Health and Public Policy

You are here


Graduate Program in Social Work

Body: 
The Graduate Program in Social WorkThe Graduate Social Work Program received full accreditation status from the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) in 2004.The MSW program at Delaware State University has one concentration — advanced generalist practice.  Accordingly, the program prepares students for advanced practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.  Having satisfied all of the program’s academic requirements, students leave the program with competencies allowing them to practice with and on behalf of Delawareans, and with clients throughout the region, across the nation and globally. Course offerings provide students an understanding of social, economic, political and interpersonal problems from a global perspective.  Consequently, students comprehend the effects of problems, such as poverty, health disparities, racism and oppression on populations that live in parts of the world outside the United States. It is understood that these unique elements of the curriculum are congruent with the concepts, and intervention principles that define the framework for all professional social work practice, that is, generalist practice.  Therefore, students graduate able to generalize the knowledge, values and skills that underlie all social work practice in different settings with diverse populations experiencing multiple, complex problems. The MSW curriculum is grounded on the Department of Social Work’s five underpinnings.Graduates of the MSW program possess the competencies needed to engage, assess, intervene and evaluate individuals, families, treatment groups, organizations and communities. They are able to evaluate the efficacy of interventions and programs, integrate theories of personality and adult psychopathology, address health and mental health disparities from a public health perspective and understand and assimilate theories and practice principles that guide human service administration.  Graduates are competent to practice with systems of all sizes in a wide array of settings—from traditional public social welfare and governmental agencies to small and medium size non-profit organizations to private and for profit entities.The foundation courses present a generalist perspective to social work practice and consist of fundamental content in human behavior and the social environment, social policies, research, practice and field practicum. The advanced courses build upon the core foundation year competencies and practice behaviors of acquired knowledge, values and skills and demonstrate the integration and application of both the core and advanced competencies in practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.Admission Information/RequirementsThe full MSW Program is offered in Dover on the main campus and in Wilmington on the satellite campus.  Students may enroll at either campus and can take classes at both campuses simultaneously.Interest Sessions (also called Open Houses) are held during the spring semester on both the Dover and Wilmington Campuses.  The purpose of the Interest Sessions is to provide information about the Program's explicit and implicit curriculums to candidates who have an interest in pursuing a MSW degree at Delaware State University.For admission to graduate study, applicants must show evidence that they have earned the baccalaureate degree at an accredited college or university (or its equivalent for foreign students) and possesses the ability to engage in high quality graduate work. Applicants must have an undergraduate Liberal Arts foundation as defined by the Program faculty. A background in the social and behavioral sciences is preferred.No academic credit is given for life and/or professional experience.All applicants must submit a complete graduate application package by the established deadline. The entire application can be completed and submitted online. May 31st is the deadline for Advanced Standing admission and June 30th is the deadline for Fall admission. There is no Spring or Summer admission.o        An application must be submitted for the Fall semester in which applicant wishes to enroll. Due to the required prerequisites, the MSW program admits students only in the Fall semester.o        Official transcripts of all previous undergraduate and graduate work are required. The applicant’s undergraduate transcript must reflect a Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 3.0 or above on a 4.00 scale (4.0=A). A “B” average in the major field of study is required. Higher scholastic achievement is preferred.o        Official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores, not more than five (5) years old, are required for admission.  Applicants are strongly encouraged to include their GRE scores with their applications. Performance on the GREs will not negate admission.o        A personal statement explaining why you want to 1) obtain a MSW degree, and 2) how you plan to use the knowledge and skills you will obtain to impact social and economic justice and improve services for populations at risk.  Statement must be no more than two (2) typed pages, double spaced, 12 point Times Roman font.o        Three letters of recommendation are required. These letters should be from individuals who can provide information about your scholarly ability, moral character and characteristics to succeed in a graduate program. Individuals like present or past teachers, advisors, supervisors, and colleagues provide strong recommendations.Personal AttributesMotivation towards, interest in, and preparation for social work education;A capacity to function as a creative, responsible independent, and accountable practitioner;Ability to deal with sexual, racial, ethnic, physical, social, and cultural diversity;A capacity and willingness for self-introspection and change;A capacity to deal with individual differences;A desire to work for social change in order to enhance leadership skills and create greater equity in society;The ability to develop a scientific stance towards social welfare and social work practice, andIdentification with and a desire to apply social work knowledge, values and skills. Type of AdmissionAdvanced standing status—one summer plus academic  year.  The Advanced Standing Seminar course is offered during the second summer session, usually from the beginning of July to the beginning of August.  The course may be offered online.  For accurate information regarding the days and times the class will meet and method of instruction, go to mydesu on the university's website.Full-time status—two yearsPart-time status—three or four yearsAdvanced standing credits (BSW only) or transfer credits (MSW only) are given on a case-by-case basis. Mandatory New Student Orientation will be held on TBA from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on the Dover campus and TBA from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on the Wilmington campus.  Students will receive all registration materials at orientation.A significant number of MSW students work full-time and hence all courses are held during evening hours between 4:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. and on weekends on an accelerated basis.  In addition, most courses are web-enhanced primarily through Blackboard.  The program plans to offer completely on-line courses in the near future.Residency RequirementsAccording to standards established by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) and defined by the Graduate Program, students must complete their residency requirement in two consecutive semesters at Delaware State University during the first year of degreed admission.Medical StatementAfter admission, each student is required to submit a health history and a recent physical examination. The report must be signed by a licensed physician stating that the student is physically capable and free of contagion.Students who do not submit completed reports by the end of the first two weeks of the semester for which they are admitted may be subject to dismissal.Curriculum RequirementsThe Graduate Program in Social Work requires the successful completion (3.00 or above on a 4.00 scale) of 60 credit hours of graduate courses, inclusive of 12 credit hours of field practicum. This curriculum consists of 28 credits hours of generalist professional foundation courses and 32 credit hours of advanced generalist professional courses.Explicit Curriculum“The explicit curriculum constitutes the program’s formal educational structure and includes the courses and the curriculum. [It] achieves the program’s competencies through an intentional design that includes the foundation offered at the baccalaureate and master’s levels and the advanced curriculum offered at the masters level (EP 2.0)” (CSWE Reaffirmation Workshop Training Manual, 2009, p. 80). Please see MSW Student Handbook for curriculum.Field education is the “signature pedagogy”…through which students connect “…the theoretical and conceptual contribution of the classroom with the practical world of the practice setting” (CSWE Reaffirmation Workshop Training Manual, 2009, p. 91). Students must be registered for practice courses in order to be placed in field practicum. Implicit Curriculum“The implicit curriculum refers to the educational environment in which the explicit curriculum is presented. [It] is as important in shaping the professional character and competence of the programs graduates)” (CSWE Reaffirmation Workshop Training Manual, 2009, p. 99).MSW students are engaged in various committees that are critical to the programs’ culture and success. Committees on which students serve include curriculum, assessment, reaffirmation, field, and recruitment. Students also serve on planning committees for co-curricular activities such as conferences, symposia, and newsletter. A student, Tabatha Miller, served as the Editor of last year’s MSW eNewsletter. Students also serve as research and graduate assistants.MSW students demonstrate leadership skills through their Student Councils on both the Dover and Wilmington campuses. The officers are elected and govern their respective councils with the assistance of faculty advisors. For more information on student activities see MSW Student Council Newsletter.Each year a student is elected by his or her peers to run for the elected position of MSW Student Representative to NASW DE Chapter. This is an elected position on the organization’s Board of Directors. The student serves a one year term.Alumni are very important to the MSW program. They serve as Adjunct Faculty, Field Instructors, Guest Lecturers, and speakers at co-curricular events. Alumni also co-author articles for journals and reports and co-present research findings at conferences with MSW faculty. The Alumni Association is in the process of being reorganized by 2010 alumnus Tabatha Miller.  In Summer 2010 she edited the first alumni eNewsletter and created the first alumni Facebook page.Curriculum GuidesMasters Program—2 year Full-TimeCourse SyllabiPolicies & Services in Social Welfare I (SCWK 601)Policies & Services in Social Welfare II (SCWK 602)Human Behavior & the Social Environment I (SCWK 603)Human Behavior & the Social Environment II (SCWK 604)Generalist Practice I (SCWK 605)Generalist Practice II (SCWK 606)Research & Evaluation Methods I (SCWK 607)Research & Evaluation Methods II (SCWK 608)Administration, Management & Supervision in Social Work Practice (SCWK 610)Field Practicum I (SCWK 633)Field Practicum II (SCWK 634)Field Practicum III (SCWK 635)Field Practicum IV (SCWK 636)Theories of Personality & Psychopathology (SCWK 643)Advanced Generalist Practice I (SCWK 646)Advanced Generalist Practice II (SCWK 647)Practice & Program Evaluation for the Advanced Practitioner (SCWK 651)Advanced Generalist Practice in Public Health (SCWK 660)Advanced Generalist Practice III (SCWK 668)Advanced Generalist Practice IV (SCWK 669) Additional InformationRequest form for more information 
Rightbar: 

