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Curriculum for Bachelor's in Early Childhood Education

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  Early Childhood Education (Birth to Grade 2) First Year     12-191             University Seminar I 1 01-101             English Composition I 3 05-101             Introduction to Art  OR 06-101             Introduction to Music 3 25-105             Math for Teachers I OR Higher 3 16-100             Fitness and Wellness 2 xx-xxx                Foreign Language I 3   15     12-192            University Seminar II 1 36-201            Introduction to General Psychology 3 01-102            English Composition II 3 23-110            Essential Topics in Biology 4 25-106            Math for Teachers II OR Higher 3 xx-xxx               Foreign Language II 3   17 Take Praxis I    Second Year     01-200           Speech 3 01-201           World Literature I OR 01-205           African-American Literature I 3 25-205           Math for Teachers III OR Higher 3 12-207           Life Span Development 3 34-201           American History to 1865 3 12-204           Philosophical Foundations of Education 3   18 Select one of the following options: 01-201 and 01-206 or 01-202-01-205 to fulfill the Literature requirement for General Education           12-205           Child Growth and Development 3 12-206            Intro to Early Childhood Education 3 01-202            World Literature II OR 01-206            African American Literature II 3 27-201            Physical Science Survey 3 32-201            World Regional Geography 3 12-313            Intro to Education of Children w/ Exceptional Learning Needs 3   18  Required to pass Praxis I and  apply for admission to Teacher Education Program   Third Year     12-257            Motor Development/Movement Education for Children 3 12-325            Language and Literacy Development 3 12-318 / 31-395            Multicultural Education w/Global Societies 3 12-329            Curriculum for Infant and Toddler Care and Development - Early Childhood Education Practicum I 4 12-319             Mathematics Curriculum in Early Childhood and Primary Grades             3   16     12-333            Methods of Teaching Students with Exceptional Leaning Needs at Pre-K Level 3 12-315            Parents, Families and Community Partnerships 3 12-340            Integrating Chldrn’s Lit. through Lang. Arts 3 27-207            Earth Space Science 3 12-337            Curr. Intgrtn In Early Chldhd Educ. and Practicum II 4   16  Apply for Student Teaching and complete Senior Audit by October 15th, Fall of Senior Year    Fourth Year     12-401            Assessment of Young Children 3 12-416            Analysis of Student Teaching 1 12-344            Instructional Technology in Education 3 12-345            Admin of Early Chldhd Educ 3 12-338           Curriculum Integration in Early Childhood Educ and Practicum III 4   14 Must pass Praxis II before Student Teaching       12-400           Student Teaching ** 12   12     Total credits 126    ** Senior Capstone   NOTE:  See Advisor For Curriculum Updating  

Science Education (MA)

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Introduction The United States faces a critical shortage of qualified science teachers, particularly within diverse communities. The Science Education program at Delaware State addresses both of these needs. Students benefit from small classes, and they gain valuable hands-on teaching experience in real-world schools. Since science education is a critical needs field with teacher shortages nationwide, program completers have good prospects for employment. Professional Preparation The Science Education program is NCATE accredited and is recognized by the National Science Teachers’ Association (NSTA).  It prepares graduates to teach physical and earth sciences at the middle school and high school levels. All graduates become licensed teachers in the state of Delaware. Students will develop professional teaching skills in: core subjects such as physics, biology, chemistry, and astronomy cutting-edge scientific material such as climate change and environmental issues the use of advanced technology in the classroom lesson planning assessment Faculty Delaware State’s diverse faculty come from a wide range of ethnic and national backgrounds, making them especially qualified to prepare teachers for multicultural classrooms. They have many years of direct teaching experience and have been involved in developing statewide science curriculum and professional development standards for teachers. Above all, science education faculty act as mentors, taking a personal interest in students to help them meet challenges in the classroom, the professional world, and in life. Research and Experience Students as part of the science education program must complete a short-term content-specific research project. In addition, they participate in direct classroom observations and a capstone student teaching experience. The process begins in the sophomore year, with more than 20 hours of early field experience (EFE), and concludes with a full semester of student-teaching placement during the senior year. Two required courses in the Master’s program — Research Experience in Science, and Analysis of Research in Teaching Science — provide participants with first-hand scientific research experience, with emphasis on research applications for the classroom. In addition, all Master’s degree candidates must complete a Capstone project, which can take one of the following two forms: Research Thesis: Students must conduct an empirical research study, develop and write a thesis, and defend it before a faculty committee. Scholarly research and multimedia presentation:  Students must write a scholarly research paper and deliver the contents in a multimedia presentation to a faculty committee. Contact: Dr. N. K. Rathee Acting Director, Graduate Program nrathee@desu.edu Ext. 7170, Room 112        

Educational Leadership (M.Ed.)

