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Nursing Course Descriptions

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NURS-191. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR I – NURSING/PRE-NURSING.  1:2:1 University Seminar is a two semester, general education comprehensive core course requirement that focuses on assisting first year students in a seamless transition from high school to college, and in becoming familiar with Delaware State University. University Seminar is specifically designed to develop academic skills including critical reading, thinking, listening, writing and speaking, as well as using the academic library and pertinent technology. As a result of this course, each student should come to realize that the university is a unique culture grounded in tradition and history and guided by shared assumptions and expectations of students, professors, and administrators. The strands and goals of the General Education Program are embedded in the class activities, providing each student the opportunity to cultivate the critical thinking skills and knowledge necessary to become globally competitive. Credit, one hour. NURS-192. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR II – NURSING/PRE-NURSING.  1:1:1 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education comprehensive core course requirement that focuses on assisting first year students in a seamless transition from high school to college, and in becoming familiar with Delaware State University. University Seminar is specifically designed to develop academic skills including critical reading, thinking, listening, writing and speaking, as well as using the academic library and pertinent technology. As a result of this course, each student should come to realize that the university is a unique culture grounded in tradition and guided by shared assumptions and expectations of students, professors and administrators. The strands and goals of the General Education Program are embedded in the class activities, providing each student the opportunity to cultivate the critical thinking skills and knowledge necessary to become globally competitive. Credit, one hour. NURS-204. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY IN NURSING.  3:3:0 This course introduces the student to the pathophysiologic disruptions in the normal body functioning in individuals across the lifespan; assessment and analysis of objective and subjective manifestations of common health problems resulting from environmental, genetic and stress-related mal-adaptations are analyzed. Diagnostic assessments are discussed for each disease process. Alternative medical and pharmacological management is briefly discussed for selected disease processes, and related nursing implications are explored. Prerequisites: BIOL 207 and BIOL 221 Credit, three hours NURS-207.  PHARMACOLOGY IN NURSING.  3:3:0 This course gives an overview of drug classifications, uses of drugs by systems, and disease.  It incorporates core drug knowledge related to therapeutic uses, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, contraindications and precautions, adverse effects, and drug interactions. Each unit will relate drug use with other drugs, food, and varied use across the lifespan. Dosage calculations, conversions and certain chemical formulations will be included.  Emphasis is given to the importance of patient safety, culture, and the nursing process. Prerequisites: BIOL 207, BIOL 208 Credit, three hours NURS-210.  CLINICAL REASONING.  2:2:0 The purpose of this course is to assist the nursing students to develop comprehensive and focused nursing assessment skills and clinical reasoning and judgment in clinical nursing practice. This course examines the collaborative role of the nurse and the use of critical thinking to assess, analyze, and recognize clients at risk for adverse health outcomes. This course uses the nursing process as a framework to guide assessments, analysis, evidence-based interventions, and to maximize safe outcomes for clients. The implementations of evidence-based strategies to promote safety and prevent critical incidents are discussed. The legal and ethical implications of nurses’ failure to intervene early with at risk patients are examined.  Prerequisites;  BIOL 207, BIOL 208, BIOL 221 Credit, two hours NURS-300. GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT ACROSS LIFE SPAN.  2:2:0   This online course is designed to assist the student in understanding concepts associated with normal growth and development across the lifespan (conception to late adulthood). Application of this knowledge will assist the student to provide appropriate interventions for clients and their significant others. Students will be introduced to major theories of human development across the lifespan. Emphasis will be placed on the influences of the psychological, sociological, and cultural dimensions of human functioning and health promotion across the lifespan. Prerequisites: PSYC 201 Credit, two hours NURS-307. INTRODUCTION TO NURSING PRACTICE.  5:3:6 This course focuses on fundamental nursing interventions and assisting individual clients to fulfill basic human needs. Adaptation related to meeting physiological, safety and security needs are emphasized. Students begin to apply principles of the nursing process when planning care for individual clients in long-term care structured settings. Opportunities to practice in the roles of caregiver, communicator, problem-solver and a group member of the health care team are provided. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all General Education and Support courses for freshman and sophomore year; formal admission to the Nursing major, (success on the Nursing Entrance Exam, G.P.A. of 3.0 or higher). Co-requisites: NURS 308, NURS 309. Credit, five hours. NURS-308. HEALTH ASSESSMENT.  3:2:3 The course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to collect data related to individual health using a multi-dimensional approach. Students use a systems approach as assessment devices and procedures are introduced in the application of data collection related to human body structure and functioning. Physical examination techniques are evaluated using simulation scenarios. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all General Education and Support courses for the Freshman and Sophomore years; formal admission to the Nursing major, (success on the Nursing Entrance Exam, minimum G.P.A. of 3.0 or higher). Co-requisites: NURS 307, NURS 309. Credit, three hours. NURS-309. MENTAL HEALTH NURSING.  5:3:6 The course provides students with didactic and clinical learning experiences utilizing the nursing process as a means of providing health care to individuals, families and groups experiencing maladaptive alterations in mental health. Student development in the following nursing roles is emphasized: communicator in the therapeutic nurse-client relationship, advocate of client’s rights and caregiver. The course prepares students to communicate professionally in the health care environment. It exposes students to maladaptive behaviors as they relate to safe, competent nursing skills. A holistic approach, which combines medical nursing and mental health nursing, will produce a nurse who is better prepared for their professional role. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all General Education and Support courses for freshman and sophomore year; formal admission to the Nursing major, (success on the Nursing Entrance Exam, G.P.A. of 3.0 or higher). Co-requisites: NURS 307, NURS 308. Credit, five hours. NURS-310. INTRODUCTION TO NURSING RESEARCH.  3:3:0  An introductory course of the fundamentals and principles of the research process and their application in nursing. Emphasis is placed on developing proficiency in critiquing and evaluating nursing research findings as they related to the evidence-based nursing practice (EBP). Prerequisites: Successful completion of NURS 307, NURS 308, NURS 309. Co-requisites: NURS 311, NURS 316. Credit, three hours. NURS-311.  NURSING CARE OF THE CHILD AND FAMILY.  5:3:6 Students develop competencies and skills to manage health care of children experiencing potential and actual problems in fulfilling human needs during the process of achieving biopsychosocial adaptation, and anticipatory guidance as part of health promotion on the individual as well as community levels. Roles of the professional nurse, including communication, ethics and cultural competency, in promoting health and adaptation for the child within the context of the family are emphasized in clinical and theoretical components of the course. Prerequisites: Successful completion of NURS 307, NURS 308, NURS 309. Co-requisites: NURS 310, NURS 316. Credit, five hours. NURS-316.  ADULT HEALTH NURSING I.  5:3:6 This course provides students with both didactic and clinical learning experiences designed to provide nursing care to adult clients who are experiencing selected communicable and chronic medical-surgical health problems in acute care and simulated clinical settings. Students utilize the nursing process to provide evidence-based healthcare to individuals. The course also focuses on individual and family responses to illness experiences. Emphasis is placed on multiple roles of nurses: caregiver, critical thinker, and healthcare team member. Pre-requisites:  NURS 307, NURS 308, NURS 309 Co-requisites:  NURS 310, NURS 311 Credit, five hours. NURS-400.  ADULT HEALTH II NURSING.  5:3:6 This course provides students with both didactic and clinical learning experiences designed to provide nursing care to adult clients who are experiencing acute and complex medical-surgical health problems in acute care clinical settings. This course focuses on utilization of the nursing process as a means of providing evidence based health care to the study of individuals with complex health problems.  The cultural, ethical, psychosocial, and legal aspects of these complex health problems as they affect individuals, families, and the health care team are emphasized. Clinical simulation activities, observation, and acute care learning experiences with the client are provided. Prerequisite:  Successful completion of all junior nursing courses. Co-requisites: NURS405, NURS408 Credit, five hours. NURS-405. NURSING LEADERSHIP.  3:3:0 The course explores concepts of leadership and management.  Emphasis is on the application of communication, delegation, and culture with a focus on legal and ethical aspects of decision making. The course will emphasize the use of critical thinking in the leadership/manager role in the delivery of health care in diverse multicultural settings.      Prerequisites: Successful completion of all junior nursing courses and first semester senior level Nursing courses. Co-requisites: NURS 407 and NURS 408. Credit, three hours. NURS-407. HEALTH PROMOTION, MAINTENANCE AND RESTORATION II.  5:3:6 The course provides students with didactic and clinical learning experiences utilizing the nursing process as a means of providing health care to individuals and families experiencing maladaptive alterations in cardiac, respiratory, neurological and gastrointestinal systems. The theoretical and clinical components are designed to assist the student to determine priority of client needs and to recognize client responses to illness.  The course provides for development of critical thinking skills and strategies of health promotion, maintenance, and restoration across the life span. Prerequisites: Successful completion of NURS 310, NURS 311, NURS 312. Co-requisites: NURS 408, NURS 409. Credit, five hours. NURS-408. MATERNAL NEWBORN NURSING.  5:3:6 This course provides didactic and clinical learning experiences designed to assist students to apply the nursing process in providing care to the childbearing family during antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum periods in a variety of settings. Health maladaptation’s as they relate to growth and development are examined. The nurses’ role in health promotion and disease prevention to fulfill client needs in childbearing and childrearing families is emphasized. The integration of basic genetic concepts and principles develops an understanding of the importance of genetics in nursing theory and clinical practice. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all junior courses. Co-requisites: NURS 405 and NURS 407. Credit, five hours. NURS-409. COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING.  5:3:6  The course provides didactic and clinical learning experiences for students in selected principles of community health, public and family health nursing. Students conduct in-depth community and family health assessments employing basic epidemiological principles and data collection strategies. The nursing process is utilized by students engaging in health promotion and maintenance strategies in a variety of community health settings. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all junior courses and NURS 405, NURS 407, NURS 408, and Co-requisites: NURS 410, NURS 412.  Credit, five hours. NURS-410. SPECIAL TOPICS IN NURSING.  3:3:0 This course is designed to review program content to prepare qualified senior-level nursing students to successfully take the NCLEX-RN exam to become Registered Nurses upon graduation.  Advanced test taking strategies are used to promote success on proctored testing in special topics as well as the comprehensive predictor exit exam Prerequisites: Successful completion of all junior courses and NURS 407, NURS 408, NURS 411. Co-requisites: NURS 409, NURS 412. Credit, three hours. NURS-412. HEALTH PROMOTION, MAINTENANCE AND RESTORATION III.  8:4:12 The course provides students with didactic and clinical learning experiences utilizing the nursing process as a means of providing health care to individuals and families experiencing maladaptive alterations in cardiac, respiratory, neurological and gastrointestinal systems. The theoretical and clinical components are designed to assist the student to determine priority of client needs and to recognize client responses to illness.  The course provides for development of critical thinking skills and strategies of health promotion, maintenance, and restoration across the life span. Prerequisites: NURS 312 HPMR1; NURS 407 HPMR II; NURS- 310 Nursing Research; NURS 311 Nursing Care of Child & Family Co-requisites: NURS 409, NURS 410. Credit, eight hours. NURS 417.  CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN NURSING.  3:3:0 This course uses a conceptual approach to explore dimensions of practice and client care issues that are directly related to the professional practice of nursing.  Students are assisted in analyzing major issues and trends influencing professional nursing practice and current health care trends used to influence decisions.  Policies related to social, ethical, legal, and economic environments are examined. Prerequisites:  NURS 307, NURS 3XX NURS 309 Co-requisites: NONE Credit, three hours. NURS 419.  TRANSITION TO PROFESSIONAL NURSING.  5:2:3 This is a capstone course that provides students with a preceptor integrative experience applying all dimensions of professional nurse in the care of diverse patient populations in acute care settings. The theoretical and preceptorship components are designed to assist the student to determine priority of client needs and to recognize client responses to illness. Application of knowledge and skills occurs in a preceptorship to facilitate an effective transition from student to graduate nurses. In addition, the preceptorship is designed to promote experiential learning.  The course provides for development of clinical reasoning skills and evidence-based practice standards. Pre-requisites:  NURS 400, NURS 405, NURS 408 Co-requisites:  NURS 409, NURS 417, NURS Elective Credits, five hours.