Graduate Faculty


Professor
Suri
ksuri@desu.edu
(302) 254-5340

Associate Professors
Jordan (MSW Program Director)
tjordan@desu.edu
(302) 857-6783

Quarless-Kingsberry
sqkingsberry@desu.edu
(302) 254-5338

Thomas
lthomas@desu.edu
(302) 857-6780

 

Resources/Information


 
 

Department of Nursing

Description: 

John R. Price Building
Phone: 302.857.6750
Fax: 302.857.6781

feature_image: 
Body: 
So you want to become a nurse? Whether you’re a beginning student in nursing or a nurse returning to school, the Nursing Program at Delaware State University has a course of study to meet your needs. The program is approved by the Delaware Board of Nursing (Cannon Building, Suite 203, 861 Silver Lake Boulevard, Dover, DE 19904, 302-744-4500) and is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, GA 30326, 404-975-5000, www.acenursing.org). This accredited baccalaureate degree nursing program is grounded in the concept of academic excellence. Students seeking professional preparation for nursing practice are admitted to the program. Preparation for professional nursing practice demands a knowledge of the humanities, natural and social sciences and nursing theory with correlated laboratory and clinical practice. The faculty of the Department of Nursing subscribe to the mission and core values of DSU and EdH&PP. Its mission is to provide meaningful and relevant education that emphasizes the liberal arts, scientific and professional aspects of higher education for a multicultural student population. The nursing program provides educational opportunities for students of diverse backgrounds and prepares knowledgeable, entry-level practitioners for meeting present and future health needs of individuals, families, groups and communities. The nursing program develops an educational base for graduate study and fosters professionalism. The primary purposes of the program are (1) to prepare competent professional nurses, (2) to meet the needs of a culturally diverse student population, and (3) to develop an educational base for future specialization and/or graduate study. The nursing curriculum is four academic years and leads to the bachelor of science degree with a major in nursing. Professional level nursing courses include both nursing theory and related laboratory and clinical study. Health agencies including hospitals, nursing homes, clinics, and other community health settings, and schools in the Delaware area provide settings for laboratory study in nursing. Practica are also provided in the simulated laboratory in the Department of Nursing. Students who meet nursing admission criteria may be admitted to the nursing program. Nursing students are responsible for their own transportation to all clinical experiences. All nursing students are eligible to become members of the Delaware State University Student Nurses' Association. Delaware State University Nursing Honor Society invites students to be members after successful completion of the junior year of the Nursing Program with a 3.0 GPA and in the top 1/3 of the class.  
Rightbar: 

Department of Nursing
Price Bldg. Room 123
1200 N. DuPont Highway
Dover, DE 19901-2277


(302) 857-6750
(302) 857-6781 Fax
Mon. - Fri. 8:30 to 4:30


Faculty/Staff Profile


Department Chair


Dr. Sharon Mills-Wisneski
Chairperson, Associate Professor
Price 101
302.857.6750
smillswis@desu.edu


