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Graduate Programs in Education

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Program Philosophy Purpose: Students will be prepared with the competencies to perform responsibilities related to their program area’s professional standards and certification requirements. Human and physical resources are provided to insure a deep understanding of important facts and issues and to develop higher order thinking skills in an environment that promotes cooperation and tolerance. Students have the ability to express themselves effectively in written and oral presentations and can use technology to enhance their teaching, communication and administrative functions. Admission and Degree Requirements All applicants must submit a completed University graduate program application, official transcripts of all academic work and three (3) letters of recommendation. Some programs may have additional application requirements.  Application materials should be submitted to the Director of Graduate Studies, College of Education, Health and Public Policy, Education and Humanities Building, room 112. All applicants must have earned a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university or have completed prerequisite courses as designated by the Education Department. The quality of academic performance in undergraduate and graduate studies will be considered in evaluating applicants for admission to a graduate program  at Delaware State University. All admission criteria must be satisfied prior to being granted degree candidacy. Applicants are required to take the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or Miller Analogies Test (MAT). Applicants are asked to provide evidence that they have taken or are scheduled to take one of these tests as part of the application process. GRE and MAT scores submitted with application must have been taken no more than five (5) years earlier than the application date. Capstone Experience Graduate students must complete a Capstone experience as one of the exit criteria for award of the degree.   Each degree program defines the options available for the Capstone.  Options may include:  (a) research thesis/dissertation; and/or (b) scholarly multi-media presentation.  Details about each option are described in detail in the Education Department’s Graduate Student Handbook. Contact: Dr. N.K. Rathee Acting Director, Graduate Programs nrathee@desu.edu Ext. 7170, Room 112  

Bachelor's Programs

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Teachers are in high demand in the United States as record numbers of Baby Boomer's are retiring from the profession.  As the need for quality educators grows, Delaware State is ready to help fill the ranks with highly-qualified teachers. Our program prepares students to meet the challenges in the classroom, and to become highly sought after professional educators. Delaware State University offers a wide variety of bachelor degree programs for education majors.  Prospective students can major in: Early Childhood Education (Birth-2) Elementary Education (K-6) Elementary Special Education (1-8) Middle Level Education (6-8) Physical Education (K-12) Science Education Secondary Special Education (7-12)  

