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NCATE STANDARD 3

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   STANDARD 3. FIELD EXPERIENCES AND CLINICAL PRACTICE   The unit and its school partners design, implement, and evaluate field experiences and clinical practice so that teacher candidates and other school professionals develop and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn.  [In this section the unit must include (1) initial and advanced programs for teachers, (2) programs for other school professionals, and (3) off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, noting differences when they exist.]   3a. Collaboration between Unit and School Partners   3a.1. Who are the unit's partners in the design, delivery, and evaluation of the unit's field and clinical experiences? Introduction The Unit’s Clinical and Field Experience process is an important component of the teacher education program. Teacher candidates and interns have the opportunity to participate in practical experiences during the different phases of the program. The unit has a variety of diverse settings for the teacher candidates and interns. Through effective collaboration with many public school partners, The Unit is able to design, implement and evaluate student’s progress toward becoming effective teaching professionals.      3(a) Collaboration between unit and school partners  1.     Who are the unit’s partners in the design, delivery, and evaluation of the  unit’s field and clinical experiences? The unit involves both primary and secondary school placements in the design, delivery and evaluation of clinical and field experiences. There are 19 public school districts within the state of Delaware. The university collaborates with all Delaware school districts; however, the majority of our students are placed in Capital, Caesar Rodney, Smyrna, Poly tech, Red Clay, Brandywine, Christina, Milford and Lake Forest school districts.  There are also private and charter sites, such as the Academy of Dover and Eastside Charter of Wilmington, that support candidates in practical experiences. Schools that are selected as internship and practica sites for candidates must adhere to the quality standards of Delaware certification regulations as well as meet the expectations of the Unit. (See 3a-1.1)- Delaware collaborative P-12 Schools Listings Delaware State University maintains collaborative agreements that explain the policies and procedures for clinical and field experiences for the candidates. Quarterly meetings with district office, administrators for curriculum, human resources and policy consultants help to guide decision making for the teacher preparation unit .(See 3a1.2)-Quarterly meeting agendas. In the advanced programs the students are directed to conduct the internships that are appropriate to their program of study within their home schools or surrounding approved venues. Public school sites listed above as well as private schools are utilized for educational leadership sites. There are plans underway to deepen collaborative relationships that will strengthen the school site selection process. The following documents depict the processes of site selection for advanced level candidates. Applied Educational Administration Internship, Portfolio Requirements, Summer Internship Sites.      3a.2. In what ways have the unit's partners contributed to the design, delivery, and evaluation of the unit's field and clinical experiences? The Unit’s partner school districts critique and respond to yearly collaborative agreements that indicate they will continue to support and assist in the mentorship of candidates  (See 3a-2.1)-District collaborative agreement form. There are formal and informal meetings that help the Unit to design and implement strategies for the initial and graduate programs. Collaboration with district personnel and site principals enables the Unit to tailor its programs to align with the conceptual framework as well as the goals and objectives for student learning in the districts. All candidates participate in EFE (Early Field Experiences) to develop effective teaching strategies.  During the early field observation stage, goals and objectives are established by individual course instructors regarding observations and initial teaching experiences.  During this phase students spend 10 hours per course for observation in entry level courses and 20 hours per course for practicum experiences in methods courses. The EFE coordinator provides placement information packets to university instructors to determine the best sites for particular course objectives for each student (See 3a2.2)-EFE Placement packet. After  student’s information is returned to the coordinator, the collaborating schools that meet the needs of the students are contacted. The building principal and instructional staff assist the coordinator to identify the appropriate classroom teachers for the placements. After the placements are confirmed, the course instructor then follows up with detailed information concerning course objectives and expectations. In conjunction with building principals, clinical interns are placed for the 14 week placement utilizing the intern placement form.  The members of the Community Advisory Board (Binder in EH 109) are education professionals, parents, alumni and local business operators who collaborate with the Unit to give input in areas for improvement of the program. Annual collaboration agreements are sent out to the participating school districts that outline the mission and scope of our unit’s teacher preparation program. The district superintendents and human resources personnel agree to provide students with enriched learning environments that promote student learning.  During the EFE phases of the program, mentor teachers evaluate the performances of the students that interact within their classrooms. Course instructors and the coordinator for EFE receive a performance evaluation for each student that is reflected in the course grade. As supervisors visit the sites, they are able to also collect informal data that assist the coordinator to recommend changes as needed to improve the program.            During the Clinical phase, mentor teachers complete a mid-term and final evaluation to determine the knowledge, skills and dispositions of each teacher intern. (3a-2.3) Clinical Evaluation form This information is submitted electronically via the TK20 data collection system. The university supervisors also collect informal data from the school partners that are used to make informed decisions for the following school year.    3a.3. What are the roles of the unit and its school partners in determining how and where candidates are placed for field experiences, student teaching, and internships? Clinical and Field placements are approved through careful collaboration with our partner school districts within diverse school settings.  Direct collaboration with district and school site administrators assists us in determining the optimum placements for teacher interns (See 3a-3.1 Students Placement form).  The placements are viewed, discussed and finally approved by the director and coordinator for the Offices of Clinical and Field Experiences respectively. Some of the districts have designated specific persons to serve as liaisons to assist in locating proper placements of teacher interns.  Based upon the content of the course, as well as previous placements, candidates are placed with mentor teachers that best fit the course objectives (See 3a-3.2) EFE Mentor Teacher Selection Form. The number of contact hours in the early field phases is based on the level of coursework. Official request forms are sent out to districts by the Field Coordinator that identify the level of field experiences that candidates are seeking.  Levels 1and 2 early field observation hours require 10 contact hours for student candidates. The higher level-3 early field hours are practica that require 20 contact hours for teacher candidates. Principals and some district level liaisons assist the unit in the selection of highly qualified, tenured and effective classroom teachers (See 3a-3.3) DE Teacher Certification web index. The university professors also identify master teachers that have been valuable resources in teaching educational concepts in the local schools. These teachers often become mentor teachers for teacher interns during the 14 week pre-service teaching seminar. The semester prior to student teaching, the interns must submit a senior audit, criminal background checks, medical documentation, pass the Praxis II exam in their content area and successfully complete course (EDUC-416) Analysis of Student Teaching. The student placement form only identifies the student’s preference of geographic location within the state. The Unit informs students that both the Clinical and Field offices will not guarantee selected placement locations; however, we make a concerted effort to accommodate travel issues within reason.  3a.4. How do the unit and its school partners share expertise and resources to support candidates' learning in field experiences and clinical practice? All teacher interns are supervised by university and school faculty personnel that are licensed or content professionals in their designated fields. The department chair in collaboration with the clinical director assigns university content supervisors from the unit to each student intern.   The supervisor collaborates with the K-12 mentor teachers to further explain the program expectations that are described in the mentor training modules. (See 3a-4.1) Mentor Training Packet Binder. During the placement, candidates obtain feedback in the form of conferences, e-mail, seminars and TK20 evaluations that are used to monitor progress. The candidates complete pedagogical reflections during clinical and field experiences that are reviewed by course instructors to ensure that the goals of the assignment were addressed.  In addition, the clinical director attends quarterly meetings and staff development sessions for K-12 districts to ensure that best practices are current as well as applicable to the districts in which candidates serve (See 3a-4.2) DE Quarterly Meeting Agenda 3a.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to collaboration between unit and school partners may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]   3b. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of Field Experiences and Clinical Practice  3b.1. What are the entry and exit requirements for clinical practice? Initial Programs: The semester prior to student teaching, interns must enroll in course, EDUC-416 Analysis of Student Teaching, where they apply for placements for the upcoming semester. Senior audits are completed for each student by the advisors and forwarded to the student services director. Admission to clinical internship is approved by the Council for Professional Education (CPE). The candidate requirements include an overall GPA of  2.5 or greater, completion of all methods coursework, satisfactory completion of EFE hours required in their prospective program, post a passing score on Praxis II (In students designated content area), TB Testing and Health clearance completed, criminal background check clearance. The exit requirements for candidates are satisfactory completion of Course EDUC-400/500 (Internship placement), at least an overall acceptable mean score on evaluations, and satisfactory completion of the teacher work sample project. Each candidate participates in a formal exit interview with the director of clinical experiences to gather critical program feedback and reflections. A survey is also completed via TK20 for further assessment of candidate data for future program improvement. (See 3b1.1) Student Teaching Handbook located in TK20 Document Room.  Advanced Programs: In the advanced programs, candidates must be in academic good standing (GPA 3.0 or better), not presently on probation, and be a candidate for the advanced degree at the time of applying for the internship. At the time of applying for the Internship, the candidate should have completed all of the graduate coursework for the program. An application and placement process is approved by the Graduate Education Department. The advance program exit requirements are a professional portfolio containing exemplars/products generated over the course of the graduate program of study. After completing the internship, the intern will be responsible for preparing a portfolio of his or her experiences which will include the student’s reflections. The candidate also conducts an oral presentation about his or her experiences to a faculty panel for evaluation (See 3b1.2) Graduate Catalog located in TK20 Document Room.  3b.2. What field experiences are required for each program or categories of programs (e.g., secondary) at both the initial teacher preparation and advanced preparation levels, including graduate programs for licensed teachers and other school professionals? What clinical practice is required for each program or categories of programs in initial teacher preparation programs and programs for the preparation of other school professionals? Please complete Table 7 or upload your own table at Prompt 3b.9 below.   