Associate Professors



Dr. Jodi Dampeer-Moore
Price 120 A
302.857.6754
jdampeer@desu.edu



Dr. Stephanie Evans-Mitchell
Price 117 B
302.857.6760
smitchell@desu.edu



Dr. Agnes Richardson
Price 120 B
302.857.6749
arichardson@desu.edu



Dr. Carol Sando
Price 118
302.857.6798
csando@desu.edu

Dr. Yvonne Stringfield
Price 117 C
302.857.6753
ystringfield@desu.edu


Assistant Professors



Dr. Michelle O’Neal 
Price 121 C
302.857.6764
moneal@desu.edu


Clinical Practitioners



Mrs. Eunice Gwanmesia
Price 119 C
302.857.6766
egwanmes@desu.edu



Ms. Vivian Hendricks
Price 119 B
302.857.6795
vhendricks@desu.edu



Mrs. Sara Myers
Price 121 B
302.857.6757
smyers@desu.edu
 

Professional Staff

Mrs. Michele Scialla
Nursing Learning Resource Center Manager
Price 111 E
302.857.6748
mscialla@desu.edu

 

Staff

Ms. Donna Bigsby
Senior Secretary
Price 123 A
302.857.6750
dbigsby@desu.edu



Ms. Mahala Duffy
Senior Secretary
Price 101
302.857.6759
mduffy@desu.edu
 

Student Information

Criteria for the Professional Nursing Phase

Application for Admission to the Professional Phase -- Check back shortly

Please return completed applications to:
Mrs. Michelle Rush
Price Bldg., Room 111


Faculty Announcements

Calendar of Events

Curriculum for Science Education

Body: 
  Upon completion of this program of study, graduates will be prepared to: design science lessons to meet the interest, knowledge, and abilities of all students; recognize and respond to student diversity and encourage all students to participate fully in science; encourage and model the skills of scientific inquiry; provide a safe environment within which students are able to engage in meaningful investigations; and, use various technologies to enhance learning. Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Science Education, Earth Science / Physical Science and General Science First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 12-191 University Seminar I 1 61-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 23-101 General Biology 3 25-121 College Algebra 3 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3     16 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 12-112 Instructional Technology in Education 3 12-192 University Seminar II 1 23-102 General Biology II 4 25-122 Trigonometry 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3   Required to take PPST/PRAXIS 17 Second Year First Semester     01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 24-101 General and Elementary Analytical Chemistry I 4 26-111 Introduction to Physics I 4 27-101 Geology 4 32-201 World Regional Geography 3     18 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 12-204 Philosophical Foundations of Education 3 23-205 Ecology 4 24-102 General and Elementary Analytical Chemistry II 4 26-112 Introduction to Physics II 4   Required to pass PPST/PRAXIS 18 Third Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 03-202 Ethics 3 12-313 Introduction to Educating Children with Exceptional Learning Needs 3 12-322 Teaching Reading in the Secondary School 3 34-201 American Civilization to 1865 3 49-321 Meteorology 3     18 Second Semester     12-210 Methods of Teaching Middle and High School Science 3 12-318 or 31-395 Multicultural Education or Global Societies 3 22-101 Descriptive Astronomy 3 30-313 Limnology 3 36-201 Introduction to General Psychology 3 36-316 Developmental Psychology 3     18 Fourth Year First Semester     12-357 Effective Teaching Skills & Classroom Management 3 12-416 Analysis of Student Teaching 1 23-XXX Chemistry Elective 4 26-XXX Physics Elective 3 30-202 Microclimatology 3 30-452 Environmental Education Workshop 3     18 Second Semester     12-400 Preservice / Student Teaching and Senior Seminar (Senior Capstone) 12     12   Total credits 135       NOTE:  See Advisor For Curriculum Updating  

Curriculum for Secondary Special Education (Gr. 7-12)

Body: 
  Upon completion of this program of study, graduates will be prepared to plan and implement age-appropriate curriculum at the secondary level based on the developmental characteristics of adolescents and characteristics of learners with varied exceptionalities; demonstrate knowledge of characteristics of various categories of mildly/moderately disabilities; plan and manage the teaching and learning environment; select and implement age-appropriate assessment tools, diagnose learning needs, and evaluate individualized education plans; manage and monitor student behavior and social interaction skills; demonstrate knowledge of the foundations of special education; plan a culturally responsive program that effectively communicates and collaborates with parents, teachers, and the educational community. Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Secondary Special Education (Gr. 7-12) First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 05-101 Introduction to Art 3 12-191 University Seminar I 1 61-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-105 Math for Teachers I 3 27-207 Earth / Space Science 4     16 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 06-101 Introduction to Music 3 12-112 Instructional Technology in Education 3 12-192 University Seminar II 1 23-101 General Biology 3 25-106 Math for Teachers II 3   Required to take PRAXIS 17 Second Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-201 or  01-205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 12-204 Philosophical Foundations of Education 3 25-205 Math for Teachers III 3 34-201 American Civilization to 1865 3 XX-XXX Elementary Foreign Language I 3     18 Second Semester     01-202 or  01-206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 12-208 The Middle School Years 3 12-313 Introduction to Education of Children with Exceptional Learning Needs 3 27-201 Physical Science Survey 4 32-201 World Regional Geography 3 XX-XXX Elementary Foreign Language II 3   Required to pass PRAXIS 19 Third Year First Semester     12-306 Methods of Teaching Mathematics in the Primary and Middle Schools 3 12-318 Multicultural Education 3 12-321 Assessment of Children and Youth with Exceptional Learning Needs 3 12-357 Effective Teaching Skills & Classroom Management 3 31-395 Global Societies 3 36-201 Introduction to General Psychology 3     18 Second Semester     12-311 Curriculum and Materials for Children with Exceptional Learning Needs 3 12-322 Teaching Reading in the Secondary School 3 12-342 Application of Technology in Special Education Classroom 3 12-346 Behavior Analysis and Modification for Individuals with Exceptional Learning Needs 3 12-417 Teaching Students with Special Learning Needs at Secondary School Level 3 12-XXX Issues in Secondary Training & Vocational Education 3     18 Fourth Year First Semester     12-309 Classroom Management / Behavior Modification for Teachers 3 12-324 Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Instruction 3 12-328 Teaching the Learning Disabled 3 12-416 Analysis of Student Teaching 1 12-419 Research Seminar in Special Education 3 12-421 Issues in Special Education and Transition (K-12) 3     16 Second Semester     12-400 Preservice / Student Teaching and Senior Seminar (Senior Capstone) 12     12   Total credits 134       NOTE:  See Advisor For Curriculum Updating  