Nursing Course Descriptions

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  NURS-191. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR I – NURSING/PRE-NURSING.  1:2:1 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success. Academic skills will be developed. These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the Internet and word processing. Values clarification, coping with peer pressures and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed. Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals. Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. General Education Requirement in Nursing orients students to the University environment and support systems. Facilitates campus community involvement of students by requiring their attendance at special academic and cultural events on campus. Emphasizes necessary tools and strategies for academic success. Techniques are used with students to assist them to assess learning styles, personality traits and motivation strategies. Credit, one hour.   NURS-192. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR II – NURSING/PRE-NURSING.  1:1:1 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success. Academic skills will be developed. These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the Internet and word processing. Values clarification, coping with peer pressures and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed. Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals. Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. General Education Requirements’ sequel to University Seminar I begins to focus students toward the academic skills necessary for success in the nursing program and discipline. Credit, one hour.   NURS-204. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY IN NURSING.  2:2:0 This course introduces the student to the pathophysiologic disruptions in the normal body functioning in individuals across the lifespan; assessment and analysis of objective and subjective manifestations of common health problems resulting from environmental, genetic and stress-related maladaptations are analyzed. Diagnostic assessments are discussed for each disease process. Alternative medical and pharmacological management is briefly discussed for selected disease processes, and related nursing implications are explored. Prerequisites: BIOL 207, BIOL 208, CHEM 107. Credit, two hours.   NURS-292. FOUNDATIONS OF NURSING.  1:1:0 This is an online course. Students taking this course will be assigned specific websites that must be used in order to be successful. The course introduces students to medical terminology, drug dosage calculations and basic safety practices in nursing. This is a nursing support course that is a prerequisite for entry into the nursing major. Prerequisites: BIOL 207, BIOL 208, CHEM 107 Co-requisites: NURS 204, NURS 292, BIOL 221. Credit, one hour.    NURS-300. GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT ACROSS LIFE SPAN.  2:2:0 This online course is designed to assist the student in understanding concepts associated with normal growth and development across the lifespan (conception to late adulthood). Application of this knowledge will assist the student to provide appropriate interventions for clients and their significant others. Students will be introduced to major theories of human development across the lifespan. Emphasis will be placed on the influences of the psychological, sociological, and cultural dimensions of human functioning and health promotion across the lifespan. Prerequisites: PSYC 201 Credit two hours   NURS-307. INTRODUCTION TO NURSING PRACTICE.  5:3:6 This course focuses on fundamental nursing interventions and assisting individual clients to fulfill basic human needs. Adaptation related to meeting physiological, safety and security needs are emphasized. Students begin to apply principles of the nursing process when planning care for individual clients in long-term care structured settings. Opportunities to practice in the roles of caregiver, communicator, problem-solver and a group member of the health care team are provided. Prerequisites: Completion of all General Education and Support courses with a letter grade of “C” or better in all courses; formal admission to the Nursing major, (success on the Nursing Entrance Exam, G.P.A. of 2.8 or higher). Co-requisites: NURS 308, NURS 309. Credit, five hours.   NURS-308. HEALTH ASSESSMENT.  4:3:3 The course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to collect data related to individual health using a multi-dimensional approach. Students are introduced to assessment devices and procedures used to collect data related to human body structure and functioning using a systems approach. Psychologic, social and cultural aspects of assessment are also introduced to assist students to analyze environmental influences on human structure and function. Assessment of normal growth and development is also emphasized.  Prerequisites: Completion of all General Education and Support courses with a letter grade of “C” or better in all courses; formal admission to the Nursing major, (success on the Nursing Entrance Exam, minimum G.P.A. of 2.8 or higher). Co-requisites: NURS 307, NURS 309. Credit, four hours.   NURS-309. PSYCHIATRIC/MENTAL HEALTH NURSING.  5:3:6 The course provides students with didactic and clinical learning experiences utilizing the nursing process as a means of providing health care to individuals, families and groups experiencing maladaptative alterations in mental health. Student development in the following nursing roles is emphasized: communicator in the therapeutic nurse-client relationship, advocate of client’s rights and caregiver. The course prepares students to communicate professionally in the health care environment. It exposes students to maladaptive behaviors as they relate to safe, competent nursing skills. A holistic approach, which combines medical nursing and mental health nursing, will produce a nurse who is better prepared for their professional role. Prerequisites: Completion of all General Education and Support courses with a letter grade of “C” or better in all courses; formal admission to the Nursing major, (success on the Nursing Entrance Exam, minimum G.P.A. of 2.8 or higher). Co-requisites: NURS 307, NURS 308. Credit, five hours.   NURS-310. INTRODUCTION TO NURSING RESEARCH.  3:3:0 An introductory course of the fundamentals and principles of the research process and their application in nursing. Emphasis is placed on developing proficiency in critiquing and evaluating nursing research findings as they relate to the practice of nursing. Prerequisites: Successful completion of NURS 307, NURS 308, NURS 309. Co-requisites: NURS 311, NURS 312. Credit, three hours.   NURS-311.  NURSING CARE OF THE CHILD AND FAMILY.  5:3:6 Students develop competencies and skills to manage health care of children experiencing potential and actual problems in fulfilling human needs during the process of achieving biopsychosocial adaptation, and anticipatory guidance as part of health promotion on the individual as well as community levels. Roles of the professional nurse, including communication, ethics and cultural competency, in promoting health and adaptation for the child within the context of the family are emphasized in clinical and theoretical components of the course. Prerequisites: Successful completion of NURS 307, NURS 308, NURS 309. Co-requisites: NURS 310, NURS 312. Credit, five hours.   NURS-312. HEALTH PROMOTION, MAINTENANCE AND RESTORATION.  5:3:6 The course provides students with both didactic and clinical learning experiences designed to provide nursing care to adult patients/clients who are experiencing acute and chronic medical-surgical health problems in clinical and community health settings. Students utilize the nursing process to provide care to individuals. The course also focuses on individual and family responses to illness experience. Emphasis is placed on the multiple roles of nurses: teacher, care giver, critical thinker and problem-solver. Prerequisites: Successful completion of NURS 307, NURS 308, NURS 309. Co-requisites: NURS 310, NURS 311. Credit, six hours.   NURS-407. HEALTH PROMOTION, MAINTENANCE AND RESTORATION II.  5:3:6 The course utilizes the nursing process in the study of individuals with simple, adaptive problems resulting from interference with basic human needs. The theoretical and clinical components are designed to assist the student to determine priority of client needs and to recognize client responses to illness. The course provides for development of critical thinking skills and strategies of health promotion, maintenance and restoration across the life span. Prerequisites: Successful completion of NURS 310, NURS 311, NURS 312. Co-requisites: NURS 408, NURS 409. Credit, five hours.    NURS-408. MATERNAL NEWBORN NURSING.  5:3:6 This course provides didactic and clinical learning experiences designed to assist students to apply the nursing process in providing care to the childbearing family during antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum periods in a variety of settings. Health maladaptations as they relate to growth and development are examined. The nurses’ role in health promotion, disease prevention to fulfill human needs in childbearing and childrearing families is emphasized. Prerequisites: Successful completion of NURS 310, NURS 311, NURS 312. Co-requisites: NURS 407, NURS 409. Credit, five hours.   NURS-409. COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING.  5:3:6 The course provides didactic and clinical learning experiences for students in selected principles of community health, public and family health nursing. Students conduct in-depth community and family health assessments employing basic epidemiological principles and data collection strategies. The nursing process is utilized by students engaging in health promotion and maintenance strategies in a variety of community health settings. Prerequisites: Successful completion of NURS 310, NURS 311, NURS 312. Co-requisites: NURS 407, NURS 408. Credit, five hours.   NURS-410. SPECIAL TOPICS IN NURSING.  3:3:0 A synthesis course that provides students with repeated opportunities to critically analyze and apply knowledge and skills learned earlier in the program, in providing care to individuals, families and groups experiencing complex problems across the life span. Test-taking and psychometric principles and skills are emphasized. Prerequisites: Successful completion of NURS 407, NURS 408, NURS 409. Co-requisites: NURS 411, NURS 412. Credit, three hours.   NURS-411. ISSUES AND LEADERSHIP IN NURSING.  3:3:0 An exploration of leadership and management theories and principles and their application to the nursing practice in the provision of health care is presented. Student development in the roles of problem solver, change agent and leader are emphasized. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all junior level Nursing courses and first semester senior level Nursing courses. Co-requisites: NURS 410, NURS 412. Credit, three hours.   NURS-412. HEALTH PROMOTION, MAINTENANCE AND RESTORATION III.  8:4:12 The course focuses on application of the nursing process in the study of individuals with complex adaptation problems. The cultural, ethical, psychosocial and legal aspects of these complex health problems as they affect individuals and their families, the health team and society are emphasized. The course allows the student to examine the historical aspects of nursing as related to the patients’ complex needs. Clinical, observational and/or participatory experiences with the client are provided in a variety of settings. Prerequisites: Successful completion of NURS 407, NURS 408, NURS 409. Co-requisites: NURS 410, NURS 411. Credit, eight hours.        

Admissions and Progression Policies

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Criteria for the Professional Phase (Admission to the Nursing Major) Application for Admission to the Professional Phase -- check back shortlyCompleted applications should be submitted to:Mrs. Michelle RushPrice Bldg., Room 111

Master of Science Degree in Sport Administration

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  Master of Science in Sport Administration offered by Department of Sport Management within College of Business, Delaware State University that professionally prepares ethical leaders for advanced responsibilities within sport organizations and/or to design and implement new sport or sport-related enterprises. This is a 30 credit hour, twelve-month program designed to develop your ability to lead and manage sport and/or sport-related organizations while adapting to changing economic, legal, political, and social influences. Unique Features: (1)This program adheres to standards of the National Association for Sport and Physical Education/North American Society for Sport Management; (2) courses are designed to incorporate extensive problem-based field experiences in the sport industry; and (3) all students pay in-state tuition and fees. Weeknight Program at Wilmington Site: Students will enroll for 9 credit hours (3 courses) during the fall and spring semesters (see below). Class meetings are Monday evenings from 5:00 – 10:30 PM for 7 weeks with a week break between sessions. The third course will be a web-based course that is throughout the semester. Fall   Code                                               Courses Credit 1 SPMT-672 Sport Management 3 2 SPMT -671 Financial Aspects in Sport 3 3 SPMT -676 Sport in Society 3                                                                                             Subtotal  9   Spring   Code                                               Courses Credit 1 SPMT -625 Introduction to Research Methods and Statistics 3 2 SPMT -674 Sport Marketing 3 3 SPMT -681 Legal Issues in Sport 3                                                                                             Subtotal  9   Summer   Code                                               Courses Credit 1 SPMT -673 Sport Facility Design and Management (Summer – I) 3 2 SPMT -675 Current Trends and Issues in Sport (Summer – I) 3 3 SPMT -616 Internship of Sport Administration (Summer – II) 6                                                                                             Subtotal  12 Total 30 Credits.    