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Introduction The Master’s degree in Educational Leadership provides a pathway to education careers at the school, district, and statewide levels. Combining theoretical framework with practical experience, the program cultivates a broad range of leadership skills, including: Creating safe, effective learning environments for students Providing support and guidance to teachers Establishing constructive relationships with parents and community stakeholders Conducting independent research, and integrating results into policy decisions Working with diverse populations Implementing effective business and financial practices Upholding legal, ethical, and social-justice principles Devising strategic frameworks to guide decision making Communicating effectively with students, parents, teachers, and the public Graduates are prepared to lead and manage schools and other education-related agencies while adapting to changing social, political and economic influences.  They also may pursue a wide range of other career paths, including: Distric/Building-Level Administration Educational Policy Analysis Curriculum Development Research Scholar Program Assessment Director/Manager Independent Educational Consulting Professional Preparation This program adheres to the (NCATE) ELCC standards.  Graduates will meet the State of Delaware certification requirements for School Leader I and Principal/Assistant Principal certification. ELCC Standards: Standard 1.0: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a school or district vision of learning supported by the school community.   Standard 2.0: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by promoting a positive school culture, providing an effective instructional program, applying best practice to student learning, and designing comprehensive professional growth plans for staff.   Standard 3.0: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by managing the organization, operations, and resources in a way that promotes a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.   Standard 4.0: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by collaborating with families and other community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources.   Standard 5.0: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by acting with integrity, fairly, and in an ethical manner.   Standard 6.0: Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.   Standard 7.0: Internship. The internship provides significant opportunities for candidates to synthesize and apply the knowledge and practice and develop the skills identified in Standards 1-6 through substantial, sustained, standards-based work in real settings, planned and guided cooperatively by the institution and school district personnel for graduate credit.     Educational Leadership Program:   What an Educational Leader Must Know and Be Able To Do   Educational leaders have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a school or district vision of learning supported by the school community.  These leaders have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by promoting a positive school culture, providing an effective instructional program, applying best practice to student learning, and designing comprehensive professional growth plans for staff.  Educational leaders have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by managing the organization, operations, and resources in a way that promotes a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.  These leaders have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by collaborating with families and other community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources.  Educational leaders have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by acting with integrity, fairly, and in an ethical manner.   Educational Leaders who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.  The internship provides significant opportunities for candidates to synthesize and apply the knowledge and practice and develop the skills identified in these Standards through substantial, sustained, standards based work in real settings, planned and guided cooperatively by the institution and school district personnel for graduate credit.  Faculty Faculty in the Department of Education combines academic expertise with direct experience in the field of education. They have served (or continue to serve) as classroom instructors, principals, policymakers, analysts, and advocates. Their experience enables them to offer practical guidance and mentorship, helping students adapt to the professional world and make wise career choices. Research and Experience Several courses in the Master’s program enable students to pursue research interests. The primary opportunity occurs in the required Capstone project that involves an internship and action research. During the internship, students participate in the everyday challenges of management and decision making, applying organizational techniques, communication skills, and problem solving abilities in a field setting. They also conduct an action-research project to examine possible solutions to a particular problem or issue, and then make recommendations supported by their data. Each candidate will present a multimedia presentation outlining the results of his or her action research study, along with a portfolio documenting the internship experience. Contact: Dr. N. K. Rathee Acting Director, Graduate Program nrathee@desu.edu Ext. 7170, Room 112   Dr. Prince Attoh Associate Professor Program Coordinator pattoh@desu.edu Ext. 6718, Room 267        

Department of Education

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Teacher preparation is an historically rooted pursuit at DSU, wherein a high emphasis is placed on producing excellent educators. This serves as unmistakable indication of the University's institutional understanding of the great need for teachers in our society. Education students are prepared to navigate the challenges presented by federal and State requirements and leave DSU to become highly qualified and competent teachers. Current Education majors receive hands-on in school experiences in early field placements with partner schools, including at the Delaware State University Caesar Rodney Transition Partnership Project on campus, and the Early Childhood Lab School, which serves infants and toddlers through kindergarten. In addition, new educational leadership master’s and doctoral degree programs have been established to produce the next generation of creative and highly skilled school administrators. The Masters and Doctorate of Education programs with a concentration in educational leadership are designed for the development and certification of educational leaders in private and public K–12 systems, higher education programs, and state, national and international educational organizations. Candidate Performance Data Candidate Pass Rate Data Program Licensure Data Teacher Work Sample Employer Survey Data Graduate Follow-up Survey Data  
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Department of Education
EH Building, Room 100
1200 North DuPont Highway
Dover, DE 19901

302.857.6720 Phone
302.857.6722 Fax

Monday - Friday 8:30 am- 4:30 pm

Faculty/Staff Profile


Department Chair


Dr. Robert Martin, Ed.D.
Acting Chairperson/Coordinator of Physical Education
Associate Professor
EH 100
302.857.6720
bmartin@desu.edu


Dr. Nirmaljit K. Rathee
Acting Director, Graduate Program
Associate Professor
EH 112/MH 208
302.857.7170
nrathee@desu.edu

Associate Professors


Dr. Chandra Aleong
EH 239
302.857.7690
caleong@desu.edu


Dr. Prince Attoh
Coordinator of Educational Leadership
EH 6718
302.857-7618
pattoh@desu.edu


Dr. Cecil Clark
Director of Early Field & Clinical Experiences
EH 110
302.857-6740
cclark@desu.edu


Dr. Joseph Falodun
EH 254
302.857.6578
jfalodun@desu.edu


Dr. Janet Hill
Coordinator of Early Childhood Education
EH 242
302.857.7393
jhill@desu.edu


Dr. Keun Kyu Kim
EH 233
302.857.6744
keunkim@desu.edu


Dr. Elaine Marker
Coordinator of Elementary Education
EH 245
302.857.7176
emarker@desu.edu


Dr. Faith Newton
Coordinator of Middle Level Education
EH  235
302.857.6826
fnewton@desu.edu


Dr. Richard Phillips
Coordinator of Curriculum & Instruction
EH 235
302.857.7569
rphillips@desu.edu


Assistant Professors

Dr. Susanta Parida
Visiting Assistant Professor
EH 242
302.857.6739
sparida@desu.edu


Dr. Yvette Pierre
Early Field Experiences Coordinator
EH 110C
302.857.7570
ypierre@desu.edu


Dr. Sae Yeol Yoon
EH 244
302.857.6726
syoon@desu.edu


Professional Staff


Ms. Brenda Hopkins
Program Coordinator
Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program
EH 248
302.857.6959
bhopkins@desu.edu


Ms. Kendra Modzelewski-Graham
Coordinator, Praxis Instruction
EH 234
302.857.5735
kmodzelewski@desu.edu

Ms. Constance Williams

Director of Early Child Lab School
EH 116
302.857.6731
clwilliams@desu.edu


Staff


Ms. Brandi Bessecker
Senior Secretary, Chair's Office
EH 100
302.857.6720
bbesecker@desu.edu


Ms. Stacey Gede
Senior Secretary, Office of Clinical & Field Experiences
EH 110
302.857.6727
sgede@desu.edu


Ms. Danielle Hicks
Senior Secretary, Graduate Program Office
EH 112
302.857.7170
dshicks@desu.edu