Curriculum for Middle Level Education

Body: 
  Graduates will be prepared to demonstrate competencies in planning and implementing instruction; utilize effective interpersonal skills and multicultural understandings; describe specific professional expectancies of a teacher's role in school; incorporate prevailing theories of teaching and learning into their practice; balance the developmental characteristics of early adolescents with the characteristics and expectations of society; develop and implement interdisciplinary curricular themes; use a variety of instructional approaches; differentiate assignments reflecting students' interests and abilities; provide exploratory opportunities to develop critical and creative thinking; and, foster students' self-esteem and respect for learning. Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Middle Level Education First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 05-101 OR 06-101 Introduction to Art OR Introduction to Music 3 12-191 University Seminar I 1 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-121 College Algebra 3 xx-xxx Elementary Foreign Language I 3     15 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 12-192 University Seminar II 1 23-110 Essential Topics in Biology 4 25-241 Elementary Statistics 3 36-201 Introduction to General Psychology 3 xx-xxx Elementary Foreign Language II 3   Required to take PRAXIS I 17 Second Year First Semester     01-201 OR 01- 205 World Literature I OR African-American Literature I 3 12-204 Philo. Foundation of Education 3 27-201 Physical Science Survey 3 34-201 American Civilization to 1865 3 01-200 Speech 3     15 Second Semester     01-202 OR 01- 206 World Literature II OR African-American Literature II 3 12-207 Life Span Development 3 12-208 The Middle School Years 3 12-313 Introduction to the Education of Children with Except. Needs 3 XX-XXX Content Area Elective 3   Required To Pass PRAXIS I and Apply for TEP Admission 15 Third Year First Semester     xx-xxx Content Area Elective 3 xx-xxx Content Area Elective 3 12-318/31-395 Multicultural Education with Global Societies 3 36-413 Psychology of Learning 3 25-403 OR Methods of Teaching Math OR   01-404 OR Methods of Teaching English OR   34-445 OR Methods of Teaching Social Studies OR   12-210 Methods of Teaching Science 3     15   Must Take 1 of 2 Required Method Courses   Second Semester     xx-xxx Content Area Elective 3 xx-xxx Content Area Elective 3 12-332 Curriculum and Instruction Strategies for Middle Level Education 3 12-344 Instructional Teaching in Education 3 25-403 OR Methods of Teaching Math OR   01-404 OR Methods of Teaching English OR   34-445 OR Methods of Teaching Social Studies OR   12-210 Methods of Teaching Science 3     15   Must Take 1 of 2 Required Method Courses     Apply for Student Teaching and Complete Senior Audit by October 15th - Fall of Senior Year   Fourth Year First Semester     xx-xxx Content Area Elective 3 12-302 Reading in the Content Areas 3 12-357 Effective Teaching Skills and Classroom Management 4 36-411 Introduction to Guidance and Counseling 3 12-416 Analysis of Student Teaching 1 12-423 Assessment Strategies (1-8) 3     17   Required To Pass Praxis II before Student Teaching   Second Semester     12-400 Preservice / Student Teaching and Senior Seminar (Senior Capstone) 12     12   Total credits:  121         NOTE: See Advisor for Curriculum Updating  

Curriculum in Elementary Education

Body: 
  Graduates of the elementary education program will be prepared to demonstrate acquired knowledge, skills and dispositions associated with child development and learning; provide equitable treatment to diverse student populations; plan and implement developmentally appropriate curriculum that includes interdisciplinary units with technology; incorporate prevailing theories of teaching and learning into their practice; align instruction with assessment; adjust teaching practices based on authentic informal and formal assessments; demonstrate awareness of culture and context on behavior; and foster students' self-esteem and respect for learning. Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Elementary Education (K-6) First Year       12-191 University Seminar I 1 01-101 English Composition I 3 05-101 OR 06-101 Introduction to Art  OR  Introduction to Music 3 25-105 Math for Teachers I  OR Higher 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 xx-xxx Foreign Language 3           15       12-192 University Seminar II 1 01-102 English Composition II 3 36-201 Introduction to General Psychology 3 23-110 Essential Topics in Biology 4 25-106 Math for Teachers II OR Higher 3 xx-xxx Foreign Language II 3     17 Take Praxis I     Second Year       01-200 Speech 3 01-201 OR 01- 205 World Literature I OR African-American Literature I 3 25-205 Math for Teachers III OR Higher 3 12-207 Life Span Development 3 34-201 American History to 1865 3 12-204 Philosophical Foundations of Education 3     18   Select one of the following options: 01-201 and 01-206 or 01-202 and 01-205 to fulfill the Literature requirement for General Education       12-205 Child Growth and Development 3 01-202 OR 01-206 World Literature II  OR African-American Literature II 3 05-201 OR 06-201 Integrating Art in Elementary School Curriculum OR Integrating Music in Elementary School Curriculum 3 27-201 Physical Science Survey 3 32-201 World Regional Geography 3 12-257 Motor Development / Movement Education for Children 3     18         Required to pass Praxis I and apply for admission to Teacher Education Program         Third Year 27-207  Earth/Space Science  3 12-335 Develop Reading in Elementary Schools 3 12-318 or 31-395 Multicultural Education/Global Societies 3 12-306 Method of Teaching Math in Elementary and Middle School 3 12-313 Introduction to Educating Children with Exceptional Learning Needs 3     15       12-357 Effective Teaching Strategies and Classroom Management 4 12-303 Teaching of Social Studies 3 12-315 Parents, Families and Community Partnerships 3 12-340 Integrating Childrens Literature through Language Arts 3 12-344 Instructional Tech in Education 3     16   Apply for Student Teaching and complete Senior Audit by October 15th, Fall of Senior Year         Fourth Year       12-331 Methods of Teaching Science in Elementary/Middle School 3 12-418 Integrating Reading Methods through  Elementary Practicum 3 12-423 Assessment Strategies 3 12-409 Methods of Teaching Students with Exceptional Learning Needs 3 12-416 Analysis of Student Teaching 1     13    Must pass Praxis II before Student Teaching         12-400 Student Teaching ** 12     12   Total credits 124           ** Senior Capstone           NOTE: See Advisor For Curriculum Updating  

Special Education (MA)