Table 7 The following table describes the minimum number of hours required for each program in the professional education unit.    Field Experiences and Clinical Practice by Program Table 3b-2.1 The following table describes the minimum number of hours required for each advanced program in the professional education unit.    Course Based Field Experiences: MA Program in Educational Leadership Table 3b-2.2  3b.3. How does the unit systematically ensure that candidates develop proficiencies outlined in the unit's conceptual framework, state standards, and professional standards through field and clinical experiences in initial and advanced preparation programs?  Initial Programs Before teacher interns are placed, the directors for student services and clinical experiences ensure that all course audits are complete, grade point averages are at or above 2.5, and that dispositions and Praxis scores are satisfactory. The assessments for interns are aligned with the unit standards as well as the Delaware Teaching Standards.  Student interns systematically receive a minimum of four evaluations by university supervisors and two evaluations from site based mentors during the 14 week placement See 3b-3.2 (Intern Evaluations, located on TK20). Teacher interns start in phase one of the placement shadowing and assisting the mentor teacher with classroom activities. During phase two the interns are granted more responsibilities and lesson planning opportunities. The third phase of the placement is the solo teaching segment. The interns are responsible for all instructional operations of the classroom under the supervision of the mentor teacher. The fourth and final phase transitions full responsibilities back to the mentor teacher and affords the intern additional opportunities for reflections See 3b-3.3 (Tentative Phase In Schedule) See TK20 Document Room.   Prior to school visits, in-class discussions are conducted concerning the goals and objectives of Early Field Experiences. In addition, the Early Field Experiences Coordinator visits classes to explain the unit’s conceptual framework and its impact in terms of teacher preparation. Instructor syllabi link EFE to the theories propounded in content materials and instructional resources. During school visits to the assigned schools, teacher candidates are given assignments that reinforce teaching strategies taught by course instructors.  Small group sessions and tutorials are also helpful for students to fully grasp how student learning occurs.  At the end of the EFE visits, teacher candidates are encouraged to reflect on their experiences using the reflection forms that are reviewed by the Field Coordinator as well as the course instructor See 3b-3.1 (EFE Reflection form). The issues raised by students in their reflections are usually discussed with students in formal classroom sessions and if necessary, with individual teacher candidates by the coordinator.  Advanced Programs In the Educational Leadership program, the applied educational leadership project serves as the program capstone. This project requires the candidate to engage in a field-based internship experience. To start this process, the doctoral candidate initially writes a proposal and obtains approval for a semester long supervised field experience with an Educational Leader at a level above the candidate current level of employment. The field experience shall involve a minimum of 240 hours of activities and projects which permit the candidate to practice/demonstrate educational leadership knowledge and skills related to ELCC standards. The internship proposal should identify activities and projects to be completed that address the ELCC standards over the internship period. At the completion of the internship, the candidate will prepare an extensive product of the experience and an oral presentation that clearly describes the activities completed during the internship in relationship to ELCC standards. This assignment is aligned with the ELCC standards and is relevant to the Educational Doctorate leadership Program outcomes for the college of Education at Delaware State University. The presented product of the internship efforts should reflect on lessons learned in relation to the ELCC standards and the actual experience. This assessment is evaluated using a rubric that identifies assessment components, describes the desired performance of the candidate, and is used to collect data. Complete APA form and style should be adhered to through the entire project (See 3b-3.5) Assignment #4 Applied Leadership Assignment  See TK20 Document Room and Rubric. See TK20 Document Room  3b.4. How does the unit systematically ensure that candidates use technology as an instructional tool during field experiences and clinical practice? The use of instructional technology is a vital component that is represented during EFE instruction and school visitations. Candidates are expected to incorporate technology into their lesson planning and delivery as they visit classrooms for practical experience. In addition, they are required to activate TK20 accounts for electronic data submissions of designated assignments from designated courses. The student interns complete all sections of the Teacher Work Sample in which they must utilize technology as an instructional tool  See 3b-4.1   3b-4.1.1 Aggregate Data Spring 2007 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment  See TK20 Document Room 3b-4.1.2 Aggregate Data Fall 2008 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room 3b-4.1.3 Aggregate Data Spring 2009 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room 3b-4.1.4 Aggregate Data Fall 2009 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room 3b-4.1.5 Aggregate Data Spring 2010 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment. See TK20 Document Room University faculty and school-based mentor teachers submit clinical experience evaluations that identify the candidate’s use of technology as an important instructional component. TK20 accounts communicate important instructional strategies and techniques to candidates from the unit as well as to the mentor teachers in the field during the placements See 3b-4.2 (data collection system binders). TK20 Document Room Faculty Guide Tk20 has user guides for both students and faculty members.  Student Guide Tk20 has user guides for both students and faculty members.  Unit candidates have access to smart boards and other instructional tools during clinical and field experiences. Mentor teachers assist students successfully plan, deliver and reflect upon innovative technology based lessons in all content areas. Candidates are also expected to integrate creative instructional strategies and other grade level appropriate technologies to enhance student learning experiences.   3b.5. What criteria are used in the selection of school-based clinical faculty? How are the criteria implemented? What evidence suggests that school-based clinical faculty members are accomplished school professionals? Mentor teachers are selected in conjunction with participating school districts and the Director of Clinical and field experiences. The Community Advisory Board is also able to give direction in terms of community/district concerns. School district contracts of collaboration provide the criteria for selection of clinical faculty. Building principals complete the mentor placement form which gives the university the option to select the mentors based upon the needs of individual students See 3b.5.1(School site selection form) students are placed within diverse settings in surrounding districts. The site principal, in conjunction with the Director of clinical and Field Experiences, makes final placement recommendations. See 3b.5.1(School site selection form) students are placed within diverse settings in surrounding districts.  The site principal in conjunction with the Director of Clinical and Field Experiences make final placement recommendations.  The teachers must hold a valid Delaware teaching certificate in the area of supervision, completed 3 plus years of satisfactory performance as a classroom teacher, successfully complete the DSU mentor orientation and demonstrate a commitment to mentoring student interns. The Delaware (DEEDS) certification website allows the unit to verify mentors’ credentials before candidates are finalized for placements.  See (3b-5.2)-DE Educator credential verification webpage or https://deeds.doe.k12.de.us/public/deeds_pc_findeducator.aspx 3b.6. What preparation do school-based faculty members receive for their roles as clinical supervisors? The preparation that school based faculty receive for their roles as Clinical supervisors is comprehensive and intense. Prior to placement, each university supervisor attends an orientation and receives a handbook that outlines the mentorship process and expectations. See  3b-6.1 (Clinical  Supervision Orientation Agenda) located in TK20 Document Room.  In addition, the school based personnel attend an orientation or electronic workshop sessions on the conceptual framework and standard operational procedures. The electronic training module method was adopted in 2009 to accommodate the needs and schedules of school site based personnel. See 3b-6.2(Electronic Training Modules) located in TK20 Document Room. The Mentor teacher responsibilities and expectations are sent via email before students arrive for placements and are followed up with phone calls for clarification. This serves as an opportunity to network, plan and answer questions before student interns report to the school site. An electronic binder is sent to each mentor teacher that explains the assessment process in depth. The binders, sent via TK20, provide on-going training and assistance to promote a quality experience for the interns. See 3b6.3 (Electronic Binders via Tk20). The binder contains all of the forms, evaluations and surveys that are required during the placement .The university supervisors that visit student interns in schools also serve as supports to assist mentor teachers as needed.   Faculty Guide Tk20 has user guides for both students and faculty members.   To access the Faculty Guide, go to: https://desu.tk20.com/campustoolshighered/start.do Student Guide Tk20 has user guides for both students and faculty members.  To access the Student Guide, go to: https://desu.tk20.com/campustoolshighered/start.do It contains all the forms, evaluations and surveys that are required during the placement. The university supervisors that visit student interns in schools also serve as support systems to assist mentor teachers as needed.   3b.7. What evidence demonstrates that clinical faculty members provide regular and continuous support for student teachers, licensed teachers completing graduate programs, and other school professionals? Evidence that demonstrates that clinical faculty members provide regular and continuous support for student teachers, licensed teachers completing graduate programs and other school professionals is presented in the following narrative. Regular on site visits and informal conferences take place with interns/ mentor teachers and faculty supervisors throughout the student’s placement See 3b7.1 (Supervisor Travel logs, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ) See TK20 Document Room. Feedback is provided to all interns by university supervisors on their observed performance and evaluations (at both undergraduate and advance levels). All undergraduate interns report to the campus every two weeks for seminar class EDUC-400. These critical sessions serve as staff development support and reflection of field performance See 3b-7.2 (Semester Seminar Log).  