Sport Management Dept. Course Descriptions

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  COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SPSC-105. RECREATIONAL AEROBICS. 1:1:0 Aerobics becomes very popular in most of recreational facilities such as YMCA and recreation centers of higher education across the country. For recreational purpose this course is designed for students who want to improve personal fitness and lifelong health and to participate in physical activity that combines with rhythmic aerobic exercise and stretching with the goals of improving all elements of physical well being. SPSC-110. FOUNDATION OF AQUATICS. 1:1:0 This is an introduction course of swimming designed for beginners of swimming by using the recreation pool of DSU Recreation Center. The course will focus on fundamental knowledge and skills of aquatics that will benefit students for lifelong recreation. SPSC-116. FOUNDATION OF GOLF. 1:1:0 This is an outdoor recreational course and designed for the students to learn fundamental knowledge and techniques of golf. The course will provide learning experience and basic training in golf that will benefit learners in healthy lifestyle and social opportunity through playing golf ($80 fee applies). The course will be held either on campus or off campus (golf court) faculties based on availability. SPSC-120. FOUNDATION OF RACQUETBALL ACTIVITIES. 1:1:0 This is an introduction course for racquet balls that could be used as recreational activities. The course may include one or more in tennis, table tennis, badminton, and other racquet skills and knowledge that will benefit students in physical well being and recreational enjoyment. The course will be held either outdoor or indoor faculties of DSU based on availability. SPSC-191 & 192. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR I & II. 1:2:0 University Seminar is a two semester, general education course sequence that develops academic skills including critical reading, thinking, writing and speaking as well as using the library, the Internet, and word processing. The strands and goals of the General Program are embedded in the class activities, providing each student the opportunity to cultivate the skills and knowledge necessary to become a life-long learner. A global, multi-cultural perspective will be used to discuss moral and ethical issues facing students in college life and career experiences. Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, wellness, nutrition, and health will be addressed. Opportunities will be provided for self-examination through assessment of career possibilities and basic learning, including time management, note taking and problem solving. Important goals of this course are to know the history of the University, to feel connected to the University and to have a common educational experience with other freshman. Credit: one hour each semester SPSC-200. TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS IN SPORT SCIENCES. 3:3:0 Tests and measurements in health and human performance is a course designed to prepare health and human performance professionals with a knowledge base involving evaluation tools, measurement techniques, and assessment modalities. A thorough understanding of measurement and evaluation is essential for prospective practitioners to effectively execute their duties and responsibilities in their respective work sites. The use of computing systems, various forms of technology, and the most recently developed tools are important in the preparation of effective teachers and practitioners. Organization, categorization, analysis and assessment tools and techniques play important roles in classroom management. Therefore, this course is part of the specialty area content of the health education and the physical education teacher education major program, as well as, the non-teacher education programs in Health and Human Performance. Credit: three hours. SPSC-204. METHODS AND MATERIALS IN RECREATION. 3:3:0 The course is designed with national standards of recreational management services with national Council On Accreditation (COA) of National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) cooperated with American Association for Physical Activity and Recreation (AAPAR). This course introduces students to program development processes in recreation and leisure services. Emphasis is on creating and implementing opportunities for positive recreation and leisure experiences. SPSC-271. MANAGEMENT IN SPORT & RECREATION. 3:3:0 This course provides an overview of the various sport industry segments and the careers found in these industry segments. SPSC-272. GOVERNANCE & INTERNATIONAL ASPECT SPORT. 3:3:0 This course provides an introduction to the history and philosophy of sport, leisure, and recreation in the United States. In addition to the structure of interscholastic athletics, collegiate athletics, and professional sports, and various sport national governing bodies will be discussed. Credit: three hours. SPSC-274. COMMUNICATION IN SPORT. 3:3:0 This course will examine the various forms of communication in the sport industry. The effective application of media and public relations in relation to the sport organization's success will be emphasized. Credit: three hours. SPSC-279. OBSERVATION AND FIELDWORK I. 1:0:2 Students will observe and assist in a variety of sport management activities under the supervision of professionals. A minimum of 45 hours is required. (Sport Management majors only) Credit: one hour. SPSC-280. PRACTICUM OF SPORT MANAGEMENT. 2:0:2 PRACTICA is a part-time work experience in the sport industry with two (2) credits and 80 clock hours. Practicum is often performed in proximity to the campus and usually involves observing and providing assistance to another professional. They must be directed and evaluated by a qualified faculty member with appropriate supervision by an on-site professional. SPSC-312. PSYCHOLOGY OF COACHING. 3:3:0 Psychology is increasingly seen as an important aspect in sport and plays an important role in the position of coach. This course is designed to introduce students to prevalent theories, concepts and research or applied interests within the sub-discipline of sport psychology. Practical application of this information is provided for students who may be pursuing careers in coaching and the sport industry. Emphases will be placed on the role of the coach in regard to enhancing the performance of athlete, team and organization. SPSC-331. OBSERVATION AND FIELDWORK. 2:0:2 Observation and fieldwork at a selected health agency (Community Health majors only). Prerequisites: Health 108 and Health 234 (may be taken concurrently). Credit: two hours. SPSC-371. FINANCIAL ASPECTS OF SPORT. 3:3:0 This course examines the financial and accounting principles and practices and their application in for-profit and nonprofit sport organizations. Topics include revenue and expenses, issues impacting revenue and expenses, budgeting methods, economic impact, and methods of funding for-profit and nonprofit sport organizations and programs. Credit: three hours. SPSC-372. LEADERSHIP IN SPORT. 3:3:0 The study of the theories, principles, and practices of leadership and group interaction in sport oriented settings. The course includes some practical experience in recreational and/or sport leadership through special events at the university or in the community. Credit: three hours. SPSC-373. PROGRAMMING IN SPORT. 3:3:3 This course introduces students to information needed to successfully program for sport-oriented organizations. Students will chose and/or develop programs or events, flyers advertising the events, budgets, and help to run the events on or off campus. Students will be required to work at events outside of class time. Credit: three hours. SPSC-374. MARKETING IN SPORT. 