objectives.  3 credits. EDUC-809. Technology Applications. The course addresses the latest technologies from a practitioner’s point of view.  The Internet and World Wide Web are used with the intent to make informed decisions.  Fifty percent of the semester is assigned to an on-site field experience, in which the student demonstrates the ability to report research, security, data collection, etc.  Doctoral candidates complete a project focusing on the applications of technology to the unique area of their administrative interest within educational administration, leadership or supervision and teaching fields.  Doctoral candidates will have the opportunity to focus on emerging technologies and their applications from the viewpoint of planning, enhancing communications, managing information and the latest technologies used by professionals in their respective fields.  3 credits. EDUC-812 & 813. Internship:  Applied Educational Administration The internship experience is a supervised field experience that enables the doctoral candidate to practice knowledge and skills acquired in coursework and professional experiences in an authentic setting.  The doctoral candidate experiences the everyday life of an administrator and how everyday challenges are solved, such as time management strategies, organizational techniques, successful secretarial relationships, appropriate interpersonal skills and human relations, communication vehicles, problem solving, negotiation, instructional leadership, management, professional dispositions, and leadership.  In conjunction with the field-based administrator, doctoral candidates will identify an educational problem in the organization and design an action-based research project to examine possible solutions.  6 credits. EDUC-817. Dissertation Seminar I EDUC-818. Dissertation Seminar II EDUC-819. Dissertation Seminar  III Three one-hour Dissertation Seminars are required.  The dissertation seminar is designed to address doctoral candidates’ progress in the choice of topic, determination of their research format, and dissertation chapter requirements.  Assistance is given to clarify the candidate’s research question(s), determine the appropriate research design, methodologies and analysis of data.  Doctoral candidates meet with the course professor as a cohort group and/or on an individual basis with their respective dissertation committee chair.  Discussion of policies and procedures of the dissertation process is addressed in this course.   One credit each. EDUC-820. DISSERTATION RESEARCH  I. EDUC-821. DISSERTATION RESEARCH  II. EDUC-822. DISSERTATION RESEARCH III . EDUC-823. DISSERTATION RESEARCH IV. This course provides candidates in the doctoral program of Educational   Leadership with advisement and support while carrying out their dissertation study.  Doctoral candidates are required to address one or more ISLLC standards through their choice of dissertation research.  Each course is three credits hours.   A minimum of 12 credit hours of Dissertation Research are required.   EDUC-899. Sustaining disseration research. Students must be continuously enrolled until their dissertation research and oral defense requirements have been completed.  This course provides the vehicle for completion of those requirements.