Expert speakers and staff development personnel visit the interns on campus for sessions that link to experiences at the school site. The TK20 data system also serves as an important resource for mentors and university supervisors throughout the placement. Intern evaluations are submitted at designated intervals during the placement by both university supervisors and mentor teachers See (3a-2.3) Clinical Evaluation form ). Additionally, samples of student portfolio assessments are located in EH 109.    3b.8. What structured activities involving the analysis of data and current research are required in programs for other school professionals? The structured activities involved in the analysis of data and current research required in programs (Ed. Leadership, Masters Program) are the action research project, thesis. Each candidate develops an action research proposal as one assignment of the Action Research course.  The proposal must address an issue in an educational organization and receive the endorsement of the course instructor and building-level (or higher) administrator where the research is designed to be conducted.  As the capstone project, the candidate must execute the research as designed, prepare results and recommendations from the project, and present the research to a panel of professionals (faculty and educational leaders).  The project is assessed using the Action Research Project rubric and scoring guide. In a written detailed report, the candidate will describe a framework for the Action Research Project and include a statement of purpose for the action research investigation. Key components of the written report include an outline of the plan of action, a description of the setting, and the assumptions and limitations of the project, including figures and tables. Course EDUC-688 Action Research in Education (in TK20), Description of Assessment and Its Use (in TK20), Description of Action Research Project (in TK20)  Delaware State University, College of Education Health and Public Policy See (3b8.1), Course Based Field Experiences: MA Program in Educational Leadership See TK20 Document Room Activities that further reinforce the analysis of data and current research is the thesis/dissertation process. In the thesis project, there is a committee chair and members who guide the development of this activity.  In the Dissertation project, there is a dissertation committee chair and members who guide and supervise the dissertation research. In addition, for both processes, thesis and dissertation, it is normally required that the research process be prepared to go through the Institutional Review Board.  3b.9. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the design, implementation, and evaluation of field experiences and clinical practice may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]  (3b.9.1) Spring 2010 Intern Disposition Assessment: Faculty's Evaluation See TK20 Document Room (3b.9.2) Application for Internship See TK20 Document Room (3b.9.3) Course Based Field Experiences: MA Program in Educational Leadership See TK20 Document Room (3b.9.4) 2010 Co-operating Teacher See TK20 Document Room (3b.9.5) Delaware State University Education Department Employer Satisfaction Survey See TK20 Document Room   3c. Candidates’ Development and Demonstration of Knowledge, Skills, and Professional Dispositions to Help All Students Learn  3c.1. On average, how many candidates are eligible for clinical practice each semester or year? What percent, on average, complete clinical practice successfully? There is an average of 21 teacher candidates per year. Teacher candidate eligibility (n=64) and completion rates (n=62) show that 98% of all eligible teacher candidates at Delaware State University have successfully completed their final clinical practice experience. One teacher candidate did not complete the clinical practice due to medical issues. The other teacher candidate experienced serious medical problems in the Spring, 2010.   The data indicates the unit is extremely successful in terms of candidate eligibility and completion of the clinical practice. Semester/Year Eligible Candidates Candidate Completers Fall /07 9 9 Spring/08 13 13 Fall /08 9 8 Spring/09 13 12 Fall /09 4 4     Spring/10 16 16     Total 64 62     3c.2. What are the roles of candidates, university supervisors, and school-based faculty in assessing candidate performance and reviewing the results during clinical practice? The role of the teacher candidates and their participation within the assessment process allows them to respond to feedback from university supervisors and mentor teachers. After each observation, candidates are given the opportunity to reflect upon and question the results of their performance assessment. Each candidate maintains a self-reflecting journal which includes instructional best practices and practices in need of modification to improve P-12 student learning.  The role of the university and site-based faculty is to evaluate teacher candidate performances though a variety of instruments that are aligned with the units conceptual framework. Each clinical placement is monitored and supervised by an assigned university supervisor, of the appropriate content knowledge, in the candidate's field of study. Supervisors collaborate with school based faculty on a regular basis to monitor progress of interns throughout the placement. The interns receive a minimum of (4) evaluations from the assigned supervisor during the 14 week placement. The mentor teacher assigned to the student performs (2) evaluations. The mentor teacher’s first evaluation is administered at the midterm and the final evaluation at the conclusion of the internship.  If an intern is experiencing difficulty in any areas of the evaluation (unacceptable) an intern improvement plan (IIP) is activated by the director, supervisor and site mentor immediately to address the specific issues. This plan contains action items for the intern and completion dates for improvement.    All (6) of the evaluations are electronically submitted via TK20 for analysis by the clinical director See 3c-2.1(Intern Improvement Plan). The DSU evaluation is aligned with the (PEU) unit standards as well as the (DTS) Delaware teaching standards.  3c.3. How is time for reflection and feedback from peers and clinical faculty incorporated into field experiences and clinical practice? Time for reflection and feedback from peers and clinical faculty are incorporated into field experiences and clinical practice in that all students are required, as part of their clinical and field experience responsibilities, to complete reflective and self-evaluation summaries. Reflection is one of the major components of the Unit Conceptual Framework and is a necessary and integral part of all field experiences and clinical practice. For example, during student teaching, teacher interns maintain reflective journals and logs. In addition, the field experience Director holds a student teaching seminar every two weeks and informal reflection and self-evaluation takes place through think-pair-share and group discussion. Moreover, interns also reflect with mentor teachers and university supervisors during individual and team conferencing.  There are 6 teaching evaluations performed for each student intern. There are 2 completed by the mentor teacher (mid term and final) and 4 evaluations completed by the university supervisor throughout the semester. Immediate performance feedback from each evaluation is given to the interns when possible. The scores and commentary from the evaluation are logged into the data collection tool (TK20) for analysis (3c-3.1) Observation Reflections in TK20 Document Room.   For advance level students, there is a required opportunity for peer and faculty feedback when candidates present their internship capstone to faculty and peers within their respective cohorts. So, overall opportunities are available for both undergraduate and advance level candidates.  3c.4. What data from multiple assessments provide evidence that candidates demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions for helping all students learn in field experiences and clinical practice? Multiple assessments are conducted collaboratively during field experience and clinical practice using standards-based and rubric guided assessments.  During clinical practice, student teaching internship, the three major unit assessments (Lesson Planning, Student Teaching Evaluation, and Teacher Work Sample) are assessed electronically using TK20 as the Unit-Wide data collection system. All clinical practice assessments have been implemented in a newly designed “Binder” format and the assessments are included in tab format for easy access. This electronic binder contains all documentation needed for internship experiences of the teacher candidate. Each individual Mentor Teacher and University Supervisor is required to complete all sections of the binder as they pertain to their teacher candidate respectively.    The clinical practice provides the teacher interns with an opportunity to develop knowledge, skills, and dispositions. More specifically, the Teacher Work Sample is designed to focus the teacher candidate on short and long-term planning, K-12 student assessment, and reflection. For example, each teacher intern must assess student learning through the completion of a unit of instruction in which pre- and post-assessment occurs with data collection. The pre-assessment data is used to determine student needs and to assist the teacher candidate with future planning. The post-assessment is used to determine if indeed student learning took place, during the instructional unit, by comparing pre- and post-test scores. Finally, teacher candidates analyze the data and reflect on the unit of instruction through the completion of the Teacher Work Sample. This is one assessment used to determine teacher candidate effectiveness during the student teaching internship. Teacher candidates are evaluated during early field experiences using multiple assessments. Mentor teachers complete a field experience scoring guide for each candidate that identifies the level of proficiency of knowledge, skills and dispositions. The aggregate data reported in the scoring guide illustrates that candidates are performing on target in all components of the Teacher Work Sample. (Scoring Guide).   Another means of assessing teacher candidate performance is with the Student Teaching Evaluation. All mentor teachers and university supervisors are required to complete a mid-semester evaluation and a final evaluation of their assigned teacher candidate (s). Rubric assessment scores for both the Teacher Work Sample and the Student Teaching Evaluation are computed to determine candidates’ final grades (3c-4.1):   (3c-4.1)Aggregate Data Spring 2007 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment See TK20 Document Room (3c-4.2)Aggregate Data Fall 2008 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room (3c-4.13Aggregate Data Spring 2009 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room (3c-4.4)Aggregate Data Fall 2009 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room (3c-4.5)Aggregate Data Spring 2010 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment. See TK20 Document Room At advance level, knowledge, skills, and dispositions are assessed during internship using a portfolio assignment that is aligned with ELCC standards. The purpose of this assignment and activity requires the candidate to compile a professional portfolio containing exemplars/products generated throughout their course experience. The following are project specific items that must be included as part of the Portfolio: ( Action Research Project, Leading School Change Project, Accumulation of Case Studies, Strategic Plan, and Internship Project and Papers ). The candidate may elect to include other items of interest, but the listed items are mandatory. The candidate makes all effort to retain and collect important documents over the course of their graduate program of studies. The Portfolio provides reflections on the candidate’s personal growth and development in relation to ELCC standards. Course related topics for this project include: analyzing educational issues, steps in strategic planning, strategic alignment, examining organizational resources (internal and external), committee(s) identification, organizational influence on leader, alignment of curriculum, managing conflict, and facilitating change in educational organizations. As part of the field-experience, candidates have the choice to meet with any of the building administrators to shadow and to discuss aspects of the strategic plan or to retrieve pertinent information. Strategic planning is a developmental process utilizing many resources and stakeholders in a sequential process and should result in professional growth of the candidate and organization. The candidate should be able to identify the relationship between the exemplars included in the Portfolio and the ELCC standards which they exemplify. This assessment is evaluated using a rubric that identifies assessment components, describes the desired performance of the candidate, and is used to collect data. This assignment is aligned with the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) standards and is relevant to the Master in Educational Leadership Program outcomes for the College of Education at Delaware State University. See (Portfolio Rubric)    3c.5. What process is used to ensure that candidates collect and analyze data on student learning, reflect on those data, and improve student learning during clinical practice?  