3:3:0 This course provides an overview of the principles and practices of promotions and marketing in the sport industry. Topics include sport marketing planning, market segmentation and identification of the target market, sport marketing mix, and sponsorship. Credits: three hours. SPSC-376. SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ASPECTS OF SPORT. 3:3:0 This course is an examination of the interactive impact of sport and society. Credit: three hours. SPSC-377. AREA FACILITIES AND DESIGN. 3:3:0 This course is designed to provide knowledge and skills in effectively managing a recreation or sport facility. It contains both educational references and professional industry insights. SPSC-401.  PRINCIPLES OF COACHING. 3:3:0 This is a core undergraduate course of the coaching minor applies all necessary principles and methods of coaching for the levels of professional, collegiate, interscholastic, and recreational sports.  The major principles and methods may relate to the coaching philosophy and ethics, safety and injury prevention during the practice and games, developing physical conditioning of athletes, youth players' growth and development, teaching and communication of the coaches, methods to improve sport skills and tactics, organization and administration of sport teams, and ways to evaluate performances of athletes and coaching effectiveness. Credit: three hours. SPSC-402.  COACHING PRACTICUM. 3:3:0 This is a capstone course of the coaching minor applied all necessary knowledge, skills and methods of coaching to the field experience through direct observation and participation with a sport team.  It is structured as a class combined with site coaching experience.  The student will be instructed theoretically by the instructor and supervised practically by the head coach of assigned team. Credit: three hours. SPSC-403. ORGANIZATION & ADMINISTRATION OF SPORT AND ATHLETIC PROGRAM. 3:3:0 The philosophy of athletics and sport programs, communication and leadership skills, facilities and equipment management, budgeting, personnel management, risk management, public relations and current issues will be explored. Students will be guided in the preparation of position papers, research reports, and presentations relating to the administration of athletic and sport programs, with the intent of providing realistic pre-professional experiences in the field. Amateur, professional, public and private athletic sport settings will be discussed. SPSC-414. PRINCIPLE OF COACHING. 3:3:0 This is a core undergraduate course of the coaching minor which applies all necessary principles and methods of coaching for the levels of professional, collegiate, interscholastic, and recreational sports. The major principles and methods may relate to the coaching philosophy and ethics, safety and injury prevention during the practice and games, developing physical conditioning of the athletes, youth players' growth and development, teaching and communication of the coaches, methods to improve sport skills and tactics, organization and administration of sport teams, and ways to evaluate performances of athletes and coaching effectiveness. SPSC-415. COACHING PRACTICUM. 3:3:0 This is a capstone course of the coaching minor applied all necessary knowledge, skills, and methods of coaching to the field experience through direct observation and participation with a sport team. The course is structured as a class combined with site coaching experience. The student will be instructed theoretically by the Instructor and supervised practically by the Head Coach of assigned team. SPSC-471. LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN SPORT AND FITNESS. 3:3:0 This course provides an overview of legislation, legal actions, and ethical concerns in the sport industry. SPSC-473. AREAS AND FACILITIES IN SPORT. 3:3:0 A study of the facilities used in the sport industry. This course will focus on the design, operation, management, scheduling, and staffing of different types of facilities. Students will visit local and regional facilities outside of class time. Credit: three hours. SPSC-475. CURRENT ISSUES IN SPORT. 3:3:0 This course is a senior seminar, which examines the current trends and issues in the sport industry. Extensive research of current texts and journal articles is required. Credit: three hours. SPSC-476. INTERNSHIP IN SPORT. 12:0:30 Off-campus senior capstone field experience with an approved agency in the sport industry. Students are supervised and evaluated by the university staff and the cooperating agency staff. A minimum of 400 clock hours is required. A journal is required. Prerequisite: Senior Sport Management majors with all other course work completed prior to this experience. Credit: twelve hours. SPSC-490, RECREATION PRACTICUM. 3:3:0 The course is designed with national standards of recreational management services with national Council On Accreditation (COA) of National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) cooperated with American Association for Physical Activity and Recreation (AAPAR). It is a capstone undergraduate course of the recreation management minor. The practicum should apply all necessary knowledge, skills and methods of recreation management to the field experience through direct observation and participation in the routine operation with a private or public recreational facility. It is structured as 100 clock-hour field experience and the students will be instructed theoretically by the instructor and supervised practically by the recreational organization. SPSC-616. INTERNSHIP IN SPORT. 6:6:0 The Sport Administration Internship is an experience in which a sport administration major enrolls in after all requirements, including coursework, in the sport administration curriculum has been completed successfully. The Sport Administration Internship comprises a minimum of 270 field-based hours at the agency, or at events sponsored by the agency if the responsibilities are carried out at another site. Credit, six hours. SPSC-625. INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS AND STATISTICS. 3:3:0 The course is designed to introduce students to research methods and statistics used to assess, evaluate, and critically examine principle and practices of sport organizations. Credit, three hours. SPSC-671. SPORT MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of organizational theory and its application in the sport industry. Students will examine the organizational structure, leadership styles, and culture of different sport organizations. Credit, three hours. SPSC-672. FINANCIAL ASPECTS IN SPORTS. 3:3:0 The course examines the financial and accounting principles and their application in for-profit and non-profit sport organizations. Topics include revenue and expenses, budgeting methods, economic principles, methods of financing sport and sport venues, and fund raising methods. Credit, three hours. SPSC-673. SPORT FACILITY DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 The course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of conducting needs assessments, planning, constructing, equipping, staffing, programming, and managing facilities in sport and physical activities. Credit, three hours. SPSC-674. SPORT MARKETING. 3:3:0 The course provides an overview of the principles and practices of promotions and marketing in the sport industry. Topics include sport marketing planning, market segmentation and identification of target market, sport marketing mix, and sponsorship. Credit, three hours. SPSC-675. CURRENT TRENDS AND ISSUES IN SPORT. 3.3.0 The course examines the current trends and issues in the sport industry. Extensive research of current texts and journal articles is required. Credit, three hours. SPSC-676. SPORT IN SOCIETY. 3.3.0 The course is an examination of sport as a social institution and of the interactive impact of sport and society. Credit, three hours. SPSC-681. LEGAL ISSUES IN SPORT. 3.3.0 The course is designed to provide an overview of legislation and legal actions in sport. Credit, three hours.  

