Health and Public Policy

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Movement Science

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The Movement Science major's theoretical and experiential approach enables students to develop the knowledge, skills, and abilities required for careers and graduate education in fitness, wellness, movement science, kinesiology, exercise science, and human performance. In addition, it provides students with the undergraduate degree and courses required for admission to graduate health professional education programs including, but not limited to: physical therapy, occupational therapy, chiropractics, Biomechanics, Exercise Physiology, Exercise Science, Fitness Industry, Health Fitness, Strength & Conditioning, graduate education exercise science, kinesiology, motor behavior, human performance, and athletic training. Regardless of the selected concentration, students are provided with opportunities to shape and practice ethical behaviors relative to fitness and allied health professions.  The goal of the experiential component is to provide students with an opportunity to develop “applied skills” and acquire best practices in a service-oriented manner.  The Bachelor of Science degree in Movement Science offers two concentrations: the Health and Exercise Science Concentration and the Pre-Health Professional Concentration The purpose of the Health and Exercise Science concentration is to provide students wit the knowledge skills, and abilities to work in health and wellness fields as strength and conditioning coaches, fitness instructors, or exercise physiologists. Students may also use the program content to attend graduate schools in those fields.  The purpose of the Pre-Health Professional concentration is to provide students with the background and introductory courses required for allied health professions and to be flexible enough to allow students to obtain pre-requisite course work for graduate program admission in allied fields such as physical therapy, athletic training, occupational therapy, or chiropractics. Upon graduation students are expected to possess the professional knowledge, skills, values, dispositions, and experiences required in allied health professions where under-represented populations are not found in large numbers. The Movement Science major consists of a combination of classroom lectures, laboratory work, co-curricular activities, service-learning, and community outreach experiences.  Students learn the most current technologies and techniques used in the profession and engage in experiential learning via course-embedded laboratory practice, service-learning, internships, and volunteer experiences.  The students gain practical, workplace-ready skills, including: health and fitness appraisals, exercise testing and prescription, risk management, interpersonal communication, socio-cultural competency, and teamwork.  Students are provided with opportunities to work with individuals of various ages and cultures, skill levels, fitness status, and physical capabilities. Graduates of the Health and Exercise Science Concentration are fully prepared to test for certification exams of the American College of Sports Medicine and the National Strength and Conditioning Association. In addition, students in this track are prepared for admission to graduate programs in Kinesiology and Movement/Exercise Science disciplines, such as Exercise Physiology, Biomechanics, Motor Behavior, and Occupational Therapy.  Graduates of the Pre-Health Professional Concentration are prepared to meet admission requirements for Health Professional graduate education including, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Athletic Training, Rehabilitation Science, and Chiropractics. In addition to obtaining prerequisites typically required by graduate health education programs, graduates of the Pre-Health Professional Concentration gain experience in the use of instrumentation typically used to assess injury, injury mechanisms, proprioception, rehabilitation progress, and performance. Movement Science students in both concentrations are encouraged to participate in research and publication. While on campus, students have access to the Exercise Physiology, and Movement Analysis Research Laboratories, and the Recreation and Wellness Center. CONCENTRATIONS Students who select the Movement Science major may pursue one of two concentrations:  Health and Exercise Science or Pre-Health Professional.  The Health and Exercise Science concentration provides students with an educational and experiential foundation that incorporates lecture, laboratory, practice, and service learning experiences to prepare them for  certification exams administered by the American College of Sports Medicine and National Strength and Conditioning Association. SENIOR CAPSTONE PROJECT Movement Science majors are required to complete a senior capstone project.  The Movement Science capstone project permits students to select a research project, or internship enabling them to apply their knowledge in a practical real-world setting.  Regardless of the major or concentration, students are required to write an extensive report and to display their work in a final oral presentation. CAREERS Graduates with a Health and Exercise Science concentration in Movement Science will have the knowledge, skills, and abilities required for employment in fitness and wellness environments, strength and conditioning centers, and related career environments upon graduation. With this degree, graduates have the skills to work with clients of all ages and fitness levels, including athletes, children, adults, and the elderly.  Career options include, but are not limited to: Personal Trainer/Health & Fitness Specialist Inclusive Fitness Trainer Cancer Exercise Trainer Physical Activity in Public Health Specialist Exercise Test Technologist Group Exercise Instructor Strength and Conditioning Specialist/Coach Health and Fitness Director Clinical Researcher Laboratory Technician Research Assistant Movement Analyst Research Scientist In addition, the curriculum prepares students for graduate education in a variety of disciplines including, but not limited to: Exercise Physiology Biomechanics Motor Behavior Kinesiology Exercise Science Health and Human Performance Therapeutic Recreation and a variety of other allied health and exercise professions   The Pre-Health Professional concentration provides students with an educational and experiential foundation that incorporates lecture, laboratory, practice, and service learning experiences to prepare them to meet requirements for admission to Allied Health Professional graduate programs*, including, but not limited to:  Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Doctor of Osteopathy Doctor of Chiropractics and a variety of other allied health and exercise professions   * Movement Science graduates who are interested in careers in Athletic Training, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Chiropractics, or other related allied health professions, must attend professional post-baccalaureate professional schools to obtain the knowledge, skills, abilities, and clinical experiences required to successfully pass examinations required for licensure. Applications for admission to physical therapy programs must be submitted using the Physical Therapy Centralized Applications Service. (www.ptcas.org).    
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Career Options


The Fitness and Strength concentration prepares students for a wide variety of health/sport-related careers. Graduates may work in fitness and/or wellness programs, cardiac rehabilitation facilities, strength and conditioning centers/gyms. With this degree, graduates have the KSA’s to work with clients of all ages and fitness levels, including athletes, children, adults, and the elderly. Career options include, but are not limited to:

  • Personal Trainer
  • Group Exercise Instructor
  • Strength and Conditioning Specialist
  • Health and Fitness Director
  • Physical Therapist Assistant

The clinical opportunities provided by this degree allow students to have experiential training required for professionals in the fitness industry. Career options include

  • Exercise Specialist
  • Exercise Test Technologist
  • Clinical Researcher
  • Laboratory Technician
  • Research Assistant
  • Research Scientist
     

If a student’s interest is strength and conditioning training in a variety of settings, the undergraduate Movement Science program prepares him or her for a number of sports-related professions. Career options include:

  • Strength and/or Conditioning Coach
  • Kinesiologist
  • Movement Analyst

 

Public Health

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The Public Health graduate possesses a unique marketable set of skills required for employment in public health agencies, private and non-profit agencies, worksite health promotion offices, HIV prevention, and many other public health-related careers. The Public Health major equips students with the knowledge, skills, dispositions and qualities required for work in diverse public and community health career settings. Graduates of this major can apply the science, theory, and practice of public health toward the enhancement of health status in the community. Public Health students participate in academic and applied training in program planning and implementation, program evaluation, policy analysis, research and management. This major gives students the strong foundation needed for careers in private and public sectors, particularly public health agencies, volunteer programs, business and industry. It prepares students for graduate education in Public Health, Epidemiology, Community Health Education, Occupational Health, and Chronic Disease Prevention. The Bachelor of Science in Public Health provides a solid background in health science, including public health education and policy, public health informatics, community health promotion in the workplace, chronic disease management, health issues, human sexuality, mental health, nutrition, disease and injury prevention, substance use and abuse, environmental health, consumer health, personal health, and epidemiology. This major provides opportunities for students to acquire skills in needs assessment, program planning, implementation, and administration, as well as program assessment, advocacy, health education and health promotion service coordination, resource management policy, and research. Senior Capstone Project The Public Health capstone project is a twelve (12) credit practicum in the field.  Regardless of the major or concentration, students are required to write an extensive report and to display their work in a final oral presentation. Public Health The Public Health graduate possesses a unique set of skills required for employment in public health agencies, private and non-profit agencies, worksite health promotion offices, and many other public health-related careers. Graduates with a B.S. degree in Public Health have a variety of diverse employment opportunities. A few examples are: State Immunization Program Coordinator Community Outreach and Case Manager, Family Planning Agency STD Prevention Specialist Diabetes Prevention Program Specialist Food and Restaurant Inspector HIV Educator and Prevention Specialist Case Management Supervisor Nutrition Coordinator, Senior Center Tobacco Prevention Specialist Project Officer, Lead Screening Program Managed Care Coordinator Employee Wellness Coordinator Epidemiology  