The process used to ensure that candidates collect and analyze data on student learning, reflect on those data, and improve student learning during clinical practice is The Teacher Work Sample (TWS). It is the primary source of assessment addressing student learning respectively and is a requirement for all candidates across initial programs. The TWS allows candidates to demonstrate proficiencies that effectively impact student learning. The TWS guides teacher candidates through a process of designing lessons based on the diverse needs of all learners. This rich and meaningful project requires candidates to synthesize the content and pedagogical knowledge and skills they have learned throughout the teacher preparation program. The TWS is comprised of seven sections, each containing its own rubric, adapted from the Renaissance Teacher Work Sampling Project. The  rubric includes the following seven sections; 1) Contextual factors; 2)Learning goals; 3) Assessment plan; 4) Design for instruction; 5) Instructional decision-making; 6) Analysis of student learning; and 7) Reflection and self-evaluation. The TWS is completed by teacher candidates as a part of their requirements for the Student Teaching Seminar which is completed concurrently during the internship.  TWS data show that teacher candidates have a clear understanding of how to initially assess students to determine a baseline for instruction. Teacher candidates progress from the early stages of understanding the context and diversity of the teaching setting, to assessing student learning, to determining the curriculum and instructional strategies by preparing focused lessons for all learners, to assessing the learning that occurs during instruction, to reflecting  on the learning and planning for future learning.  Teacher candidates score consistently high on all portions of the TWS. Additionally, it is scored by their same discipline university supervisor and one other university supervisor, to provide inter-rater reliability. The data reveals that teacher candidates develop a clear understanding of the challenges associated with learning and assessment. The Student Teaching seminar provides support to teacher interns throughout their teaching placement and creates numerous opportunities to share concerns as the TWS project evolves. This encourages a significant amount of self-reflection throughout the project. See Table (3c5.1) TWS.   3c.6. How does the unit ensure that all candidates have field experiences or clinical practice that includes students with exceptionalities and students from diverse ethnic/racial, linguistic, gender, and socioeconomic groups? The Professional Education Unit at DSU firmly believes that early field experiences and clinical experiences are vital and integral components of the teacher preparation program. As such, the curriculum of each teacher preparation program within the Unit provides opportunities for early field experiences and practicum experiences in the foundational courses and subject area methods courses. Teacher candidates are placed within K-12 student populations that represent students of different races, cultures, socioeconomic levels, family backgrounds, and academic abilities including special learning needs. In fact, most classes in which teacher candidates are placed for early field experiences and clinical experiences are inclusive classrooms that contain student populations identified as special learning needs students. The DSU teacher candidates are mostly placed in the school districts surrounding the capital city of Dover. The demographic distribution of student population as shown in the link below demonstrates that placement schools represent a diverse ethnic and racial population having a wide range of socioeconomic groups and a substantial representation of students with special needs from various categories. The description of the selection process to ensure diverse placements are available in EH109.      Student placement spread sheets (3c6.1)  The link above shows collaborating DE school demographics that assist in the process of ensuring diverse school placements for candidates and interns.  http://profiles.doe.k12.de.us/SchoolProfiles/District/Student.aspx(3c6.2)  3c.7. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the development and demonstration of knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions for helping all students learn may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]   Optional   1. What does your unit do particularly well related to Standard 3? The university supervisors and collaborating schools are always willing to assist our teacher candidates with planning and lesson delivery in all phases of field experiences. Instructors meet with students after scheduled class periods as well as during office hours to discuss specific concepts that they may be having difficulty comprehending. Our smaller class sizes afford us the opportunity to properly address the needs of each teacher candidate in the program. The mentor teachers utilized at the school sites are very receptive to developing the knowledge, skills and dispositions of our teacher candidates. The diverse classroom settings in the Dover Delaware area are excellent for our candidates to develop quality teachings strategies that positively affect learning for all students. The high degree of communication and collaboration between the supervising faculty and the Director of Clinical and Field Experiences provides a solid foundation that supports student teachers experiences in the schools. The onsite Early Childhood Lab School provides early field experiences in a number of courses across the Unit.    2. What research related to Standard 3 is being conducted by the unit or its faculty?  The following examples are evidence of faculty research related to Standard 3:   (3c.7.1) Related Research Candidates Establishing The Linkages Among Context, Assessment, and Instruction Using an Adapted Teacher Work Sample (TWS) in Rural Capstone  (3c.7.2) ACT 2007 Conference Presentation PPt. Experiences  Presentation:  Infusing Constructivist Strategies into the Capstone Clinical Experience using TWS Methodology   Exhibits 1.   Memoranda of understanding, minutes from meetings, etc. to document partnerships with schools (Located in EH 109) 2.   List of criteria for the selection of school-based clinical faculty (e.g., cooperating teachers, internship supervisors) 3b.5.1School site selection form 3.   Professional development opportunities and requirements for school-based clinical faculty 3b.6.1 Clinical  Supervision Orientation Agenda 4.   Descriptions of field experiences in programs for initial and advanced teacher candidates and other school professionals Field Experiences and Clinical Practice by Program 5.   Descriptions of clinical practice in programs for initial teacher candidates and other school professionals Early Field Experience Scoring Guide 6.   Student teaching handbook 7.   Assessments and scoring rubrics/criteria used in field experiences for initial and advanced teacher candidates and other school professionals Located in TK20 8.   Assessments and scoring rubrics/criteria used in clinical practice for initial teacher candidates and other school professionals 9.   Agendas from meetings with cooperating teachers and internship supervisors 3b.6.2 Electronic Training Modules 10. Summary results of candidate assessments upon entering and exiting field experiences (Cross-reference with Standard 1 as appropriate.) 11. Completion rates for candidates in student teaching and internships by semester Candidate Eligibility and Clinical Practice Completion Rates        

NCATE STANDARD 2

Body: 
    STANDARD 2. ASSESSMENT SYSTEM AND UNIT EVALUATION   The unit has an assessment system that collects and analyzes data on the applicant qualifications, the candidate and graduate performance, and unit operations to evaluate and improve the unit and its programs. [In this section the unit must include (1) initial and advanced programs for teachers, (2) programs for other school professionals, and (3) off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, noting differences when they exist.]   2a. Assessment System   2a.1. How does the unit ensure that the assessment system collects information on candidate proficiencies outlined in the unit's conceptual framework, state standards, and professional standards? The Delaware State University’s Professional Education Unit’s Conceptual Framework standards are aligned with NCATE standards, the respective specialized professional association standards, and the State of Delaware Professional Teaching Standards. Teacher candidates’ knowledge, skills, and dispositions are reflected across all standards.    Program Coordinators and members of the Professional Education Unit developed, reviewed, and revised the assessment system in 2006 through departmental and unit-wide processes. The teacher education programs are articulated in accordance with standards and expectations in institutional goals, state, national and specialized professional associations. The curriculum, instruction, field experiences, clinical practice and assessment make up the common elements of all teacher education programs. In 2006 the program was experiencing difficulties with students passing PRAXIS II as part of their program completion. Therefore, in order to produce highly qualified teachers, the unit revised the assessment system and the teacher education programs, in accordance to standards and expectations, articulated in institutional goals, state, national and specialized professional associations. This change is reflected in the conceptual frame work.   PRAXIS I is required by the State of Delaware and is used in the evaluation of the Teacher Education program candidates’ entry into the Teacher Education Program (TEP). Members of the Professional Education Unit (respective content area advisor, and professional education faculty) serve on the interview admittance team in the selection and approval of teacher candidates.  The interview of the teacher candidate must be completed at an acceptable level in order to be admitted into the program. Team members evaluate the candidate’s performance during interview by using a common TEP rubric. Candidates are required to develop an introductory portfolio which is examined for quality and completeness during the interview. The portfolio must meet an "acceptable" level on the rubric. The professional education community is involved with the assessment of the teacher candidates’ performance during their teacher candidacy transitional points.  School faculties (practicum locale) assess a teacher candidates' application of content knowledge, skills and dispositions during early field experiences.  Teacher candidate’s working portfolios are an extension of the introductory portfolio.    The working portfolio is compiled by each teacher candidate with artifacts organized according to the Professional Education Unit Standards that document the teacher candidate’s acquisition of knowledge, skills and professional dispositions.  The working portfolios are reviewed by the respective program coordinators, and the coordinator of early field experiences. The PRAXIS II examination (required by the State of Delaware) is used in the evaluation of the Teacher Education Program candidates for admittance to internship.  Admission to internship also requires that teacher candidates maintain a minimum GPA of 2.5. The teacher candidate must successfully complete his/her program of study prior to the internship which is followed by submission of a professional  portfolio which demonstrates acceptable levels of performance in knowledge, skills, and dispositions.  