Social Work BSW Course Descriptions

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39-101. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK. 3:3:0 This course is an introduction to the field of social welfare and the professional of social work. The historical background within which social welfare arose provides the context for in-depth learning about specific social problem areas. This course serves to introduce prospective social work majors to the field of social welfare and social work, help them arrive at career decisions and prepare for future social work courses. Students are introduced to generalist social work practice, empowerment, and the Black experience, as a means for providing the necessary beginning knowledge and skills for working with individual, groups, families, communities, and organizations. Credit, three hours. 39-201. ECONOMICS, POLITICS AND SOCIAL WELFARE. 3:3:0 This course provides an examination of the structure, function and interaction of economics, politics and social welfare. The interrelation between the nature and scope of the U.S. economic and political systems is explored. Focus is on social welfare policies and programs within the context of economic and political demands. Selected social welfare problems are surveyed and examined. This course will attempt to apply the principles of political economy to the world of Social Work. What is the basis of this discipline, and how can this method of inquiry enhance our understanding of it. What? How? And Why? Do we do what we do as social workers? Prerequisites: Social Work 101. Credit, three hours. 39-302. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I. 3:3:0 Human Behavior and Social Environment I is the first part of a two-semester course. This course, a study of the various components of human behavior, is developed to provide a framework for studying the factors that shape the development of individual growth and social interaction as a means for developing a conceptual model for viewing human behavior from a holistic perspective. An ecological approach will be used that stresses: (1) the major areas of normal developmental milestones from the perspective of significant biological, cognitive, psychological and socio-structural variables, (2) life cycle stages and their associated life events, and (3) human diversity and its effect on human behavior. Prerequisites: Junior standing, Sociology 101, Sociology 203, Biology 100. Credit, three hours. 39-303. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT II. 3:3:0 Continues focus of HBSE I. Includes issues such as death and dying; stress and coping; and normal and abnormal behaviors. Prerequisites: Social Work 302. Credit, three hours. 39-310. ELEMENTARY STATISTICS FOR SOCIAL WORK. 3:3:0 This course communicates the underlying statistical methods used in the analysis of social data. The course presents the basic concepts and assumptions of statistical theory applied in the logical development of statistical inferences. Descriptive and inferential statistics (parametric and non-parametric) are covered. Emphasis is on the interpretation of statistics in social work research, literature, and evaluation. The course emphasizes a generalists perspective in social work practice problem solving. Basic concepts include centrality; estimation of variability; probability and the normal distribution; precision of estimate; group differences; ANOVA; single subject design regression and correlation. Prerequisites: Mathematics 101 and Mathematics 102. Credit, three hours. 39-311. INTRODUCTION TO GROUP DYNAMICS. 3:3:0 Students form small groups to experience various aspects of group life (group goals, leadership, communication and decision making, conflict, cohesion and norms, culture and stages of group development) and participate in total class sessions for mini-lectures and demonstrations of course content. Through readings, class discussions and experimental learning in these task groups, students integrate theory and action in group dynamics. The instructor serves as resource person and consultant to the small groups to foster their mutual aid in learning. Prerequisites: Social Work 101 and Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 39-315. SOCIAL WELFARE POLICIES AND PROGRAMS I. 3:3:0 This course provides a framework for the understanding of social welfare policies and programs and the historical and contemporary forces that have shaped their development in Western Europe and the United States and connects definitive issues of social policy and planning to the structure of social service program planning and delivery. The role of the social work profession in the formulation of social policy with special reference to advocacy and social action will be examined. Prerequisites: Junior standing. Credit, three hours. 39-316. SOCIAL WELFARE POLICIES AND PROGRAMS II. 3:3:0 Consistent with the generalist perspective to social work practice, the purpose of this course is to ensure that the student is able to analyze social welfare policies within a specific conceptual framework. To this end, students will, among other things, examine residual and universal social welfare benefits and related policies regarding their goals, recipients, form of benefits, how social welfare programs are financed, their effectiveness and adequacy, etc. While examining specific programs and policies, the course will explore the myriad social problems that give rise to social welfare programs and policies. The course will also examine the degree to which the concept of social and political justice bears on the nature and scope of social welfare programs and the policies that govern them. Prerequisites: Social Work 315. Credit, three hours. 39-341. SEMINAR IN HELPING. 3:3:0 This course is the first in a four course practice sequence. This course gives the student knowledge about entry level skills for the worker in activities and transactions with individuals, groups, families, organizations, institutions, and community systems. The second course, Social Work Practice Seminar I is structured as an experiential laboratory in which students begin to develop the entry level skills for generalist practice. In this course, the general method of social work practice will be introduced; a problem-solving approach, systems theory, and an ecological perspective will be highlighted. Students will become familiar with the general method's six (6) identifiable stages: engagement and problem identification, data collection, assessment and identification of possible interventions, intervention, evaluation, and termination. Within the context of a Black Experience and the philosophy of empowerment, application of social work values, promotion of social and economic justice, and service to diverse groups will be highlighted as they pertain to each topic. Prerequisites: Junior standing, Social Work majors only. Credit, three hours. 39-342. SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE SEMINAR I. 3:3:0 This course builds on the knowledge base of generalist social work practice which was covered in the preceding practice course, Seminar in Helping, and is structured as an experiential laboratory. The course will focus on two areas. The first area is interviewing strategies. Interviewing skills will be analyzed for the appropriate application with different size client systems (individuals, groups, families, communities, and organizations), with different populations, and with different racial, ethnic, gender, age (and otherwise different) client populations. The second area is the development of interpersonal practice skills especially those which empower others, the use of interventive roles, and recording skills which are needed to work with individuals, groups, families, communities, and organizations. Prerequisites: Junior standing, Social Work 341. Credit, three hours. 39-401. RACE AND ETHNIC DISPARITIES IN SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 This course examines the ways in which oppression and discrimination are institutionalized in various sectors of American society and their effect on racial and ethnic groups. It explores the multiple faceted experience of being a person of color and/or a specific ethnic group in the United States. Institutional forces (economic, educational, familial, political and social welfare) are examined that influence the structure and status of racial and ethnic groups. Particular attention will be given to racial and ethnic disparities in health care delivery systems. Emphasis is on the connections among forms of oppression, the ideology of donation and subordination which perpetuates oppressions, and the role of social work in utilizing appropriate strategies in challenging oppression and fostering social change. Prerequisites: Social Work 101, Social Work 302, and Junior status or permission of instructor. Credit, three hours. 39-402. FAMILY VIOLENCE. 3:3:0 An examination of violence in the family, including child, spousal, sexual, and elderly abuse. Violence not only in America, but in other countries will be explored and compared. Emphasis will be on determining mechanisms, therapies and techniques, not only for treating the abuser and the abused, but in preventing violence in the family. Prerequisites: Psychology 201, Social Work 101, Junior status or permission of the instructor. Credit, three hours. 39-405. OCCUPATIONAL SOCIAL WORK. 3:3:0 This course is designed to introduce students to the field of occupational social services. Content includes: an overview of the world of work, the history of occupational social welfare, organizational and structural arrangements of business, labor and trade unions, and the various social work roles in industrial settings. Program in mental health and substance abuse will be examined. Issues affecting special groups - women, minorities, and the handicapped - discussed. Prerequisites: Junior standing. Credit, three hours. 39-407. INTEGRATING FAMILY AND SOCIAL SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEMS IN EDUCATION. 