Physical Education (K-12)

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Introduction   Delaware State offers a physical education program for the 21st century. We are emerging as national leaders in the innovative “tactical” approach to physical education, a teaching model that organizes instruction around broad skills and strategies rather than individual sports. Our redesigned program also covers recent trends such as movement education and adaptive PE, current methods of assessment and testing, and cultural/gender diversity in physical education. Students enjoy close mentoring from faculty, opportunities for community involvement, and academic support (as needed) to build classroom skills in reading, writing, and math. Professional Preparation The Physical Education program at Delaware State meets all standards set by the National Association for Sports and Physical Education (NASPE) and National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Upon graduation, PE majors become licensed teachers in the state of Delaware. They are eligible to teach in public, private, parochial, and charter schools; substitute teach in any school district; or work in PE-related fields such as coaching, recreation, and fitness training. Faculty The Physical Education faculty are experts in fitness — not just physical fitness but also mental and career fitness. They help students master course material while developing the habits, discipline, and confidence to succeed as educators. Our faculty combine academic credentials with personal experience as PE instructors, coaches, and trainers. They have life lessons to share along with their subject-matter expertise. Research and Experience This program provides for extensive early field experience and a one-semester student teaching experience. Students spend time in real-world schools during the sophomore, junior, and senior years. Delaware State’s use of the innovative “tactical” approach has created research opportunities for our students. Some have participated in studies to test outcomes and develop assessment methods for the new model. Others have been involved in programs to introduce the tactical approach to veteran PE teachers.      

Middle Level Education (5-8)

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  Introduction A Middle Level Education degree from Delaware State provides a competitive edge in the job market. Students in our program are required to develop two subject-area concentrations, which makes them highly marketable. In addition, Delaware State offers specific preparation for teaching in diverse classrooms, where there is a nationwide shortage of middle-school teachers — especially in areas such as math, science and world languages. Because Delaware State has a reputation for excellence in teacher education, our graduates enjoy a very high job-placement rate and are often recruited by out-of-state districts. Professional Preparation All graduates become licensed teachers in the state of Delaware. They are prepared to teach fifth through eight grades, with two subject-area concentrations. Students will develop professional teaching skills in: adolescent psychology and emotional development the use of technology in education guidance and counseling multicultural classrooms and global societies literacy development In addition, professional teaching organizations such as Kappa Delta Pi and the Council for Exceptional Children have campus chapters at Delaware State, providing career guidance and preparation to education students. Faculty Most faculty members in this program have taught at the middle-school level and bring real world experiences to the program. They offer more than academic instruction, acting as mentors who can help students meet challenges in the classroom, the professional world, and in life. Research and Experience Candidates have opportunities to get involved in community-based research, in which they study educational problems in local school districts and proffer solutions based on their research and experience. These projects are attached to specific courses such as Middle School Years, Effective Teaching and Classroom Management, and Technology in Education. Students are exposed to real word experiences through early field experiences (EFE), engaged in at the entry level, practical experiences through methods courses, and student teaching in partnered middle schools.  

Elementary Education (K-6)

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Introduction The Elementary Education program at Delaware State provides outstanding career preparation for K-6 teachers. Students learn to teach all academic subjects, with extra emphasis on literacy and multicultural / multiethnic classrooms. The program emphasizes direct, hands-on experience in real-world classrooms and incorporates the most current theories in learning, assessment, and child development. Delaware State has a growing reputation for excellence in teacher education. Our graduates have an extremely high job-placement rate within the state and are also recruited by out-of-state districts. Professional Preparation All graduates become licensed teachers in the state of Delaware. The college has campus chapters of professional teaching organizations such as Kappa Pi Delta and the Council for Exceptional Children. Students will develop professional teaching skills in academic instruction classroom management lesson planning assessment child intellectual and psychological development special education communication with parents and family members the use of technology in the classroom music and art literacy development Faculty Faculty in the College of Education, Health and Public Policy offers more than academic instruction. They act as mentors, taking a personal interest in students to help them meet challenges in the classroom, the professional world, and in life. COE professors represent a diversity of cultural and ethnic backgrounds and have an impressive list of achievements in research and writing, as well as excellent connections within the education community. Research and Experience The Elementary Education major requires dozens of hours of direct classroom observation and student teaching experience, spread across three years of the program. The process begins in the sophomore year, with more than 20 hours of early field experience (EFE), and concludes with a 12-week student-teaching placement during the senior year.

Early Childhood Education (Birth to Grade 2)

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Introduction Delaware State University’s Early Childhood program provides a high quality educational experience in working with children ages 3-8. With its heavy emphasis on direct, practical experience, the ECE major offers outstanding preparation for careers in teaching, research, administration, and related fields.   Students log many hours in Delaware State’s Early Childhood Lab School, an on-site licensed facility that serves toddlers and preschoolers from the local community. The Lab School enables ECE majors to work with seasoned instructors, develop classroom skills, get familiar with multicultural educational settings, and interact with parents — all while engaging their passion for teaching and working with young children.  In addition, students have the opportunity to apply their learning in the Delaware public schools (K-2) and child care programs in the area. Professional Preparation The Early Childhood Education program at Delaware State meets all standards set by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). Early childhood Education students will develop the following professional skills as outlined in the NAEYC Standards for Professional Preparation: Promoting child development and learning Building family and community relationships Observing, documenting and assessing to support students and families Using developmentally effective approaches Using content knowledge to build meaningful curriculum Developing as a professional Faculty Faculty in the College of Education, Health and Public Policy offers far more than academic instruction. They act as mentors, taking a personal interest in students to help them meet challenges in the classroom, the professional world, and in life. The on-site Lab School also provides an ideal setting for mentorship, enabling students to observe and work with veteran teachers and learn from their problem-solving strategies, communication methods, and teaching expertise. Our faculty members are well published and bring a wealth of knowledge and experience in young children’s development, literacy learning, administration as well as family and community partnerships. Research and Experience Opportunities for action research take place in many field based courses throughout the program. In addition to the observation hours spent at the DSU Lab School, students gain valuable experience by participating in early-childhood programs in the community and local schools. Early in their college career, students complete 60 hours of early field experience. Once juniors and seniors enter the Teacher Education Program they complete four practicums (infant/toddler, preschool, special education, and primary grades), followed by a full semester of student teaching. Contact:   Dr. Janet Hill, Associate Professor Program Coordinator jhill@desu.edu Ext. 6718, Room 243  