The Teacher Work Sample, which is completed during the internship, is reviewed by the university supervisor, the Teacher Work Sample primary reviewer, and one additional professional education unit faculty member.    Mentor teachers evaluate teacher candidates during the internship on the application of content and pedagogical knowledge, skills and dispositions. The student teaching evaluation instrument is used by mentor teachers and university supervisors to assess the teacher candidates. The University supervisor visits the class to observe and evaluate the teacher candidate in a teaching setting a minimum of four times during the semester; meets with the mentor teacher and teacher candidate to discuss and evaluate the progress of the teacher.  The internship occurs during the last semester of enrollment prior to graduation and is used as the capstone experience for teacher candidates.  The teacher candidate must submit professional portfolio and it must meet an acceptable or target level of performance as evaluated by the Director of Clinical and Early Field Experiences.  2a.2. What are the key assessments used by the unit and its programs to monitor and make decisions about candidate performance at transition points such as those listed in Table 6? Please complete Table 6 or upload your own table at Prompt 2a.6 below. Table 6 is located in TK20 Document Room  2a.3. How is the unit assessment system evaluated? Who is involved and how?  The system is based on the unit’s conceptual framework and its commitment to comprehensive assessment. In spring 2004, the unit assessment committee was formed to review new unit assessments and make recommendations regarding validity and reliability of the unit the assessments. Up to this point, the unit has systemically evaluated individual programs but has not systemically evaluated the unit assessment system. The Unit has reviewed the responsibilities of the assessment committee, and has recommended that the unit establish a model to review the assessment system and maintain ongoing processes to self evaluate. The expanded purpose of this committee will be to review the assessment system and make further recommendations for modifications and improvements based on actual use of assessment data. The Professional Education Unit is comprised of the Education Department and representatives from associated content area departments that have faculty members responsible for preparing teacher candidates within the PEU. The Education Department is the administrative body within the Professional Education Unit headed by the Department Chairperson, who also chairs the Council for Professional Education. The Council for Professional Education (CPE) is a standing committee of the Faculty Senate.  The council membership is comprised of representatives from all teacher education programs. The purpose of the council is both advisory and policy making.  It formulates and approves policies and procedures pertaining to the teacher education program.  In addition, the CPE approves all phases of students’ admission to the Teacher Education Program and admission to student teaching. The Community Advisory Board periodically reviews and provides input to evaluation of the unit assessment system. The Community Advisory Board is structured to encompass representation from throughout the state (CAB Binder is located in EH 109). The Education Department Chairperson works with the Community Advisory Board relative to issues involving changes and modifications to the curricula.  The CPE reviews all change proposals regarding the Unit Assessment System. The PEU began its electronic (TK20 program assessment system in the spring, 2007 in preparation for the 2011 NCATE reaffirmation visit as a result of feedback from the previous visit. The PEU revised the unit assessment system and hired a technology analyst to create and manage the TK20technology data management system. The purpose of TK20 is to provide a repository to collect, organize, maintain, and analyze information toward the evaluation and improvement of candidate, program, and unit performance. 2a.4. How does the unit ensure that its assessment procedures are fair, accurate, consistent, and free of bias?  The Professional Education Unit employs multiple procedures to ensure fairness, consistency, accuracy, and avoidance of bias to teacher candidates in the initial program.  In spring of 2004, a Unit Assessment Committee comprised of a panel of statistical experts was formed to review and validate unit and program assessment tools used for evaluation of teacher candidates and advance level students.   Key assessments are reviewed by program coordinators or the clinical and field experience Director and brought to the Council for Professional Education as assessment issues arise.  If there is a concern with validity, the documents are reviewed by the assessment committee.  For example, concerns regarding the use of the zero to ten point rating scale were discussed in Council for Professional Education regarding the instructional unit and lesson plan rubrics. It was decided that the target range from eight to ten was broad and ambiguous.  Therefore, the zero to ten point rating scale was subsequently changed to a 1-3 point rating scale.  Documents were revised by the technology analyst for the Education Department in our TK20 technological assessment system.  A team of evaluators is trained to assess the Teacher Work Sample.  Each Teacher Work Sample is assessed by two to three evaluators.  If two evaluators are used, then inter-rater agreement is calculated. The student teaching evaluations are triangulated between the university supervisors, Director of clinical and field experience and mentor teachers as facilitated by electronic assessment on the TK20 technological assessment system.  The process used to address bias in the requirements for advance level students include a number of procedures: 1) Writing samples are analyzed by a minimum of three professional education unit faculty members to ensure fairness, consistency and avoidance of bias in the admittance to the program transition point 2) At the program completion transition point, a minimum of two professional education faculty members assess the candidates’ research-based or multi-media presentation, 3) A minimum grade of “B” is required of all candidates on program completion assessments, and 4) If a discrepancy occurs relative to the writing sample the research-based multi-media presentation, or thesis/dissertation research, the ultimate resolution follows the established appeals process.   These procedures ensure the credibility of assessments relative to fairness, consistency, accuracy, and avoidance of bias in the selection and matriculation of candidates.   2a.5. What assessments and evaluation measures are used to manage and improve the operations and programs of the unit?  The program assessment and evaluation measures used to manage and improve the programs and operations of the unit evolve from the conceptualization of the Professional Education Unit Model.   More specifically, the program assessments consist of these five assessment paradigms: Program Admission, Candidacy, and Admission to Internship, Program Completion, and Work Force Induction.  Evaluating the critical area of program admissions, the Unit employs multiple indicators.  Therefore, interviews, GPA (2.5 minimum), an Introductory Portfolio, Completion of 45-60 semester hours and Praxis I scores are used.  For advanced level students letters of recommendation, application form data, essays and GRE/GMAT scores are used.    At the point of evaluating the critical area of candidacy, the Unit employs GPA (minimum 2.5 for undergraduates; 3.0 for advanced level), knowledge (program of study), dispositions (attitudes and values), skills (performance) and the working portfolio.  For advanced level, with the exception of the 3.0 GPA the same indicators are used as specified for the undergraduate level.    Evaluating the critical area of admission to internship, the Unit continues to employ multiple indicators.  Therefore, the GPA (minimum 2.5), the program of study completed, the working portfolio and Praxis II scores are used.  For advance level students, GPA 3.0 , internship - Educational Leadership & Special Education only, requirement of within 2 semesters of graduation and data from the Completion of Application Form are used.    At the point of Program Completion, the Unit uses teaching certification eligibility, exit interviews, GPA, student internship completion (capstone), the professional portfolio and the teacher work sample.  For advance level the unit also uses the GPA, internship completion, completion of dissertation and/or multimedia research presentation.    For the final critical area in the conceptual model—work force indication—the unit uses employer satisfaction surveys for both program levels.  In addition, the Unit also uses the data from graduate follow up surveys at both levels.    With these streams of data flowing in consistently, the professional unit is able to evaluate its performance.   The information used from the data generated enables the faculty and administrators to affirm management and program operation policies and procedures or to identify where modifications are essential to enhance or improve the unit programs and operation.   Results of analysis of data from teacher candidate performance based assessments are used to evaluate and improve unit programs by analyzing curricula, delivery of instruction, clinical and field experiences. Data analyzed from teacher candidate performance based assessments are also used to make changes in unit procedures for data collection, analysis and storage via the TK20 assessment system.  Student intern evaluate their mentor teacher and university supervisor using an exit survey during their exit interview at program completion. This survey is used to explore strengths and weaknesses of candidate student experiences with his/her mentor teacher and university supervisor. Employer survey is administered to administrators in local school districts in Northern and Southern Delaware where program completers are employed as teachers and other school personnel.  This survey provides information about the competence of our program completers’ content knowledge, their professional skills and professional dispositions.   The survey was sent to 134 administrators of local Delaware school systems with a 16 percent return rate. A copy of the 2008 employer survey is on file in the documents room in TK20 and/or as a hard copy in EH109. The 2008 survey included questions that evaluated pedagogical knowledge and skills (planning, implementation, assessment, classroom management, reflection) and dispositions (professional dispositions, diversity, collaboration), but not content knowledge. Based on the responses from the survey, the candidates met the target level performance in the areas of pedagogical knowledge, skills and dispositions (See table 1a.4: Employer Survey SU 2008).  An updated employer follow up survey is scheduled to be administered in the spring 2011. The new survey will include questions that will help us evaluate all three areas of Standard 1; content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge and skills, and dispositions (See exhibit 1a.4: New Employer Survey).   2a.6. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the unit's assessment system may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.] The Key Assessments for the Unit are: Oral Presentation, Student Teaching Evaluation, Working and Professional Portfolios, Teacher Work Sample, Unit Plan, Lesson Plans, and GPA. See Table 2a.6.1     2b. Data Collection, Analysis, and Evaluation  2b.1. What are the processes and timelines used by the unit to collect, compile, aggregate, summarize, and analyze data on candidate performance, unit operations, and program quality? l   How are the data collected? l   From whom (e.g., applicants, candidates, graduates, faculty) are data collected? l   How often are the data summarized and analyzed? l   Whose responsibility is it to summarize and analyze the data? (dean, assistant dean, data coordinator, etc.) l   In what formats are the data summarized and analyzed? (reports, tables, charts, graphs, etc.) l   What information technologies are used to maintain the unit's assessment system? The following discussion highlights the processes and timelines used by the unit to collect, compile, aggregate, summarize, and analyze data on candidate performance, unit operations, and program quality. Currently the Unit is using the TK-20 Campus Tools to facilitate the Comprehensive Assessment System in which the Unit and program assessment data are saved. This system enables the Unit to view and analyze data. Many questions are answered through this system. The technology analyst who serves as the system administrator provides training and administrative support to faculty, students and external evaluators throughout the academic year.  