3:3:0 A study of parent involvement from an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores home-school collaboration from a holistic viewpoint using historical, educational, psychological, ethnic/social diversity, and sociological perspectives. The requirements, challenges and opportunities, as well as the roles and functions of early child care teachers and social workers within a complex ecological system of home/school/community will be examined, differentiated and compared. Students will be offered experiential opportunities to gain awareness and knowledge of social policies and governmental initiatives, as well as community agencies that support families and children and the implications for prevention and/or intervention with a variety of systems. Prerequisites for Social Work Department: Psychology 201, Sociology 101, Senior status or permission of the instructor. Prerequisites for Education Department: Psychology 201, Education 206, Admission to TEP status. Credit, three hours. 39-413. RESEARCH AND EVALUATION METHODS I. 3:3:0 This is an introductory course in social work research methods. In an applied profession, knowledge of research principles is essential for understanding, critically evaluating, and competently utilizing the vast array of theories and methods available. In addition, the research process (as well as the skills involved in that process) provides a model for conscious, responsible, competent, and ethical practice. The course provides the student with the foundation skills for evaluating and critically reviewing his/her own practice. This course, then is designed both to develop such skills and to integrate this knowledge into a framework of professional social work practice from a generalist perspective. The course presents methods from the perspective that generalists can be proficient consumers of research and apply findings to practice. Prerequisites: Social Work 310. Credit, three hours. 39-414. RESEARCH AND EVALUATION METHODS II 3:3:0 Research and Evaluation Methods II is the second and final sequential research course offering in the BSW research curriculum. the course engages students in the scientific inquiry within the context of generalist social work practice and problem-solving. The course examines ways in which theoretical models underpin knowledge and skills for the application of methods associated with generalist social work practice. It examines the processes involved in research methodologies in studying individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Emphasis is directed toward framing hypothesis, research design and measurement. Continued consideration is given to the logic of various conceptualization and operationalization; sampling; and qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis. Prerequisites: Social Work 413. Credit, three hours. 39-421. ISSUES IN SOCIAL SERVICE DELIVERY. 3:3:0 Content material is designed to address some basic and emerging issues in the broad area of service delivery. Emphasis is on the social work practitioner working with individuals, families, groups, communities and organizations reflecting a broad spectrum of racial, ethnic, sexual, gender and cultural backgrounds and settings. Social issues such as perspectives on culture, sexual orientation, social change and advocacy, etc. are explored within the context of social work roles, responsibilities and functions. Additionally, issues related to organizational culture, policies and programs are assessed as to their mission and relevancy to the populations served. Prerequisites: Senior standing. Co-requisites: Social Work 450. Credit, three hours. 39-440. WELFARE OF CHILDREN. 3:3:0 Reviews historical perspectives of approaches on child welfare in the context of today's law, programs, services, and funding. Examines the complexity of government responsibility for service delivery. Explores the differentials of the public-private systems as they are reviewed in the traditional child welfare settings handling abused, dependent, neglected, and delinquent children. Examines the shift in emphasis from separation of children from the families to innovative, creative approaches to keep children at home. Utilizes a family-centered perspective. Addresses issues of law and funding, the related systems of mental health and education, and effort to look at services for a child and his family, the impact of advocacy groups on child welfare policy with implications for the practitioner. Case material documents and analyses each phase of the course outline. Prerequisites: Junior standing. Credit, three hours. 39-441. SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE SEMINAR II. 3:3:0 This course is a continuation of the principles and practices of the generalist perspective covered in Seminar in Helping and Social Work Practice Seminar I. It provides more in-depth knowledge of social work practice with individuals, groups, families, organizations and communities. Students will be provided with an understanding of various interventive strategies and the criteria necessary for choosing appropriate social work practice interventions. Students will begin to identify and analyze their own individual style of working with each of the aforementioned client groups. Practice issues such as alternative paradigms in practice, ethnic sensitive practice, psychopharmological considerations in practice, empowerment for working with minorities, women and other diverse populations will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Social Work 342, Co-requisite: Social Work 450. Open to social work majors only. Credits, three hours. 39-450. FIELD INSTRUCTION I. 6:3:0 Students are placed in a social work agency for their first practical experience and afforded an opportunity to integrate theory and knowledge base of social work learned in class with the actual setting of the social welfare field. Agencies selected for use as field placements are those committed to the value of training undergraduate social work students for generalist practice and who have indicated a willingness to structure actively a number of learning experiences for students. Students are responsible for making their transportation and housing arrangements. Prerequisites: all prior required general education, co-requisite and social work courses as defined by the Social Work program. Open to social work majors only. Credit, six hours. 39-451. FIELD INSTRUCTION II. 6:0:12 Continuation of experiential practice opportunities in a social service agency approved by the program. Students are exposed to continued in-depth correlation of theory and practice for entry level into the employment field. Agencies selected for use as field placements are those committed to the value of training undergraduate social work students for generalist practice and willing to structure actively a number of learning experiences for students. Agency field instructors have met the criteria set by the Council on Social Work. Students are responsible for making their own transportation and housing arrangements. Prerequisites: All prior required general education, corequisite and social work courses as defined by the Social Work Program (See curriculum plan). Open to social work majors only. Credit, six hours. 39-460. SENIOR SEMINAR. 3:3:0 Provides an integrative experience to the students of course and field materials. Students are given an opportunity to assess and define their learning needs as based on practice skills and theoretical background, and plan and develop structured learning experiences. Focus is on the development of an individual social work practice frame of reference. Explores careers and graduate school systems with emphasis on practice skills required for entrance into the post-graduate market. Pre-requisite: Social Work 441. Co-requisite: Social Work 451. Open to social work majors only. Credit, three hours. 39-462. SOCIAL WORK WITH AND FOR THE AGED. 3:3:0 This course is an overview of and an introduction of the field of Gerontology and social work with and on behalf of older persons. Developmental stages of older persons are studied and aging is presented as a normative aspect of the life cycle. Theories of aging and adaptation are reviewed as are effects of the social environment upon older persons. Based on this foundation, students explore interventions particularly suited to work with and for older persons at the individual, family, group, community, and policy levels. Issues of the aged poor, females, minorities, rural residents and other diversities are explored. Policies, program and services for the elderly are studied. The goal of this course is to prepare generalist social work practitioners to work with older clients and their families and with service delivery systems addressing the needs of this clientele. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit, three hours. 39-465. ALCOHOLISM AND OTHER ADDICTIONS. 3:3:0 This course introduces students to the field of addictions. The primary objective is to help social workers and other helping professionals understand the uses and abuses of licit and illicit drugs, addictive behavior, i.e. eating, gambling, smoking, etc., and the impact of addiction of individuals, families and society. The role of the helping professionals in the identification, prevention, treatment of these dependencies and the social problems related to them, i.e. racism, economic, gender and cultural barriers, etc. will be explored. Credit, three hours. 39-469. HUMAN SEXUALITY AND SEX RELATED ISSUES. 3:3:0 Explores the nature and varieties of human sexual expression, the reason and effect of societal controls and changing definitions of normal sexual behavior. The application of social work services to problems associated with human sexuality, treatment and prevention are stressed. Prerequisite: Senior level status or permission of director of program. Credit, three hours. 39-470. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-3:3:0 Provides the opportunity to undertake individual, in-depth, supervised study of a practice theory or social issue. Prerequisites: Senior level status and prior written consent of instructor. Credit, one to three hours.  