 
 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing

Description: 

John R. Price Building
Phone: 302.857.6750
Fax: 302.857.6755

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 IntroductionThe United States already suffers from a shortage of nurses, and demand is increasing. So a bachelor’s degree in nursing can yield terrific career opportunities and Delaware State is an ideal setting to prepare for them.Delaware State’s undergraduate nursing degree program features an unusually high degree of face-to-face interaction between instructors and students. Our nursing students work in smart classrooms and simulation labs, getting hands-on experience with electronic medication carts, computerized monitors, and other high-tech tools of the nursing profession.Above all, the undergraduate nursing degree emphasizes real-world experience and direct community involvement. Students participate in field work at public clinics, schools, assisted-living facilities, and other health care sites. They gain the skills, confidence, and communication ability to excel in this rapidly growing field.Professional PreparationThe undergraduate nursing major prepares students to take the NCLEX (the licensure examination administered by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing) and become a licensed Registered Nurse. Graduates are broadly prepared for employment in entry level positions in professional nursing in a variety of health care agencies.Delaware State’s undergraduate nursing degree program is approved by the Delaware Board of Nursing (820 Silver Lake Road, Dover, DE 19904, 302-744-4500) and is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, GA 30326, 404-975-5000, www.acenursing.org).All nursing students are eligible to become members of the Delaware State University Student Nurses Association. Students may also be invited for induction into the Delaware State University Nursing Honor Society after successful completion of the junior year of the Nursing Program, with a 3.0 GPA and in the top third of class rank.FacultyNursing faculty at Delaware State combine years of professional experience with academic and research achievement, providing perspective and insight to act as true mentors. Instructors get to know their students as individuals and offer guidance related to the classroom, career, and in life. They also are true experts with a passion for their profession.
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Department of Nursing
Undergraduate Student Handbook – under construction

 

Community Health Course Descriptions

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    HEPR-105. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC & COMMUNITY HEALTH.  3:3:0 This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of public and community health. The influence of public health professionals on the past, present and future health status of society through the examination of critical health issues will be described. Programming models, theories and policy development are included. Credit: three hours. HEPR-106. INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH BEHAVIOR.  3:3:0 This course examines the psychological, social-psychological, and sociological approaches to the development of health attitudes and behavior. The use of behavior change theories as a basis for the development of behavior change intervention programs. Credit: three hours. HEPR-108. PERSONAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH.  3:3:0 This course provides opportunity for study in personal and community health problems as well as steps that can be taken by individuals and groups to reduce risk of health problems for individuals, families, and communities. It also provides an introduction to the nature of community health services and resources. Credit: three hours. MVSC-191. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR I.  1:2:0 University Seminar is a two-semester General Education course sequence that develops academic skills including critical reading, thinking, writing, speaking, and computer and information literacy. The goals and objectives of the General Education Program are introduced in these courses and subsequently embedded across the curriculum in each of the majors and selected concentrations. Class activities provide each student with the opportunity to cultivate the skills and knowledge necessary to become a life-long learner. A global, multi-cultural perspective is used to discuss moral and ethical issues, values, peer pressure, wellness, nutrition, and health issues. Other goals of this course are: knowledge of the University’s history, development of the sense of University community, and a shared common educational experience with other freshmen. Credit: one hour. MVSC-192. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR II.  1:1:0 University Seminar is a two-semester General Education course sequence that develops academic skills including critical reading, thinking, writing, speaking, and computer and information literacy. The goals and objectives of the General Education Program are introduced in these courses and subsequently embedded across the curriculum in each of the majors and selected concentrations. Class activities provide each student with the opportunity to cultivate the skills and knowledge necessary to become a life-long learner. A global, multi-cultural perspective is used to discuss moral and ethical issues, values, peer pressure, wellness, nutrition, and health issues. The second semester course focuses on career and graduate school information, resume development, and development of communication skills. Other goals of this course are: knowledge of the University’s history, development of the sense of University community, and a shared common educational experience with other freshmen. Credit: one hour. HEPR-205. FOUNDATIONS OF PUBLIC HEALTH EDUCATION & POLICY.  