Education Course Descriptions

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  EDUC-000. INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTIONAL PREPARATION IN EDUCATION. 2:2:0 Designed to provide education majors with a forum for enhancing their skills in the area of writing, reading, math, speech, and test-taking strategies. Eligible students will be identified through the Teacher Education Screening Process which includes PRAXIS I scores and an interview. This course will utilize both group and computer-assisted instruction. Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of the required Learning Skills course, and Education Department referral. (Course does not fulfill degree requirements). Credit: two hours. EDUC-112. INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION. 3:3:0 Presents current technological trends that will assist in classroom instruction. Special emphasis placed on computers and computer packages useful to the classroom teacher. Traditional audio-visual aides will be explored. Students expected to plan lessons utilizing technologies. Credit: three hours. EDUC-121. MICROCOMPUTER SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS. 3:3:0 This course addresses the three major business and management microcomputer applications: word processing, spreadsheets, and database management. Graphics and data communications are also included. Prerequisite: Education 100. Credit: three hours. EDUC-204. PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION. 3:3:0 The philosophical foundations of society and education are explored in this course and their impact on traditional contemporary theories of education are examined. Schools as institutions, issues affecting teachers, characteristics of learners, current topics related to the teaching profession, and the role of teachers in society are discussed. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Credit: three hours. EDUC-205. CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT-(Ages 0-14). 3:3:0 This is an introductory course to a comprehensive study of child development. It includes a chronological treatment of this development - infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence, The course also includes an examination of current research findings on children's lives as they move into first experiences with peers and outside-the-home care to elementary school, junior and senior high school. Principles of child growth and development will be applied through direct observation of children in home and school settings. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Credit: three hours. EDUC-206. INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. 3:3:0 Discussion of goals, objectives, and principles of educating young children. Included are the historical, philosophical, psychological, and social foundations of Early Childhood Education. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Credit: three hours. EDUC-208. THE MIDDLE SCHOOL YEARS. 3:3:0 Middle level education is viewed as a transition period for young adolescents. This course explores the development of the student in the academic, physical, social and emotional realms as it relates to the teaching/learning environment. This course is required in the Middle Level (5-8) Program. No prerequisites. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.) Credit: three hours. EDUC-210. METHODS OF TEACHING MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE. 3:3:0 Designed to include various methods, materials and techniques involved in teaching science in grades 7-12. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Admission to Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-251. TECHNOLOGIES AND SUPPORT FOR OFFICE SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 This course provides a comprehensive overview of evolving electronic office systems and the support technologies necessary to maintain various systems; office administration; design and integration of new technologies for efficient office operation. Students will be provided with theoretical and practical experiences. Prerequisites: Education 121. Credit: three hours. Method courses at the 300 level and above require admission to the Teacher Education Program and/or permission of the Chairperson before enrolling. EDUC-302. READING IN THE CONTENT AREAS. 4:4:0 Presents the basic principles, concepts, and instructional strategies which will enable the classroom teacher in grades 4-8 to integrate the teaching of reading into the content areas. Current research on the development of comprehension, vocabulary, metacognition, and the use of microcomputers will be covered. Early field experience is required (20 hrs.). Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: four hours. EDUC-303. TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES. 3:3:0 Presents various methods of teaching the numerous phases of community living with special attention being given to community, history and geography, social types and groups. Opportunities are provided for constructing units and projects in social studies for the elementary school child. Field experience is required (10 hrs.). Prerequisites: Education 204 and History 201. Admission to Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-306. METHODS OF TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN THE PRIMARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 3:3:0 Examines current trends used in teaching mathematics at the elementary school level and makes use of current research on teaching special student populations, students of diverse backgrounds, and students with different learning styles in developing relevant teaching strategies. Emphasis is placed on examination of teaching materials (especially textbooks, audio-visual aids, and computer software) and techniques of computer-assisted instruction. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Prerequisite: Education 204, Math 105 and Math 106. Admission to Teacher Education is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-311. CURRICULUM AND MATERIALS FOR CHILDREN WITH EXCEPTIONAL LEARNING NEEDS. 3:3:0 Examines the theoretical framework and practical applications for accommodating, adapting, and/or modifying curriculum and related materials to increase instructional access for individual children with exceptional learning needs. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (10 hours). Prerequisites: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-313. INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH EXCEPTIONAL LEARNING NEEDS. 3:3:0 Provides a general overview of the legal and educational concerns of educating exceptional children. Includes the historical perspectives, analysis of Federal and State laws and regulations and their implications, as well as models of service delivery and medical, social, emotional, behavioral, and parental considerations in special education. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Credit: three hours. EDUC-314. SEMINAR IN CLASSROOM RESEARCH. 3:3:0 Designed to investigate an aspect of classroom teaching identified during the practicum experience. Quantitative and qualitative research methods utilized to produce a major research paper. Admission to Teacher Education is required. Corequisite: Education 335 or Education 409. Credit: three hours. EDUC-318. MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION. 3:3:0 Examination of cultural and ethnic differences in values and the implications for classroom instruction and curriculum development. Examination of current research findings concerning cultural perceptions, practices and communication styles for teaching approaches, materials, learning experiences and curriculum development. Examination of the implications of cultural and ethnic differences for program planning for classrooms, schools and school districts. Credit: three hours. EDUC-319. MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM IN EARLY CARE AND PRIMARY EDUCATION. 3:3:0 Examines mathematics concepts, methods of instruction, and instructional materials suitable for young children. Includes the use of computers. Examines techniques for assessing the effectiveness of the curriculum and instructional strategies. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Prerequisites: Education 205, Math 105, Math 106. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-320. LANGUAGE ARTS INSTRUCTION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 3:3:0 The integration of the language arts components of listening, speaking, reading, and writing processes are studied. Instructional strategies for achieving an integrated language arts program in pre-K through 8th grade classrooms are analyzed, and the needs of students from diverse cultural backgrounds are examined. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-321. ASSESSMENT OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH WITH EXCEPTIONAL LEARNING NEEDS. 3:3:0 Examines a variety of formal and informal instruments and techniques used in assessing the strength, needs, interests, and preferences of children and youth with exceptional learning needs. The focus is placed on providing students with knowledge and skills necessary for selecting, using, interpreting, and evaluating results from measurement and/or screening instruments and techniques commonly employed by professionals to facilitate special education placement and program decisions. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Students will be required to assess two (2) children enrolled in public schools or the Education Department's Early Childhood Laboratory School. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisite: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-322. TEACHING READING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3:3:0 Designed to assist teachers in extending the elementary skills along the developmental reading continuum to include the content areas and the informal diagnostic tools. The major objective is to improve the teaching of reading in content area subjects at the secondary level, grades 7-12. Strategies for improving reading and study skills, microcomputer instruction, and current research are major topics. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-323. INTERRELATED EXCEPTIONALITIES. 3:3:0 Provides the opportunity for in-depth study of a variety of educational theories related to the nature and needs of exceptional populations. Because education majors have numerous opportunities to study and gain competencies with theoretical perspectives by completing degree requirements, this course is designed to increase the competencies of non-degree undergraduate students returning for certification purposes. Students will be required to do research in an area of interest. Prerequisites: Education 204, Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-324. DIAGNOSIS AND REMEDIATION OF READING INSTRUCTION. 3:3:0 Designed to enable the classroom teacher to implement appropriate instructional strategies based on data obtained from informal and standardized test data. Prerequisite: Education 335. Application of theory in the classroom is required. Admission to Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-325. LANGUAGE AND LITERACY DEVELOPMENT. 3:3:0 An introduction to the study of language acquisition. The emphasis will be placed on the characteristics of common communication disorders. Training will be provided in the use of oral language screening and diagnostic instruments and in various techniques, methods and materials used to teach students with language differences. The nature of language, language and linguistics, and dialectical variations will be examined. Credit: three hours. EDUC-328. TEACHING THE LEARNING DISABLED. 3:3:0 Designed to explore the historical and theoretical development of the present field of learning disabilities. Emphasis will be placed on current definitions and characteristics of specific learning disabilities. The content of the course will focus on identification, assessment and placement, major educational approaches, and specialized techniques in programming. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Admission to the Teacher Education program is required. Prerequisites: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-329. CURRICULUM FOR INFANT AND TODDLER CARE AND DEVELOPMENT. 3:3:0 Emphasis is placed on the growth and development of infants and toddlers (ages 0-3). Special attention will be given to sequencing of skills in order to plan for the holistic development of the child to encompass the social, physical, emotional, creative and cognitive selves with strong emphasis on appropriate activities. Integrating those activities into the daily schedule of the child and group will be of high priority. Opportunities for students to explore culturally sensitive areas will be provided through observation and participation in infant and toddler programs. Using instructional technology as a tool in developing and assessing models of curriculum will provide students with additional resources for program implementation. Early field experience is required (20 hrs.). This course is required in Early Care and Education Program. Prerequisites: Education 204, 205, 206, 208, and 325. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-331. CURRICULUM INTEGRATION OF MATH, SCIENCE AND SOCIAL STUDIES AND PRACTICUM. 6:6:0 This course will provide students with an exemplary model of teaching that will foster an understanding of the interrelationship of instruction, curriculum and assessment in the discipline areas of mathematics, science, and social studies. This course is required in the Primary (K-4) and Middle Level (4-8) Education Programs. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (20 hrs.). Prerequisites: Physical Science 201, Physical Science 301, Biology 100, Math 100, Math 105, Education 305, History 201 and Education 204. Credit: six hours. EDUC-332. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION STRATEGIES FOR MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION. 3:3:0 This course is designed to give students the curriculum and instructional strategies needed for effective teaching and learning in the middle grades. The major topics studies are the core curriculum, integration of curriculum and instruction, grouping of students, interdisciplinary teams, co-curricular activities, staff development programs, school climate, cooperative relationships with the home and community, and assessment. This course is required in the Middle Level (5-8) Program. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisites: Education 205, 208, 357, 302. Credit: three hours. EDUC-333. EDUCATION OF THE PRESCHOOL EXCEPTIONAL CHILD. 3:3:0 The course emphasizes classroom procedures for enhancing development in children who are experiencing developmental delays. The course covers organization of the curriculum, goal setting, task analysis, lesson planning, facilitating Individual Family Service Plans (IFSP's) as well as organizing and managing the learning environment. Practicum with preschool children is an integral part of this course. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (20 hours). Prerequisite: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-335. DEVELOPMENTAL READING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 4:4:0 This course provides an overview of theories and practices related to reading from kindergarten through grade 8. It is designed to assist the prospective teacher in understanding the developmental process of learning to read and to assist in understanding the components of reading instruction. Students will be expected to apply these understandings in an intensive public school experience in which they observe and teach reading under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and a practicum supervisor. This course is required in the Primary (K-4) and Middle Level (5-8) Education Programs. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (20 hrs.). Prerequisite: Education 204, 205, 313, and 340 (if applicable). Credit: four hours. EDUC-336. METHODS OF TEACHING BUSINESS. 3:3:0 This course emphasizes techniques, methodologies, materials, curriculum requirements and materials for teaching business education and computer application programs. Other activities include preparation of resource units, lesson plans, and research papers. Prerequisite: Prior Business Education Courses. Credit: three hours. EDUC-337. CURRICULUM INTEGRATION IN EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION AND PRACTICUM I. 6:6:0 Students will analyze and evaluate developmentally appropriate early childhood curricula. Emphasis is on designing curriculum to enhance the young child's ability to construct knowledge through exploration and experimentation in all domains through the creation and management of learning environments that capitalize on "work through play", computer technology, and learning activities and materials that are concrete, manipulative, real and relevant to the lives of young children. Curriculum Integration I focuses on aesthetic expression, literacy and language, and social and group dynamics. Requires an extended field experience component supervised by the instructor, consisting of observation/participation with two age groups: infant/toddler and preschool/kindergarten, which provides the pre-service teacher with experiences at activity preparation, classroom management, and facilitation skills and applications. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (30 hrs.). Credit: six hours. EDUC-338. CURRICULUM INTEGRATION IN EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION AND PRACTICUM II. 6:6:0 Students will analyze and evaluate developmentally appropriate early childhood curricula. Emphasis is on designing curriculum to enhance the young child's ability to construct knowledge through exploration and experimentation in all domains through the creation and management of learning environments that capitalize on "work through play", computer technology, and learning activities and materials that are concrete, manipulative, real and relevant to the lives of young children. Curriculum Integration II focuses on inquiry, health and safety, mathematics, science, and social studies. Requires an extended field experience component supervised by the instructor, consisting of observation/participation with two age groups: infant/toddler and preschool/kindergarten, which provides the pre-service teacher with experiences at activity preparation, classroom management, and facilitation skills and applications. This course is required in the Early Care and Education Program. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (30 hrs.). Credit: six hours. EDUC-340. INTEGRATING CHILDREN'S LITERATURE THROUGH LANGUAGE ARTS. 4:4:0 The integration of the language arts components of listening, speaking, reading, and writing processes will be introduced and studied. Instructional strategies for achieving an integrated language arts program in kindergarten through grade 8 classrooms will be provided and the needs of children from diverse cultural backgrounds will be examined. The study of children's literature (prose and poetry) will be integrated with instruction in language arts. Authentic texts will be analyzed and their impact discussed. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). This course is required in the Primary (K-4) and Middle Level (5-8) Education Programs. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisites: Education 205, Psychology 201. Credit: four hours. EDUC-342. APPLICATION OF TECHNOLOGY IN SPECIAL EDUCATION CLASSROOM. 3:3:0 Explores and demonstrates the application of evolving technologies related to accommodating, modifications, and/or alternatives necessary for curriculum and instructional access. Emphasis will be given to assistive and augmentative technology, and microcomputer applications in classroom settings. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisite: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-345. PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN THE ADMINISTRATION OF EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION. 3:3:0 This course discusses the goals, objectives and principles of educating young children. Included are historical, philosophical, psychological and social foundations of early care and education. Various types of early childhood programs will be examined focusing on theoretical and practical aspects of program administration. Topics to be included will be licensing, budget management program funding, staff supervision, daily operations, nutrition, health and safety issues, and working with parents and volunteers. This course is required in the Early Care and Education Program. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisites: Education 204, Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-346. BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS AND MODIFICATION FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH EXCEPTIONAL LEARNING NEEDS. 3:3:0 The course is designed to study assessment, implementation, monitoring and program evaluation procedures involved with the use of behavior change techniques for individuals across ages and settings with exceptional social, emotional, and/or behavioral needs. Emphasis is placed on the actual implementation and analysis of behavior change projects for students with exceptional need in public school settings. Early field experience is required (20 hrs.). Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisites: Education 313, Education 321. Credit: three hours. EDUC-347. MICROCOMPUTER SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS. 3:3:0 This course provides students with opportunities to analyze the efficient utilization of microcomputers to enhance office productivity at all levels of organization, from office personnel to executive management. Students examine the different types and uses of hardware, software, operating systems, multimedia, the Internet, Web page design, etc. Hardware and software for all areas of business such as accounting, marketing and production will be analyzed also. Prerequisite: Education 121. Credit, three hours. EDUC-351. OCCUPATIONAL PRACTICUM I. 3:3:0 Supervised on-the-job work experience in the field of specialization, to be started during the second year of the four-year Occupational Teacher Education Program. Credit: three hours. EDUC-352. OCCUPATIONAL PRACTICUM II. 3:3:0 Continuation of supervised on-the-job work experiences in the field of specialization in Education 351. Credit: three hours. EDUC-353. VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE. 3:2:1 This course is designed to provide the in-service and pre-service teacher with a historical, philosophical and practical overview of vocational guidance and its place in the career development continuum. This course is also recommended for high school academic teachers and teachers of adult basic education who would like to become knowledgeable in this aspect of vocational education. Credit: three hours; 2 lecture, 1 lab. EDUC-356. SHOP ORGANIZATION, MANAGEMENT AND SAFETY. 3:2:1 This course integrates shop, laboratory and/or classroom organization, management and safety with the ultimate goal of providing a safe and healthy environment conducive to the teaching/learning process. In-service and pre-service teachers will apply local, state and federal regulations regarding the organization and safety of the vocational-technical program. Credit: three hours; 2 lecture, 1 lab. EDUC-357. EFFECTIVE TEACHING SKILLS AND CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT. 4:4:0 This course combines effective teaching skills and classroom management into one comprehensive course. It is designed to provide basic pedagogical tools and conceptual frames necessary for creating effective teaching and learning environments. Students will be introduced to the current research on best practices that informs teacher/practitioners. Students will be required to demonstrate through individual and small group experimental activities the critical teaching skills that are embodied in the Delaware Teaching Standards, multiple assessment strategies, micro-teaching, mastery teaching, cooperative learning strategies and other instructional models. Additionally, the student will have the opportunity to develop reflective teaching skills in the planning, delivery and evaluation of teaching of their cohort's teaching performances. In a convivial atmosphere, the instructor and peers will provide feedback on an individual's teaching related to performance-based objectives and learner outcomes. This course incorporates current research on the most effective strategies for improving classroom discipline, motivation, interpersonal relationships, and academic performance on all grade levels. Attention will be given to aspects of diversity and/or cultural factors that influence perceptions about classroom management, and to factors that may help facilitate mainstreaming efforts. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisites: Education 313 and Psychology 201. Credit: four hours. EDUC-360. INSTRUCTIONAL EVALUATION IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION. 3:2.5:.5 This course is designed to assist the in-service and pre-service teacher in developing criteria for student performance and selecting the appropriate means to determine student mastery of knowledge, skills and attitudes. A component of this course will also assist teachers in seeking feedback, evaluating feedback and developing the appropriate skills and behaviors indicated in feedback on teacher performance from students, administrators and peers. No prerequisite. Credit: three hours; 2.5 lecture, .5 lab. EDUC-361. CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION IN VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION. 3:2:1 This course addresses the rationale for and the curriculum development processes commonly used in vocational-technical education. The conversion of workplace competencies in various occupations will be transformed into student instructional and terminal objectives. Academic skills necessary to perform occupational skills will be identified and integrated into the curriculum. Program evaluation processes will be examined. It is strongly recommended that the student have work experience in an occupational area and an understanding of the role of vocational-technical education in America today. Credit: 3 hours, 2 lecture, 1 lab. EDUC-400-00 PRESERVICE/STUDENT TEACHING. 