Admission to the Nursing Program

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Delaware State University College of Education, Health and Public Policy Department of Nursing   Admission Criteria for Pre-Nursing Majors   The following is the approved admission criteria for all pre-nursing students, who desired to be admitted into the Department of Nursing.   A complete admission packet must be submitted between March 15th and April 15th (no late applications will be accepted) to the: Students Service Center College of Education, Health, and Public Policy Price Bldg. 111 Delaware State University 1200 N. DuPont Hwy. Dover, DE 19901 (Phone): 302-857-7143   A minimal Grade Point Average (GPA) for admission is 3.0. All pre-requisites must be completed in the spring of applying semester. Students will be allowed to repeat one identified Science course (A&P I, A&P II, Microbiology and Pathophysiology). Students will be allowed to transfer in two of the four identified Science courses. Two (2) Science courses must be completed at Delaware State University. Science courses that are 5-years or older will not be transferrable. The NLN PAX will be given to freshman pre-nursing majors twice per year by the Department of Nursing. The NLN PAX can only be taken at Delaware State University, on specified dates in September and in March. To be eligible to apply to the nursing major, the applicant must score a minimum of 55% on all three sections (Verbal, Math and Science) and a minimum composite score of 115. The dates, times and location will be announced during University Seminar. Applicants, who have taken the NLN PAX more than twice, regardless of location, are ineligible for admission into the nursing major.         Approved by Department of Nursing May, 2014 Effective:  August 24, 2014, Revised July 2015    

Master of Science Degree in Sport Administration

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  Master of Science in Sport Administration offered by Department of Sport Management within College of Business, Delaware State University that professionally prepares ethical leaders for advanced responsibilities within sport organizations and/or to design and implement new sport or sport-related enterprises. This is a 30 credit hour, twelve-month program designed to develop your ability to lead and manage sport and/or sport-related organizations while adapting to changing economic, legal, political, and social influences. Unique Features: (1)This program adheres to standards of the National Association for Sport and Physical Education/North American Society for Sport Management; (2) courses are designed to incorporate extensive problem-based field experiences in the sport industry; and (3) all students pay in-state tuition and fees. Weeknight Program at Wilmington Site: Students will enroll for 9 credit hours (3 courses) during the fall and spring semesters (see below). Class meetings are Monday evenings from 5:00 – 10:30 PM for 7 weeks with a week break between sessions. The third course will be a web-based course that is throughout the semester. Fall   Code                                               Courses Credit 1 SPMT-672 Sport Management 3 2 SPMT -671 Financial Aspects in Sport 3 3 SPMT -676 Sport in Society 3                                                                                             Subtotal  9   Spring   Code                                               Courses Credit 1 SPMT -625 Introduction to Research Methods and Statistics 3 2 SPMT -674 Sport Marketing 3 3 SPMT -681 Legal Issues in Sport 3                                                                                             Subtotal  9   Summer   Code                                               Courses Credit 1 SPMT -673 Sport Facility Design and Management (Summer – I) 3 2 SPMT -675 Current Trends and Issues in Sport (Summer – I) 3 3 SPMT -616 Internship of Sport Administration (Summer – II) 6                                                                                             Subtotal  12 Total 30 Credits.    

Sport Management Dept. Course Descriptions

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  COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SPSC-105. RECREATIONAL AEROBICS. 1:1:0 Aerobics becomes very popular in most of recreational facilities such as YMCA and recreation centers of higher education across the country. For recreational purpose this course is designed for students who want to improve personal fitness and lifelong health and to participate in physical activity that combines with rhythmic aerobic exercise and stretching with the goals of improving all elements of physical well being. SPSC-110. FOUNDATION OF AQUATICS. 1:1:0 This is an introduction course of swimming designed for beginners of swimming by using the recreation pool of DSU Recreation Center. The course will focus on fundamental knowledge and skills of aquatics that will benefit students for lifelong recreation. SPSC-116. FOUNDATION OF GOLF. 1:1:0 This is an outdoor recreational course and designed for the students to learn fundamental knowledge and techniques of golf. The course will provide learning experience and basic training in golf that will benefit learners in healthy lifestyle and social opportunity through playing golf ($80 fee applies). The course will be held either on campus or off campus (golf court) faculties based on availability. SPSC-120. FOUNDATION OF RACQUETBALL ACTIVITIES. 1:1:0 This is an introduction course for racquet balls that could be used as recreational activities. The course may include one or more in tennis, table tennis, badminton, and other racquet skills and knowledge that will benefit students in physical well being and recreational enjoyment. The course will be held either outdoor or indoor faculties of DSU based on availability. SPSC-191 & 192. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR I & II. 1:2:0 University Seminar is a two semester, general education course sequence that develops academic skills including critical reading, thinking, writing and speaking as well as using the library, the Internet, and word processing. The strands and goals of the General Program are embedded in the class activities, providing each student the opportunity to cultivate the skills and knowledge necessary to become a life-long learner. A global, multi-cultural perspective will be used to discuss moral and ethical issues facing students in college life and career experiences. Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, wellness, nutrition, and health will be addressed. Opportunities will be provided for self-examination through assessment of career possibilities and basic learning, including time management, note taking and problem solving. Important goals of this course are to know the history of the University, to feel connected to the University and to have a common educational experience with other freshman. Credit: one hour each semester SPSC-200. TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS IN SPORT SCIENCES. 3:3:0 Tests and measurements in health and human performance is a course designed to prepare health and human performance professionals with a knowledge base involving evaluation tools, measurement techniques, and assessment modalities. A thorough understanding of measurement and evaluation is essential for prospective practitioners to effectively execute their duties and responsibilities in their respective work sites. The use of computing systems, various forms of technology, and the most recently developed tools are important in the preparation of effective teachers and practitioners. Organization, categorization, analysis and assessment tools and techniques play important roles in classroom management. Therefore, this course is part of the specialty area content of the health education and the physical education teacher education major program, as well as, the non-teacher education programs in Health and Human Performance. Credit: three hours. SPSC-204. METHODS AND MATERIALS IN RECREATION. 3:3:0 The course is designed with national standards of recreational management services with national Council On Accreditation (COA) of National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) cooperated with American Association for Physical Activity and Recreation (AAPAR). This course introduces students to program development processes in recreation and leisure services. Emphasis is on creating and implementing opportunities for positive recreation and leisure experiences. SPSC-271. MANAGEMENT IN SPORT & RECREATION. 3:3:0 This course provides an overview of the various sport industry segments and the careers found in these industry segments. SPSC-272. GOVERNANCE & INTERNATIONAL ASPECT SPORT. 3:3:0 This course provides an introduction to the history and philosophy of sport, leisure, and recreation in the United States. In addition to the structure of interscholastic athletics, collegiate athletics, and professional sports, and various sport national governing bodies will be discussed. Credit: three hours. SPSC-274. COMMUNICATION IN SPORT. 3:3:0 This course will examine the various forms of communication in the sport industry. The effective application of media and public relations in relation to the sport organization's success will be emphasized. Credit: three hours. SPSC-279. OBSERVATION AND FIELDWORK I. 1:0:2 Students will observe and assist in a variety of sport management activities under the supervision of professionals. A minimum of 45 hours is required. (Sport Management majors only) Credit: one hour. SPSC-280. PRACTICUM OF SPORT MANAGEMENT. 2:0:2 PRACTICA is a part-time work experience in the sport industry with two (2) credits and 80 clock hours. Practicum is often performed in proximity to the campus and usually involves observing and providing assistance to another professional. They must be directed and evaluated by a qualified faculty member with appropriate supervision by an on-site professional. SPSC-312. PSYCHOLOGY OF COACHING. 3:3:0 Psychology is increasingly seen as an important aspect in sport and plays an important role in the position of coach. This course is designed to introduce students to prevalent theories, concepts and research or applied interests within the sub-discipline of sport psychology. Practical application of this information is provided for students who may be pursuing careers in coaching and the sport industry. Emphases will be placed on the role of the coach in regard to enhancing the performance of athlete, team and organization. SPSC-331. OBSERVATION AND FIELDWORK. 2:0:2 Observation and fieldwork at a selected health agency (Community Health majors only). Prerequisites: Health 108 and Health 234 (may be taken concurrently). Credit: two hours. SPSC-371. FINANCIAL ASPECTS OF SPORT. 3:3:0 This course examines the financial and accounting principles and practices and their application in for-profit and nonprofit sport organizations. Topics include revenue and expenses, issues impacting revenue and expenses, budgeting methods, economic impact, and methods of funding for-profit and nonprofit sport organizations and programs. Credit: three hours. SPSC-372. LEADERSHIP IN SPORT. 3:3:0 The study of the theories, principles, and practices of leadership and group interaction in sport oriented settings. The course includes some practical experience in recreational and/or sport leadership through special events at the university or in the community. Credit: three hours. SPSC-373. PROGRAMMING IN SPORT. 3:3:3 This course introduces students to information needed to successfully program for sport-oriented organizations. Students will chose and/or develop programs or events, flyers advertising the events, budgets, and help to run the events on or off campus. Students will be required to work at events outside of class time. Credit: three hours. SPSC-374. MARKETING IN SPORT. 3:3:0 This course provides an overview of the principles and practices of promotions and marketing in the sport industry. Topics include sport marketing planning, market segmentation and identification of the target market, sport marketing mix, and sponsorship. Credits: three hours. SPSC-376. SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ASPECTS OF SPORT. 3:3:0 This course is an examination of the interactive impact of sport and society. Credit: three hours. SPSC-377. AREA FACILITIES AND DESIGN. 3:3:0 This course is designed to provide knowledge and skills in effectively managing a recreation or sport facility. It contains both educational references and professional industry insights. SPSC-401.  PRINCIPLES OF COACHING. 3:3:0 This is a core undergraduate course of the coaching minor applies all necessary principles and methods of coaching for the levels of professional, collegiate, interscholastic, and recreational sports.  The major principles and methods may relate to the coaching philosophy and ethics, safety and injury prevention during the practice and games, developing physical conditioning of athletes, youth players' growth and development, teaching and communication of the coaches, methods to improve sport skills and tactics, organization and administration of sport teams, and ways to evaluate performances of athletes and coaching effectiveness. Credit: three hours. SPSC-402.  COACHING PRACTICUM. 3:3:0 This is a capstone course of the coaching minor applied all necessary knowledge, skills and methods of coaching to the field experience through direct observation and participation with a sport team.  It is structured as a class combined with site coaching experience.  The student will be instructed theoretically by the instructor and supervised practically by the head coach of assigned team. Credit: three hours. SPSC-403. ORGANIZATION & ADMINISTRATION OF SPORT AND ATHLETIC PROGRAM. 3:3:0 The philosophy of athletics and sport programs, communication and leadership skills, facilities and equipment management, budgeting, personnel management, risk management, public relations and current issues will be explored. Students will be guided in the preparation of position papers, research reports, and presentations relating to the administration of athletic and sport programs, with the intent of providing realistic pre-professional experiences in the field. Amateur, professional, public and private athletic sport settings will be discussed. SPSC-414. PRINCIPLE OF COACHING. 3:3:0 This is a core undergraduate course of the coaching minor which applies all necessary principles and methods of coaching for the levels of professional, collegiate, interscholastic, and recreational sports. The major principles and methods may relate to the coaching philosophy and ethics, safety and injury prevention during the practice and games, developing physical conditioning of the athletes, youth players' growth and development, teaching and communication of the coaches, methods to improve sport skills and tactics, organization and administration of sport teams, and ways to evaluate performances of athletes and coaching effectiveness. SPSC-415. COACHING PRACTICUM. 3:3:0 This is a capstone course of the coaching minor applied all necessary knowledge, skills, and methods of coaching to the field experience through direct observation and participation with a sport team. The course is structured as a class combined with site coaching experience. The student will be instructed theoretically by the Instructor and supervised practically by the Head Coach of assigned team. SPSC-471. LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN SPORT AND FITNESS. 3:3:0 This course provides an overview of legislation, legal actions, and ethical concerns in the sport industry. SPSC-473. AREAS AND FACILITIES IN SPORT. 3:3:0 A study of the facilities used in the sport industry. This course will focus on the design, operation, management, scheduling, and staffing of different types of facilities. Students will visit local and regional facilities outside of class time. Credit: three hours. SPSC-475. CURRENT ISSUES IN SPORT. 3:3:0 This course is a senior seminar, which examines the current trends and issues in the sport industry. Extensive research of current texts and journal articles is required. Credit: three hours. SPSC-476. INTERNSHIP IN SPORT. 12:0:30 Off-campus senior capstone field experience with an approved agency in the sport industry. Students are supervised and evaluated by the university staff and the cooperating agency staff. A minimum of 400 clock hours is required. A journal is required. Prerequisite: Senior Sport Management majors with all other course work completed prior to this experience. Credit: twelve hours. SPSC-490, RECREATION PRACTICUM. 3:3:0 The course is designed with national standards of recreational management services with national Council On Accreditation (COA) of National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) cooperated with American Association for Physical Activity and Recreation (AAPAR). It is a capstone undergraduate course of the recreation management minor. The practicum should apply all necessary knowledge, skills and methods of recreation management to the field experience through direct observation and participation in the routine operation with a private or public recreational facility. It is structured as 100 clock-hour field experience and the students will be instructed theoretically by the instructor and supervised practically by the recreational organization. SPSC-616. INTERNSHIP IN SPORT. 6:6:0 The Sport Administration Internship is an experience in which a sport administration major enrolls in after all requirements, including coursework, in the sport administration curriculum has been completed successfully. The Sport Administration Internship comprises a minimum of 270 field-based hours at the agency, or at events sponsored by the agency if the responsibilities are carried out at another site. Credit, six hours. SPSC-625. INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS AND STATISTICS. 3:3:0 The course is designed to introduce students to research methods and statistics used to assess, evaluate, and critically examine principle and practices of sport organizations. Credit, three hours. SPSC-671. SPORT MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of organizational theory and its application in the sport industry. Students will examine the organizational structure, leadership styles, and culture of different sport organizations. Credit, three hours. SPSC-672. FINANCIAL ASPECTS IN SPORTS. 3:3:0 The course examines the financial and accounting principles and their application in for-profit and non-profit sport organizations. Topics include revenue and expenses, budgeting methods, economic principles, methods of financing sport and sport venues, and fund raising methods. Credit, three hours. SPSC-673. SPORT FACILITY DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 The course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of conducting needs assessments, planning, constructing, equipping, staffing, programming, and managing facilities in sport and physical activities. Credit, three hours. SPSC-674. SPORT MARKETING. 3:3:0 The course provides an overview of the principles and practices of promotions and marketing in the sport industry. Topics include sport marketing planning, market segmentation and identification of target market, sport marketing mix, and sponsorship. Credit, three hours. SPSC-675. CURRENT TRENDS AND ISSUES IN SPORT. 3.3.0 The course examines the current trends and issues in the sport industry. Extensive research of current texts and journal articles is required. Credit, three hours. SPSC-676. SPORT IN SOCIETY. 3.3.0 The course is an examination of sport as a social institution and of the interactive impact of sport and society. Credit, three hours. SPSC-681. LEGAL ISSUES IN SPORT. 3.3.0 The course is designed to provide an overview of legislation and legal actions in sport. Credit, three hours.  