3:3:0 This course examines foundations and content of two professions, health education and public health, including history, mission, terminology, philosophy, ethical principles and scientific foundations. Emerging and reemerging threats to the public’s health will be discussed, as well as societal influences on health and health policy. Also addresses professional competencies and preparation, and the role of professional organizations. Prerequisites: HEPR-105 Credit: three hours. HEPR-210. HEALTH PROMOTION IN THE WORKPLACE.  3:3:0 The purpose of the course is to provide the student with an understanding of how to promote a healthy and safe workplace. The course examines occupational stress, occupational safety and health, women’s health, AIDS, violence, drugs, etc. The course includes lectures, discussions, speakers, and films. Prerequisites: HEPR-105, HEPR-205 Credit: three hours. HEPR-234. PUBLIC AND COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES.  3:3:0 In-depth study of community health organization, including public health agencies. The course will examine the organization, governance, problems, services and programs of local, state, national and international organizations and agencies. Credit: three hours. Prerequisite: Personal and Community Health. Credit: three hours. HEPR-236. SUBSTANCE USE AND ABUSE.  3:3:0 The study of the physical, mental, social and illegal implications of alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drugs ad the nature and proper use of prescription drugs and nonprescription medications. Credit: three hours. HEPR-220. PUBLIC HEALTH INFORMATICS & COMMUNICATION.  3:3:0 The course provides an overview of the development, design, and delivery process for public health communications and informatics. Students will gain both conceptual and theoretical knowledge as well as practical experience in a variety of communications, including instructional, clinical, technological, and communication-oriented. The course emphasizes various types of intervention and recipient factors that contribute to the success or failure. Prerequisites: HEPR-105, HEPR-205 Credit: three hours. HEPR-330. CHRONIC DISEASE MANAGEMENT.  3:3:0 Epidemiology, prevention and control of chronic disease (e.g. obesity, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, hypertension, diabetes, etc.) related to health and wellness. Students will examine risk factors, as well as preventive measured, as they relate to public health, individual management, and clinical interventions. Prerequisites: HEPR-105, HEPR-205, Anatomy & Physiology II (MVSC 202 or BIOL 208) Credit: three hours. HEPR-331. OBSERVATION AND FIELDWORK.  3:0:3 Observation and fieldwork at selected health agency (Community Health major only). Prerequisites: Personal and Community Health and Public and Community Health Services (may be taken concurrently). Credit: three hours. HEPR-332. CONSUMER HEALTH.  3:3:0 An in-depth study of the factors involved in the selection and evaluation of health services and products. Emphasis includes medical quackery, efficiently using health services, consumer protection, alternative and complementary therapies, food selection, and influences of advertising on consumer choices. Credit: three hours. HEPR-333. DISEASE AND INJURY PREVENTION.  3:3:0 This course provides study of occurrence and prevention of injuries. It also provides study in chronic and infectious diseases, including causation and prevention. Prerequisite: Personal and Community Health. Credit: three hours. HEPR-336. MENTAL HEALTH AND STRESS MANAGEMENT IN HEALTH PROMOTION.  3:3:0 This course focuses on issues relating to mental and emotional health, including stress and stress management. Services in the community are explored. Credit: three hours. HEPR-337. PROGRAMING PLANNING AND EVALUATION IN HEALTH EDUCATION AND PROMOTION I.  3:3:0 Needs assessment and planning for health education/promotion programs in a variety of settings. Consideration of issues relating to implementation of programs. Prerequisites: Measurement and Evaluation in Health Promotion, Principles of Health Education. Credit: three hours. HEPR-339. HUMAN SEXUALITY.  3:3:0 The study of basic aspects of human sexuality, including human sexual response, development of sex roles and sexual lifestyles, reproduction and control of reproduction, AIDS and other STD’s and societal legal implications of sexuality. Credit: three hours. HEPR-340. BARRIERS TO HEALTHY LIFESTYLES.  3:3:0 This course provides students with an understanding of common barriers to healthy lifestyles through nutrition, physical activity, etc. The barriers are described using an ecological framework (intrapersonal, interpersonal, community/institution, and macro/public policy) to emphasize the need for multidimensional approaches that Public/Allied Health Professionals can use to help individuals overcome barriers. Prerequisites: HEPR-105, HEPR-205 Credit: three hours. HEPR-402. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY.  3:3:0 This course focuses on threats to the environment, effects on human health, regulation and enforcement, risk assessment, community action, and professional responsibilities. Credit: three hours. HEPR-410. COMMUNITY HEALTH ISSUES.  3:3:0 This course examines the most current issues in community health. Etiology and treatment options for common chronic and communicable diseases are discussed. Primary, secondary, and tertiary measures to prevent and treat conditions most prevalent at the community level are addressed. Prerequisites: HEPR-105, HEPR-205 Credit: three hours. HEPR-431. DESCRIPTIVE EPIDEMIOLOGY.  3:3:0 The study of disease and injury, including characteristics of person, place and time. Topics covered include the natural history of disease, models of diseases, individual diseases, measures of morbidity and mortality, and sources of data and indices of community health. Credit: three hours. HEPR-432. HEALTH PRACTICUM.  12:0:34 Off-campus senior capstone fields experience for community health majors. Students will be placed in community health agencies or public health facilities for field instruction. Students ate supervised and evaluated by the university staff and the cooperating agency staff. A minimum of 400 clock hours is required. A journal is required. Prerequisites: Senior Community Health majors with all other course work completed prior to this experience. Credit: twelve hours.  