Body: 
Introduction Candidates in the Special Education Master of Arts degree program develop leadership skills in an area of critical needs. This degree prepares special educators for leadership positions in research, professional development, collaboration, policy analysis, program management, and other activities that advance the standards of Special Education. This MA program, in and of itself, does not lead to certification in special education. Should a candidate wish to complete an MA program that leads to initial certification in Elementary or Secondary Special Education, they must complete additional designated courses and pass PRAXIS I and PRAXIS II (in Special Education K-12). Professional Preparation Using a combination of coursework and hands-on experiences in real settings, candidates gain a firm knowledge of best practices in assessment, instruction, behavior intervention, Response to Intervention (RTI), collaboration and consultation with families and related service providers, and transition from school to adult living and working for learners with exceptional needs. The program embraces the core tenets of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), focusing on inclusion, self-determination, and equal opportunity. Faculty Faculty members in the Education Department have terminal degrees and offer more than academic instruction. They act as mentors and advisors, taking a personal interest in students to help them meet the rigors of their academic preparation. Education faculty represent a diversity of cultural and ethnic backgrounds and have an impressive list of achievements in research and publishing, as well as excellent leadership roles within the professional community. Research and Experience All Master of Arts in Special Education candidates must complete a Capstone Project, which can take one of the following forms: (a) Research Thesis: Students must conduct an empirical research study, develop and write a thesis, and defend it before a faculty committee, or (b) Scholarly research and multimedia presentation:  Students must write a scholarly research paper and deliver the contents in a multimedia presentation to a faculty committee.    Contact:   Dr. N. K. Rathee Acting Director, Graduate Program nrathee@desu.edu Ext. 7170, Room 112        