Social Work BSW Course Descriptions

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39-101. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK. 3:3:0 This course is an introduction to the field of social welfare and the professional of social work. The historical background within which social welfare arose provides the context for in-depth learning about specific social problem areas. This course serves to introduce prospective social work majors to the field of social welfare and social work, help them arrive at career decisions and prepare for future social work courses. Students are introduced to generalist social work practice, empowerment, and the Black experience, as a means for providing the necessary beginning knowledge and skills for working with individual, groups, families, communities, and organizations. Credit, three hours. 39-201. ECONOMICS, POLITICS AND SOCIAL WELFARE. 3:3:0 This course provides an examination of the structure, function and interaction of economics, politics and social welfare. The interrelation between the nature and scope of the U.S. economic and political systems is explored. Focus is on social welfare policies and programs within the context of economic and political demands. Selected social welfare problems are surveyed and examined. This course will attempt to apply the principles of political economy to the world of Social Work. What is the basis of this discipline, and how can this method of inquiry enhance our understanding of it. What? How? And Why? Do we do what we do as social workers? Prerequisites: Social Work 101. Credit, three hours. 39-302. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I. 3:3:0 Human Behavior and Social Environment I is the first part of a two-semester course. This course, a study of the various components of human behavior, is developed to provide a framework for studying the factors that shape the development of individual growth and social interaction as a means for developing a conceptual model for viewing human behavior from a holistic perspective. An ecological approach will be used that stresses: (1) the major areas of normal developmental milestones from the perspective of significant biological, cognitive, psychological and socio-structural variables, (2) life cycle stages and their associated life events, and (3) human diversity and its effect on human behavior. Prerequisites: Junior standing, Sociology 101, Sociology 203, Biology 100. Credit, three hours. 39-303. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT II. 3:3:0 Continues focus of HBSE I. Includes issues such as death and dying; stress and coping; and normal and abnormal behaviors. Prerequisites: Social Work 302. Credit, three hours. 39-310. ELEMENTARY STATISTICS FOR SOCIAL WORK. 3:3:0 This course communicates the underlying statistical methods used in the analysis of social data. The course presents the basic concepts and assumptions of statistical theory applied in the logical development of statistical inferences. Descriptive and inferential statistics (parametric and non-parametric) are covered. Emphasis is on the interpretation of statistics in social work research, literature, and evaluation. The course emphasizes a generalists perspective in social work practice problem solving. Basic concepts include centrality; estimation of variability; probability and the normal distribution; precision of estimate; group differences; ANOVA; single subject design regression and correlation. Prerequisites: Mathematics 101 and Mathematics 102. Credit, three hours. 39-311. INTRODUCTION TO GROUP DYNAMICS. 3:3:0 Students form small groups to experience various aspects of group life (group goals, leadership, communication and decision making, conflict, cohesion and norms, culture and stages of group development) and participate in total class sessions for mini-lectures and demonstrations of course content. Through readings, class discussions and experimental learning in these task groups, students integrate theory and action in group dynamics. The instructor serves as resource person and consultant to the small groups to foster their mutual aid in learning. Prerequisites: Social Work 101 and Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 39-315. SOCIAL WELFARE POLICIES AND PROGRAMS I. 3:3:0 This course provides a framework for the understanding of social welfare policies and programs and the historical and contemporary forces that have shaped their development in Western Europe and the United States and connects definitive issues of social policy and planning to the structure of social service program planning and delivery. The role of the social work profession in the formulation of social policy with special reference to advocacy and social action will be examined. Prerequisites: Junior standing. Credit, three hours. 39-316. SOCIAL WELFARE POLICIES AND PROGRAMS II. 3:3:0 Consistent with the generalist perspective to social work practice, the purpose of this course is to ensure that the student is able to analyze social welfare policies within a specific conceptual framework. To this end, students will, among other things, examine residual and universal social welfare benefits and related policies regarding their goals, recipients, form of benefits, how social welfare programs are financed, their effectiveness and adequacy, etc. While examining specific programs and policies, the course will explore the myriad social problems that give rise to social welfare programs and policies. The course will also examine the degree to which the concept of social and political justice bears on the nature and scope of social welfare programs and the policies that govern them. Prerequisites: Social Work 315. Credit, three hours. 39-341. SEMINAR IN HELPING. 3:3:0 This course is the first in a four course practice sequence. This course gives the student knowledge about entry level skills for the worker in activities and transactions with individuals, groups, families, organizations, institutions, and community systems. The second course, Social Work Practice Seminar I is structured as an experiential laboratory in which students begin to develop the entry level skills for generalist practice. In this course, the general method of social work practice will be introduced; a problem-solving approach, systems theory, and an ecological perspective will be highlighted. Students will become familiar with the general method's six (6) identifiable stages: engagement and problem identification, data collection, assessment and identification of possible interventions, intervention, evaluation, and termination. Within the context of a Black Experience and the philosophy of empowerment, application of social work values, promotion of social and economic justice, and service to diverse groups will be highlighted as they pertain to each topic. Prerequisites: Junior standing, Social Work majors only. Credit, three hours. 39-342. SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE SEMINAR I. 3:3:0 This course builds on the knowledge base of generalist social work practice which was covered in the preceding practice course, Seminar in Helping, and is structured as an experiential laboratory. The course will focus on two areas. The first area is interviewing strategies. Interviewing skills will be analyzed for the appropriate application with different size client systems (individuals, groups, families, communities, and organizations), with different populations, and with different racial, ethnic, gender, age (and otherwise different) client populations. The second area is the development of interpersonal practice skills especially those which empower others, the use of interventive roles, and recording skills which are needed to work with individuals, groups, families, communities, and organizations. Prerequisites: Junior standing, Social Work 341. Credit, three hours. 39-401. RACE AND ETHNIC DISPARITIES IN SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 This course examines the ways in which oppression and discrimination are institutionalized in various sectors of American society and their effect on racial and ethnic groups. It explores the multiple faceted experience of being a person of color and/or a specific ethnic group in the United States. Institutional forces (economic, educational, familial, political and social welfare) are examined that influence the structure and status of racial and ethnic groups. Particular attention will be given to racial and ethnic disparities in health care delivery systems. Emphasis is on the connections among forms of oppression, the ideology of donation and subordination which perpetuates oppressions, and the role of social work in utilizing appropriate strategies in challenging oppression and fostering social change. Prerequisites: Social Work 101, Social Work 302, and Junior status or permission of instructor. Credit, three hours. 39-402. FAMILY VIOLENCE. 3:3:0 An examination of violence in the family, including child, spousal, sexual, and elderly abuse. Violence not only in America, but in other countries will be explored and compared. Emphasis will be on determining mechanisms, therapies and techniques, not only for treating the abuser and the abused, but in preventing violence in the family. Prerequisites: Psychology 201, Social Work 101, Junior status or permission of the instructor. Credit, three hours. 39-405. OCCUPATIONAL SOCIAL WORK. 3:3:0 This course is designed to introduce students to the field of occupational social services. Content includes: an overview of the world of work, the history of occupational social welfare, organizational and structural arrangements of business, labor and trade unions, and the various social work roles in industrial settings. Program in mental health and substance abuse will be examined. Issues affecting special groups - women, minorities, and the handicapped - discussed. Prerequisites: Junior standing. Credit, three hours. 39-407. INTEGRATING FAMILY AND SOCIAL SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEMS IN EDUCATION. 3:3:0 A study of parent involvement from an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores home-school collaboration from a holistic viewpoint using historical, educational, psychological, ethnic/social diversity, and sociological perspectives. The requirements, challenges and opportunities, as well as the roles and functions of early child care teachers and social workers within a complex ecological system of home/school/community will be examined, differentiated and compared. Students will be offered experiential opportunities to gain awareness and knowledge of social policies and governmental initiatives, as well as community agencies that support families and children and the implications for prevention and/or intervention with a variety of systems. Prerequisites for Social Work Department: Psychology 201, Sociology 101, Senior status or permission of the instructor. Prerequisites for Education Department: Psychology 201, Education 206, Admission to TEP status. Credit, three hours. 39-413. RESEARCH AND EVALUATION METHODS I. 3:3:0 This is an introductory course in social work research methods. In an applied profession, knowledge of research principles is essential for understanding, critically evaluating, and competently utilizing the vast array of theories and methods available. In addition, the research process (as well as the skills involved in that process) provides a model for conscious, responsible, competent, and ethical practice. The course provides the student with the foundation skills for evaluating and critically reviewing his/her own practice. This course, then is designed both to develop such skills and to integrate this knowledge into a framework of professional social work practice from a generalist perspective. The course presents methods from the perspective that generalists can be proficient consumers of research and apply findings to practice. Prerequisites: Social Work 310. Credit, three hours. 39-414. RESEARCH AND EVALUATION METHODS II 3:3:0 Research and Evaluation Methods II is the second and final sequential research course offering in the BSW research curriculum. the course engages students in the scientific inquiry within the context of generalist social work practice and problem-solving. The course examines ways in which theoretical models underpin knowledge and skills for the application of methods associated with generalist social work practice. It examines the processes involved in research methodologies in studying individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Emphasis is directed toward framing hypothesis, research design and measurement. Continued consideration is given to the logic of various conceptualization and operationalization; sampling; and qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis. Prerequisites: Social Work 413. Credit, three hours. 39-421. ISSUES IN SOCIAL SERVICE DELIVERY. 3:3:0 Content material is designed to address some basic and emerging issues in the broad area of service delivery. Emphasis is on the social work practitioner working with individuals, families, groups, communities and organizations reflecting a broad spectrum of racial, ethnic, sexual, gender and cultural backgrounds and settings. Social issues such as perspectives on culture, sexual orientation, social change and advocacy, etc. are explored within the context of social work roles, responsibilities and functions. Additionally, issues related to organizational culture, policies and programs are assessed as to their mission and relevancy to the populations served. Prerequisites: Senior standing. Co-requisites: Social Work 450. Credit, three hours. 39-440. WELFARE OF CHILDREN. 3:3:0 Reviews historical perspectives of approaches on child welfare in the context of today's law, programs, services, and funding. Examines the complexity of government responsibility for service delivery. Explores the differentials of the public-private systems as they are reviewed in the traditional child welfare settings handling abused, dependent, neglected, and delinquent children. Examines the shift in emphasis from separation of children from the families to innovative, creative approaches to keep children at home. Utilizes a family-centered perspective. Addresses issues of law and funding, the related systems of mental health and education, and effort to look at services for a child and his family, the impact of advocacy groups on child welfare policy with implications for the practitioner. Case material documents and analyses each phase of the course outline. Prerequisites: Junior standing. Credit, three hours. 39-441. SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE SEMINAR II. 3:3:0 This course is a continuation of the principles and practices of the generalist perspective covered in Seminar in Helping and Social Work Practice Seminar I. It provides more in-depth knowledge of social work practice with individuals, groups, families, organizations and communities. Students will be provided with an understanding of various interventive strategies and the criteria necessary for choosing appropriate social work practice interventions. Students will begin to identify and analyze their own individual style of working with each of the aforementioned client groups. Practice issues such as alternative paradigms in practice, ethnic sensitive practice, psychopharmological considerations in practice, empowerment for working with minorities, women and other diverse populations will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Social Work 342, Co-requisite: Social Work 450. Open to social work majors only. Credits, three hours. 39-450. FIELD INSTRUCTION I. 6:3:0 Students are placed in a social work agency for their first practical experience and afforded an opportunity to integrate theory and knowledge base of social work learned in class with the actual setting of the social welfare field. Agencies selected for use as field placements are those committed to the value of training undergraduate social work students for generalist practice and who have indicated a willingness to structure actively a number of learning experiences for students. Students are responsible for making their transportation and housing arrangements. Prerequisites: all prior required general education, co-requisite and social work courses as defined by the Social Work program. Open to social work majors only. Credit, six hours. 39-451. FIELD INSTRUCTION II. 6:0:12 Continuation of experiential practice opportunities in a social service agency approved by the program. Students are exposed to continued in-depth correlation of theory and practice for entry level into the employment field. Agencies selected for use as field placements are those committed to the value of training undergraduate social work students for generalist practice and willing to structure actively a number of learning experiences for students. Agency field instructors have met the criteria set by the Council on Social Work. Students are responsible for making their own transportation and housing arrangements. Prerequisites: All prior required general education, corequisite and social work courses as defined by the Social Work Program (See curriculum plan). Open to social work majors only. Credit, six hours. 39-460. SENIOR SEMINAR. 3:3:0 Provides an integrative experience to the students of course and field materials. Students are given an opportunity to assess and define their learning needs as based on practice skills and theoretical background, and plan and develop structured learning experiences. Focus is on the development of an individual social work practice frame of reference. Explores careers and graduate school systems with emphasis on practice skills required for entrance into the post-graduate market. Pre-requisite: Social Work 441. Co-requisite: Social Work 451. Open to social work majors only. Credit, three hours. 39-462. SOCIAL WORK WITH AND FOR THE AGED. 3:3:0 This course is an overview of and an introduction of the field of Gerontology and social work with and on behalf of older persons. Developmental stages of older persons are studied and aging is presented as a normative aspect of the life cycle. Theories of aging and adaptation are reviewed as are effects of the social environment upon older persons. Based on this foundation, students explore interventions particularly suited to work with and for older persons at the individual, family, group, community, and policy levels. Issues of the aged poor, females, minorities, rural residents and other diversities are explored. Policies, program and services for the elderly are studied. The goal of this course is to prepare generalist social work practitioners to work with older clients and their families and with service delivery systems addressing the needs of this clientele. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit, three hours. 39-465. ALCOHOLISM AND OTHER ADDICTIONS. 3:3:0 This course introduces students to the field of addictions. The primary objective is to help social workers and other helping professionals understand the uses and abuses of licit and illicit drugs, addictive behavior, i.e. eating, gambling, smoking, etc., and the impact of addiction of individuals, families and society. The role of the helping professionals in the identification, prevention, treatment of these dependencies and the social problems related to them, i.e. racism, economic, gender and cultural barriers, etc. will be explored. Credit, three hours. 39-469. HUMAN SEXUALITY AND SEX RELATED ISSUES. 3:3:0 Explores the nature and varieties of human sexual expression, the reason and effect of societal controls and changing definitions of normal sexual behavior. The application of social work services to problems associated with human sexuality, treatment and prevention are stressed. Prerequisite: Senior level status or permission of director of program. Credit, three hours. 39-470. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-3:3:0 Provides the opportunity to undertake individual, in-depth, supervised study of a practice theory or social issue. Prerequisites: Senior level status and prior written consent of instructor. Credit, one to three hours.  