Graduate Program in Social Work

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The Graduate Program in Social WorkThe Graduate Social Work Program received full accreditation status from the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) in 2004.The MSW program at Delaware State University has one concentration — advanced generalist practice.  Accordingly, the program prepares students for advanced practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.  Having satisfied all of the program’s academic requirements, students leave the program with competencies allowing them to practice with and on behalf of Delawareans, and with clients throughout the region, across the nation and globally. Course offerings provide students an understanding of social, economic, political and interpersonal problems from a global perspective.  Consequently, students comprehend the effects of problems, such as poverty, health disparities, racism and oppression on populations that live in parts of the world outside the United States. It is understood that these unique elements of the curriculum are congruent with the concepts, and intervention principles that define the framework for all professional social work practice, that is, generalist practice.  Therefore, students graduate able to generalize the knowledge, values and skills that underlie all social work practice in different settings with diverse populations experiencing multiple, complex problems. The MSW curriculum is grounded on the Department of Social Work’s five underpinnings.Graduates of the MSW program possess the competencies needed to engage, assess, intervene and evaluate individuals, families, treatment groups, organizations and communities. They are able to evaluate the efficacy of interventions and programs, integrate theories of personality and adult psychopathology, address health and mental health disparities from a public health perspective and understand and assimilate theories and practice principles that guide human service administration.  Graduates are competent to practice with systems of all sizes in a wide array of settings—from traditional public social welfare and governmental agencies to small and medium size non-profit organizations to private and for profit entities.The foundation courses present a generalist perspective to social work practice and consist of fundamental content in human behavior and the social environment, social policies, research, practice and field practicum. The advanced courses build upon the core foundation year competencies and practice behaviors of acquired knowledge, values and skills and demonstrate the integration and application of both the core and advanced competencies in practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.Admission Information/RequirementsThe full MSW Program is offered in Dover on the main campus and in Wilmington on the satellite campus.  Students may enroll at either campus and can take classes at both campuses simultaneously.Interest Sessions (also called Open Houses) are held during the spring semester on both the Dover and Wilmington Campuses.  The purpose of the Interest Sessions is to provide information about the Program's explicit and implicit curriculums to candidates who have an interest in pursuing a MSW degree at Delaware State University.For admission to graduate study, applicants must show evidence that they have earned the baccalaureate degree at an accredited college or university (or its equivalent for foreign students) and possesses the ability to engage in high quality graduate work. Applicants must have an undergraduate Liberal Arts foundation as defined by the Program faculty. A background in the social and behavioral sciences is preferred.No academic credit is given for life and/or professional experience.All applicants must submit a complete graduate application package by the established deadline. The entire application can be completed and submitted online. May 31st is the deadline for Advanced Standing admission and June 30th is the deadline for Fall admission. There is no Spring or Summer admission.o        An application must be submitted for the Fall semester in which applicant wishes to enroll. Due to the required prerequisites, the MSW program admits students only in the Fall semester.o        Official transcripts of all previous undergraduate and graduate work are required. The applicant’s undergraduate transcript must reflect a Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 3.0 or above on a 4.00 scale (4.0=A). A “B” average in the major field of study is required. Higher scholastic achievement is preferred.o        Official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores, not more than five (5) years old, are required for admission.  Applicants are strongly encouraged to include their GRE scores with their applications. Performance on the GREs will not negate admission.o        A personal statement explaining why you want to 1) obtain a MSW degree, and 2) how you plan to use the knowledge and skills you will obtain to impact social and economic justice and improve services for populations at risk.  Statement must be no more than two (2) typed pages, double spaced, 12 point Times Roman font.o        Three letters of recommendation are required. These letters should be from individuals who can provide information about your scholarly ability, moral character and characteristics to succeed in a graduate program. Individuals like present or past teachers, advisors, supervisors, and colleagues provide strong recommendations.Personal AttributesMotivation towards, interest in, and preparation for social work education;A capacity to function as a creative, responsible independent, and accountable practitioner;Ability to deal with sexual, racial, ethnic, physical, social, and cultural diversity;A capacity and willingness for self-introspection and change;A capacity to deal with individual differences;A desire to work for social change in order to enhance leadership skills and create greater equity in society;The ability to develop a scientific stance towards social welfare and social work practice, andIdentification with and a desire to apply social work knowledge, values and skills. Type of AdmissionAdvanced standing status—one summer plus academic  year.  The Advanced Standing Seminar course is offered during the second summer session, usually from the beginning of July to the beginning of August.  The course may be offered online.  For accurate information regarding the days and times the class will meet and method of instruction, go to mydesu on the university's website.Full-time status—two yearsPart-time status—three or four yearsAdvanced standing credits (BSW only) or transfer credits (MSW only) are given on a case-by-case basis. Mandatory New Student Orientation will be held on TBA from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on the Dover campus and TBA from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on the Wilmington campus.  Students will receive all registration materials at orientation.A significant number of MSW students work full-time and hence all courses are held during evening hours between 4:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. and on weekends on an accelerated basis.  In addition, most courses are web-enhanced primarily through Blackboard.  The program plans to offer completely on-line courses in the near future.Residency RequirementsAccording to standards established by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) and defined by the Graduate Program, students must complete their residency requirement in two consecutive semesters at Delaware State University during the first year of degreed admission.Medical StatementAfter admission, each student is required to submit a health history and a recent physical examination. The report must be signed by a licensed physician stating that the student is physically capable and free of contagion.Students who do not submit completed reports by the end of the first two weeks of the semester for which they are admitted may be subject to dismissal.Curriculum RequirementsThe Graduate Program in Social Work requires the successful completion (3.00 or above on a 4.00 scale) of 60 credit hours of graduate courses, inclusive of 12 credit hours of field practicum. This curriculum consists of 28 credits hours of generalist professional foundation courses and 32 credit hours of advanced generalist professional courses.Explicit Curriculum“The explicit curriculum constitutes the program’s formal educational structure and includes the courses and the curriculum. [It] achieves the program’s competencies through an intentional design that includes the foundation offered at the baccalaureate and master’s levels and the advanced curriculum offered at the masters level (EP 2.0)” (CSWE Reaffirmation Workshop Training Manual, 2009, p. 80). Please see MSW Student Handbook for curriculum.Field education is the “signature pedagogy”…through which students connect “…the theoretical and conceptual contribution of the classroom with the practical world of the practice setting” (CSWE Reaffirmation Workshop Training Manual, 2009, p. 91). Students must be registered for practice courses in order to be placed in field practicum. Implicit Curriculum“The implicit curriculum refers to the educational environment in which the explicit curriculum is presented. [It] is as important in shaping the professional character and competence of the programs graduates)” (CSWE Reaffirmation Workshop Training Manual, 2009, p. 99).MSW students are engaged in various committees that are critical to the programs’ culture and success. Committees on which students serve include curriculum, assessment, reaffirmation, field, and recruitment. Students also serve on planning committees for co-curricular activities such as conferences, symposia, and newsletter. A student, Tabatha Miller, served as the Editor of last year’s MSW eNewsletter. Students also serve as research and graduate assistants.MSW students demonstrate leadership skills through their Student Councils on both the Dover and Wilmington campuses. The officers are elected and govern their respective councils with the assistance of faculty advisors. For more information on student activities see MSW Student Council Newsletter.Each year a student is elected by his or her peers to run for the elected position of MSW Student Representative to NASW DE Chapter. This is an elected position on the organization’s Board of Directors. The student serves a one year term.Alumni are very important to the MSW program. They serve as Adjunct Faculty, Field Instructors, Guest Lecturers, and speakers at co-curricular events. Alumni also co-author articles for journals and reports and co-present research findings at conferences with MSW faculty. The Alumni Association is in the process of being reorganized by 2010 alumnus Tabatha Miller.  In Summer 2010 she edited the first alumni eNewsletter and created the first alumni Facebook page.Curriculum GuidesMasters Program—2 year Full-TimeCourse SyllabiPolicies & Services in Social Welfare I (SCWK 601)Policies & Services in Social Welfare II (SCWK 602)Human Behavior & the Social Environment I (SCWK 603)Human Behavior & the Social Environment II (SCWK 604)Generalist Practice I (SCWK 605)Generalist Practice II (SCWK 606)Research & Evaluation Methods I (SCWK 607)Research & Evaluation Methods II (SCWK 608)Administration, Management & Supervision in Social Work Practice (SCWK 610)Field Practicum I (SCWK 633)Field Practicum II (SCWK 634)Field Practicum III (SCWK 635)Field Practicum IV (SCWK 636)Theories of Personality & Psychopathology (SCWK 643)Advanced Generalist Practice I (SCWK 646)Advanced Generalist Practice II (SCWK 647)Practice & Program Evaluation for the Advanced Practitioner (SCWK 651)Advanced Generalist Practice in Public Health (SCWK 660)Advanced Generalist Practice III (SCWK 668)Advanced Generalist Practice IV (SCWK 669) Additional InformationRequest form for more information 
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Graduate Faculty