Educational Leadership (M.Ed.) Program Details

Body: 
  Philosophy, Goals and Objectives In collaboration with the State of Delaware, the purpose of Delaware State University Graduate Education Leadership program is to prepare Educational leaders for prominent leadership and service positions in School Districts, Higher Educational Institutions, and society. Through a rigorous educational formation and directed field experience, students emerge as viable candidates for leadership position throughout the country. Since (2002) the Doctorate and the Masters programs have consistently adjusted to meet the current needs of our public and higher education societies in dramatic changes. At Delaware State University, you will find a unique balance between rigorous research, serious academic studies, partnership, collegiality, and personal development. You will be prepared to make data driven decisions to serve authentically, and lead with integrity. Educational Philosophy  Delaware State University fulfills its mission with an emphasis on education that prepares Educational leaders for leadership and service in the public school system, higher education and other related educational institutions. Such an emphasis mandates a well rounded curriculum which prepares individuals who are thoughtful, compassionate, culturally sensitive, and capable of integrating personal integrity and scholarly appreciation in all avenues of society. Educational Goal The primary goal of the Delaware State University Educational Leadership Programs is to prepare leaders who are equipped with a repertoire of knowledge, skills, and dispositions to meet the challenges of school leadership. It is also to prepare leaders who demonstrate instructional leadership by understanding and applying the curriculum standards of the State of Delaware and being able to evaluate and mentor teachers using non-coercive methods to assist them with planning, presentation, and continuous refinement of instructional and leadership skills. Additional goals prepare leaders who can: Articulate a vision for public schools on the district and building levels as well as other educational institutions and involve all the stakeholders in strategic planning, implementing, and evaluating processes which benefit the academic growth and development of all students. Demonstrate a deep commitment to diversity issues and are role models for the community. Demonstrate technological awareness and competence. Demonstrate substantive knowledge of school finance, law, contract Create a positive school culture that promotes student learning and development. Understand schools as political systems and develop relationships with constituent groups which effectively connect the community with the school. To enhance knowledge and understanding of Institutional Research and the relevant issues of current practice. To promote the use of Institutional Research in policy development and administrative processes at educational institutions. To stimulate interest in using national databases to address educational issues. To promote professional collaboration and the advancement of Institutional Research in the US and other countries Educational Objectives  The integration of rigorous academic training and field experience in learning is facilitated by a curriculum and learning environment which: Offers an appropriate balance between courses in educational theories, research methodologies, leadership courses, school law, finance, general education, and an internship that erase any artificial barriers between these areas of study; encourages a flexible schedule and promote individual research aspirations Personalizes the educational process by emphasizing the priority of relationship-building throughout the University experience. Student Learning Outcomes  Delaware State University commits itself to producing students who will exemplify ethnical and authentic leadership qualities in public schools, higher educational and other related educational institutions. Through the integration of educational philosophies, theories, leadership constructs, and critical thought in the arenas of educational literacy, field experience formation, communication, systematic and empirical research inquiries, socio-cultural perspective, professional development, and transformational leadership.   DSU Graduates will:  Exemplify Educational literacy through applied leadership knowledge, a research foundation, and an Educational leader worldview.  Describe the nature and mission of the educational leadership process  revealed in the literatures. Apply a dialectic approach in the examination of educational issues that impact the school community, reflecting the conditions and dynamics of the diverse school community, enabling ongoing dialogue with representatives of diverse community groups, taking into account community resources, and recognizing the role of public education in developing and renewing a democratic society and the role of equity in a democratic society. Develop a framework for use in examining matters of significance in education in order to clarify personal viewpoints and develop a successful model of a school, family, business, community, government and higher education partnership that works within the greater framework of policies, laws, and regulations enacted by local, state, and federal authorities. Ensure that the environment in which schools operate is influenced on behalf of students and their families as well as recognize that the social, political and economic settings of schools have a great impact on their orientation, organization, and operation. Examine the contextual variables, value orientations, and philosophical and political assumptions that shape both the status quo and reform efforts. Relate educational issues to focus on the success of all students by advocating that education is the key to opportunity and social mobility and recognizing and respecting a variety of ideas, values, and cultures. Participate actively in the political and policy-making contest in the service of education. Demonstrate ethical and professional competence in their chosen disciplines. Integrate content knowledge and experience Demonstrate discernment of the ethical consequences of decisions and actions Demonstrate understanding of the importance of lifelong learning and personal flexibility to sustain personal and professional development Knowledge and application of human resource management and personnel administration and development, ensuring the maintenance of confidentiality and privacy of school records. Ability to communicate and work effectively with diverse populations in the school community in a human resource office. Knowledge and application of information sources, data collection and data analysis strategies, and related technologies. Ability to facilitate processes to ensure that the human resources functions support the attainment of school goals. Ability to engage in activities ensuring that financial, human, and material resources are aligned to the goals of schools. Demonstrate their working knowledge of the values and skills that are needed by successful practicing CEOs and/or administrators by being able to design interview questions, successfully conduct interviews with practicing CEOs and/or administrators, and deliver a presentation of the results of their findings. Demonstrate their ability to construct a vision of learning that will enhance the success of all students by conducting a visioning workshop. Be able to examine their current dispositions to assist in their prediction for success as an administrator by completing a reflective paper describing their predispositions toward being able to become a successful, effective, efficient and caring administrator. Be able to craft their individual professional development plan. Requirements This program of study requires the completion of 33 graduate credit hours over a two year (24 month) period. Included as an integral component of the program is a six (6) credit hour Applied Educational Internship. Capstone Options Students in this program option must complete a three-pronged Capstone. Each candidate will present a multimedia presentation outlining the results of an action research study they conducted as one component of the internship, reflections on their internship experience along with a portfolio documenting the internship experience Required Courses Course Descriptions: EDUC-605. THEORIES AND METHODS OF INSTRUCTION A study of educational theories as applied to curriculum and instruction with emphasis on current trends and the identification of the instructional process, organizing operations and skills for teaching. 3 credits. EDUC-680. LEADERSHIP WITH A VISION FOR CHANGING SCHOOL CULTURE IN A CHANGING SOCIETY This course focuses on the educational administrator’s development of a vision for the creation of effective teaching that is shared by the school community. The course presents the conceptual underpinnings regarding building of effective learning organizations. The importance and relevance of (1) decision-making; (2) problem solving; (3) effective verbal and written communication skills; (4) relationship-building skills; (5) good listening skills; (6) ability to manage conflict; (7) creation of a safe and secure learning environment; and (8) ongoing effective reflective practice are discussed. 3 credits. EDUC-681. HUMAN RELATIONS IN DIVERSE POPULATIONS This course examines how administrators must react, understand and respond to a changing society to foster a true sense of community in school. The course primarily addresses three dimensions: 1) developing academic partnerships with parents and the members of the community; 2) creating learning organizations (communities of practice)among teachers; and 3) nurturing the development of personalized learning environments for students. 3 credits. EDUC-682. SUPERVISION AND EVALUATION OF STAFF/ASSESSMENT OF INSTRUCTION This course emphasizes the role of assistant principals and principals as the instructional leaders of the school and the official in charge of promoting a safe, secure student environment to make possible student learning and staff professional growth. Reflective assessment practices are thoroughly reviewed and discussed. Research is conducted by advanced students on the following topics: (1) identifying effective models of instruction; (2) student achievement; and (3) frameworks for identifying and analyzing models of teaching, decision-making, and assessment. Additionally, the course focuses on defining supervisor responsibilities, understanding and implementing controls, solving problems and making decisions, effective communications, effective leadership, motivational techniques, problem-solving, and the supervisor’s role in labor relations. 3 credits. EDUC-683. USING TECHNOLOGY TO ENHANCE STUDENT LEARNING AND ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT This course addresses current technologies from a practitioner’s point of view. The Internet, World Wide Web and production software are sued with the intent to make informed decisions both administratively and instructionally. Advance students will have the opportunity to focus on emerging technologies in their applications from the viewpoint of planning, enhanced communications, managing information, delivery of instruction and the latest technologies used by professionals in their respective fields. 3 credits. EDUC-684. LEGAL ISSUES, ETHICAL CONDUCT AND SOCIAL JUSTICE IN TODAY’S SCHOOLS This course examines the following: (1) prudent strategies, safe environments, ethical principles in decision making, and fair practices in a litigious society; 2) school district judicial policies and student/employee rights; (3) legal issues that impact today’s schools; and; (4) students’ and teachers practices. 3 credits. EDUC-685. SUPPORTING A SCHOOL VISION THROUGH EFFECTIVE BUSINESS AND FINANCE PRACTICES This course provides advanced students with an understanding of the issues and challenges facing administrators with regards to the financing of education in an era of intense change. Some of the issues facing practicing school administrators, teachers, school board members, legislators and other interested parties include, but are not limited to: The No Child Left Behind Act; budget cuts at the federal, state, local and school levels; and changes in legislation allowing for school choice, voucher plans and charter schools. This course also addresses the various principles relating to the fiscal operations of a school’s management and the entrepreneurial acts required to support the continuous improvement of instruction and learning for all students. Strategic planning, budgeting, accounting, auditing, and human resource management at the school level will be discussed through case studies. 3 credits. EDUC-686. SUPERVISION AND LEADERSHIP IN ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS This course focuses on the knowledge, dispositions and performance skills required of school principals that include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) development, articulation, implementation and stewardship of a vision of learning in a pluralistic society; (2) encouraging and achieving high standards of learning; (3) effective communication, consensus building and negotiation skills; (4) continuous school improvement; (5) involvement of the school community; (6) continuous staff professional growth; (7) effective instruction(learning theories, motivational theories, assessment strategies and recognizing student growth and development); (8) technology in promoting student learning and professional growth; (9) valuing student diversities and school cultures; (10) creating a safe and supportive learning environment; (11) implementing and evaluating curriculum and instruction; (12) management of school operations; and (13) selecting, supervising and evaluating staff. 3 credits. EDUC-688. ACTION RESEARCH IN EDUCATION This course addresses the fundamentals of evaluating and designing educational research with an emphasis on applied and action research. Types of research, their advantages and disadvantages, the research process and the similarities and differences between action research and formal quantitative and qualitative research will be examined. Participants will have hands-on opportunity to develop an action research proposal and use statistical software to analyze and interpret data. This course facilitates assessment of school programs and the accomplishment of knowledge and skills. This is not an accelerated format course. 3 credits. EDUC-690. APPLIED EDUCATIONAL INTERNSHIP The internship experience is a supervised field experience that enables Masters degree candidates to practice knowledge and skill performances acquired in coursework and professional experiences in an authentic setting. The Masters degree candidate will experience first hand the everyday challenges of making management decisions with the enhancement of learning and teaching in mind. Advanced students will develop and apply organizational techniques and communication and problem solving abilities in a field setting. In conjunction with the field-based administrator, master’s degree candidates will execute an action- research project to examine possible solutions and to provide data to support data-based decision-making. 6 credits. Contact: Dr. N. K. Rathee Acting Director, Graduate Program nrathee@desu.edu Ext. 7170, Room 112   Dr. Prince Attoh Associate Professor Program Coordinator pattoh@desu.edu Ext. 6718, Room 267  