College of Education, Health & Public Policy

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The Academic programs are Education, Nursing, Social Work,  Public Health, and Movement Science. The Community based program is the Capitol Park Community Center. Building on the mission of the University, the mission of the College of Education, Health and Public Policy is to promote excellence in education, research and health related services for our students, citizens of Delaware, the nation and the world. These pursuits will focus on increasing knowledge, shaping policy and providing solutions for health related issues. The educational programs are guided by the standards and ethics of the various professional organizations and accrediting agencies. The College is dedicated to preparing students in health professions for graduate study who will be informed professionals empowered to lead and manage change while shaping society's future. EDUCATION NCATE Information Bachelor's Programs Master's Programs Doctoral Programs Education Course Descriptions Early Childhood Lab School Program Data NURSING Admissions & Progression Policies Bachelor's in Nursing Course Descriptions Four Year BS Degree in Nursing     PUBLIC & ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES Bachelor's Programs Public Health Course Descriptions Curriculum Guide Movement Science Fitness & Strength Curriculum Pre-Health Prof. Curriculum Movement Science Course Descriptions   SOCIAL WORK Bachelor's in Social Work Curriculum Field Education Graduate Program in Social Work Social Work Course Descriptions Undergrad Program in Social Work       STUDENT SERVICES CENTER DELAWARE CENTER FOR HEALTH PROMOTION         FOOD PANTRY RIBBON CUTTING Wednesday, November 2, was the Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting for the CEHPP Food Pantry making us the first institution of higher education in the state of Delaware to provide this service to our students.   The ceremony included comments by DSU President Dr. Harry L. Williams; Mr. Harry Keswani, Founder of the Harry K Foundation and sponsor of the Food Pantry; President and CEO of the Food Bank of DE, Ms. Patricia Beebe; and Dr. Marshá T. Horton, Dean of the College of Education, Health and Public Policy.  This need was identified by Ms. Amy Goote-Ash, Instructor, Department of Public and Allied Health Sciences.  Her vision which was funded by a generous donation from the Harry K. Foundation, and facilitated by the Food Bank of Delaware, was implemented by a team of faculty, staff, and students including, but not limited to, Chaplain Pamela Adams, Ms. Patrice Elder, Mrs. Susan Kelly, Ms. Angela Shorter, Dr. Erica Taylor, Dr. Hazel Beaumont, Dr. Jacqueline Washington, and Mrs. Lynn McGinnis.  Through the DSU Food Pantry – located in the John R. Price Building on campus – food insecure Delaware State University students will be able to access emergency food and hygiene products by visiting the food pantry. The new pantry will offer a variety of nutritious food products and hygiene items. Students will select food based on their needs. Food for the pantry will be provided by the Food Bank of Delaware and school-wide food drives or community donations.  For more information on comments made at the ribbon cutting ceremony, click here. In addition, DSU hosted the Mobile Food Pantry.  Students were able to get everything from cookies to chicken!  The pantry was staffed by the following student volunteers, Jordan Dupree, Keith Allen, Rodney Bennett, Shatiek Billups, Edward Hurley, Dukens Jean-Marie, Donte Moten, Kristina Jenkins, Nicolette Gross, Beverlyn Ongeri, Najah Smith, and Amber Hunt. Thanks to all who helped to make this day special.  We look forward to a long partnership with the Food Bank of Delaware and the Harry K Foundation. For a slide show of pictures from the Mobile Food Pantry, click here.     Food Pantry – Price Room 208 On Friday, October 7, there was a soft opening for the food pantry. Chaplain Pam and the 4 interns opened the pantry from 12 noon to 3 p.m. and had 75 students walk through the door! The Food Bank expected us to have ten participants and no more than 20 - we definitely moved product!  This coming week we will not be open, Chaplain Pam and the students will be completing an evaluation of the process and experience ----they did a phenomenal job! We will be open the following week and will have an electronic announcement together.  Click here for pictures before the opening.  Click here for pictures after the opening.     Heart Walk On Saturday, October 22, despite the cold and rain, the HFLO (Health and Fitness Leaders Organization) and a team sponsored by the Delaware Center for Health romotion (Marianne Carter) participated as part of the DSU Heart Walk Team for the 3.1 mile Southern DE Heart Walk. The HFLO team raised $130 and the Carter team raised $1,358. Kudos for braving the bad weather.   William Justice Hometown: Philadelphia, Pa. Major: Movement Science Pre-med     Classification: Senior   GPA: 3.91 Tom Joyner Foundation Hercules Scholar Today, The Tom Joyner Foundation (TJF) honors the fourth and final Hercules Scholar selected by Delaware State University (DSU). He's William Justice, the eighth child in his family, and a future medical doctor who plans to serve in marginalized underrepresented communities. He has other big plans, too. CLICK HERE to read more about his past and his future. The Hercules Scholarship The Hercules Scholarship formerly the Brotha’s On the Move Scholarship is now named after Tom Joyner’s late father Hercules L. Joyner. This scholarship embodies and celebrates successful male students attending HBCUs. Students selected for this scholarship must exhibit academic excellence, leadership skills and community services. They must be a male, enrolled as a full time student and have a grade point average of 3.5 or higher. All students are selected to be Hercules Scholars through the Tom Joyner Foundation School of the Month program. The students are also announced on the Tom Joyner Morning Show every Thursday. Thanks for allowing us to share the great news about Delaware State University with you this month. Delaware State University continues to make its mark on the state, nation and the world! SHOW DSU SOME LOVE  DONATE TODAY
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College of Education, Health and Public Policy
Price Building, Room 114
1200 N. DuPont Highway
Dover, DE 19901-2277
302.857.6700
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Meet The Dean & Staff


Dean
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Washington
Jacqueline A. Washington, Ed.D.
Associate Dean
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Lynn McGinnis
Lynn McGinnis, MBA
Administrative Assistant/Finance & Budget Assistant
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Doctorate in Educational Leadership