Graduate Program in Social Work

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The Graduate Program in Social Work The Graduate Social Work Program received full accreditation status from the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) in 2004. The MSW program at Delaware State University has one concentration — advanced generalist practice.  Accordingly, the program prepares students for advanced practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.  Having satisfied all of the program’s academic requirements, students leave the program with competencies allowing them to practice with and on behalf of Delawareans, and with clients throughout the region, across the nation and globally. Course offerings provide students an understanding of social, economic, political and interpersonal problems from a global perspective.  Consequently, students comprehend the effects of problems, such as poverty, health disparities, racism and oppression on populations that live in parts of the world outside the United States. It is understood that these unique elements of the curriculum are congruent with the concepts, and intervention principles that define the framework for all professional social work practice, that is, generalist practice.  Therefore, students graduate able to generalize the knowledge, values and skills that underlie all social work practice in different settings with diverse populations experiencing multiple, complex problems. The MSW curriculum is grounded on the Department of Social Work’s five underpinnings. Graduates of the MSW program possess the competencies needed to engage, assess, intervene and evaluate individuals, families, treatment groups, organizations and communities. They are able to evaluate the efficacy of interventions and programs, integrate theories of personality and adult psychopathology, address health and mental health disparities from a public health perspective and understand and assimilate theories and practice principles that guide human service administration.  Graduates are competent to practice with systems of all sizes in a wide array of settings—from traditional public social welfare and governmental agencies to small and medium size non-profit organizations to private and for profit entities. The foundation courses present a generalist perspective to social work practice and consist of fundamental content in human behavior and the social environment, social policies, research, practice and field practicum. The advanced courses build upon the core foundation year competencies and practice behaviors of acquired knowledge, values and skills and demonstrate the integration and application of both the core and advanced competencies in practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Admission Information/Requirements The full MSW Program is offered in Dover on the main campus and in Wilmington on the satellite campus.  Students may enroll at either campus and can take classes at both campuses simultaneously. Interest Sessions (also called Open Houses) are held during the spring semester on both the Dover and Wilmington Campuses.  The purpose of the Interest Sessions is to provide information about the Program's explicit and implicit curriculums to candidates who have an interest in pursuing a MSW degree at Delaware State University. For admission to graduate study, applicants must show evidence that they have earned the baccalaureate degree at an accredited college or university (or its equivalent for foreign students) and possesses the ability to engage in high quality graduate work. Applicants must have an undergraduate Liberal Arts foundation as defined by the Program faculty. A background in the social and behavioral sciences is preferred. No academic credit is given for life and/or professional experience. All applicants must submit a complete graduate application package by the established deadline. The entire application can be completed and submitted online. May 31st is the deadline for Advanced Standing admission and June 30th is the deadline for Fall admission. There is no Spring or Summer admission. o    An application must be submitted for the Fall semester in which applicant wishes to enroll. Due to the required prerequisites, the MSW program admits students only in the Fall semester. o   Official transcripts of all previous undergraduate and graduate work are required. The applicant’s undergraduate transcript must reflect a Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 3.0 or above on a 4.00 scale (4.0=A). A “B” average in the major field of study is required. Higher scholastic achievement is preferred. o  Official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores, not more than five (5) years old, are required for admission.  Applicants are strongly encouraged to include their GRE scores with their applications. Performance on the GREs will not negate admission. o  A personal statement explaining why you want to 1) obtain a MSW degree, and 2) how you plan to use the knowledge and skills you will obtain to impact social and economic justice and improve services for populations at risk.  Statement must be no more than two (2) typed pages, double spaced, 12 point Times Roman font. o  Three letters of recommendation are required. These letters should be from individuals who can provide information about your scholarly ability, moral character and characteristics to succeed in a graduate program. Individuals like present or past teachers, advisors, supervisors, and colleagues provide strong recommendations. Personal Attributes Motivation towards, interest in, and preparation for social work education; A capacity to function as a creative, responsible independent, and accountable practitioner; Ability to deal with sexual, racial, ethnic, physical, social, and cultural diversity; A capacity and willingness for self-introspection and change; A capacity to deal with individual differences; A desire to work for social change in order to enhance leadership skills and create greater equity in society; The ability to develop a scientific stance towards social welfare and social work practice, and Identification with and a desire to apply social work knowledge, values and skills.   Type of Admission Advanced standing status—one summer plus academic  year.  The Advanced Standing Seminar course is offered during the second summer session, usually from the beginning of July to the beginning of August.  The course may be offered online.  For accurate information regarding the days and times the class will meet and method of instruction, go to mydesu on the university's website. Full-time status—two years Part-time status—three or four years Advanced standing credits (BSW only) or transfer credits (MSW only) are given on a case-by-case basis.   Mandatory New Student Orientation will be held on TBA from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on the Dover campus and TBA from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on the Wilmington campus.  Students will receive all registration materials at orientation. A significant number of MSW students work full-time and hence all courses are held during evening hours between 4:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. and on weekends on an accelerated basis.  In addition, most courses are web-enhanced primarily through Blackboard.  The program plans to offer completely on-line courses in the near future. Residency Requirements According to standards established by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) and defined by the Graduate Program, students must complete their residency requirement in two consecutive semesters at Delaware State University during the first year of degreed admission. Medical Statement After admission, each student is required to submit a health history and a recent physical examination. The report must be signed by a licensed physician stating that the student is physically capable and free of contagion. Students who do not submit completed reports by the end of the first two weeks of the semester for which they are admitted may be subject to dismissal. Curriculum Requirements The Graduate Program in Social Work requires the successful completion (3.00 or above on a 4.00 scale) of 60 credit hours of graduate courses, inclusive of 12 credit hours of field practicum. This curriculum consists of 28 credits hours of generalist professional foundation courses and 32 credit hours of advanced generalist professional courses. Explicit Curriculum “The explicit curriculum constitutes the program’s formal educational structure and includes the courses and the curriculum. [It] achieves the program’s competencies through an intentional design that includes the foundation offered at the baccalaureate and master’s levels and the advanced curriculum offered at the masters level (EP 2.0)” (CSWE Reaffirmation Workshop Training Manual, 2009, p. 80). Please see MSW Student Handbook for curriculum. Field education is the “signature pedagogy”…through which students connect “…the theoretical and conceptual contribution of the classroom with the practical world of the practice setting” (CSWE Reaffirmation Workshop Training Manual, 2009, p. 91). Students must be registered for practice courses in order to be placed in field practicum. Implicit Curriculum “The implicit curriculum refers to the educational environment in which the explicit curriculum is presented. [It] is as important in shaping the professional character and competence of the programs graduates)” (CSWE Reaffirmation Workshop Training Manual, 2009, p. 99). MSW students are engaged in various committees that are critical to the programs’ culture and success. Committees on which students serve include curriculum, assessment, reaffirmation, field, and recruitment. Students also serve on planning committees for co-curricular activities such as conferences, symposia, and newsletter. A student, Tabatha Miller, served as the Editor of last year’s MSW eNewsletter. Students also serve as research and graduate assistants. MSW students demonstrate leadership skills through their Student Councils on both the Dover and Wilmington campuses. The officers are elected and govern their respective councils with the assistance of faculty advisors. For more information on student activities see MSW Student Council Newsletter. Each year a student is elected by his or her peers to run for the elected position of MSW Student Representative to NASW DE Chapter. This is an elected position on the organization’s Board of Directors. The student serves a one year term. Alumni are very important to the MSW program. They serve as Adjunct Faculty, Field Instructors, Guest Lecturers, and speakers at co-curricular events. Alumni also co-author articles for journals and reports and co-present research findings at conferences with MSW faculty.  Curriculum Guides Masters Program—2 year Full-Time   Additional Information Request form for more information  
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Graduate Faculty