Science Education (MA) Program Details

Body: 
Purpose Our purpose is to prepare students to successfully interact within the society they will enter upon termination of their formal schooling. This purpose is served by offering the human physical resources required to support the opportunity to acquire deep understandings about important facts and issues. Higher order thinking skills are provided in an environment that promotes cooperation and tolerance. Students are prepared to enter the work force with adequate communication skills. Minimal training for the work force will be required. Goals and Objectives The Science Education Master’s Degree program is designed to provide a middle and senior high school science teachers with additional training in at least two science disciplines, as well s, in the methodologies and techniques appropriate to the teaching experience. The goals of this program are: To provide an exemplary program for the education of science teachers. To provide a contemporary methodological foundation in science education. To provide an opportunity for science teachers to broaden their understanding of concepts and issues related to their major discipline. To provide an interdisciplinary perspective of the relationship between science, technology, and society. To provide an opportunity to participate in the rigors of research and to appreciate its implications in classroom situations. Requirements This program requires the successful completion (3.0 grade point average) of thirty-six semester hours of graduate level courses including 15 hours of Science Education core courses, 15 hours of Science Electives and six hours of Science Education  electives. Capstone Options Students may choose one of the following options for completing the Capstone Requirement. Research Thesis:  Students selecting the thesis option must satisfactorily conduct an empirical research study and successfully defend the thesis before a faculty committee.  Scholarly research and multimedia presentation:  This option requires students to write a scholarly research paper and present the contents of the paper in a multi-media presentation to a faculty committee. Required Courses Course Descriptions: PSED-626. SCIENCE, TECHNOLGY, AND SOCIETY. This course is designed to investigate the linkages that exist among science, technology, and society. An interdisciplinary approach will be assumed to convey the interrelationships that exist among science, technology and the humanities, with a focus on various historic, current and ongoing ethical issues in science an social policy. 3 credits. PSED-627. RESEARCH EXPERIENCE IN SCIENCE. This course will provide a field experience for science teachers that are designed to present science as dynamic problem-solving endeavors. Students will work towards the resolution of a problem with a practicing scientist in his or her discipline. 3 credits. PSED-628. ANALYSIS OF RESEARCH ON TEACHING SCIENCE. This course provides the student with the means by which they may systematically evaluate current classroom teaching practices, and analyze the dynamics of student-teacher interactions. Methods of educational research in naturalistic settings will be examined. This course will consist of classroom instruction, field work in various school settings, and laboratory work, on the SPSS-X computer system at the college. 3 credits. PSED-629. CONTEMPORARY METHODS OF SCIENCE TEACHING. A survey of methodologies will be presented that research has indicated are most effective for teaching science. Methods will be presented from a constructed perspective. Contemporary curriculum and assessment philosophies and materials will also be discussed. 3 credits. PSED-630. INTERDISCIPLINARY SCIENCE. This is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of scientific principles. Common concepts and themes such as atomic theory, systems and energy will be studied in a context that relates the concept to multiple scientific disciplines. 3 credits. PSED-615. EDUCATIONAL MEASUREMENT AND STATISTICS. The nature of measurement and types of scales, unites, scores, norms, sampling, item analysis, batteries and profiles will be explored. Principles of reliability and validity and the use of test scores in decision making as well as descriptive and inferential statistics and the design of educational research are course topics. 3 credits. Course Descriptions/Electives PSED-625. MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENCE TEACHERS. This is a predominantly methods-based course in which various means of presenting mathematical concepts are developed/devised/researched. Application of math principles to science topics will be stressed. The concepts to be dealt with will include, but not be limited to: factor-label (unit-analysis), metrics, proportionalities, triangulation, graphing, data analysis, etc. The integration of NCTM standards with science instruction will be addressed. 3 credits. PSED-631. SELECTED TOPICS IN SCIENCE EDUCATION. This course is designed to allow flexibility in the selection of specific educational topics to meet students’ needs and interests, as well as professor expertise. Topics will be posted prior to the first class meetings. 1 credit. PSED-632. SELECTED TOPICS IN SCIENCE EDUCATION. As per above. 2 credits. PSED-633. SELECTED TOPICS IN SCIENCE EDUCATION. As per above. 3 credits. PSED-634. COMPUTERS AND OTHER TECHNOLOGIES IN SCIENCE TEACHING. This course is an introduction to the use of the computer and other technologies in interactive modes in the science classroom and laboratory. Emphasis will be placed upon the construction of inexpensive equipment and review of currently available software to accompany the equipment. 3 credits. PSED-636. THE SCIENCE OLYMPIAD AND OTHER COMPETITIONS. The course is designed to give science teachers background information needed to prepare an Olympiad team for competition within the individual classroom, school, state or nation. It consists of an overview of the activities, with emphasis upon specific curricular topics that will help the teacher better prepare their team. 3 credits. EDUC-614. HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. This course focuses upon the educational implications of human development throughout the life span. Students will survey research giving special attention to application to teaching and development of school programs. 3 credits. EDUC-611. THEORIES AND PRACTICES IN EXCEPTIONALITIES. This course is designed to identify exceptional learner and provide an understanding of their educational need. Specific teaching techniques will be explored as well as principles and practices of program development. 3 credits. EDUC-699. THESIS OPTION. 6 credits.