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DOCTOR OF EDUCATION (Ed. D.) IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP In collaboration with the State of Delaware, the purpose of Delaware State University’s Doctor of Education (Ed. D.) in Educational Leadership program is to prepare educational leaders for prominent leadership and service positions in School Districts and Higher Education sectors. Through a rigorous educational formation and directed field experience, students emerge as viable candidates for leadership positions throughout the country. At Delaware State University, you will find a unique balance between rigorous research, serious academic studies, partnership, collegiality, and personal development. You will be prepared to make data driven decisions to serve authentically, and lead with integrity. To serve the professional needs of the applicants and to meet the growing demands of the job market, our doctoral program offers two concentrations to the students to choose from: (i) Doctor of Education (Ed. D.) in Educational Leadership in K-12, and (ii) Doctor of Education (Ed. D.) in Educational Leadership in Higher Education. The Doctor of Education (Ed. D.) in Educational Leadership is a 51 credit hour, three year program, including a 6 credit hour Applied Educational Internship. Courses are conducted in an accelerated weekend format.  Courses span six weeks.  Class sections are normally held the first, third and sixth weekends of a six week session.  Normally a two week break is provided between courses, so that students can prepare for the next course.  Sessions are held Friday nights from 5:00-9:00pm; Saturdays from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Sundays from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. This program prepares leaders who will be equipped with a repertoire of knowledge, skills, and dispositions to meet the challenges of educational leadership and will emerge as: Experts in Educational Leadership who can connect and apply educational research to policy and practice to serve the institution and the community. Critical Thinkers who strive to become successful, effective, efficient and socially responsive administrators. Change agents and reflective practitioners who stimulate interest in using national databases to address educational issues. Professionals who can effectively utilize education software tools for data collection & data analysis, and adopt other information technology to broaden their vision of learning. Self-aware and ethical professionals who demonstrate ethical and professional competence in their chosen disciplines. Professionals who value diversity and demonstrate a deep commitment to diversity issues and are role models for the community. Informed Leaders who demonstrate the understanding of the importance of lifelong learning and personal flexibility to sustain personal and professional development. Specifically, the concentration in K - 12 will: Help students articulate a vision for public schools at the district level as well as other educational institutions and involve all the stakeholders in strategic planning, implementing, and evaluating processes which benefit the academic growth and development of all students. Specifically, the concentration in Higher Education will: Provide students with grounding in the conceptual underpinnings of the practice of Higher Education. It will prepare them with a broad appreciation and understanding of educational systems in social, historical, and normative perspectives as related to theory and research on educational leadership in higher education. PROGRAM GOALS Provide a high quality educational program that prepares candidates for successful careers as administrative leaders Provide a program of study that promotes effective organizational and individual performance Maintain a professional environment that promotes an understanding of and appreciation for diversity Provide a rigorous multidisciplinary advanced program of study for working professionals that fosters continuous refinement of leadership knowledge and skills. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES Education department at Delaware State University has established the following Learning Outcomes for its doctoral program:   Learning Outcomes for Ed. D. in K-12 concentration: Vision • Students will be able to facilitate the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a district-wide vision of learning supported by the school community. Culture • Students will be able to promote a positive district culture, provide an effective instructional program, apply best practice to student learning, and design comprehensive professional growth plans for staff. Management • Students will be able to manage district organization, operations, and resources in a way that promotes a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment. Collaboration • Students will be able to collaborate with families and other community members, respond to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilize community resources. Ethics/Integrity • Students will be able to act with integrity, fairly, and in an ethical manner. Context/Influence • Students will be able to influence the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context. Research and Real-Work Applications • Students will be able to synthesize and apply the above outcomes through substantial, sustained, standards-based work in real settings. Learning Outcomes for Ed. D. in Higher Education concentration: Knowledge acquisition, integration, construction, and application Students will be able to understanding knowledge from a range of disciplines; connecting knowledge to other knowledge, ideas, and experiences; constructing knowledge; and relating knowledge to daily life Cognitive complexity Students will be able to demonstrate critical thinking, reflective thinking, effective reasoning, and creativity. Intrapersonal development Students will be able to develop realistic self-appraisal, self-understanding, and self-respect; identity development; commitment to ethics and integrity; and spiritual awareness. Interpersonal competence Students will be able to develop meaningful relationships, interdependence, collaboration, and effective leadership. Humanitarianism and civic engagement Students will be able to develop an understanding and appreciation of cultural and human differences, social responsibility, global perspective, and sense of civic responsibility. Practical competence Students will be able to pursuing goals, communicating effectively, develop technical competence, manage personal affairs, manage career development, demonstrate professionalism, maintain health and wellness, and live a purposeful and satisfying life. ADMISSION DEADLINES Application Deadlines: Fall (August) enrollment - June 30 International Admission Deadlines: Fall (August) enrollment – May 1 All applicants are required to submit evidence of the following for the consideration of unconditional admission: An earned master’s degree with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00. Complete an on-line application for admission. Application fee of $50.00 made payable to Delaware State University Submit official transcript(s) of all academic work completed. Submit Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores.  However, if the applicants have taken the Miller Analogies Test (MAT), those scores will also be accepted. Testing must be within 5 years of application. Scores must be submitted prior to being interviewed or admitted into respective program. The acceptable cut-off scores for GRE: 50 percentile (+ - 1); for MAT: 400. Submit a resume. Submit three (3) letters of recommendation via the online application process (two academic/ professional recommendations and one character recommendation). An “essay” is required. Essay needs to be content specific, focused on the philosophy of education and on the candidate’s intent to join the program. Specifications: 2-5 pages; double spaced, APA format, grammatical error free. Copies of any earned teaching and/or administrative certificates (optional)  Sample of scholarly work: It is optional for an applicant who has conducted some research or has some research publications that he or she wants to highlight. Director of Education Graduate Programs and the Education Department Graduate Admission Committee will review students' application materials and make recommendation for acceptance into the program to the Dean, School of Graduate Studies and Research who will extend an offer of admission to the applicant. Requirements for International Applicants Please review application procedures at the following link: http://www.desu.edu/graduate-studies/prospective-students In addition to the requirements noted above, international applicants must submit WES or ECE evaluation of all academic work completed as well and results from the TOEFL examination if the earned baccalaureate degree is from a non-English speaking country.  The IELTS may be accepted. All international students must also meet visa requirements before the Office of International Student Services will issue a Certificate of Eligibility for Non-immigrant (F-1) Student Visa (I-20 A-B form) (http://www.desu.edu/international-programs/office-international-affairs-0). DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Qualifying Examination The students are required to take a Qualifying Examination. Schedule of this Exam is included in the three-year cohort plan of study provided to the students at the time of New Student Orientation. Capstone Ed. D. program offers three capstone options for the final capstone experience i.e. the Case Study Analysis, the Project Study, and the Dissertation. Doctoral candidates must complete, and orally present and defend a doctoral research capstone as one of their course requirements. Candidates are also responsible for submitting a professional portfolio reflecting their experiences and skills related to District level ELCC/NELP standards. This is to be accomplished after successfully defending the capstone. The Director, Education Graduate Programs along with the candidate’s advisor will make the arrangements for submitting the portfolio.  COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR Ed. D. IN K-12 CONCENTRATION EDUC-800. THE SUPERINTENDENT AS CEO- EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT AND EXECUTIVE SKILLS: This course gives an overview and provides the foundation for developing and cultivating the leadership skills and values that superintendents will find helpful to move from a theoretical base to becoming an effective practicing CEO. This course addresses district vision, school culture, politics and governance, internal and external communication, organizing for high performance, curriculum design and delivery, and human resource management for student learning.  CAEP (ELCC/NELP Standards) and AASA professional standards for the superintendency are used to define the role of a superintendent as CEO.  3 credits. EDUC-801. CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN AMERICAN EDUCATION: This course assists advanced students to further analyze current trends, problems and theories based upon an examination of recently surfacing educational events and/or topics from a historical perspective.  Discussions focus on a critical exploration of topics related, but not limited to, the formation of curriculum, instructional policy and methodology, and assessment of student success in education.  Additionally, current issues that involve students with challenges, The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), No Child Left Behind, state standards and teacher certification, state testing, the state student testing program (DSTP), full inclusion, school choice, charter schools, and accreditation are typical topics of discussion.  Components that relate to administrative handling of current issues and challenges in the educational system, found in the ELCC/NELP Standards, are addressed. 3 credits. EDUC-888. ACTION RESEARCH AND QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHOD IN EDUCATION: This course addresses the role of action research in studying the underlying problems that occur in educational organizations.  The role of action research as it relates to educational leadership roles in strategic planning, change management and organization development will be emphasized. Types of action research, their advantages and disadvantages, the action research process and the similarities and differences between action research and formal qualitative research will be examined.  The Qualitative research paradigm will be further examined and explored. Participants will have hands-on opportunity to plan action research projects and apply action research planning techniques. 3 credits. EDUC-803. HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT/PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION: This course addresses the role and functions, strategic planning, information technology, recruitment, selection, and induction of employees, staff development, performance appraisal, compensations, employment continuity, and unionism from the human resource administrator’s standpoint.  Additionally, this course addresses the human relations aspects intrinsically involved in and through the human resource parameters.  The relationship of the human resources office to the effective, safe, and efficient operation of an educational organization’s vision for the promotion of student success are further examined.  3 credits. EDUC-804. EFFECTIVE ADMINISTRATION, STAFF DEVELOPMENT, SCHOOL PLANT AND FACILITIES: This course explores the major issues that impact administrative policies, decisions, and one’s effectiveness as a school leader. The following topics are examined: district vision and school culture: developing a staff development/in-service program that addresses the improvement of the educational program and assesses its effectiveness; strategic planning for future plant and facility needs; politics and school governance; internal and external communication; organizational processes for effective and efficient performance; curriculum design and delivery; human resource management for student learning; and leadership values and skills. 3 credits. EDUC-805. QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS: This course is designed to prepare doctoral students to understand, interpret, evaluate and design quantitative research and to develop the ability to select and use appropriate research methods. This course integrates the major concepts and practices of quantitative research methodology and introduces descriptive and inferential statistics. This course focuses on the development and application of research for the purpose of writing the doctoral capstone. Topics addressed in this course include choice of research methods, developing a problem statement and proposal, preparing questionnaires, conducting research, tabulating data, and reaching conclusions from quantitative data. Additionally, this course includes readings on methodology, lectures, discussions, presentations, and in-class exercises that are designed to highlight various issues. 3 credits. EDUC-806. EDUCATIONAL POLICY:  POLITICAL, SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, LEGAL, AND CULTURAL ISSUES: This course provides the framework and content by which the doctoral student as an aspiring administrator can affect school governance and policy.  Major issues influencing administrative practices are addressed, including, but not limited to, school autonomy versus government control, state legislated learning effects on the teaching profession, democratic versus professional authority in the teaching profession, lack of minorities in administration, the effects of economics on the educational system, society’s cultural views, desires, and ramifications, and comprehending the diverse theories of school change.  In this course, doctoral students have opportunities to develop their skill sets that will enable them, as aspiring administrators, to build the requisite interlocking and collaborative relationships among school personnel, the community, and state and federal agencies for the purpose of creating better schools. Advanced students will focus upon current issues and challenges that impact the formation of educational policy in today’s ever changing society. 3 credits. EDUC-807. LEADING SCHOOL CHANGE AT A TIME OF INCREASING DEMANDS, PRESSURES, AND SOCIETAL CHANGE: This course focuses on a review and discussion of current methods used to change school cultures, curriculums, and parent/community involvement.  The course is used to enhance collegiality, professionalism, instructional strategies, classroom management techniques, effective classroom designs, student motivational techniques, and to create a safe and orderly environment. Additionally, the course focuses on making staff development a worthwhile endeavor and using systems thinking as the key to continuous improvement.  It focuses on envisioning desired results, defining reality through data, developing action plans while welcoming accountability. 3 credits. EDUC-808. STRATEGIC PLANNING AND PROGRAM ANALYSIS: This course explores the steps of the strategic planning process in educational organizations.  The benefits of involving a broad range of personnel in the process are discussed.  The doctoral student will examine the following strategic planning steps: the development of a mission statement; completion of an environmental scan; development of key objectives and initiatives; design of programs and activities to accomplish the key objectives; and determination of performance measures to monitor and evaluate the organization’s progress toward accomplishing its key objectives.  3 credits. EDUC-809. TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS: The course addresses the latest technologies from a practitioner’s point of view. The Internet and World Wide Web are used with the intent to make informed decisions. Fifty percent of the semester is assigned to an on-site field experience, in which the student demonstrates the ability to report research, security, data collection, etc. Doctoral candidates complete a project focusing on the applications of technology to the unique area of their administrative interest within educational administration, leadership or supervision and teaching fields. Doctoral candidates will have the opportunity to focus on emerging technologies and their applications from the viewpoint of planning, enhancing communications, managing information and the latest technologies used by professionals in their respective fields. 3 credits. EDUC-812 and EDUC-813. INTERNSHIP:  APPLIED EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION: The internship experience is a supervised field experience that enables the doctoral candidate to practice knowledge and skills acquired in coursework and professional experiences in an authentic setting. The doctoral candidate experiences the everyday life of an administrator and how everyday challenges are solved, such as time management strategies, organizational techniques, successful secretarial relationships, appropriate interpersonal skills and human relations, communication vehicles, problem solving, negotiation, instructional leadership, management, professional dispositions, and leadership. In conjunction with the field-based administrator, doctoral candidates will identify an educational problem in the organization and design an action-based research project to examine possible solutions. 