Professor
Austin (MSW Program Director)
jaustin@desu.edu
302.857.6771

Associate Professors

Jordan
tjordan@desu.edu
302.254.5338

Quarless-Kingsberry
sqkingsberry@desu.edu
302.254.5338

Thomas
lthomas@desu.edu
302.857.6780

 

Resources/Information


MSW Student Handbook – under construction
 
 
 

Department of Nursing

Description: 

John R. Price Building
Phone: 302.857.6750
Fax: 302.857.6781

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Welcome to Delaware State University Department of Nursing. The Department of Nursing faculty and staff are committed to provide educational opportunities for students of diverse backgrounds and preparing high quality graduate nurses who are ready to practice in today’s challenging health-care environment.   The competitive program is grounded in academic excellence and prepares students to become professional nurses. Following the successful completion of the program, graduates will receive a Bachelor of Science degree, with a major in Nursing, and will be eligible to take the registered nurse licensure examination (NCLEX-RN)  administered by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing. The nursing curriculum consists of four (4) academic years. The student will take two years of pre-professional courses and apply for the professional phase of the nursing major during their sophomore year.  Professional phase nursing courses include both nursing theory and related laboratory and clinical study.  A variety of healthcare agencies including hospitals, long term care facilities, clinics, and community health settings, provide opportunities for clinical study in the tri state area.   Clinical laboratory practice is also provided in a state of the art simulation laboratory. The Nursing Program has full approval status from the Delaware Board of Nursing The Nursing Program is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing  and is on warning until reaccreditation visit scheduled for Spring 2017. ACEN 3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850 Atlanta, GA 30326 Phone: 404-975-5000    
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Department of Nursing
Price Bldg. Room 121
1200 N. DuPont Highway
Dover, DE 19901-2277


302.857.6750
302.857.6781 Fax
Mon. - Fri. 8:30 to 4:30


Faculty/Staff Profile


Department Chair


Dr. Agnes Richardson
Acting Chairperson/Associate Professor
Price 121A
302.857.6750
arichardson@desu.edu


Associate Professors

Dr. Jennifer Akey
Price 117B
302.857.6760
jakey@desu.edu



Dr. Jodi Dampeer-Moore
Price 120 A
302.857.6754
jdampeer@desu.edu

Dr. Sally Danz
Associate Professor
Price 121B
302.857.6791
sdanz@desu.edu


Dr. Sharon Mills-Wisneski
Price 123A
302.857.6793
smills-wis@desu.edu



Dr. Carol Sando
Price 118
302.857.6798
csando@desu.edu


Dr. Yvonne Stringfield

Price 117 C
302.857.6753
ystringfield@desu.edu


Clinical Practitioners



Mrs. Eunice Gwanmesia
Price 119 C
302.857.6766
egwanmes@desu.edu



Ms. Vivian Hendricks
Price 119 B
302.857.6795
vhendricks@desu.edu



Mrs. Sara Myers
Price 120B
302.857.6757
smyers@desu.edu
 

Staff

Vacant
Senior Secretary
Price 121
302.857.6750
 

Student Information

Criteria for the Professional Nursing Phase

Application for Admission to the Professional Phase -- Check back shortly

Please return completed applications to:
Mrs. Michelle Rush
Price Bldg., Room 111


 

Educational Leadership (M.Ed.) Program Details

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Philosophy, Goals and Objectives In collaboration with the State of Delaware, the purpose of Delaware State University Graduate Education Leadership program is to prepare Educational leaders for prominent leadership and service positions in School Districts, Higher Educational Institutions, and society. Through a rigorous educational formation and directed field experience, students emerge as viable candidates for leadership position throughout the country. Since (2002) the Doctorate and the Masters programs have consistently adjusted to meet the current needs of our public and higher education societies in dramatic changes. At Delaware State University, you will find a unique balance between rigorous research, serious academic studies, partnership, collegiality, and personal development. You will be prepared to make data driven decisions to serve authentically, and lead with integrity. Educational Philosophy  Delaware State University fulfills its mission with an emphasis on education that prepares Educational leaders for leadership and service in the public school system, higher education and other related educational institutions. Such an emphasis mandates a well rounded curriculum which prepares individuals who are thoughtful, compassionate, culturally sensitive, and capable of integrating personal integrity and scholarly appreciation in all avenues of society. Educational Goal The primary goal of the Delaware State University Educational Leadership Programs is to prepare leaders who are equipped with a repertoire of knowledge, skills, and dispositions to meet the challenges of school leadership. It is also to prepare leaders who demonstrate instructional leadership by understanding and applying the curriculum standards of the State of Delaware and being able to evaluate and mentor teachers using non-coercive methods to assist them with planning, presentation, and continuous refinement of instructional and leadership skills. Additional goals prepare leaders who can: Articulate a vision for public schools on the district and building levels as well as other educational institutions and involve all the stakeholders in strategic planning, implementing, and evaluating processes which benefit the academic growth and development of all students. Demonstrate a deep commitment to diversity issues and are role models for the community. Demonstrate technological awareness and competence. Demonstrate substantive knowledge of school finance, law, contract Create a positive school culture that promotes student learning and development. Understand schools as political systems and develop relationships with constituent groups which effectively connect the community with the school. To enhance knowledge and understanding of Institutional Research and the relevant issues of current practice. To promote the use of Institutional Research in policy development and administrative processes at educational institutions. To stimulate interest in using national databases to address educational issues. To promote professional collaboration and the advancement of Institutional Research in the US and other countries Educational Objectives  The integration of rigorous academic training and field experience in learning is facilitated by a curriculum and learning environment which: Offers an appropriate balance between courses in educational theories, research methodologies, leadership courses, school law, finance, general education, and an internship that erase any artificial barriers between these areas of study; encourages a flexible schedule and promote individual research aspirations Personalizes the educational process by emphasizing the priority of relationship-building throughout the University experience. Student Learning Outcomes  Delaware State University commits itself to producing students who will exemplify ethnical and authentic leadership qualities in public schools, higher educational and other related educational institutions. Through the integration of educational philosophies, theories, leadership constructs, and critical thought in the arenas of educational literacy, field experience formation, communication, systematic and empirical research inquiries, socio-cultural perspective, professional development, and transformational leadership.   DSU Graduates will:  Exemplify Educational literacy through applied leadership knowledge, a research foundation, and an Educational leader worldview.  Describe the nature and mission of the educational leadership process  revealed in the literatures. Apply a dialectic approach in the examination of educational issues that impact the school community, reflecting the conditions and dynamics of the diverse school community, enabling ongoing dialogue with representatives of diverse community groups, taking into account community resources, and recognizing the role of public education in developing and renewing a democratic society and the role of equity in a democratic society. Develop a framework for use in examining matters of significance in education in order to clarify personal viewpoints and develop a successful model of a school, family, business, community, government and higher education partnership that works within the greater framework of policies, laws, and regulations enacted by local, state, and federal authorities. Ensure that the environment in which schools operate is influenced on behalf of students and their families as well as recognize that the social, political and economic settings of schools have a great impact on their orientation, organization, and operation. Examine the contextual variables, value orientations, and philosophical and political assumptions that shape both the status quo and reform efforts. Relate educational issues to focus on the success of all students by advocating that education is the key to opportunity and social mobility and recognizing and respecting a variety of ideas, values, and cultures. Participate actively in the political and policy-making contest in the service of education. Demonstrate ethical and professional competence in their chosen disciplines. Integrate content knowledge and experience Demonstrate discernment of the ethical consequences of decisions and actions Demonstrate understanding of the importance of lifelong learning and personal flexibility to sustain personal and professional development Knowledge and application of human resource management and personnel administration and development, ensuring the maintenance of confidentiality and privacy of school records. Ability to communicate and work effectively with diverse populations in the school community in a human resource office. Knowledge and application of information sources, data collection and data analysis strategies, and related technologies. Ability to facilitate processes to ensure that the human resources functions support the attainment of school goals. Ability to engage in activities ensuring that financial, human, and material resources are aligned to the goals of schools. Demonstrate their working knowledge of the values and skills that are needed by successful practicing CEOs and/or administrators by being able to design interview questions, successfully conduct interviews with practicing CEOs and/or administrators, and deliver a presentation of the results of their findings. Demonstrate their ability to construct a vision of learning that will enhance the success of all students by conducting a visioning workshop. Be able to examine their current dispositions to assist in their prediction for success as an administrator by completing a reflective paper describing their predispositions toward being able to become a successful, effective, efficient and caring administrator. Be able to craft their individual professional development plan. Requirements This program of study requires the completion of 33 graduate credit hours over a two year (24 month) period. Included as an integral component of the program is a six (6) credit hour Applied Educational Internship. Capstone Options Students in this program option must complete a three-pronged Capstone. Each candidate will present a multimedia presentation outlining the results of an action research study they conducted as one component of the internship, reflections on their internship experience along with a portfolio documenting the internship experience Required Courses Course Descriptions: EDUC-605. THEORIES AND METHODS OF INSTRUCTION A study of educational theories as applied to curriculum and instruction with emphasis on current trends and the identification of the instructional process, organizing operations and skills for teaching. 3 credits. EDUC-680. LEADERSHIP WITH A VISION FOR CHANGING SCHOOL CULTURE IN A CHANGING SOCIETY This course focuses on the educational administrator’s development of a vision for the creation of effective teaching that is shared by the school community. The course presents the conceptual underpinnings regarding building of effective learning organizations. The importance and relevance of (1) decision-making; (2) problem solving; (3) effective verbal and written communication skills; (4) relationship-building skills; (5) good listening skills; (6) ability to manage conflict; (7) creation of a safe and secure learning environment; and (8) ongoing effective reflective practice are discussed. 3 credits. EDUC-681. HUMAN RELATIONS IN DIVERSE POPULATIONS This course examines how administrators must react, understand and respond to a changing society to foster a true sense of community in school. The course primarily addresses three dimensions: 1) developing academic partnerships with parents and the members of the community; 2) creating learning organizations (communities of practice)among teachers; and 3) nurturing the development of personalized learning environments for students. 3 credits. EDUC-682. SUPERVISION AND EVALUATION OF STAFF/ASSESSMENT OF INSTRUCTION This course emphasizes the role of assistant principals and principals as the instructional leaders of the school and the official in charge of promoting a safe, secure student environment to make possible student learning and staff professional growth. Reflective assessment practices are thoroughly reviewed and discussed. Research is conducted by advanced students on the following topics: (1) identifying effective models of instruction; (2) student achievement; and (3) frameworks for identifying and analyzing models of teaching, decision-making, and assessment. Additionally, the course focuses on defining supervisor responsibilities, understanding and implementing controls, solving problems and making decisions, effective communications, effective leadership, motivational techniques, problem-solving, and the supervisor’s role in labor relations. 3 credits. EDUC-683. USING TECHNOLOGY TO ENHANCE STUDENT LEARNING AND ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT This course addresses current technologies from a practitioner’s point of view. The Internet, World Wide Web and production software are sued with the intent to make informed decisions both administratively and instructionally. Advance students will have the opportunity to focus on emerging technologies in their applications from the viewpoint of planning, enhanced communications, managing information, delivery of instruction and the latest technologies used by professionals in their respective fields. 3 credits. EDUC-684. LEGAL ISSUES, ETHICAL CONDUCT AND SOCIAL JUSTICE IN TODAY’S SCHOOLS This course examines the following: (1) prudent strategies, safe environments, ethical principles in decision making, and fair practices in a litigious society; 2) school district judicial policies and student/employee rights; (3) legal issues that impact today’s schools; and; (4) students’ and teachers practices. 3 credits. EDUC-685. SUPPORTING A SCHOOL VISION THROUGH EFFECTIVE BUSINESS AND FINANCE PRACTICES This course provides advanced students with an understanding of the issues and challenges facing administrators with regards to the financing of education in an era of intense change. Some of the issues facing practicing school administrators, teachers, school board members, legislators and other interested parties include, but are not limited to: The No Child Left Behind Act; budget cuts at the federal, state, local and school levels; and changes in legislation allowing for school choice, voucher plans and charter schools. This course also addresses the various principles relating to the fiscal operations of a school’s management and the entrepreneurial acts required to support the continuous improvement of instruction and learning for all students. Strategic planning, budgeting, accounting, auditing, and human resource management at the school level will be discussed through case studies. 3 credits. EDUC-686. SUPERVISION AND LEADERSHIP IN ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS This course focuses on the knowledge, dispositions and performance skills required of school principals that include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) development, articulation, implementation and stewardship of a vision of learning in a pluralistic society; (2) encouraging and achieving high standards of learning; (3) effective communication, consensus building and negotiation skills; (4) continuous school improvement; (5) involvement of the school community; (6) continuous staff professional growth; (7) effective instruction(learning theories, motivational theories, assessment strategies and recognizing student growth and development); (8) technology in promoting student learning and professional growth; (9) valuing student diversities and school cultures; (10) creating a safe and supportive learning environment; (11) implementing and evaluating curriculum and instruction; (12) management of school operations; and (13) selecting, supervising and evaluating staff. 3 credits. EDUC-688. ACTION RESEARCH IN EDUCATION This course addresses the fundamentals of evaluating and designing educational research with an emphasis on applied and action research. Types of research, their advantages and disadvantages, the research process and the similarities and differences between action research and formal quantitative and qualitative research will be examined. Participants will have hands-on opportunity to develop an action research proposal and use statistical software to analyze and interpret data. This course facilitates assessment of school programs and the accomplishment of knowledge and skills. This is not an accelerated format course. 3 credits. EDUC-690. APPLIED EDUCATIONAL INTERNSHIP The internship experience is a supervised field experience that enables Masters degree candidates to practice knowledge and skill performances acquired in coursework and professional experiences in an authentic setting. The Masters degree candidate will experience first hand the everyday challenges of making management decisions with the enhancement of learning and teaching in mind. Advanced students will develop and apply organizational techniques and communication and problem solving abilities in a field setting. In conjunction with the field-based administrator, master’s degree candidates will execute an action- research project to examine possible solutions and to provide data to support data-based decision-making. 6 credits. Contact: Dr. N. K. Rathee Acting Director, Graduate Program nrathee@desu.edu Ext. 7170, Room 112   Dr. Prince Attoh Associate Professor Program Coordinator pattoh@desu.edu Ext. 6718, Room 267  