Technical support is also provided by the technology analyst.   The student information data is compiled by a representative from Institutional Research.  The data are disseminated to the technology analyst of the Unit.  The data is then sent to the TK20 engineers twice a semester; at the beginning and after add/drop period of each academic semester.  This data is loaded into the TK20technological system in order to send out program assignments to students in unit courses and program courses.  Student teaching assessments are sent through the TK20 assessment system to mentor teachers and university supervisors in order to capture performance data electronically for analysis. The technology analyst for the Unit has the responsibility of compiling data and creating reports.  The data is then analyzed by the program coordinators.  The evidence is presented to the Council for Professional Education, the Professional Education Unit faculty, alumni groups, the community advisory board. The data is compiled by the technology analyst and the director of student services. The office of institutional research and the office of student services for the College serve as alternative backup in situations where technology does not work.   The office of student services for the College plays a vital role in continuously collecting evidence from the teacher education program admissions.  The office of student services for the College collects and compiles information related to PRAXIS I Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST), introductory portfolios, course grades, and semester grade point averages.  Teacher Education Program admittance evidence is stored in an excel spreadsheet by the Director of student services.  No undergraduate student may take 300 – 400 level methods courses without admission to the teacher education program, an approved teacher education program card, and a written approval/acceptance letter from the chair of the Council for Professional Education.  An undergraduate student who is denied admission to the teacher education program may reapply the following semester, and if all criteria have been met, admission to the teacher education program will be granted. Introductory portfolios that are determined to be unacceptable may be resubmitted by the teacher candidates for re-evaluation and must meet the acceptable criteria.  Evidence of the teacher education program admittance and/or updates of program admittance are discussed at the CPE's monthly meetings.  The advance level candidates, (master and doctoral students) are assessed on a course by course basis.  Course syllabi reflect the levels of assessment and evaluation standards.  Teacher or leader candidates in this phase of their knowledge base must maintain a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average on a 4.0 scale.  Each content course must be completed with a minimum grade of “C” (no more than two Cs are permitted throughout the program).  Failure to maintain the minimum 3.0 grade point average results in dismissal from the program.  Teacher candidates may reapply to the program via the office of student services for the Education Department when minimum standards are met.  Quality grade point averages are required for the Teacher Education Program to maintain its academic integrity.  The content areas are assessed in each course by use of evaluation and minimum standards, as specified by the syllabus in each course.  In addition to the program of study, a working portfolio is compiled by each teacher candidate that documents the teacher candidate’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions.    Admission to internship requires that teacher candidates must maintain a minimum 2.5 cumulative grade point average and pass the PRAXIS II examination.  Each content course must be completed with a minimum grade of “C”.  The teacher candidate must successfully complete his/her program of study except for the student teaching experience, and submit a working portfolio which is an extension of the introductory portfolio documenting acceptable levels of performance in knowledge, skills, and dispositions.   Teacher candidates are assessed at the completion of their senior capstone, student teaching.  To successfully exit the program, teacher candidates must meet the following minimum standards; complete the student teaching experience with a grade of “C” or better, submit a professional portfolio that is evaluated at an acceptable level of performance, have a 2.5 minimum cumulative grade point average, successfully complete an exit interview at an acceptable level of performance, and be eligible to meet the State of Delaware teacher certification standards.    Evidence from student teaching is collected and compiled by the TK20 technological assessment system.  The technology analyst compiles all aggregated and disaggregated reports.  The reports for the student teaching evaluations are evaluated, analyzed and summarized by the Director of field and clinical experiences and program coordinators at the end of each semester. Evidence from student intern surveys and employer surveys is collected and compiled by the technology analyst for the Education Department.  The analysis and summarization is completed by the Director of clinical and field experiences and program coordinators at the end of each semester.  Evidence gathered from assessments in key courses related to program data are collected and evaluated to make program improvements. The analysis is completed by program coordinators on a semester by semester basis. Based on the data assessments the program coordinators and program directors make recommendations for future course offerings and curriculum revisions.   The teacher candidate’s final transition point occurs after the teacher candidate has secured a position in the work force.  This assessment focuses on the Unit’s operations and program assessment, including courses, programs, and clinical experiences.  Graduates are contacted via follow-up questionnaires and employers are contacted via satisfaction surveys in order to (1) determine the quality of the Delaware State University teacher education program and (2) to be able to determine if revisions to the program are needed for improvement. The preceding discussion has presented the processes and timelines used by the unit to collect, compile, aggregate, summarize, and analyze data on candidate performance, unit operations, and program quality.   2b.2 How does the unit disaggregate candidate assessment data for candidates on the main campus, at off-campus sites, in distance learning programs, and in alternate route programs? Using the Tk20 assessment system, individual students submit data. This data can be reported on each student and aggregated on key variables. Therefore the data received is already disaggregated by program.  Since the Unit does not offer programs off-campus, or through distance learning, nor through alternate route programs, disaggregating in these modes is not required.  2b.3. How does the unit maintain records of formal candidate complaints and their resolutions? The Unit follows the institution’s Student Complaint of Instruction policy to assure fairness, and unbiased treatment of teacher candidates and advanced students. All records are maintained in the Education Department Chair’s office. However, if the complaint is not resolved at the instructor and chairperson levels, the respective dean has the final authority in the resolution of the complaint.  The records of formal student complaints are maintained in the respective chairs’ and deans’ offices.   2b.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the unit's data collection, analysis, and evaluation may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.] 2c. Use of Data for Program Improvement  2c.1. In what ways does the unit regularly and systematically use data to evaluate the efficacy of and initiate changes to its courses, programs, and clinical experiences? The CPE has charged the assessment committee with the task of creating a regular and systematic evaluation of Unit and SPA data to evaluate the efficacy of and initiate changes to its courses, programs, and clinical experiences. The committee is responsible for reviewing Unit data and providing feedback to the CPE and the SPA coordinators. In addition, the committee creates timelines for Unit and program review to ensure that regular and systematic review occurs to improve Unit and programs assessments. The committee reviews new key rubric assessments and makes recommendations for change prior to the piloting of new and revised key assessments. SPA coordinators oversee the implementation of new and/or revised key assessments and report pilot results.   Results of analysis of data from teacher candidate performance-based assessments are shared with teacher candidates regularly during their matriculation in their courses, student teaching, and during field experiences so that plans may be designed and implemented for the teacher candidates’ knowledge, skills and dispositions.   The Unit also systematically analyzes teacher candidates’ performance as a group, e.g., PRAXIS I and II examination passage rates. In an effort to increase the population of teacher education candidates in the Unit, the mathematics course sequence of the General Education Program ensures that teacher candidates include a three-course block sequence instead of a two course sequence. The effects of this change has shown an increase in the pass rate of the mathematics PRAXIS I examination.   2c.2. What data-driven changes have occurred over the past three years?  As a result of the 2003 recommendations, a technology analyst was hired to improve information technologies and continue data collection, analysis and storage via an electronic assessment system.  The technology analyst who serves as the system administrator provides training and administrative support to faculty, students and external evaluators throughout the academic year.  Technical support is also provided by the technology analyst.    In fall 2006, the members of the professional unit selected and purchased TK20 (CampusTools Higher Ed).  This electronic secure web-based program enables the unit to collect, aggregate, disaggregate and summarize candidates’ knowledge, skills, and dispositions.  The system was piloted in spring 2007 to assess student interns during their student teaching experience.  The buy-in across the unit with the electronic assessment system has increased and the system is now utilized more efficiently than in the past. Students are trained by the technology analyst to upload assignments that are sent to them via the TK20 electronic assessment system by instructors. The transitional points of teacher candidates are now housed in the TK20 assessment system which has increased the reporting efforts of students.  The system assists in assessing candidate’s performance, knowledge, skills and disposition at different transitional points.  Data are aggregated, analyzed, and summarized by a team of Professional Education Faculty. Results are reported on a monthly basis to the Council of Professional Education and to the Education Department.  The unit’s assessment system collects, stores and analyses data on applicant qualifications, candidate and graduate performances, and unit operations to improve unit and program outcomes. All faculty members are now trained to use the TK20 technological assessment system as it relates to analysis and aggregation of data to improve unit and program outcomes.  In fall 2007 six programs underwent curriculum revisions and overall credit hour reduction.  This was in response to a university wide directive to make our programs more competitive and to increase enrollment. Also, a Smart classroom was planned and approved for the Unit. During that year the College of Education increased the number of courses that are now web-enhanced using the Blackboard System.  As a result, two courses were developed to be taught on-line during the 2007 academic year.    