3 + 3 credits. EDUC-817. RESEARCH SEMINAR I: Dissertation/Project Study/Case Study - Writing: The research seminar is designed to address doctoral candidates’ progress as they navigate through the doctorate program. Course familiarizes candidates with the importance of Form/Style (APA) and Scholarly writing. An orientation to the capstone process is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the Ed. D. course sequences and capstone products for each of the Research seminars. Special attention is given to literature review and the importance of understanding the complexity of conducting a search. Additionally, students are assisted on how to select a capstone topic, determination of their research format, and the chapter requirements.  Doctoral candidates meet with the course professor as a cohort group. Discussion of policies and procedures of the capstone process takes place in this course/seminar. 1 credit. EDUC-818. RESEARCH SEMINAR II: Dissertation/Project Study/Case Study - Prospectus Workshop: The research seminar is designed to address doctoral candidates’ progress in the choice of topic, determination of their research format, and the capstone chapter requirements. Assistance is given to clarify the candidate’s research question(s), determine the appropriate research design, methodologies and analysis of data. Doctoral candidates meet with the course professor as a cohort group and on an individual basis. Discussion of policies and procedures of the capstone process and the qualifying exam are addressed in this course/seminar. 1 credit. EDUC-819. RESEARCH SEMINAR III: Dissertation/Project Study/Case Study – Final Research Document Preparation: This course provides a comprehensive review and knowledge of educational leadership research and prepares students for the final research document preparation. Emphasis is placed on understanding of a variety of leadership paradigms, understanding of quantitative and qualitative research competencies, how to effectively analyze data and examine their own leadership experiences through the lenses of the Education leadership curriculum. Instructions are given on how to complete the final research document. Doctoral candidates meet with the course instructor as a cohort group and on an individual basis with their respective advisory committee chair.  Discussion of policies and procedures of the dissertation/project study/case study process is addressed in this course. 1 credit. EDUC-820. RESEARCH COURSE I: Dissertation: IRB Prep & Developing Prospectus; Project Study: Identifying the Problem; Case Study: Selecting the Thesis/ Principle/ Problem: This course provides candidates in the doctoral program of Educational Leadership with advisement and support while carrying out their doctoral research study.  Doctoral candidates are required to address one or more ELCC/NELP standards through their choice of doctoral research. This course provides assistance with completing and presenting the prospectus. The overarching objective of this course is for students to demonstrate readiness to conduct doctoral research. EDUC 820 is designed as the culminating experience of the first year experience of the Ed. D. leadership program. 3 credits. EDUC-821. RESEARCH COURSE II: Dissertation: Proposal Completion & Defense; Project Study: Development of Project; Case Study: Presentation of Analysis: This course provides a comprehensive review and knowledge of educational leadership research. Emphasis is placed on understanding of a variety of leadership paradigms, understanding of quantitative and qualitative research competencies, how to effectively analyze data and examine their own leadership experiences through the lenses of the educational leadership curriculum. 3 credits. EDUC-822. RESEARCH COURSE III: Dissertation/Project Study/Case Study – Research Doc. Finalization & Defense Prep: This course provides a comprehensive review and knowledge of educational leadership research and prepares students for the completion, defense and submission of the final research document. Emphasis is placed on understanding of a variety of leadership paradigms, understanding of quantitative and qualitative research competencies, how to effectively analyze data and examine their own leadership experiences through the lenses of the educational leadership curriculum. Instructions are given on how to write final research document. Doctoral candidates meet with the course professor as a cohort group and on an individual basis with their respective advisory committee chair. Discussion of policies and procedures of the capstone process is addressed in this course. 3 credits. EDUC-823. RESEARCH COURSE IV: Dissertation/Project Study/Case Study – Research Document Completion, Defense & Submission process: This course provides candidates in the doctoral program of Educational   Leadership with advisement and support while carrying out their dissertation/project study/case study. Doctoral candidates are required to address one or more ELCC/NELP standards through their choice of dissertation/project study/case study research. 3 credits. EDUC- 829. SUSTAINING DISSERTATION RESEARCH: Students must maintain Capstone Sustaining Credits as they progress toward completion of their capstone experience. Students must maintain communication with the course instructor and their committee chair and submit a summary of progress made and plan; outlining the next steps and targeted completion dates for their capstone experience prior to the end of each course. 6 credits. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR ED. D. IN HIGHER EDUCATION CONCENTRATION EDUC-801. CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN AMERICAN EDUCATION: This course assists advanced students to further analyze current trends, problems and theories based upon an examination of recently surfacing educational events and/or topics from a historical perspective. Discussions focus on a critical exploration of topics related, but not limited to, the formation of curriculum, instructional policy and methodology, and assessment of student success in education. Additionally, current issues that involve students with challenges, The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), No Child Left Behind, state standards and teacher certification, state testing, the state student testing program (DSTP), full inclusion, school choice, charter schools, and accreditation are typical topics of discussion. Components that relate to administrative handling of current issues and challenges in the educational system, found in the ELCC/NELP Standards, are addressed. 3 credits. EDUC-802. LEADERSHIP IN HIGHER EDUCATION: THEORY & PRACTICE: This course will focus on seminal works, contemporary theories and models, and emerging perspectives of educational leadership. Adopts a cross-disciplinary and integrative view of the leadership phenomenon that highlights how different disciplines inform leadership study and illustrates various research methodologies used for understanding and assessing the concept of leadership. It will examine the complex social and political environments and the current and future trends of higher education while providing a foundational grounding in the study of leadership theory and research. 3 credits. EDUC-805. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS: This course is designed to prepare doctoral students to understand, interpret, evaluate and design quantitative research and to develop the ability to select and use appropriate research methods. This course integrates the major concepts and practices of quantitative research methodology and introduces descriptive and inferential statistics. This course focuses on the development and application of research for the purpose of writing the doctoral capstone. Topics addressed in this course include choice of research methods, developing a problem statement and proposal, preparing questionnaires, conducting research, tabulating data, and reaching conclusions from quantitative data. Additionally, this course includes readings on methodology, lectures, discussions, presentations, and in-class exercises that are designed to highlight various issues. 3 credits. EDUC-888. ACTION RESEARCH AND QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHOD IN EDUCATION: This course addresses the role of action research in studying the underlying problems that occur in educational organizations.  The role of action research as it relates to educational leadership roles in strategic planning, change management and organization development will be emphasized. Types of action research, their advantages and disadvantages, the action research process and the similarities and differences between action research and formal qualitative research will be examined.  The Qualitative research paradigm will be further examined and explored. Participants will have hands-on opportunity to plan action research projects and apply action research planning techniques. 3 credits. EDUC-803. HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT/PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION: This course addresses the role and functions, strategic planning, information technology, recruitment, selection, and induction of employees, staff development, performance appraisal, compensations, employment continuity, and unionism from the human resource administrator’s standpoint. Additionally, this course addresses the human relations aspects intrinsically involved in and through the human resource parameters.  