12:0:12 Preservice / Student teaching is the senior capstone experience that provides opportunities for students to integrate content, strategies, and theories into practice. The student teacher is expected to assimilate the culture of teaching, practice reflective teaching, function effectively in diverse class situations, manage a class of the 21st century, demonstrate content knowledge, and work effectively with students, cooperating teacher, and university supervisor. Students are placed in one or two student teaching settings according to the requirements of certification. Teaching responsibility gradually increases from one or two lessons daily up to a full day of lessons and then decreases gradually to one or two lessons daily. Student teachers are assigned to an appropriate school for twelve weeks under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and university supervisor. Prerequisites: Admission into the Teacher Education Program and successful completion of the total curriculum in the student's major field of study. Credit: twelve hours. EDUC-401. ASSESSMENT OF YOUNG CHILDREN. 3:3:0 The goals of developmental screening and assessment can only be achieved when screening and assessment tests are valid and accurate. In this course, students will be exposed to evaluation of screening and assessment instruments, Child find, developmental screening, diagnostic assessment and individual program planning. Students will be able to apply these tools in field-based settings. This course is required in the Early Care and Education Program. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program; completion of all freshman, sophomore and junior course work. Credit: three hours. EDUC-404. EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY. 3:3:0 A study of the relationship between the society and the school and of the obligations placed upon the school by social change. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Credit, three hours. EDUC-405. SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES. 3:3:0 A study of the foundation, development, and organization of secondary education in the United States with emphasis upon the purposes, role, and functions of Secondary Education as these relate to curricula and selected performance criteria for the instruction and evaluation of students in the secondary school. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Prerequisites: Education 204, Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-406. METHODS OF TEACHING IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL. 3:3:0 Designed for those preparing to teach in the middle school. Current principles of teaching and classroom organization are evaluated in the light of present day socio-economic factors and conditions. Class activities include lectures, observations, and special reports. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisites: Education 302, 331, 332. Credit: three hours. EDUC-409. METHODS OF TEACHING EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS. 3:3:0 Provides a supervised field experience in the design and implementation of instructional strategies and materials. The content of the course focuses on designing instruction and developing teacher materials, classroom teaching, with feedback and evaluation with course instructor. All required special education courses must be completed prior to enrollment in this course. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (20 hrs.). Prerequisite: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-413. INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES FOR TEACHING IN THE ELEMENTARY/MIDDLE SCHOOL. 3:3:0 Designed to assist students in developing effective teaching strategies based on current research. Individual differences, classroom management, discipline, motivation, lesson/unit planning, parental involvement, evaluation, special types of learners, and microcomputer instruction are studied. Field experiences required (10 hrs.). Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-415. INTRODUCTION TO VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION. 3:3:0 This survey course will address the history, philosophy, principles and current trends in vocational-technical education and provide a foundation to subsequent courses in this discipline. Credit: three hours. EDUC-416. ANALYSIS OF STUDENT TEACHING. 1:1:0 Designed for student teaching trainees. The role and problems of student teaching are analyzed and discussed. This class is to be taken the semester prior to student teaching. Credit: one hour. EDUC-417. TEACHING STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL LEARNING NEEDS AT SECONDARY SCHOOL LEVEL. 3:3:0 Provides an overview of the commonly known needs of high school students who are identified and are receiving special education services across the continuum of settings. Emphasis will be placed on identifying, organizing, and evaluating instructional materials, content, and strategies appropriate for increasing students' academic achievement, social skills development and self-determination, in preparation for successful transactions to adult living. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (20 hrs.). Prerequisites: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-418. INTEGRATING READING METHODS THROUGH THE PRIMARY CURRICULUM PRACTICUM. 