Concentration in Curriculum and Instruction

Body: 
The purpose of the Curriculum and Instruction (C&I) graduate program is to increase the knowledge and competence of educators and to prepare graduates for leadership roles as department chairs and curriculum directors.  The focus of the program is on development, improvement and assessment  of curricula, materials and instruction at all levels of the educational system. The program will provide opportunities to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes to understand the educational needs of individuals with differing economic, social, racial, ethnic, religious backgrounds and handicapping conditions. This program is a course of advanced study and does not lead to certification. Goals and Objectives The Master of Arts degree in Curriculum and Instruction goals are:  Provide opportunities for advanced study in the area of Curriculum and Instruction Prepare educators to assume leadership roles in improving the curriculum and design of instruction at all levels of schools and types of school (elementary, secondary, post-secondary, public and private, trade and professional schools). Prepare educators to assume leadership roles in improving the design of classroom instruction for special populations of  students (exceptional children, minorities, low-income). Requirements This program requires the completion of 36 graduate credits in the program of study. Capstone Options Students may choose one of the following options for completing the Capstone Requirement. Research Thesis:  Students selecting the thesis option must satisfactorily conduct an empirical research study and successfully defend the thesis before a faculty committee.  Scholarly research and multimedia presentation:  This option requires students to write a scholarly research paper and present the contents of the paper in a multi-media presentation to a faculty committee. Required Courses in the Program of Study Course Descriptions: EDUC-603. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF AMERICAN EDUCATION This course systematically explores the history of American education from colonial times to the present.  Students examine selected educational theories and philosophies with particular emphasis on their application to instruction. 3 credits. EDUC-640. DIVERSITY IN EDUCATION This  course explores the use of knowledge about culture in the schooling process.  It presents specific teaching strategies, classroom management techniques and communication strategies that have proven effective with culturally diverse student populations.  Students explore ways to identify and alleviate negative bias and prejudice in teaching materials, assessment instruments, school practices and school organization. 3 credits. EDUC-614. HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT Educational implications of human development over the life-span are examined.  Students will survey research with special attention to the applications to teaching and developmentally appropriate school programs. 3 credits. EDUC-625/688.  INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS AND RESEARCH METHODS/ACTION RESEARCH This course covers application of basic statistical techniques and research methodologies employed in qualitative and quantitative research in education.  The focus of the course is primarily on action research and students will develop an action research plan as a  course requirement. 3 credits. EDUC-604. THEORIES AND METHODS OF INSTRUCTION This course is a study of educational theories as applied to curriculum and instruction with emphasis on current trends and the identification of the instructional process, organizing operations and skills for teaching. 3 credits. EDUC-605. CURRICULUM ORGANIZATION AND DESIGN This course analyzes the historical, philosophical, sociological, epistemological and pedagogical bases of curriculum patterns with emphasis on relationships to contemporary designs.  Students explore models of curriculum organization by which to effect curriculum change.  3 credits. Course Descriptions/Elective Courses: EDUC-601. CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN AMERICAN EDUCATION This course analyzes current trends, problems and theories based upon examination of recent educational literature.  Students critically explore topics related to the formulation of curriculum, instructional policy and methodology in education.  3 credits. EDUC-602. IDENTIFICATION AND INSTRUCTION OF THE DISADVANTAGED This course identifies the school population classified as disadvantaged and explores the classroom, problems affecting instruction of the rural and urban disadvantaged.  Students examine techniques of classroom instruction that have been successful locally and nationally.  3 credits. EDUC-606. CAREER EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY CURRICULUM This course explores resources for career information, instruments for assessing career awareness curricula,, programs and centers and examines application of techniques for career education.  3 credits. EDUC-607/633. THEORIES AND PRACTICES OF CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT This course explores the application of theories, practices and identification of management skills, using the dynamics of interpersonal relations in planning and facilitating classroom instruction.  3 credits. EDUC-608. DIAGNOSTIC TEACHING OF READING This course consists of a review of current research and opinion, evaluation of materials techniques and programs for assessment and prescription of reading techniques.  A Practicum  provides students the opportunity to implement and evaluate a diagnostic-prescriptive reading program.  3 credits. EDUC-609. IDENTIFICATION AND INSTRUCTION OF THE GIFTED This course addresses the characteristics of the gifted and talented child.  Students will analyze national and state programs for the gifted and talented and explore techniques of instruction to meet the needs of the gifted and talented student.  2 credits. EDUC-610. DEVELOPMENT OF INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS This course reviews the theory and practice in selection and use of educational media, equipment and materials.  Students will review the research literature concerned with effective use of instructional materials.  Each student will complete an individualized instructional materials package to be presented to the class.  3 credits. EDUC-611. THEORIES AND PRACTICES OF EXCEPTIONALITIES This course is designed to identify exceptional learners and provide an understanding of their educational needs.  Specific teaching techniques will be explored, as well as principles and practices of program development.  3 credits. EDUC-614/683. USING TECHNOLOGY TO ENHANCE STUDENT LEARNING AND ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT. This course addresses current technologies from a practitioner’s point of view. The Internet, World Wide Web and production software are sued with the intent to make informed decisions both administratively and instructionally.  Advance students will have the opportunity to focus on emerging technologies in their applications from the viewpoint of planning, enhanced communications, managing information, delivery of instruction and the latest technologies used by professionals in their respective fields.  3 credits. EDUC-627. SURVEY OF PRE-COLLEGE SCIENCE INSTRUCTION This course reviews contemporary issues and trends in science instruction and explores the methodologies and philosophies of the teaching of science, including various interdisciplinary characteristics of science instruction.  3 credits. EDUC-641/682. Supervision and Evaluation of Staff/Assessment of Instruction This course emphasizes the role of assistant principals and principals as the instructional leaders of the school and the official in charge of promoting a safe, secure student environment to make possible student learning and staff professional growth.     Reflective assessment practices are thoroughly reviewed and discussed.  Research is conducted by advanced students on the following topics. (1) identifying effective models of instruction; (2) student achievement; and (3) frameworks for identifying and analyzing models of teaching, decision-making, and assessment.  Additionally, the course focuses on defining supervisor responsibilities, understanding and implementing controls, solving problems and making decisions, effective communications, effective leadership, motivational techniques, problem-solving, and the supervisor’s role in labor relations.  3 credits. EDUC-644. TECHNOLOGY IN TEACHING      This course presents current technological trends that will assist teachers in classroom instruction. Special emphasis is placed on the integration of multi-media software web-based materials. Students will plan and produce multi-media/Internet project in their content area using a systems approach.  3 credits. EDUC-699. THESIS OPTION : 6 credits.   Contact: Dr. N. K. Rathee Acting Director, Graduate Program nrathee@desu.edu Ext. 7170, Room 112 Dr. Richard Phillips Assistant Professor Program Coordinator rphillips@desu.edu Ext. 7569, Room 235

Pages