The relationship of the human resources office to the effective, safe, and efficient operation of an educational organization’s vision for the promotion of student success are further examined. 3 credits. EDUC-814. PUBLIC POLICY AND HIGHER EDUCATION: This course will enable students to describe and interrogate contemporary public policy issues confronting American higher education. Selected policy issues will be probed in depth, drawing upon scholarly sources as well as public reports.3 credits. EDUC-816. ETHICS & LAW IN HIGHER EDUCATION: The purpose of this course is to assist students in developing a detailed ethical framework that will guide their actions and decision-making as they serve in leadership and teaching positions in higher education. Areas of emphasis include (a) learning selected philosophies of ethics; (b) exploring student, faculty, and classroom ethical issues; (c) discussing administrator/board ethical issues; and (d) examining the college or university as an ethical organization. 3 credits. EDUC-824. GLOBALIZATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION - INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES: This course examines the related concepts of globalization/internationalization from an interdisciplinary perspective, and probes their interlocks in the context of higher education policy and student identity/learning in a transnational context. The students will also explore a number of current issues and key concepts relevant to higher education in a transnational context, in relation to how they inform practices of student learning/identity and every day social relations (e.g., knowledge production, transnational organizations, global trade policies, study abroad, citizenship, immigration, policy, media, language, power, and curriculum). 3 credits. EDUC-825. INSTITUTIONAL STRATEGIC PLANNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION: This course will examine the conceptual framework for developing an integrated and comprehensive institutional strategic plan, while suggesting guidelines intended to assure its successful implementation. The students will explore the environmental challenges and trends, ways to examine institutional strengths and weaknesses within a broader competitive context, the function of major components within a plan and the ways the institutional direction and priorities may be determined. 3 credits. EDUC-809. TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS: The course addresses the latest technologies from a practitioner’s point of view.  The Internet and World Wide Web are used with the intent to make informed decisions. Fifty percent of the semester is assigned to an on-site field experience, in which the student demonstrates the ability to report research, security, data collection, etc.  Doctoral candidates complete a project focusing on the applications of technology to the unique area of their administrative interest within educational administration, leadership or supervision and teaching fields.  Doctoral candidates will have the opportunity to focus on emerging technologies and their applications from the viewpoint of planning, enhancing communications, managing information and the latest technologies used by professionals in their respective fields. 3 credits. EDUC-812 and EDUC-813. INTERNSHIP:  APPLIED EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION: The internship experience is a supervised field experience that enables the doctoral candidate to practice knowledge and skills acquired in coursework and professional experiences in an authentic setting. The doctoral candidate experiences the everyday life of an administrator and how everyday challenges are solved, such as time management strategies, organizational techniques, successful secretarial relationships, appropriate interpersonal skills and human relations, communication vehicles, problem solving, negotiation, instructional leadership, management, professional dispositions, and leadership.  In conjunction with the field-based administrator, doctoral candidates will identify an educational problem in the organization and design an action-based research project to examine possible solutions. 3 + 3 credits. EDUC-817. RESEARCH SEMINAR I: Dissertation/Project Study/Case Study - Writing: The research seminar is designed to address doctoral candidates’ progress as they navigate through the doctorate program. Course familiarizes candidates with the importance of Form/Style (APA) and Scholarly writing. An orientation to the capstone process is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the Ed. D. course sequences and capstone products for each of the Research seminars. Special attention is given to literature review and the importance of understanding the complexity of conducting a search. Additionally, students are assisted on how to select a capstone topic, determination of their research format, and the chapter requirements.  Doctoral candidates meet with the course professor as a cohort group. Discussion of policies and procedures of the capstone process takes place in this course/seminar. 1 credit. EDUC-818. RESEARCH SEMINAR II: Dissertation/Project Study/Case Study - Prospectus Workshop: The research seminar is designed to address doctoral candidates’ progress in the choice of topic, determination of their research format, and the capstone chapter requirements. Assistance is given to clarify the candidate’s research question(s), determine the appropriate research design, methodologies and analysis of data. Doctoral candidates meet with the course professor as a cohort group and on an individual basis. Discussion of policies and procedures of the capstone process and the qualifying exam are addressed in this course/seminar. 1 credit. EDUC-819. RESEARCH SEMINAR III: Dissertation/Project Study/Case Study – Final Research Document Preparation: This course provides a comprehensive review and knowledge of educational leadership research and prepares students for the final research document preparation. Emphasis is placed on understanding of a variety of leadership paradigms, understanding of quantitative and qualitative research competencies, how to effectively analyze data and examine their own leadership experiences through the lenses of the Education leadership curriculum. Instructions are given on how to complete the final research document. Doctoral candidates meet with the course instructor as a cohort group and on an individual basis with their respective advisory committee chair.  Discussion of policies and procedures of the dissertation/project study/case study process is addressed in this course. 1 credit. EDUC-820. RESEARCH COURSE I: Dissertation: IRB Prep & Developing Prospectus; Project Study: Identifying the Problem; Case Study: Selecting the Thesis/ Principle/ Problem: This course provides candidates in the doctoral program of Educational Leadership with advisement and support while carrying out their doctoral research study.  Doctoral candidates are required to address one or more ELCC/NELP standards through their choice of doctoral research.  This course provides assistance with completing and presenting the prospectus. The overarching objective of this course is for students to demonstrate readiness to conduct doctoral research. EDUC 820 is designed as the culminating experience of the first year experience of the Ed. D. leadership program. 3 credits. EDUC-821. RESEARCH COURSE II: Dissertation: Proposal Completion & Defense; Project Study: Development of Project; Case Study: Presentation of Analysis: This course provides a comprehensive review and knowledge of educational leadership research. Emphasis is placed on understanding of a variety of leadership paradigms, understanding of quantitative and qualitative research competencies, how to effectively analyze data and examine their own leadership experiences through the lenses of the Ed leadership curriculum. 3 credits. EDUC-822. RESEARCH COURSE III: Dissertation/Project Study/Case Study – Research Doc. Finalization & Defense Prep: This course provides a comprehensive review and knowledge of educational leadership research and prepares students for the completion, defense and submission of the final research document. Emphasis is placed on understanding of a variety of leadership paradigms, understanding of quantitative and qualitative research competencies, how to effectively analyze data and examine their own leadership experiences through the lenses of the educational leadership curriculum. Instructions are given on how to write final research document. Doctoral candidates meet with the course professor as a cohort group and on an individual basis with their respective advisory committee chair. Discussion of policies and procedures of the capstone process is addressed in this course. 3 credits. EDUC-823. RESEARCH COURSE IV: Dissertation/Project Study/Case Study – Research Document Completion, Defense & Submission process: This course provides candidates in the doctoral program of Educational   Leadership with advisement and support while carrying out their dissertation/project study/case study. Doctoral candidates are required to address one or more ELCC/NELP standards through their choice of dissertation/project study/case study research. 3 credits. EDUC- 829. SUSTAINING DISSERTATION RESEARCH: Students must maintain Capstone Sustaining Credits as they progress toward completion of their capstone experience. Students must maintain communication with the course instructor and their committee chair and submit a summary of progress made and plan; outlining the next steps and targeted completion dates for their capstone experience prior to the end of each course. Credit 6 hours. Contact: Dr. N. K. Rathee  Director, Education Graduate Program Associate Professor Room #: EH 112 nrathee@desu.edu Phone: (302) 857-7170  