4:0:0 This course provides an overview of theories related to early childhood and primary curriculum development, content, and implementation from kindergarten through grade 4. A primary emphasis will be an overview of theories and practices related to reading instruction integrated with the content curricula fostering young children's ability to construct knowledge in all relative areas. In addition, an intensive field experience for early childhood majors will be provided in which students observe, develop, and implement integrated reading, prereading, curricular, and/or the developmentally appropriate activities under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and a practicum supervisor. A practicum experience will be provided in both kindergarten and primary grades. This course is required in the Primary (K-4) Program. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (20 hrs.). Prerequisite: Education 205, 313, 340. Credit: four hours. EDUC-419. RESEARCH SEMINAR IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. 3:3:0 This course is designed to intensively study selected areas of special education, through special reading or conducting special projects depending on the needs of the student. Students are expected to conduct literature reviews, explore theoretical bases, locate resources and propose instructional strategies in their selected area of interest. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisite: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-421. ISSUES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION AND TRANSITION (K-12). 3:3:0 This students will identify current issues in special education (i.e., under-served groups) and by level (i.e., Elementary/Secondary) and intensively study the educational implications of the issues in relation to increasingly diverse, inclusive educational settings, and inclusive classroom learning environments. For secondary majors, special emphasis is placed on career development, vocational rehabilitation services, and transactions of students with disabilities from school to adult living. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisite: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-425. DOCUMENT DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH IN BUSINESS EDUCATION. 3:3:0 Issues and trends in the field of business education will be examined and researched. Students will complete a research project on a related business and/or education topic. They will conduct research on an area of business or education by doing a literature search, write a proposal, demonstrate knowledge of the latest publications and authors in the area; attend and prepare a paper for presentation at a Business Education Conference; compose and format key documents using the style appropriate for the document. Students must demonstrate formatting and editing skills relevant to the particular communication format, such as business and personal letters, headings, memos, outlines, reports, including citations, footnotes, etc., based on industry and education standards. Prerequisite: Completion of all Education and Business courses, except Student Teaching. Credit: three hours. EDUC-451. CLASSROOM PRACTICUM I. 3:0:3 This course is designed for the vocational-technical teacher and requires demonstration of competence in curriculum development, lesson planning and evaluation of students. All competencies are demonstrated in an actual school situation. Credit: three hours. EDUC-452. CLASSROOM PRACTICUM II. 3:0:3 This course is designed for the vocational-technical teacher and requires demonstration of competence in instructional delivery, teaching techniques, shop organization, management and safety. All Competencies are demonstrated in an actual school situation. Credit: three hours. EDUC-455. METHODS IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION. 3:2:1 This higher level methods course addresses more complex teaching skills and strategies including cooperative learning communities, integrating academics into the vocational program, assisting students in the development of problem-solving skills, integrating technology into the learning environment and implementing writing across the curriculum. All skills will be demonstrated for documentation in class. There will be an element of field-based observation of the above skills by the instructor. Participants will also have the option of videotaping their activities, self-evaluating their performance and sharing their experiences with peers in classroom learning situations. Credit: three hours: 2 lecture, 1 lab. EDUC-456. YOUTH ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES. 3:2:1 An investigation into various effective means of involving students in organizations and activities to foster interest and leadership development in career education. Participation in a state leadership and/or skills event is required. A critical evaluation of local, state, and national efforts and their effects. Credit: three hours: 2 lecture, 1 lab. EDUC-498. INDIVIDUAL STUDY. 1-3:3:0 This course is designed to give pre-service and in-service teachers and other professionals the opportunity to develop independent inquiry skills. It permits students to strengthen individual needs or to expand interest in early childhood, elementary, secondary, or special education. The number of hours and credit granted will depend on the comprehensiveness of programming necessary to reach the solution to the individual's problem. Permission of the department chair is required. Credit: one to three hours. EDUC-499. SEMINAR: CURRENT ISSUES IN AMERICAN EDUCATION. 1-3:3:0 In this seminar, students will research and discuss current political, economic, social, and/or pedagogical issues effecting educational policy and practice. The seminar may be offered on general issues or on specific topics to be selected. Prerequisite: senior status. Credit: one to three hours. EDUC-501. FIRST YEAR TEACHER SEMINAR-ELEMENTARY. 3:3:0 Beginning teachers will have the support of a faculty member to assist in analysis of the process and application of diagnostic and prescriptive teaching; the analysis of ways to improve classroom management; and the identification of ways to increase effectiveness as a team member within a school or school district. Prerequisites: Open to graduates of Delaware State University and beginning teachers. Credit: three hours. EDUC-502. FIRST YEAR TEACHER SEMINAR-SECONDARY. 3:3:0 Beginning teachers will have the support of a faculty member to assist in analysis of the process and application of diagnostic and prescriptive teaching; the analysis of ways to improve classroom management; and the identification of ways to increase effectiveness as a team member within a school or school district. Prerequisites: Open to graduates of Delaware State University and beginning teachers. Credit: three hours.  