Movement Science Course Descriptions

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MVSC-101. LIFETIME FITNESS AND WELLNESS.  2:3:1 This course is designed to acquaint the undergraduate student with current and correct information concerning fitness and its components, and wellness concepts. Lifetime fitness and wellness is a general education core course providing life-long learning by addressing general information concerning fitness and wellness promotion, as well as HIV/AIDS and drug abuse prevention.  Course includes two hours of lecture and one hour of lab. Credit: two hours. MVSC-110. INTRODUCTION TO MOVEMENT SCIENCE.  1:1:0 This course offers a basic introduction to movement science foundational principles from different perspectives. Student will be provided with information about career opportunities, professional organizations, and resources available in the pre-health, health professional, kinesiology, and fitness industry and education. Credit: one hour. MVSC-124. TEACHING FITNESS & PHYSICAL ACTIVITY CONCEPTS. 3:3:0 The course will focus upon the Fitness Gram, a health-related fitness test developed by Cooper Institute for Aerobics. Students will be required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the Fitness Gram through application and analysis of the data. From data interpretation, the students will plan and develop improvement plans integrating the F.I.T.T. principles to maintain or improve upon the health-related fitness components for self and others. An out-of-class field experience is required. Credit: three hours. MVSC-191. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR I – PAHS.  1:2:0 University Seminar is a two-semester General Education course sequence that develops academic skills including critical reading, thinking, writing, speaking, and computer and information literacy. The goals and objectives of the General Education Program are introduced in these courses and subsequently embedded across the curriculum in each of the majors and selected concentrations. Class activities provide each student with the opportunity to cultivate the skills and knowledge necessary to become a life-long learner. A global, multi-cultural perspective is used to discuss moral and ethical issues, values, peer pressure, wellness, nutrition, and health issues. Other goals of this course are: knowledge of the University’s history, development of the sense of University community, and a shared common educational experience with other freshmen. Credit: one hour. MVSC-192. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR II – PAHS.  1:1:0 University Seminar is a two-semester General Education course sequence that develops academic skills including critical reading, thinking, writing, speaking, and computer and information literacy. The goals and objectives of the General Education Program are introduced in these courses and subsequently embedded across the curriculum in each of the majors and selected concentrations. Class activities provide each student with the opportunity to cultivate the skills and knowledge necessary to become a life-long learner. A global, multi-cultural perspective is used to discuss moral and ethical issues, values, peer pressure, wellness, nutrition, and health issues. The second semester course focuses on career and graduate school information, resume development, and development of communication skills. Other goals of this course are: knowledge of the University’s history, development of the sense of University community, and a shared common educational experience with other freshmen. Credit: one hour. MVSC-201. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I.  4:3:1 These foundation courses are designed to provide fundamental knowledge of the structure and function of the systems of the human body. This first course of the two-semester course sequence presents the study of human anatomy and physiology at the cell, tissue, and organ system levels of organization. An emphasis is placed on anatomical terminology, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and endocrine systems. This second course of the two-semester course sequence focuses on topics, which include the cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive systems, human immunity, electrolytes and water balance, and human growth and development. Both courses consist of three (3) hours of lecture and one (1) one-hour of laboratory per week. Credit: four hours each semester. MVSC-202. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II.  4:3:1 These foundation courses are designed to provide fundamental knowledge of the structure and function of the systems of the human body. This first course of the two-semester course sequence presents the study of human anatomy and physiology at the cell, tissue, and organ system levels of organization. An emphasis is placed on anatomical terminology, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and endocrine systems. This second course of the two-semester course sequence focuses on topics, which include the cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive systems, human immunity, electrolytes and water balance, and human growth and development. Both courses consist of three (3) hours of lecture and one (1) one-hour of laboratory per week. Credit: four hours each semester. MVSC-210. PSYCHOLOGY OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY.  3:3:0 This course will address theories of behavior change as they apply to physical activity participation and other health behaviors. There will be an emphasis on application to understand factors related to physical activity and exercise participation, and health behavior intervention planning to maximize adherence. Additionally, this course will address physical activity and exercise as they relate to psychological health issues. The course will be taught with an emphasis on application of concepts and the critical analysis of the scientific research. Prerequisites: MVSC 110 Credit: three hours. MVSC-218. SPORT AND FITNESS NUTRITION.  3:3:0 This course is designed to present an overview of nutrition as it relates to physical activity. Course topics include carbohydrate, protein, fat, vitamin, mineral, and water requirements for fitness and sport. Popular nutritional supplements and ergonomic aids used by physically active individuals will also be discussed, along with an in-depth look into specific athlete’s nutritional requirements for their given sport. Prerequisites: None. Credit: three hours. MVSC-255. INTRODUCTION TO MOTOR CONTROL AND MOTOR LEARNING.  3:3:0 This course introduces students to the principles related to learning and control of psychomotor skills. The course focuses on motor skill acquisition and control. Primary focus is placed on the cognitive and neuromuscular processes underlying acquisition of motor skills and neuromuscular factors related to skilled motor performance. Prerequisites: None Credit: three hours. MVSC-355. PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE.  3:3:1 This course is designed to provide students with a physiological perspective of how the human body responds, adjusts, and adapts to exercise. Course content includes study of energy transfer and energy expenditure at rest and during exercise, bioenergetics, contributions and adaptations of the neuromuscular, pulmonary and circulatory systems during exercise, environmental aspects (thermal stress, altitude, microgravity) of physiology related to exercise performance, and body composition. Prerequisites: MVSC-201, MVSC-202.  Course includes two hours of lecture and one hour of lab. Credit: three hours. BIOMECHANICS.  3:3:0 This course examines the relationship between skeletal, muscular, and neurological structures and function in the production of movement. Functional relationships among anatomical structures are identified and applied to fundamental movement skills. Students are introduced to qualitative anatomical analysis and neuromuscular assessment of dance and sport skills. Prerequisites: MVSC-201 Credit, three hours. MVSC-361. SPORT BIOMECHANICS.  3:3:0 This course examines fundamental mechanical principles involved in the process of the production of human movement and optimization of performance. In addition to the identification of application of kinematics and kinetic principles to human movement, dance, and sport skills, the strength and mechanical properties of human tissues, and equipment design are discussed. Students are introduced to qualitative and quantitative mechanical analysis of human movement. Prerequisite: MVSC-201 Credit: three hours. MVSC-362. EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION AND TESTING.  3:3:1 This course provides a comprehensive and advanced approach to health and fitness appraisal and exercise prescription for both healthy and special populations. It is designed to provide a well-balanced approach to the assessment of health and physical fitness and the design and implementation of exercise programs, addressing cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular fitness, body weight and composition, and flexibility. Necessary modifications to assessment procedures and exercise prescription for special populations (peripheral arterial and pulmonary disease, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, arthritis, osteoporosis, pregnancy, and the elderly) will also be addressed. Two lectures per week and integrated laboratory experiences.  Course includes two hours of lecture and one hour of lab. Prerequisites:  MVSC-355 Credit:  three hours. MVSC-363. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY EPIDEMIOLOGY.  