Graduate Programs in Education

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Master of Education (M. Ed.) in Educational Leadership PROGRAM OBJECTIVES In collaboration with the State of Delaware, the purpose of Delaware State University’s Master of Education (M. Ed.) in Educational Leadership program is to prepare educational leaders for prominent leadership and service positions in Schools and other educational institutions. Through a rigorous educational formation and directed field experience, students emerge as viable candidates for leadership position throughout the country. Since 2002 the Master’s program has consistently adjusted to meet the current needs of our public and higher education societies in dramatic changes. At Delaware State University, you will find a unique balance between rigorous research, serious academic studies, partnership, collegiality, and personal development. You will be prepared to make data driven decisions to serve authentically and lead with integrity. PROGRAM GOALS The primary goal of the Delaware State University’s Master of Education (M. Ed.) in Educational Leadership program is to prepare leaders who are equipped with a repertoire of knowledge, skills, and dispositions to meet the challenges of school leadership. It is also to prepare leaders who demonstrate instructional leadership by understanding and applying the curriculum standards of the State of Delaware and being able to evaluate and mentor teachers using non-coercive methods to assist them with planning, presentation, and continuous refinement of instructional and leadership skills. Additional goals prepare leaders who can: Articulate a vision for public schools at the building levels as well as other educational institutions and involve all the stakeholders in strategic planning, implementing, and evaluating processes which benefit the academic growth and development of all students. Demonstrate a deep commitment to diversity issues and are role models for the community. Demonstrate technological awareness and competence. Demonstrate substantive knowledge of school finance, law, and contract Create a positive school culture that promotes student learning and development. Understand schools as political systems and develop relationships with constituent groups which effectively connect the community with the school. Promote professional collaboration and the advancement of Institutional Research. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES Delaware State University commits itself to producing students who will exemplify ethnical and authentic leadership qualities in public schools, higher educational and other related educational institutions through the integration of educational philosophies, theories, leadership constructs, and critical thought in the arenas of educational literacy, field experience formation, communication, systematic and empirical research inquiries, socio-cultural perspective, professional development, and transformational leadership. DSU Graduates will: Exemplify educational literacy through applied leadership knowledge, a research foundation, and an educational leader worldview. Describe the nature and mission of the educational leadership process as revealed in the literatures. Apply a dialectic approach in the examination of educational issues that impact the school community, reflecting the conditions and dynamics of the diverse school community, enabling ongoing dialogue with representatives of diverse community groups, taking into account community resources, and recognizing the role of public education in developing and renewing a democratic society and the role of equity in a democratic society. Develop a framework for use in examining matters of significance in education in order to clarify personal viewpoints and develop a successful model of a school. Examine the contextual variables, value orientations, and philosophical and political assumptions that shape both the status quo and reform efforts. Relate educational issues to focus on the success of all students by advocating that education is the key to opportunity and social mobility and recognizing and respecting a variety of ideas, values, and cultures. Demonstrate ethical and professional competence in their chosen disciplines. Develop the knowledge and application of human resource management and personnel administration and development, ensuring the maintenance of confidentiality and privacy of school records. Demonstrate the knowledge and application of information sources, data collection and data analysis strategies, and related technologies. Acquire the ability to facilitate processes to ensure that the human resources functions support the attainment of school goals. Be able to craft their individual professional development plan. ADMISSION DEADLINES AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Application Deadlines: Fall (August) enrollment - June 30 International Admission Deadlines:   Fall (August) enrollment – May 1 All applicants are required to submit evidence of the following for consideration of unconditional admission: An earned baccalaureate degree with a minimum undergraduate cumulative grade point average of 3.00. Complete an on-line application for admission. Application fee of $50.00 made payable to Delaware State University Submit official transcript(s) of all academic work completed. Submit Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores.  However, if the applicants have taken the Miller Analogies Test (MAT), those scores will also be accepted. Testing must be within 5 years of application. Scores must be submitted prior to being interviewed or admitted into respective program. The acceptable cut-off scores for GRE: 50 percentile (+ - 1), and for MAT: 400. A resume. Submit three (3) letters of recommendation via the online application process (two academic/ professional recommendations and one character recommendation). A statement of Purpose/Intent to include the following: the philosophy, objectives, and career aspirations of the candidate. Specifications: 1-2 pages, double spaced, APA format, grammatical error free. Director, Education Program and the Education Department Graduate Admission Committee will review students' application materials and make recommendation for acceptance into the program to the Dean, School of Graduate Studies and Research who extends an offer of admission to the applicant. Requirements for International Applicants Please review application procedures at the following link: http://www.desu.edu/graduate-studies/prospective-students. In addition to the requirements noted above, international applicants must submit WES or ECE evaluation of all academic work completed as well and results from the TOEFL examination if the earned baccalaureate degree is from a non-English speaking country.  The IELTS may be accepted. All international students must also meet visa requirements before the Office of International Student Services will OISS issue a Certificate of Eligibility for Non-immigrant (F-1) Student Visa (I-20 A-B form) (http://www.desu.edu/international-programs/office-international-affairs-0). DEGREE REQUIREMENTS This program of study requires the completion of 36 graduate credit hours. Included as an integral component of the program is a six (6) credit hour Applied Educational Internship. The Students admitted to this course are required to pass the Comprehensive Examination as a part of their degree requirement. Capstone Requirements: Students in this program must complete the following Capstone projects: 1.    Comprehensive Exam, after completing 24 credit hours.  2.   Submit and present their internship portfolio and other important artifacts collected as a part of their internship experience. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS EDUC-605. THEORIES AND METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. A study of educational theories as applied to curriculum and instruction with emphasis on current trends and the identification of the instructional process, organizing operations and skills for teaching. 3 credits. EDUC-614 DIFFERENTIATING INSTRUCTION BASED ON STUDENT GROWTH This course explores the use of knowledge about culture in the schooling process.  It presents specific teaching strategies, classroom management techniques and communication strategies that have proven effective with culturally diverse student populations.  Educational implications of human development over the life-span are examined. Students explore ways to identify and alleviate negative bias and prejudice in teaching materials, assessment instruments, school practices and school organization. 3 credits EDUC-680. LEADERSHIP WITH A VISION FOR CHANGING SCHOOL CULTURE IN A CHANGING SOCIETY. This course focuses on the educational administrator’s development of a vision for the creation of effective teaching that is shared by the school community. The course presents the conceptual underpinnings regarding building of effective learning organizations. The importance and relevance of (1) decision-making; (2) problem solving; (3) effective verbal and written communication skills; (4) relationship-building skills; (5) good listening skills; (6) ability to manage conflict; (7) creation of a safe and secure learning environment; and (8) ongoing effective reflective practice are discussed.  3 credits. EDUC-681. HUMAN RELATIONS IN DIVERSE POPULATIONS This course examines how administrators must react, understand and respond to a changing society to foster a true sense of community in school. The course primarily addresses three dimensions: 1) developing academic partnerships with parents and the members of the community; 2) creating learning organizations (communities of practice)among teachers; and 3) nurturing the development of personalized learning environments for students. 3 credits. EDUC-682. SUPERVISION AND EVALUATION OF STAFF/ASSESSMENT OF INSTRUCTION This course emphasizes the role of assistant principals and principals as the instructional leaders of the school and the official in charge of promoting a safe, secure student environment to make possible student learning and staff professional growth. Reflective assessment practices are thoroughly reviewed and discussed. Research is conducted by advanced students on the following topics: (1) identifying effective models of instruction; (2) student achievement; and (3) frameworks for identifying and analyzing models of teaching, decision-making, and assessment. Additionally, the course focuses on defining supervisor responsibilities, understanding and implementing controls, solving problems and making decisions, effective communications, effective leadership, motivational techniques, problem-solving, and the supervisor’s role in labor relations. 3 credits. EDUC-683. USING TECHNOLOGY TO ENHANCE STUDENT LEARNINGAND ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT. This course addresses current technologies from a practitioner’s point of view. The Internet, World Wide Web and production software are sued with the intent to make informed decisions both administratively and instructionally. Advance students will have the opportunity to focus on emerging technologies in their applications from the viewpoint of planning, enhanced communications, managing information, delivery of instruction and the latest technologies used by professionals in their respective fields. 3 credits. EDUC-684. LEGAL ISSUES, ETHICAL CONDUCT AND SOCIAL JUSTICE IN TODAY’S SCHOOLS This course examines the following: (1) prudent strategies, safe environments, ethical principles in decision making, and fair practices in a litigious society; 2) school district judicial policies and student/employee rights; (3) legal issues that impact today’s schools; and; (4) students’ and teachers practices. 3 credits. EDUC-685. SUPPORTING A SCHOOL VISION THROUGH EFFECTIVE BUSINESS AND FINANCE PRACTICES This course provides advanced students with an understanding of the issues and challenges facing administrators with regards to the financing of education in an era of intense change. Some of the issues facing practicing school administrators, teachers, school board members, legislators and other interested parties include, but are not limited to: The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), The No Child Left Behind Act; budget cuts at the federal, state, local and school levels; and changes in legislation allowing for school choice, voucher plans and charter schools. This course also addresses the various principles relating to the fiscal operations of a school’s management and the entrepreneurial acts required to support the continuous improvement of instruction and learning for all students. Strategic planning, budgeting, accounting, auditing, and human resource management at the school level will be discussed through case studies. 3 credits. EDUC-686. SUPERVISON AND LEADERSHIP IN ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS. This course focuses on the knowledge, dispositions and performance skills required of school principals that include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) development, articulation, implementation and stewardship of a vision of learning in a pluralistic society; (2) encouraging and achieving high standards of learning; (3) effective communication, consensus building and negotiation skills; (4) continuous school improvement; (5) involvement of the school community; (6) continuous staff professional growth; (7) effective instruction(learning theories, motivational theories, assessment strategies and recognizing student growth and development); (8) technology in promoting student learning and professional growth; (9) valuing student diversities and school cultures; (10) creating a safe and supportive learning environment; (11) implementing and evaluating curriculum and instruction; (12) management of school operations; and (13) selecting, supervising and evaluating staff. 3 credits. EDUC -625. ACTION RESEARCH IN EDUCATION This course addresses the fundamentals of evaluating and designing educational research with an emphasis on applied and action research. Types of research, their advantages and disadvantages, the research process and the similarities and differences between action research and formal quantitative and qualitative research will be examined. Participants will have hands-on opportunity to develop an action research proposal and use statistical software to analyze and interpret data. This course facilitates assessment of school programs and the accomplishment of knowledge and skills. This is not an accelerated format course. 3 credits. EDUC-690 (I & II). APPLIED EDUCATONAL LEADERSHIP INTERNSHIP. The internship experience is a supervised field experience that enables Master’s degree candidates to practice knowledge and skill performances acquired in coursework and professional experiences in an authentic setting. The Master’s degree candidate will experience firsthand the everyday challenges of making management decisions with the enhancement of learning and teaching in mind. Advanced students will develop and apply organizational techniques and communication and problem solving abilities in a field setting. In conjunction with the field-based administrator, master’s degree candidates will execute an action- research project to examine possible solutions and to provide data to support data-based decision-making. 3 + 3 credits. Contact: Dr. N. K. Rathee Director, Graduate Program & Associate Professor Room #: EH 112 nrathee@desu.edu Phone: (302) 857-7170  

Bachelor's Programs

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Teachers are in high demand in the United States as record numbers of Baby Boomer's are retiring from the profession.  As the need for quality educators grows, Delaware State is ready to help fill the ranks with highly-qualified teachers. Our program prepares students to meet the challenges in the classroom, and to become highly sought after professional educators. Delaware State University offers a wide variety of bachelor degree programs for education majors.  Prospective students can major in: Early Childhood Education (Birth-2) Elementary Education (K-6) Middle Level Education (6-8) Physical Education (K-12)  

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