Department of Social Work

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The mission of the Department of Social Work is to prepare culturally competent professionals guided by values, ethics, and evidence-based practice for professional and leadership roles; thus enhancing the quality of life of individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations in a global society. The Department’s goals are to: prepare social work practitioners to develop an understanding of the importance of a Black perspective based on strengths-based empowerment approach for social work practice; prepare culturally competent professionals guided by values and ethics who are capable of promoting social and economic justice when working with diverse and at risk populations in a global society; prepare practitioners for evidence-based professional practice and leadership roles; and educate students to think critically and to evaluate their own practice. Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes   BSW Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes MSW Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes   Advanced Standing Credits Applicants who have graduated from a Bachelor of Social Work Degree Program accredited by the Council on Social Work Education may receive up to a maximum of twenty-eight (28) credits applied towards the MSW degree at the time of admission, if they meet the requirements for regular status. This option may be an acceptable alternative for applicants who do not meet the requirements for Advanced Standing. If admitted under regular status, these individuals may receive advanced standing credits for all undergraduate foundations courses with grades of "B" or better earned within the last five (5) years. This option is granted on an individual basis. Advanced standing credit will not be considered for practice courses or field practicum. Applicants seeking advanced standing credits may be required to submit course syllabi from their undergraduate courses.  
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Department of Social Work
Price Building, Room 202
1200 North DuPont Highway
Dover, DE 19901

302.857.6775
302.857.6794 Fax

Monday - Friday 8:30 am- 4:30 pm

 

Faculty/Staff Profile


Department Chair


Dr. John N. Austin
Acting Chairperson/Professor
Price 201
302.857.6789
jaustin@desu.edu

 

Associate Professors

Dr. Ezekiel Ette
Associate Professor
Price 227
302.857.6785
eette@desu.edu


Dr. Dolores Finger Wright
Price 217
302.857.6784
dwright@desu.edu


Dr. Tina Jordan
MSW Program Director
Price 227
302.857.6783
tjordan@desu.edu
 
Dr. Anthony Hill
Price 221
302.857.6790
ajhill@desu.edu
 
 

Dr. Leela Thomas
Price 226
302.857.6780
lthomas@desu.edu
 

Assistant Professors

 
 

Dr. Fran Franklin
BSW Program Director
Price 222
302.857.6794
ffranklin@desu.edu
 

Professional Staff

Mrs. Cherita Brown
Technical Analyst & Quality Assurance Manager
Price 202B
302.857.6771
cbrown@desu.edu
 
Dr. Chavon Dottin
Director of Field Instruction
Price 219
302.857.6778
cdottin@desu.edu
 

Staff


Mrs. Shacre Bennett
Secretary
Price 202A
302.857.6775
sbennett@desu.edu

 

 

Forms Library


BSW Student Handbook – Available soon
Curriculum Advisement Form
MSW Student Handbook – Available soon
 

 

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