3:3:0 This course exposes students to epidemiological methods that are relevant to the study of physical activity. It is intended to enhance students’ ability to understand and apply epidemiological methods to physical activity-related research. Basic epidemiological study design, methods, and issues pertinent to the study of physical activity are presented early in the course. Subsequent classes are structured to provide opportunity for in-depth analysis and discussion of how epidemiological methods are used to study injury patterns and trends and physical activity behavior. Prerequisites: MVSC 201, MVSC 202 Credit: three hours. MVSC-365. RESEARCH DESIGN AND QUANTITATIVE SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS.  3:3:0 This course examines and compares types of research design, statistical analysis, and software applications in movement science. Application of descriptive and inferential statistical techniques commonly used in movement science research, relationships between research design and descriptive and inferential statistical applications are explored. Literature review, research protocol, statistical analysis, reporting techniques and APA formatting and reference styles are incorporated. This is a writing emphasis class. Prerequisites: MVSC-362. Pre/Co-requisite: MVSC-470 Credit: three hours. MVSC-370. RESEARCH EXPERIENCE IN MOVEMENT SCIENCE.  1-6:1-6:1-6 An opportunity to actively engage in a mentored research project in a Movement Science discipline. A scholarly report is required. The sequence begins in the spring semester of the junior year, laying the groundwork for development of a full research project. Prerequisites: Second semester junior or senior standing in Movement Science Credit: one to three hours each semester. MVSC-401. NEUROMECHANICS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT.  3:3:0 An introduction to the study of how the nervous system controls muscle activation and movement. Relationships among neural and muscle tissues, neural elements and force production, acute and chronic adaptations to stress, neural plasticity, neural elements of movement disorders, prevention of and recovery from injury will be discussed. Prerequisites: MVSC-255, MVSC-360 Credit: three hours. MVSC-402. INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN TISSUE MECHANICS.  3:3:0 This course is an introduction to the biomechanical properties and behavior of human tissues and joints. Human tissue behavior under various loading conditions, including sitting, standing, gait and fundamental movement skills will be discussed. In addition, the development and etiology of fractures, strains, sprains and arthroplasty will be presented and discussed. Prerequisites: MVSC-360, MVSC-361 Credit: three hours. MVSC-410. CLINICAL EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY.  3:3:1 This course provides a comprehensive exposure to and experience in the clinical aspects of exercise physiology by exploring the relationship between exercise and chronic disease. The pathophysiology, medical and clinical considerations, as well as exercise prescriptions designed for specific diseases will be discussed.  Course includes two hours of lecture and one hour of lab. Prerequisites: MVSC-355, MVSC-362, MVSC-365 Credit: three hours. MVSC-415. EXPERIMENTAL EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY.  3:3:1 This course will provide students with knowledge of how environment (heat and cold exposure, microgravity, chronobiological factors, altitude, diving, pollution) can impact an individual’s capacity to perform exercise and work. Students will be encouraged to participate in and conduct experiments designed to replicate these conditions in the laboratory setting and submit their findings in professional laboratory reports.  Course includes two hours of lecture and one hour of lab. Prerequisites: MVSC-355, MVSC-362, MVSC-365 Credit: three hours. MVSC-461. PREVENTION AND CARE OF ATHLETIC INJURIES.  3:3:1 This course is designed to introduce roles of the sports medicine team, liability issues, and necessary skills and competencies required for evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation of basic athletic injuries. This course includes the study of modern theories and principles of athletic training, injury mechanisms, fatigue, gender and nutrition related to injury prevention, and causes of the most common sports-related injuries.  Course includes two hours of lecture and one hour of lab. Prerequisites: MVSC-362 Credit: three hours. MVSC-463. NEUROMUSCULAR ADAPTATIONS TO STRENGTH TRAINING AND CONDITIONING.  3:3:0 This courses provides an overview of the methods and techniques associated with the strength and conditioning of athletes through cardiovascular and resistance training. The physiological principles for developing strength and conditioning training programs, utilizing both anaerobic and aerobic systems and performance assessment methods, will be addressed. An emphasis will be placed on metabolic energy systems and specific physical adaptations to exercise. The use of plyometrics, speed/agility/speed-endurance training, Pilates, and core training to maximize and athlete's performance will also be addressed.  As a final project, students are required to use knowledge gained throughout the semester to develop a one-year training program for a specific athlete. Prerequisites: MVSC-362 Credit: three hours. MVSC-464. ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHY.  3:3:0 Recognition and understanding of normal and abnormal electrocardiographic patterns are examined, with an emphasis on the underlying physiologic mechanisms and pathophysiology. Use of the resting electrocardiogram (ECG) to identify contraindications for exercise and use of the exercise ECG to identify clinically significant cardiovascular disease will be emphasized. A student successfully completing this course will be prepared to successfully complete the ECG portion of the American College of Sports Medicine Exercise Specialist or Registered Clinical Exercise Physiologist Certification Exams. Prerequisites: MVSC-355, MVSC-362 Credits: three hours. MVSC-465. POPULATION SPECIFIC EXERCISE INTERVENTIONS.  3:3:0 This course addresses the role of physical activity in at-risk populations for health promotion and disease prevention and treatment. At-risk populations are groups that traditionally report low levels of physical activity and/or have a high risk for chronic disease. Students will learn how to promote physical activity and how to prescribe physical activity for specific high risk populations. Prerequisites: MVSC-355, MVSC-362 Credit: three hours. MVSC-466. HEALTH AND FITNESS SPECIALIST.  3:3:1 This course provides students with the skills, knowledge, and abilities necessary to be clinicians in a health/fitness and wellness setting. This course prepares students to successfully complete the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Health/Fitness Specialist® (HFS) Certification, a certification considered the “gold standard” of all health-fitness instructor certifications and required by many employers, including those in the health-fitness, university, corporate, commercial, hospital, and community settings.  Course includes two hours of lecture and one hour of lab. Prerequisites: MVSC-201, MVSC-202, MVSC-365, MVSC-362 Credit: three hours. MVSC-470. MOVEMENT ANALYSIS.  3:3:1 This course introduces the student to the use of technology commonly used in movement analysis techniques. The processes of data collection, analysis, interpretation, and reporting using video, force, and EMG techniques will be introduced and explored. Quantitative analysis of human movement toward understanding the mechanisms of injury, reduction of injury production and improved movement outcomes will include kinematic and kinetic aspects of total body and isolated joint movements and electromyographic activity of muscle.  Course includes two hours of lecture and one hour of lab. Prerequisites: MVSC-360, MVSC-361 Credit: three hours. MVSC-475. CSCS EXAM WORKSHOP.  1:1:0 This is an intensive weekend workshop designed to address and fine-tune theory and practice, specifically related to the content of NSCA’s Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist examination. Students will cover exam topics through a combination of classroom and practical experience. At the conclusion of this course, students will be taking a practice CSCS exam. Prerequisites: MVSC-355, MVSC-362, MVSC-463 Credit: one hour. MVSC-476. HEALTH/FITNESS SPECIALIST® CERTIFICATION WORKSHOP.  1:1:0 This intensive workshop provides students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to sit for and pass ACSM’s Health Fitness Specialist® Certification Exam. The course focuses on the ten competency areas of the exam, with an emphasis on exercise physiology and exercise prescription and programming. The Exercise Physiology Lab is used to prepare students for health appraisal techniques. Practice questions and a practice exam for the HFS® exam are provided. Prerequisites: MVSC-355, MVSC-362, MVSC-466 Credit: one credit MVSC-480. MOVEMENT SCIENCE SENIOR SEMINAR.  6:1:5 A seminar course and capstone experience required of all Movement Science majors. Students may meet this requirement by completing one (1) of the following three (3) options: 1) an original research study, 2) a literature review, or 3) an internship with an associated service project and report. Topics are selected in consultation with Movement Science faculty. Regardless of the option chosen, students must present their work orally in an open meeting format and provide a final paper detailing the work to the Department. Prerequisites: MVSC-362, MVSC-470. Current First Aid, AED, and CPR certifications are required for Senior Movement Science majors Credit: six hours.  