Education Course Descriptions

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  EDUC-000. INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTIONAL PREPARATION IN EDUCATION. 2:2:0 Designed to provide education majors with a forum for enhancing their skills in the area of writing, reading, math, speech, and test-taking strategies. Eligible students will be identified through the Teacher Education Screening Process which includes PRAXIS I scores and an interview. This course will utilize both group and computer-assisted instruction. Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of the required Learning Skills course, and Education Department referral. (Course does not fulfill degree requirements). Credit: two hours. EDUC-112. INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION. 3:3:0 Presents current technological trends that will assist in classroom instruction. Special emphasis placed on computers and computer packages useful to the classroom teacher. Traditional audio-visual aides will be explored. Students expected to plan lessons utilizing technologies. Credit: three hours. EDUC-121. MICROCOMPUTER SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS. 3:3:0 This course addresses the three major business and management microcomputer applications: word processing, spreadsheets, and database management. Graphics and data communications are also included. Prerequisite: Education 100. Credit: three hours. EDUC-204. PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION. 3:3:0 The philosophical foundations of society and education are explored in this course and their impact on traditional contemporary theories of education are examined. Schools as institutions, issues affecting teachers, characteristics of learners, current topics related to the teaching profession, and the role of teachers in society are discussed. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Credit: three hours. EDUC-205. CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT-(Ages 0-14). 3:3:0 This is an introductory course to a comprehensive study of child development. It includes a chronological treatment of this development - infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence, The course also includes an examination of current research findings on children's lives as they move into first experiences with peers and outside-the-home care to elementary school, junior and senior high school. Principles of child growth and development will be applied through direct observation of children in home and school settings. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Credit: three hours. EDUC-206. INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. 3:3:0 Discussion of goals, objectives, and principles of educating young children. Included are the historical, philosophical, psychological, and social foundations of Early Childhood Education. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Credit: three hours. EDUC-208. THE MIDDLE SCHOOL YEARS. 3:3:0 Middle level education is viewed as a transition period for young adolescents. This course explores the development of the student in the academic, physical, social and emotional realms as it relates to the teaching/learning environment. This course is required in the Middle Level (5-8) Program. No prerequisites. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.) Credit: three hours. EDUC-210. METHODS OF TEACHING MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE. 3:3:0 Designed to include various methods, materials and techniques involved in teaching science in grades 7-12. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Admission to Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-251. TECHNOLOGIES AND SUPPORT FOR OFFICE SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 This course provides a comprehensive overview of evolving electronic office systems and the support technologies necessary to maintain various systems; office administration; design and integration of new technologies for efficient office operation. Students will be provided with theoretical and practical experiences. Prerequisites: Education 121. Credit: three hours. Method courses at the 300 level and above require admission to the Teacher Education Program and/or permission of the Chairperson before enrolling. EDUC-302. READING IN THE CONTENT AREAS. 4:4:0 Presents the basic principles, concepts, and instructional strategies which will enable the classroom teacher in grades 4-8 to integrate the teaching of reading into the content areas. Current research on the development of comprehension, vocabulary, metacognition, and the use of microcomputers will be covered. Early field experience is required (20 hrs.). Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: four hours. EDUC-303. TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES. 3:3:0 Presents various methods of teaching the numerous phases of community living with special attention being given to community, history and geography, social types and groups. Opportunities are provided for constructing units and projects in social studies for the elementary school child. Field experience is required (10 hrs.). Prerequisites: Education 204 and History 201. Admission to Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-306. METHODS OF TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN THE PRIMARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 3:3:0 Examines current trends used in teaching mathematics at the elementary school level and makes use of current research on teaching special student populations, students of diverse backgrounds, and students with different learning styles in developing relevant teaching strategies. Emphasis is placed on examination of teaching materials (especially textbooks, audio-visual aids, and computer software) and techniques of computer-assisted instruction. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Prerequisite: Education 204, Math 105 and Math 106. Admission to Teacher Education is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-311. CURRICULUM AND MATERIALS FOR CHILDREN WITH EXCEPTIONAL LEARNING NEEDS. 3:3:0 Examines the theoretical framework and practical applications for accommodating, adapting, and/or modifying curriculum and related materials to increase instructional access for individual children with exceptional learning needs. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (10 hours). Prerequisites: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-313. INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH EXCEPTIONAL LEARNING NEEDS. 3:3:0 Provides a general overview of the legal and educational concerns of educating exceptional children. Includes the historical perspectives, analysis of Federal and State laws and regulations and their implications, as well as models of service delivery and medical, social, emotional, behavioral, and parental considerations in special education. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Credit: three hours. EDUC-314. SEMINAR IN CLASSROOM RESEARCH. 3:3:0 Designed to investigate an aspect of classroom teaching identified during the practicum experience. Quantitative and qualitative research methods utilized to produce a major research paper. Admission to Teacher Education is required. Corequisite: Education 335 or Education 409. Credit: three hours. EDUC-318. MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION. 3:3:0 Examination of cultural and ethnic differences in values and the implications for classroom instruction and curriculum development. Examination of current research findings concerning cultural perceptions, practices and communication styles for teaching approaches, materials, learning experiences and curriculum development. Examination of the implications of cultural and ethnic differences for program planning for classrooms, schools and school districts. Credit: three hours. EDUC-319. MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM IN EARLY CARE AND PRIMARY EDUCATION. 3:3:0 Examines mathematics concepts, methods of instruction, and instructional materials suitable for young children. Includes the use of computers. Examines techniques for assessing the effectiveness of the curriculum and instructional strategies. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Prerequisites: Education 205, Math 105, Math 106. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-320. LANGUAGE ARTS INSTRUCTION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 3:3:0 The integration of the language arts components of listening, speaking, reading, and writing processes are studied. Instructional strategies for achieving an integrated language arts program in pre-K through 8th grade classrooms are analyzed, and the needs of students from diverse cultural backgrounds are examined. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-321. ASSESSMENT OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH WITH EXCEPTIONAL LEARNING NEEDS. 3:3:0 Examines a variety of formal and informal instruments and techniques used in assessing the strength, needs, interests, and preferences of children and youth with exceptional learning needs. The focus is placed on providing students with knowledge and skills necessary for selecting, using, interpreting, and evaluating results from measurement and/or screening instruments and techniques commonly employed by professionals to facilitate special education placement and program decisions. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Students will be required to assess two (2) children enrolled in public schools or the Education Department's Early Childhood Laboratory School. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisite: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-322. TEACHING READING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3:3:0 Designed to assist teachers in extending the elementary skills along the developmental reading continuum to include the content areas and the informal diagnostic tools. The major objective is to improve the teaching of reading in content area subjects at the secondary level, grades 7-12. Strategies for improving reading and study skills, microcomputer instruction, and current research are major topics. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-323. INTERRELATED EXCEPTIONALITIES. 3:3:0 Provides the opportunity for in-depth study of a variety of educational theories related to the nature and needs of exceptional populations. Because education majors have numerous opportunities to study and gain competencies with theoretical perspectives by completing degree requirements, this course is designed to increase the competencies of non-degree undergraduate students returning for certification purposes. Students will be required to do research in an area of interest. Prerequisites: Education 204, Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-324. DIAGNOSIS AND REMEDIATION OF READING INSTRUCTION. 3:3:0 Designed to enable the classroom teacher to implement appropriate instructional strategies based on data obtained from informal and standardized test data. Prerequisite: Education 335. Application of theory in the classroom is required. Admission to Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-325. LANGUAGE AND LITERACY DEVELOPMENT. 3:3:0 An introduction to the study of language acquisition. The emphasis will be placed on the characteristics of common communication disorders. Training will be provided in the use of oral language screening and diagnostic instruments and in various techniques, methods and materials used to teach students with language differences. The nature of language, language and linguistics, and dialectical variations will be examined. Credit: three hours. EDUC-328. TEACHING THE LEARNING DISABLED. 3:3:0 Designed to explore the historical and theoretical development of the present field of learning disabilities. Emphasis will be placed on current definitions and characteristics of specific learning disabilities. The content of the course will focus on identification, assessment and placement, major educational approaches, and specialized techniques in programming. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Admission to the Teacher Education program is required. Prerequisites: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-329. CURRICULUM FOR INFANT AND TODDLER CARE AND DEVELOPMENT. 3:3:0 Emphasis is placed on the growth and development of infants and toddlers (ages 0-3). Special attention will be given to sequencing of skills in order to plan for the holistic development of the child to encompass the social, physical, emotional, creative and cognitive selves with strong emphasis on appropriate activities. Integrating those activities into the daily schedule of the child and group will be of high priority. Opportunities for students to explore culturally sensitive areas will be provided through observation and participation in infant and toddler programs. Using instructional technology as a tool in developing and assessing models of curriculum will provide students with additional resources for program implementation. Early field experience is required (20 hrs.). This course is required in Early Care and Education Program. Prerequisites: Education 204, 205, 206, 208, and 325. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-331. CURRICULUM INTEGRATION OF MATH, SCIENCE AND SOCIAL STUDIES AND PRACTICUM. 6:6:0 This course will provide students with an exemplary model of teaching that will foster an understanding of the interrelationship of instruction, curriculum and assessment in the discipline areas of mathematics, science, and social studies. This course is required in the Primary (K-4) and Middle Level (4-8) Education Programs. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (20 hrs.). Prerequisites: Physical Science 201, Physical Science 301, Biology 100, Math 100, Math 105, Education 305, History 201 and Education 204. Credit: six hours. EDUC-332. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION STRATEGIES FOR MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION. 3:3:0 This course is designed to give students the curriculum and instructional strategies needed for effective teaching and learning in the middle grades. The major topics studies are the core curriculum, integration of curriculum and instruction, grouping of students, interdisciplinary teams, co-curricular activities, staff development programs, school climate, cooperative relationships with the home and community, and assessment. This course is required in the Middle Level (5-8) Program. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisites: Education 205, 208, 357, 302. Credit: three hours. EDUC-333. EDUCATION OF THE PRESCHOOL EXCEPTIONAL CHILD. 3:3:0 The course emphasizes classroom procedures for enhancing development in children who are experiencing developmental delays. The course covers organization of the curriculum, goal setting, task analysis, lesson planning, facilitating Individual Family Service Plans (IFSP's) as well as organizing and managing the learning environment. Practicum with preschool children is an integral part of this course. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (20 hours). Prerequisite: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-335. DEVELOPMENTAL READING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 4:4:0 This course provides an overview of theories and practices related to reading from kindergarten through grade 8. It is designed to assist the prospective teacher in understanding the developmental process of learning to read and to assist in understanding the components of reading instruction. Students will be expected to apply these understandings in an intensive public school experience in which they observe and teach reading under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and a practicum supervisor. This course is required in the Primary (K-4) and Middle Level (5-8) Education Programs. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (20 hrs.). Prerequisite: Education 204, 205, 313, and 340 (if applicable). Credit: four hours. EDUC-336. METHODS OF TEACHING BUSINESS. 3:3:0 This course emphasizes techniques, methodologies, materials, curriculum requirements and materials for teaching business education and computer application programs. Other activities include preparation of resource units, lesson plans, and research papers. Prerequisite: Prior Business Education Courses. Credit: three hours. EDUC-337. CURRICULUM INTEGRATION IN EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION AND PRACTICUM I. 6:6:0 Students will analyze and evaluate developmentally appropriate early childhood curricula. Emphasis is on designing curriculum to enhance the young child's ability to construct knowledge through exploration and experimentation in all domains through the creation and management of learning environments that capitalize on "work through play", computer technology, and learning activities and materials that are concrete, manipulative, real and relevant to the lives of young children. Curriculum Integration I focuses on aesthetic expression, literacy and language, and social and group dynamics. Requires an extended field experience component supervised by the instructor, consisting of observation/participation with two age groups: infant/toddler and preschool/kindergarten, which provides the pre-service teacher with experiences at activity preparation, classroom management, and facilitation skills and applications. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (30 hrs.). Credit: six hours. EDUC-338. CURRICULUM INTEGRATION IN EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION AND PRACTICUM II. 6:6:0 Students will analyze and evaluate developmentally appropriate early childhood curricula. Emphasis is on designing curriculum to enhance the young child's ability to construct knowledge through exploration and experimentation in all domains through the creation and management of learning environments that capitalize on "work through play", computer technology, and learning activities and materials that are concrete, manipulative, real and relevant to the lives of young children. Curriculum Integration II focuses on inquiry, health and safety, mathematics, science, and social studies. Requires an extended field experience component supervised by the instructor, consisting of observation/participation with two age groups: infant/toddler and preschool/kindergarten, which provides the pre-service teacher with experiences at activity preparation, classroom management, and facilitation skills and applications. This course is required in the Early Care and Education Program. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (30 hrs.). Credit: six hours. EDUC-340. INTEGRATING CHILDREN'S LITERATURE THROUGH LANGUAGE ARTS. 4:4:0 The integration of the language arts components of listening, speaking, reading, and writing processes will be introduced and studied. Instructional strategies for achieving an integrated language arts program in kindergarten through grade 8 classrooms will be provided and the needs of children from diverse cultural backgrounds will be examined. The study of children's literature (prose and poetry) will be integrated with instruction in language arts. Authentic texts will be analyzed and their impact discussed. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). This course is required in the Primary (K-4) and Middle Level (5-8) Education Programs. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisites: Education 205, Psychology 201. Credit: four hours. EDUC-342. APPLICATION OF TECHNOLOGY IN SPECIAL EDUCATION CLASSROOM. 3:3:0 Explores and demonstrates the application of evolving technologies related to accommodating, modifications, and/or alternatives necessary for curriculum and instructional access. Emphasis will be given to assistive and augmentative technology, and microcomputer applications in classroom settings. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisite: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-345. PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN THE ADMINISTRATION OF EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION. 3:3:0 This course discusses the goals, objectives and principles of educating young children. Included are historical, philosophical, psychological and social foundations of early care and education. Various types of early childhood programs will be examined focusing on theoretical and practical aspects of program administration. Topics to be included will be licensing, budget management program funding, staff supervision, daily operations, nutrition, health and safety issues, and working with parents and volunteers. This course is required in the Early Care and Education Program. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisites: Education 204, Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-346. BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS AND MODIFICATION FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH EXCEPTIONAL LEARNING NEEDS. 3:3:0 The course is designed to study assessment, implementation, monitoring and program evaluation procedures involved with the use of behavior change techniques for individuals across ages and settings with exceptional social, emotional, and/or behavioral needs. Emphasis is placed on the actual implementation and analysis of behavior change projects for students with exceptional need in public school settings. Early field experience is required (20 hrs.). Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisites: Education 313, Education 321. Credit: three hours. EDUC-347. MICROCOMPUTER SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS. 3:3:0 This course provides students with opportunities to analyze the efficient utilization of microcomputers to enhance office productivity at all levels of organization, from office personnel to executive management. Students examine the different types and uses of hardware, software, operating systems, multimedia, the Internet, Web page design, etc. Hardware and software for all areas of business such as accounting, marketing and production will be analyzed also. Prerequisite: Education 121. Credit, three hours. EDUC-351. OCCUPATIONAL PRACTICUM I. 3:3:0 Supervised on-the-job work experience in the field of specialization, to be started during the second year of the four-year Occupational Teacher Education Program. Credit: three hours. EDUC-352. OCCUPATIONAL PRACTICUM II. 3:3:0 Continuation of supervised on-the-job work experiences in the field of specialization in Education 351. Credit: three hours. EDUC-353. VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE. 3:2:1 This course is designed to provide the in-service and pre-service teacher with a historical, philosophical and practical overview of vocational guidance and its place in the career development continuum. This course is also recommended for high school academic teachers and teachers of adult basic education who would like to become knowledgeable in this aspect of vocational education. Credit: three hours; 2 lecture, 1 lab. EDUC-356. SHOP ORGANIZATION, MANAGEMENT AND SAFETY. 3:2:1 This course integrates shop, laboratory and/or classroom organization, management and safety with the ultimate goal of providing a safe and healthy environment conducive to the teaching/learning process. In-service and pre-service teachers will apply local, state and federal regulations regarding the organization and safety of the vocational-technical program. Credit: three hours; 2 lecture, 1 lab. EDUC-357. EFFECTIVE TEACHING SKILLS AND CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT. 4:4:0 This course combines effective teaching skills and classroom management into one comprehensive course. It is designed to provide basic pedagogical tools and conceptual frames necessary for creating effective teaching and learning environments. Students will be introduced to the current research on best practices that informs teacher/practitioners. Students will be required to demonstrate through individual and small group experimental activities the critical teaching skills that are embodied in the Delaware Teaching Standards, multiple assessment strategies, micro-teaching, mastery teaching, cooperative learning strategies and other instructional models. Additionally, the student will have the opportunity to develop reflective teaching skills in the planning, delivery and evaluation of teaching of their cohort's teaching performances. In a convivial atmosphere, the instructor and peers will provide feedback on an individual's teaching related to performance-based objectives and learner outcomes. This course incorporates current research on the most effective strategies for improving classroom discipline, motivation, interpersonal relationships, and academic performance on all grade levels. Attention will be given to aspects of diversity and/or cultural factors that influence perceptions about classroom management, and to factors that may help facilitate mainstreaming efforts. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisites: Education 313 and Psychology 201. Credit: four hours. EDUC-360. INSTRUCTIONAL EVALUATION IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION. 3:2.5:.5 This course is designed to assist the in-service and pre-service teacher in developing criteria for student performance and selecting the appropriate means to determine student mastery of knowledge, skills and attitudes. A component of this course will also assist teachers in seeking feedback, evaluating feedback and developing the appropriate skills and behaviors indicated in feedback on teacher performance from students, administrators and peers. No prerequisite. Credit: three hours; 2.5 lecture, .5 lab. EDUC-361. CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION IN VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION. 3:2:1 This course addresses the rationale for and the curriculum development processes commonly used in vocational-technical education. The conversion of workplace competencies in various occupations will be transformed into student instructional and terminal objectives. Academic skills necessary to perform occupational skills will be identified and integrated into the curriculum. Program evaluation processes will be examined. It is strongly recommended that the student have work experience in an occupational area and an understanding of the role of vocational-technical education in America today. Credit: 3 hours, 2 lecture, 1 lab. EDUC-400-00 PRESERVICE/STUDENT TEACHING. 12:0:12 Preservice / Student teaching is the senior capstone experience that provides opportunities for students to integrate content, strategies, and theories into practice. The student teacher is expected to assimilate the culture of teaching, practice reflective teaching, function effectively in diverse class situations, manage a class of the 21st century, demonstrate content knowledge, and work effectively with students, cooperating teacher, and university supervisor. Students are placed in one or two student teaching settings according to the requirements of certification. Teaching responsibility gradually increases from one or two lessons daily up to a full day of lessons and then decreases gradually to one or two lessons daily. Student teachers are assigned to an appropriate school for twelve weeks under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and university supervisor. Prerequisites: Admission into the Teacher Education Program and successful completion of the total curriculum in the student's major field of study. Credit: twelve hours. EDUC-401. ASSESSMENT OF YOUNG CHILDREN. 3:3:0 The goals of developmental screening and assessment can only be achieved when screening and assessment tests are valid and accurate. In this course, students will be exposed to evaluation of screening and assessment instruments, Child find, developmental screening, diagnostic assessment and individual program planning. Students will be able to apply these tools in field-based settings. This course is required in the Early Care and Education Program. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program; completion of all freshman, sophomore and junior course work. Credit: three hours. EDUC-404. EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY. 3:3:0 A study of the relationship between the society and the school and of the obligations placed upon the school by social change. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Credit, three hours. EDUC-405. SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES. 3:3:0 A study of the foundation, development, and organization of secondary education in the United States with emphasis upon the purposes, role, and functions of Secondary Education as these relate to curricula and selected performance criteria for the instruction and evaluation of students in the secondary school. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Prerequisites: Education 204, Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-406. METHODS OF TEACHING IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL. 3:3:0 Designed for those preparing to teach in the middle school. Current principles of teaching and classroom organization are evaluated in the light of present day socio-economic factors and conditions. Class activities include lectures, observations, and special reports. Early field experience is required (10 hrs.). Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisites: Education 302, 331, 332. Credit: three hours. EDUC-409. METHODS OF TEACHING EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS. 3:3:0 Provides a supervised field experience in the design and implementation of instructional strategies and materials. The content of the course focuses on designing instruction and developing teacher materials, classroom teaching, with feedback and evaluation with course instructor. All required special education courses must be completed prior to enrollment in this course. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (20 hrs.). Prerequisite: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-413. INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES FOR TEACHING IN THE ELEMENTARY/MIDDLE SCHOOL. 3:3:0 Designed to assist students in developing effective teaching strategies based on current research. Individual differences, classroom management, discipline, motivation, lesson/unit planning, parental involvement, evaluation, special types of learners, and microcomputer instruction are studied. Field experiences required (10 hrs.). Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Credit: three hours. EDUC-415. INTRODUCTION TO VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION. 3:3:0 This survey course will address the history, philosophy, principles and current trends in vocational-technical education and provide a foundation to subsequent courses in this discipline. Credit: three hours. EDUC-416. ANALYSIS OF STUDENT TEACHING. 1:1:0 Designed for student teaching trainees. The role and problems of student teaching are analyzed and discussed. This class is to be taken the semester prior to student teaching. Credit: one hour. EDUC-417. TEACHING STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL LEARNING NEEDS AT SECONDARY SCHOOL LEVEL. 3:3:0 Provides an overview of the commonly known needs of high school students who are identified and are receiving special education services across the continuum of settings. Emphasis will be placed on identifying, organizing, and evaluating instructional materials, content, and strategies appropriate for increasing students' academic achievement, social skills development and self-determination, in preparation for successful transactions to adult living. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (20 hrs.). Prerequisites: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-418. INTEGRATING READING METHODS THROUGH THE PRIMARY CURRICULUM PRACTICUM. 4:0:0 This course provides an overview of theories related to early childhood and primary curriculum development, content, and implementation from kindergarten through grade 4. A primary emphasis will be an overview of theories and practices related to reading instruction integrated with the content curricula fostering young children's ability to construct knowledge in all relative areas. In addition, an intensive field experience for early childhood majors will be provided in which students observe, develop, and implement integrated reading, prereading, curricular, and/or the developmentally appropriate activities under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and a practicum supervisor. A practicum experience will be provided in both kindergarten and primary grades. This course is required in the Primary (K-4) Program. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Early field experience is required (20 hrs.). Prerequisite: Education 205, 313, 340. Credit: four hours. EDUC-419. RESEARCH SEMINAR IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. 3:3:0 This course is designed to intensively study selected areas of special education, through special reading or conducting special projects depending on the needs of the student. Students are expected to conduct literature reviews, explore theoretical bases, locate resources and propose instructional strategies in their selected area of interest. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisite: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-421. ISSUES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION AND TRANSITION (K-12). 3:3:0 This students will identify current issues in special education (i.e., under-served groups) and by level (i.e., Elementary/Secondary) and intensively study the educational implications of the issues in relation to increasingly diverse, inclusive educational settings, and inclusive classroom learning environments. For secondary majors, special emphasis is placed on career development, vocational rehabilitation services, and transactions of students with disabilities from school to adult living. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is required. Prerequisite: Education 313. Credit: three hours. EDUC-425. DOCUMENT DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH IN BUSINESS EDUCATION. 3:3:0 Issues and trends in the field of business education will be examined and researched. Students will complete a research project on a related business and/or education topic. They will conduct research on an area of business or education by doing a literature search, write a proposal, demonstrate knowledge of the latest publications and authors in the area; attend and prepare a paper for presentation at a Business Education Conference; compose and format key documents using the style appropriate for the document. Students must demonstrate formatting and editing skills relevant to the particular communication format, such as business and personal letters, headings, memos, outlines, reports, including citations, footnotes, etc., based on industry and education standards. Prerequisite: Completion of all Education and Business courses, except Student Teaching. Credit: three hours. EDUC-451. CLASSROOM PRACTICUM I. 3:0:3 This course is designed for the vocational-technical teacher and requires demonstration of competence in curriculum development, lesson planning and evaluation of students. All competencies are demonstrated in an actual school situation. Credit: three hours. EDUC-452. CLASSROOM PRACTICUM II. 3:0:3 This course is designed for the vocational-technical teacher and requires demonstration of competence in instructional delivery, teaching techniques, shop organization, management and safety. All Competencies are demonstrated in an actual school situation. Credit: three hours. EDUC-455. METHODS IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION. 3:2:1 This higher level methods course addresses more complex teaching skills and strategies including cooperative learning communities, integrating academics into the vocational program, assisting students in the development of problem-solving skills, integrating technology into the learning environment and implementing writing across the curriculum. All skills will be demonstrated for documentation in class. There will be an element of field-based observation of the above skills by the instructor. Participants will also have the option of videotaping their activities, self-evaluating their performance and sharing their experiences with peers in classroom learning situations. Credit: three hours: 2 lecture, 1 lab. EDUC-456. YOUTH ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES. 3:2:1 An investigation into various effective means of involving students in organizations and activities to foster interest and leadership development in career education. Participation in a state leadership and/or skills event is required. A critical evaluation of local, state, and national efforts and their effects. Credit: three hours: 2 lecture, 1 lab. EDUC-498. INDIVIDUAL STUDY. 1-3:3:0 This course is designed to give pre-service and in-service teachers and other professionals the opportunity to develop independent inquiry skills. It permits students to strengthen individual needs or to expand interest in early childhood, elementary, secondary, or special education. The number of hours and credit granted will depend on the comprehensiveness of programming necessary to reach the solution to the individual's problem. Permission of the department chair is required. Credit: one to three hours. EDUC-499. SEMINAR: CURRENT ISSUES IN AMERICAN EDUCATION. 1-3:3:0 In this seminar, students will research and discuss current political, economic, social, and/or pedagogical issues effecting educational policy and practice. The seminar may be offered on general issues or on specific topics to be selected. Prerequisite: senior status. Credit: one to three hours. EDUC-501. FIRST YEAR TEACHER SEMINAR-ELEMENTARY. 3:3:0 Beginning teachers will have the support of a faculty member to assist in analysis of the process and application of diagnostic and prescriptive teaching; the analysis of ways to improve classroom management; and the identification of ways to increase effectiveness as a team member within a school or school district. Prerequisites: Open to graduates of Delaware State University and beginning teachers. Credit: three hours. EDUC-502. FIRST YEAR TEACHER SEMINAR-SECONDARY. 3:3:0 Beginning teachers will have the support of a faculty member to assist in analysis of the process and application of diagnostic and prescriptive teaching; the analysis of ways to improve classroom management; and the identification of ways to increase effectiveness as a team member within a school or school district. Prerequisites: Open to graduates of Delaware State University and beginning teachers. Credit: three hours.  