Professor
Suri
ksuri@desu.edu
(302) 254-5340

Associate Professors
Jordan (MSW Program Director)
tjordan@desu.edu
(302) 857-6783

Quarless-Kingsberry
sqkingsberry@desu.edu
(302) 254-5338

Thomas
lthomas@desu.edu
(302) 857-6780

 

Resources/Information


 
 

Department of Nursing

Description: 

John R. Price Building
Phone: 302.857.6750
Fax: 302.857.6781

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So you want to become a nurse? Whether you’re a beginning student in nursing or a nurse returning to school, the Nursing Program at Delaware State University has a course of study to meet your needs.The program is approved by the Delaware Board of Nursing (Cannon Building, Suite 203, 861 Silver Lake Boulevard, Dover, DE 19904, 302-744-4500) and is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, GA 30326, 404-975-5000, www.acenursing.org).This accredited baccalaureate degree nursing program is grounded in the concept of academic excellence. Students seeking professional preparation for nursing practice are admitted to the program. Preparation for professional nursing practice demands a knowledge of the humanities, natural and social sciences and nursing theory with correlated laboratory and clinical practice.The faculty of the Department of Nursing subscribe to the mission and core values of DSU and EdH&PP. Its mission is to provide meaningful and relevant education that emphasizes the liberal arts, scientific and professional aspects of higher education for a multicultural student population. The nursing program provides educational opportunities for students of diverse backgrounds and prepares knowledgeable, entry-level practitioners for meeting present and future health needs of individuals, families, groups and communities. The nursing program develops an educational base for graduate study and fosters professionalism.The primary purposes of the program are (1) to prepare competent professional nurses, (2) to meet the needs of a culturally diverse student population, and (3) to develop an educational base for future specialization and/or graduate study.The nursing curriculum is four academic years and leads to the bachelor of science degree with a major in nursing. Professional level nursing courses include both nursing theory and related laboratory and clinical study. Health agencies including hospitals, nursing homes, clinics, and other community health settings, and schools in the Delaware area provide settings for laboratory study in nursing. Practica are also provided in the simulated laboratory in the Department of Nursing.Students who meet nursing admission criteria may be admitted to the nursing program. Nursing students are responsible for their own transportation to all clinical experiences. All nursing students are eligible to become members of the Delaware State University Student Nurses' Association. Delaware State University Nursing Honor Society invites students to be members after successful completion of the junior year of the Nursing Program with a 3.0 GPA and in the top 1/3 of the class. 
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Department of Nursing
Price Bldg. Room 123
1200 N. DuPont Highway
Dover, DE 19901-2277


(302) 857-6750
(302) 857-6781 Fax
Mon. - Fri. 8:30 to 4:30


Faculty/Staff Profile


Department Chair

Dr. Sharon Mills-Wisneski
Chairperson, Associate Professor
Price 101
302.857.6750
smillswis@desu.edu


Associate Professors



Dr. Jodi Dampeer-Moore
Price 120 A
302.857.6754
jdampeer@desu.edu



Dr. Stephanie Evans-Mitchell
Price 117 B
302.857.6760
smitchell@desu.edu



Dr. Agnes Richardson
Price 120 B
302.857.6749
arichardson@desu.edu

Dr. Carol Sando

Price 118
302.857.6798
csando@desu.edu

Dr. Yvonne Stringfield
Price 117 C
302.857.6753
ystringfield@desu.edu


Assistant Professors



Dr. Michelle O’Neal 
Price 121 C
302.857.6764
moneal@desu.edu


Clinical Practitioners



Mrs. Eunice Gwanmesia
Price 119 C
302.857.6766
egwanmes@desu.edu



Ms. Vivian Hendricks
Price 119 B
302.857.6795
vhendricks@desu.edu



Mrs. Sara Myers
Price 121 B
302.857.6757
smyers@desu.edu
 

Professional Staff

Mrs. Michele Scialla
Nursing Learning Resource Center Manager
Price 111 E
302.857.6748
mscialla@desu.edu

 

Staff

Ms. Donna Bigsby
Senior Secretary
Price 123 A
302.857.6750
dbigsby@desu.edu



Ms. Mahala Duffy
Senior Secretary
Price 101
302.857.6759
mduffy@desu.edu
 

Student Information

Criteria for the Professional Nursing Phase

Application for Admission to the Professional Phase -- Check back shortly

Please return completed applications to:
Mrs. Michelle Rush
Price Bldg., Room 111


Faculty Announcements

Calendar of Events

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