Department of Public and Allied Health Sciences

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The Department of Public and Allied Health Sciences is a unique interdisciplinary department that prepares students for a wide variety of careers, graduate education, and professional health education. The Department is composed of two unique, yet related majors; Movement Science and Health Promotion. Regardless of the selected major and concentration, students must complete the General Education Program as required of all University students (See General Education Requirements). Mission Consistent with the University’s Mission and Goals, the Mission of the Department of Public and Allied Health Sciences, is to prepare undergraduates for careers and graduate education in movement/exercise science, kinesiology, human performance, allied health disciplines, public health and community health. Graduates of these majors are provided with theoretical, laboratory, research, service learning, clinical, and community service opportunities to advance knowledge, ethical practice and service in future endeavors. The department provides the potential for current and meaningful interaction among its constituents, the campus community and the community at-large through the use of educational and research methodologies, service learning, and community service activities. Moreover, the Department promotes and provides programs which seek to remedy current under-representation of minorities in allied health, fitness and wellness, exercise/movement science, kinesiological, allied health, community health and public health professions. The Department is dedicated to meeting the educational and professional preparation needs of individuals who plan to interface with the diverse and ever-changing society of the 21st century. Departmental Philosophy The philosophy of the Department of Public and Allied Health Sciences is to develop effective and ethical practitioners, clinicians, and researchers who possess comprehensive content knowledge, practice and ethical behaviors; utilize appropriate assessment procedures and techniques; demonstrate effective interpersonal communication skills; display the ability to problem solve and develop strategies for successful outcomes; employ technology in a variety of settings; and apply successful strategies through proven models of research, best practices, and service. Department's Beliefs The faculty believes that every major in the Department should have access to a program of high quality that prepares its constituents for careers in the fitness and wellness industry and post graduate education in movement/exercise science, kinesiology, human performance, allied health disciplines, community health, and public health disciplines. In addition, the faculty believes that every graduate should: Demonstrate proficiency in the content area in which he or she elects to specialize. Provide evidence of professional and ethical disposition and a broad spectrum of instructional knowledge, skills, and values. Exhibit the ability to work effectively within our nationally and internationally diverse society. Display a wide range of communication skills, including writing, speaking, and listening. Demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge, skills, and values by engaging in critical thinking and problem solving activities and critical analysis for successful outcomes. Provide evidence of the ability to translate research findings into meaningful practical applications. Exhibit technological and information literacy, conduct literature searches and use technology for the advancement of knowledge, practice, and service. Display an understanding that their selected interdisciplinary discipline is a dynamic process, which is knowledge-based, comprehensive and continuous, and requires discourse among colleagues. Educational Policy The Department of Public and Allied Health Sciences faculty of Delaware State University models instruction, experiences, service learning, and community engagement, and utilizes “Best Practices” in its delivery of instruction. Thus, Movement Science students are actively engaged in lecture, laboratory experiences, and campus and community service activities, and faculty-directed student research, all of which embrace the concerns of a diverse, changing global society. Health Promotion classes actively engage students through program planning, implementation, and assessment, research activities, observation and fieldwork, practicum, and internships. Problem solving activities provide students with the opportunity to explore real life situations, which present opportunities to develop skills to adapt to new problems and issues. The Department provides equipment, facilities, experiences, and instruction to facilitate optimal learning and community engagement.  
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Department of Public & Allied Health Sciences
Price Building, Room 103
1200 North DuPont Highway
Dover, DE 19901

302.857.6750
302.857.6781 Fax

Monday - Friday 8:30 am- 4:30 pm

Faculty/ Staff Profile


Department Chair



Dr. Bradley Skelcher
Acting Chairperson/Associate Provost
Price 103
302.857.6703
bskelcher@desu.edu


Associate Professor



Dr. Erica Jackson
Price 105 A
302.857.6709
emjackson@desu.edu
 

Assistant Professors



Dr. Sangeeta Gupta
Price 207
302.857.6782
sgupta@desu.edu

Dr. Adam Kuperavage
Price 107
302.857.7688
akuperavage@desu.edu


Instructors



Mrs. Cara Cordrey Gomez
Price 105 B
302.857.6776
ccordrey@desu.edu

Ms. Amy Goote-Ash
Visiting Instructor
Price 108
302.857.6604
agoote@desu.edu



Ms. Megan Maloney
Visiting Instructor
Price 104
302.857.7657
mmaloney@desu.edu



Ms. Julia Olsen
Visiting Instructor
Price 104
302.857.6711
jolsen@desu.edu

 

Professional Staff

Ms. Angela Shorter
Coordinator, Lifetime Fitness & Wellness
Memorial Hall 107
302.857.6615
ashorter@desu.edu
 

Staff



Mrs. Susan Kelly
Technical Secretary
Price 103
302.857.6703
sukelly@desu.edu

 