Department of Social Work

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The mission of the Department of Social Work is to prepare culturally competent professionals guided by values, ethics, and evidence-based practice for professional and leadership roles; thus enhancing the quality of life of individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations in a global society. The Department’s goals are to: prepare social work practitioners to develop an understanding of the importance of a Black perspective based on strengths-based empowerment approach for social work practice; prepare culturally competent professionals guided by values and ethics who are capable of promoting social and economic justice when working with diverse and at risk populations in a global society; prepare practitioners for evidence-based professional practice and leadership roles; and educate students to think critically and to evaluate their own practice. Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes   BSW Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes MSW Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes   Study Abroad         Trip to London Flyer         Cost Information Advanced Standing Credits Applicants who have graduated from a Bachelor of Social Work Degree Program accredited by the Council on Social Work Education may receive up to a maximum of twenty-eight (28) credits applied towards the MSW degree at the time of admission, if they meet the requirements for regular status. This option may be an acceptable alternative for applicants who do not meet the requirements for Advanced Standing. If admitted under regular status, these individuals may receive advanced standing credits for all undergraduate foundations courses with grades of "B" or better earned within the last five (5) years. This option is granted on an individual basis. Advanced standing credit will not be considered for practice courses or field practicum. Applicants seeking advanced standing credits may be required to submit course syllabi from their undergraduate courses.  
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Department of Social Work
Price Building, Room 205
1200 North DuPont Highway
Dover, DE 19901

302.857.6775
302.857.6794 Fax

Monday - Friday 8:30 am- 4:30 pm

 

Faculty/Staff Profile


Department Chair


Dr. John N. Austin
Chairperson/Professor
Price 205C
302.857.6789
jaustin@desu.edu

 

Associate Professors

Dr. Ezekiel Ette

Dr. Ezekiel Ette
Associate Professor
Price 227
302.857.6785
eette@desu.edu

Dr. Dolores Finger Wright
Dr. Dolores Finger Wright
Price 217
302.857.6784
dwright@desu.edu

 
Dr. Anthony Hill
Dr. Anthony Hill
Price 221
302.857.6790
ajhill@desu.edu
 
Dr. Sheridan Quarless Kingsberry
 
Dr Leela Thomas
Dr. Leela Thomas
Price 226
302.857.6780
lthomas@desu.edu
 

Assistant Professors


Dr Fran Franklin

Dr. Fran Franklin
BSW Program Director
Price 222
302.857.6794
ffranklin@desu.edu
 
Dr. Eleanor Kiesel
ekiesel@desu.edu

Professional Staff

Brown
Mrs. Cherita Brown
Technical Analyst & Quality Assurance Manager
Price 205A
302.857.6771
cbrown@desu.edu
 
Dr. Chavon Dottin
Dr. Chavon Dottin
Director of Field Instruction
Price 219
302.857.6778
cdottin@desu.edu
 

Staff

Mrs. Shacre Bennett
Mrs. Shacre Bennett
Secretary
Price 205
302.857.6775
sbennett@desu.edu

 

 

Forms Library


BSW Student Handbook – Available soon
Curriculum Advisement Form
MSW Student Handbook – Available soon
 

 

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