Movement Science

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    Introduction The interdisciplinary Movement Science degree offers complete preparation for careers in fitness, personal training, strength training and conditioning, and movement analysis. Students learn the most current techniques and technologies in fitness and fitness assessments, training and conditioning, injury prevention, and physical rehabilitation, developing all the expertise necessary to pass professional certification exams. The degree also provides an excellent foundation for graduate school programs in allied health disciplines such as kinesiology, exercise science, athletic training, sports medicine, physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician assistant, chiropractics, and medical school. Delaware State’s program stands out for its emphasis on laboratory work and service learning. Students get more than 100+ hours of practical experience in the community, developing professional attitudes, skills, and values that translate directly to the workplace. While on campus, they have access to the Exercise Physiology, Movement Analysis, Exercise Physiology and Rehabilitation Research Laboratories, as well as the newly opened, state-of-the-art Wellness and Recreation Center.  Students are encouraged to participate as volunteers in clinical environments and to actively engage in research. Professional Preparation Movement Science graduates possess a unique set of marketable skills. They are fully prepared to pass the certification exams of the American College of Sports Medicine and the National Strength and Conditioning Association, which provide immediate qualification for employment. Graduates enjoy a wide range of career options in such fields as personal training, health, wellness, and fitness, strength and conditioning, and movement analysis. Movement Science graduates may have an opportunity to engage in research and/or move on to graduate and health professional graduate education. Faculty The faculty of the Movement Science program teaches from personal and professional experience. Combining academic expertise with years of professional practice, they offer practical wisdom and insight along with textbook lessons. Delaware State has a small, intimate program. Instructors develop close relationships with students, offering mentorship, academic guidance, and career advice. Research and Experience Movement Science majors gain hundreds of hours of hands-on experience via faculty directed student research projects, course encumbered laboratory practice, service learning, internships, and volunteer experiences. In addition, students gain practical, workplace-ready skills such as exercise testing and prescription, personal training, fitness assessment and program planning, interpersonal communication and teamwork. Students work both on-campus and off, interacting with individuals of many different ages and cultures, skill levels, fitness status, and physical capabilities. The Movement Science Fitness and Biomechanics Assessment program, Lifetime Fitness and Wellness Baseline Health Risk Appraisals, course encumbered service learning opportunities, on campus Early Childhood Learning Lab and Boys and Girls Club of Dover, and Capitol Park Community Fitness Initiative provide numerous opportunities for students to develop and hone best practices in research and practice. The Movement Science program culminates in a senior capstone project (consisting of a research project, literature review, or internship), which enables students to apply their knowledge in a real-world setting.  
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Career Options


The Fitness and Strength concentration prepares students for a wide variety of health/sport-related careers. Graduates may work in fitness and/or wellness programs, cardiac rehabilitation facilities, strength and conditioning centers/gyms. With this degree, graduates have the KSA’s to work with clients of all ages and fitness levels, including athletes, children, adults, and the elderly. Career options include, but are not limited to:

  • Personal Trainer
  • Group Exercise Instructor
  • Strength and Conditioning Specialist
  • Health and Fitness Director
  • Physical Therapist Assistant

The clinical opportunities provided by this degree allow students to have experiential training required for professionals in the fitness industry. Career options include

  • Exercise Specialist
  • Exercise Test Technologist
  • Clinical Researcher
  • Laboratory Technician
  • Research Assistant
  • Research Scientist
     

If a student’s interest is strength and conditioning training in a variety of settings, the undergraduate Movement Science program prepares him or her for a number of sports-related professions. Career options include:

  • Strength and/or Conditioning Coach
  • Kinesiologist
  • Movement Analyst

 

Health Promotion

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  Introduction The health promotion degree prepares students with the professional skills necessary to promote healthy lifestyles, particularly among populations that have limited access to health-related information and services. These skills include needs assessment, program development and implementation, and evaluation of program outcomes. Delaware State’s health promotion program emphasizes hands-on learning. Students gain many of hours of practical work experience via field placements as volunteers in health agencies, public health departments, the corporate world, and other agencies. They develop programs to enhance health in a variety of ways including:   nutrition obesity prevention and reduction alcohol, tobacco, and other drug abuse sexually transmissible diseases pregnancy and prenatal care heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, and other chronic conditions mental health pollution and environmental health   Professional Preparation Graduates enter the work force with a wide range of job-ready work skills, including public speaking, written communication, qualitative research techniques, health promotion and disease prevention education, needs assessment and analysis. The program includes an in-depth study of public, personal, and community health topics, public health policy, informatics, workplace health promotion, epidemiology, barriers to healthy lifestyles, public and community health organization mechanisms, and health-related challenges of diverse and low-income populations. Faculty Faculty in the health promotion program teaches from first-hand experience. Combining academic expertise with years of professional practice, they have earned their “street cred” and can offer practical wisdom and insight along with textbook lessons. Delaware State’s Health Promotion program offers intimate class sizes to enable meaningful content delivery. Instructors are able to develop close relationships with students, offering mentorship, academic guidance, and career advice. Research and Experience During the junior year, all students perform dozens of hours of observation and fieldwork at an off-campus site including, but not limited to health care agencies, correctional facilities, HIV Prevention centers, health care and disease prevention entities, etc. Students are required to engage in course encumbered mini-research projects, progressively working towards a qualitative research project. The senior capstone consists of a minimum twelve-week, full-time placement at a community health agency or public health facility. Here students engage in supervised work site activities.  
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Career Options


The Health Promotion graduate possesses a unique marketable set of skills required for employment in public health agencies, private and non-profit agencies, worksite health promotion offices, and many other public health related careers. Graduates with a B.S. degree in Health Promotion have a variety of diverse employment opportunities. A few examples are:
 

  • Bioterrorism Prevention Specialist
  • State Immunization Program Coordinator
  • Community Outreach and Case Manager, Family Planning Agency
  • Project Officer, National Geological Survey
  • STD Prevention Specialist
  • Diabetes Prevention Program Specialist
  • Food and Restaurant Inspector
  • HIV Educator and Prevention Specialist
  • Case Management Supervisor
  • Nutrition Coordinator, Senior Center Tobacco Prevention Specialist
  • Project Officer, Lead Screening Program
  • Managed Care Coordinator
  • Employee Wellness Coordinator
  • Infectious Disease Epidemiologist

 

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