Based on the findings from the Teacher Work Sample in academic year 2007, all teacher candidates were within acceptable or target range, however, qualitative analysis of candidates’ reflections indicated that they needed to reference and address contextual factors.  In spring 2007 the Science Education SPA requirements were aligned to the teacher work sample for assessing science education candidate performance. All other teacher education program coordinators have aligned teacher work to their respective SPA standards.   The coordinator of the early field experiences established a new electronic data base for tracking all completed early field experience hours in order to streamline data collection. However, that assessment and system for tracking all early field experiences is under revision.   In order to produce highly qualified teachers, the Unit revised the assessment system and the teacher education programs, in accordance with standards and expectations, articulated in institutional learning goals, state, national and SPA standards.  In an effort to improve our program completer data, the PRAXIS II is now required before student internship. All of our program completers are highly qualified and certifiable.    In summer 2008, the rating categories on all major Unit assessments were revised by standardizing the performance ranges to ensure fairness, reduce possibility of bias, and to maintain consistency in the assessments of student performance, knowledge and skills.  The student teaching assessment was also revised to reflect a developing category.  In fall 2008, a full time PRAXIS coordinator was added to the Education Department to assist teacher candidates in specially designed courses in writing, reading, and mathematics to help them prepare for the PRAXIS I and PRAXIS II examinations.  The number of Teacher Education Program admittance has increased due to the addition of the full time PRAXIS coordinator and the inclusion of PRAXIS instruction with the students in their freshman year.    2c.3. What access do faculty members have to candidate assessment data and/or data systems? Faculty has access to the TK20 technological assessment system to create and score assignments and align rubrics with program specific standards.    ·         Faculty sends out assignment ·         Faculty receives assignments, assess and give feedback ·         Faculty receives disaggregated/aggregated report on coursework assessment at the end of each academic semester ·         Based on the report, faculty in conjunction with program coordinator make informed decisions about courses and program improvement.   2c.4. How are assessment data shared with candidates, faculty, and other stakeholders to help them reflect on and improve their performance and programs? Course and unit assessment data are captured in our TK20 technological system.  The data are reviewed at the end of each academic semester by program coordinators and the Director of clinical and field experiences. There is feed-back functionality on the TK20 technological system whereby students can view any suggestions or comments for improvement.  Students can view any assessment that was completed by the evaluator.  Surveys regarding clinical experiences from student interns are collected at the end of the academic semester and are reviewed by the Director of clinical and field experiences.  A Mentor teacher evaluates a student intern throughout his/her experience and completes two evaluations on the Tk20 assessment system.  Student interns can view his/her results as soon as the evaluation(s) are completed.  The university supervisor also evaluates a student intern throughout his/her experience and the university supervisor completes a minimum of four evaluations on the Tk20 assessment system.  The evaluations are reviewed by the student intern, and, the student intern is mentored by the university supervisor and mentor teacher on his/her strengths and needs within the classroom. There is a regularly scheduled meeting for the Council for Professional Education and the Education Department where data is reported by the Director of Student Services, the Director of clinical and field experiences, the Coordinator of clinical and field experiences, program coordinators and the technology analyst.  The summaries of reports are then disseminated to the Community Advisory Board by the Chair of the Council of Professional Education. See the TK-20 folder titled, "Quick Reference Guide" TK20 Document Room   2c.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the use of data for program improvement may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]  Optional  1. What does your unit do particularly well related to Standard 2? The Professional Education Unit employs multiple procedures to assure fairness, consistency, accuracy, and avoidance of bias in the selection and matriculation of teacher candidates in the initial program and advanced students.   The TK20 assessment system has been enhanced to engage users in a continuous process. The mentor teachers and university supervisor use the system to evaluate student interns; thus electronic evaluations are received in a timely manner. The assessment system is also reviewed and evaluated each semester by the faculty, university supervisors, mentor teachers and the students.   Results of analysis of data from teacher candidate performance-based assessments are shared with teacher candidates regularly during their matriculation in their courses of student and during field experiences so that plans for the teacher candidates’ knowledge, skills and dispositions may be designed and implemented.  2. What research related to Standard 2 is being conducted by the unit or its faculty? The following examples are evidence of faculty research related to assessment:   Candidates Establishing The Linkages Among Context, Assessment, and Instruction Using an Adapted Teacher Work Sample (TWS) in Rural Capstone Experiences  Example 1 TK20 Document Room Presentation:  Infusing Constructivist Strategies into the Capstone Clinical Experience using (TWS) Methodology Example 2 PPt. TK20 Document Room Content Specificity of Expectancy Beliefs and Task Values in Elementary Physical Education Example 3  TK20 Document Room An Examination of the Multidimensionality of Situational Interest in Elementary School Physical Education Example 4  TK20 Document Room   Exhibits 1.      Document describing the unit’s assessment system in detail, including assessment of candidate performance and evaluations of unit operations (Exhibit room EH 109) 2.      Samples of formative and summative key assessments used to ensure candidates are ready to progress through the program and enter the profession (see TK20) 3.      Summaries of data from key assessments used at transition points (a) at entry to programs, (b) prior to the student teaching/internship, (c) at completion of the student teaching/internship, and (d) at program completion (see TK20) 4.      Minutes of meetings on the development and refinement of the assessment system and the use of data (Exhibit room EH 109) 5.      Procedures for ensuring that key assessments and unit operations are fair, accurate, consistent, and free of bias (Exhibit room EH 109) 6.      Policies and procedures that ensure that data are regularly collected, compiled, aggregated, summarized, analyzed, and used to make improvements (Exhibit room EH 109) 7.      Sample of candidate assessment data disaggregated by alternate route, off-campus, and distance learning programs N/A 8.      Unit or institutional policies for handling student complaints Office of Judicial Affairs 9.      File of student complaints and the unit’s response (Exhibit Room EH 109) 10.   Description of information technology used to manage performance data. (see TK20) 11.   Schedule for when unit analyzes data to make changes 12.   Examples of changes made to courses, programs, and the unit in response to data gathered from the assessment system (see AACTE/NCATE annual reports)        

NCATE STANDARD 1

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  STANDARDS  This section is the focus of the institutional report. A description of how the unit meets each standard element must be presented. Significant differences among programs should be described as the response is written for each element under subheadings of initial teacher preparation, advanced teacher preparation, and other school professionals. Significant differences among programs on the main campus, in off-campus programs, in distance learning programs, and in alternate route programs should be identified. Links to key exhibits to support the descriptions may be attached to the last prompt of each element.  Standard 1: Candidate Knowledge, Skills, and Professional Dispositions Candidates preparing to work in schools as teachers or other school professionals know and demonstrate the content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and skills, pedagogical and professional knowledge and skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates meet professional, state, and institutional standards.    Directions When Programs Have Been Reviewed Nationally or by a Similar State Review To reduce burden and duplication, units have fewer reporting requirements for Standard1 when programs have been submitted for national review or similar state review. These review processes cover many of the elements in Standard 1. For programs that have been submitted for national review or similar state review, units are asked to report in the IR only the following information:    Because program standards do not generally cover general professional knowledge and skills nor professional dispositions, the unit must respond to all of the prompts in Elements 1c (Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates) and 1g (Professional Dispositions for All Candidates) regardless of whether programs have been submitted for national or state review.    The prompts for each element in the IR include reminders of when data for these programs need not be included. The term "similar state review" refers to state review processes that require institutions to submit assessments and assessment data for evaluation and/or approval. For more information on "similar state review," click on the HELP button at the top right corner of your screen.    1a. Content Knowledge for Teacher Candidates. [In this section the unit must address (1) initial teacher preparation programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels and, if the institution offers them, (2) licensure and non-licensure graduate programs for teachers who already hold a teaching license.]   1a.1. What are the pass rates of teacher candidates in initial teacher preparation programs on state tests of content knowledge for each program and across all programs (i.e., overall pass rate)? Please complete Table 4 or upload your own table at Prompt 1a.5 below. [This information could be compiled from Title II data submitted to the state or from program reports prepared for national review.]  DSU requires the passage of PRAXIS II prior to student teaching and, subsequently, program completion. The table below indicates that all completers passed their state licensure test for the 2008-09 academic year. For a complete report on pass rates please see ETS Pass Rates, 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09    Table 4 is located in TK20 Document Room     1a.2 (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from other key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation programs demonstrate the content knowledge delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards? [Data for initial teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1a.5 below.] All of our programs have been nationally reviewed with the exception of Art Education and Music Education, which are reviewed by the state. State review for these programs is in progress.   1a.3. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that advanced teacher candidates demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of the content knowledge delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards? [Data for advanced teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1a.5 below.] All of our programs have been nationally reviewed with the exception of Art Education and Music Education, which are reviewed by the state. State review for these programs is in progress.   1a.4. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' preparation in the content area? If survey data are being reported, what was the response rate? [A table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to content knowledge could be attached at Prompt 1a.5 below. The attached table could include all of the responses to your follow-up survey to which you could refer the reader in responses on follow-up studies in other elements of Standard 1.] Currently, we collect graduate surveys from pre-service teachers who have just finished their student teaching. The current instrument asks candidates to rate their mentor teachers and faculty supervisors, offer advice to future student teachers, and discuss ways in which they felt unprepared for teaching. The last two elements  of the survey reveal their perspectives on their preparation for teaching (See table 1a.4: Graduate Survey 2009-2010). Response rate for Sp09 was 85%, for F09 was 0%, and for Sp10 was 65%. No students indicated that they were unprepared in their content areas. As a result of this analysis, we realize that it is necessary to develop a new survey which will better align with the standard. A new instrument was created in the fall of 2010 and will be administered to program completers at the end of the spring 2011 semester. The new instrument will be available in the evidence room at the time of the BOE visit. Initial employer follow up surveys of DSU education baccalaureate graduates were conducted in the summer of 2008. The survey was sent to 134 administrators of local Delaware school systems with a 16 percent return rate. The 2008 survey, (See table 1a.4: Old Employee Survey) included questions that evaluated pedagogical knowledge and skills (planning, implementation, assessment, classroom management, reflection) and dispositions (professional dispositions, diversity, collaboration), but not content knowledge. (See table 1a.4: Old Employee Survey) An updated employer follow up survey is scheduled to be administered in the Fall of 2010. The new survey will include questions that will help us evaluate all three areas of Standard 1; content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge and skills, and dispositions (See exhibit 1a.4: New Employer Survey). Forty eight percent of DSU’s education students come from the neighboring states of Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York. The University does not have an effective method of tracking out of state graduates once they leave the institution. However, the DSU Department of Education is making efforts to improve communication with graduates by working with IHE’s in the state through the Delaware Association for Teacher Colleges of Education (Delaware State University, Wesley College, Wilmington University and the University of Delaware) to determine the best way to keep contact with out of state graduates. Currently, the plan is to ensure that the education department has permanent home addresses of all candidates when they exit our programs.   1a.5 (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the content knowledge of teacher candidates may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]  table 1a.4: Graduate Survey 2009-2010  table 1a.4: Employer Survey SU 2008  1b. Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates. [In this section the unit must address (1) initial teacher preparation programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels and, if the institution offers them, (2) licensure and non-licensure graduate programs for teachers who already hold a teaching license.]   1b.1. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation programs demonstrate the pedagogical content knowledge and skills delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards? [Data for initial teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1b.4 below.] All of our programs have been nationally reviewed with the exception of Art Education and Music Education, which are reviewed by the state. State review for these programs is in progress.   1b.2. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that advanced teacher candidates know and apply theories related to pedagogy and learning, are able to use a range of instructional strategies and technologies, and can explain the choices they make in their practice. [Data for advanced teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1b.4 below.] All of our programs have been nationally reviewed with the exception of Art Education and Music Education, which are reviewed by the state. State review for these programs is in progress.   1b.3. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' preparation in pedagogical content knowledge and skills? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate? [If these survey data are included in a previously attached table, refer the reader to that attachment; otherwise, a table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to pedagogical content knowledge and skills could be attached at Prompt 1b.4 below.]  Please see table Graduate Survey and description in 1a.4.  Data revealed that one student felt unprepared in the content areas of reading and math for early childhood education. Our early childhood candidates receive less content in the area of reading instruction than do the elementary candidates. There were no data for Fall 2009 because it could not be extracted from TK20. The data for the graduate surveys administered in the spring semesters of 2009 and 2010 show a significant improvement in percentage difference (from 55% to .09% students feeling inadequate in preparation) for classroom management;  an opposite change in the area of assessment occurred (from 18% to 27%). With the exception of Early Childhood majors, all candidates take EDUC 357, Effective Teaching Strategies and Classroom Management. In this course, candidates create a classroom management plan. This assessment will need to be revisited when we review the findings of the NCATE self-study and review. The Unit has been working to revise the early childhood curriculum to include, in the fall of 2011, a developmental reading course. When this is in place, candidates will have a more solid foundation for reading instruction, including phonics. Please see table Employer Survey SU 2008 and the description of the assessment in 1a.4. Survey results for the old survey were rated on a 3 point scale (inadequate, adequate, and target). Interestingly, the mean scores for the six elements that relate to pedagogical knowledge and skills were all 2.7, indicating an excellent rating for our graduates in this area.  1b.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the pedagogical content knowledge of teacher candidates may be attached here. (Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.)   1c. Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates. [In this section the unit must address (1) initial teacher preparation programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels and, if the institution offers them, (2) licensure and non-licensure graduate programs for teachers who already hold a teaching license.]  1c.1. What data from key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation and advanced teacher preparation programs demonstrate the professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards to facilitate learning? [A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1c.5 below.] The Teacher Work Sample and the Student Teaching Evaluation are the key instruments used to assess undergraduate candidates’ ability to demonstrate professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills. Both instruments are aligned with professional, state, and institutional standards. Aggregated data for Spring 2009 – Spring 2010 are presented in the table in 1a.4: Teacher Work Sample and Student Teaching. For Teacher Work Sample, N = 63 reflects number of TWS evaluation. Each TWS is independently evaluated by two evaluators. For Student Teaching Evaluations, N = 198 reflects number of Student Teaching Evaluations conducted by Supervisors (4) and Mentor Teachers (2).   See table 1b.4: TWS - ST Data Sp 09-SP10. Overall, the data reveal that DSU teacher candidates graduate having the professional knowledge and skills to facilitate learning as delineated by professional, state, and institutional standards. Aggregated mean scores show that candidate performance falls well within the target area. The difference in scores indicates that comprehensive mean scores appear to have moved from the Acceptable range into the Target range. This information is gratifying to us as efforts have been made throughout the unit to ensure that candidates are prepared to carry out the expectations of this assessment during their student teaching semester. Although recent scores in the TWS are still in the Target range, lowest scores on individual elements of the TWS throughout the three semesters indicate that candidates have the most difficulty with #3, the Assessment Plan (7.65 – 8.84). The Assessment Plan involves performance in both formative and summative assessments throughout the time of study. This unit-wide concern will be addressed as we review the findings of the NCATE self-study and review.  Student Teaching Data for spring 2009-spring 2010 indicates that candidates are well prepared in the areas of planning, implementation, evaluation, and reflection. The lowest scores, although still within the Target range, are in planning. Our advanced programs for licensed teachers are in Curriculum and Instruction and Special Education and have the capacity to produce a high number of graduates. These programs are currently undergoing rigorous review at the unit, university, and state levels. Therefore, we are closely monitoring these programs as a prelude to incorporating them into our assessment system.     1c.2. What data from key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation programs consider the school, family, and community contexts and the prior experiences of students; reflect on their own practice; know major schools of thought about schooling, teaching, and learning; and can analyze educational research findings? If a licensure test is required in this area, how are candidates performing on it? [A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1c.5 below.] See table 1b.4: TWS - ST Data Sp 09-SP10.  1. TWS – Contextual Factors and Assessment Plan  The accompanying table indicates an above average degree of ability in analyzing school, family, and community contexts and the prior experiences of students. Data indicate that the mean scores for Contextual Factors and Assessment Plan are 8.1 and 8.4 respectively, both of which fall within the Target range for these assessments.  2. TWS – Reflection and Self-Assessment The accompanying table indicates an above average degree of ability in reflection. Data indicate that the mean score for Reflection and Self Assessment is 8.86, well within the Target range of the assessment. 3. The Persuasive Essay assessment is required of all students in the department in EDUC-204, Philosophical Foundations of Education. The essay requires students to examine Schools of Thought in light of their own thinking and create a referenced persuasive argument for their position. Table 1c.2 Persuasive Essay indicates a high degree of student understanding of major schools of thought about schooling, teaching, and learning. 4. The Critique of a Research Article Assessment is required of all students in EDUC-416 Analysis of Student Teaching. The accompanying table indicates a superior degree of ability of students to analyze educational research findings.  The percentage of students reaching the target is high with an anomaly occurring within the summary category during the Spring 2009 semester.  This is not considered a problem since 61.11% of students fell within the acceptable range.     Our advanced programs for licensed teachers are in Curriculum and Instruction and Special Education and produce a small number of masters’ degrees.  These programs are currently undergoing rigorous review at the unit, university, and state levels. Therefore, we have no current data to report.    1c.3. What data from key assessments indicate that advanced teacher candidates reflect on their practice; engage in professional activities; have a thorough understanding of the school, family, and community contexts in which they work; collaborate with the professional community; are aware of current research and policies related to schooling, teaching, learning, and best practices; and can analyze educational research and policies and explain the implications for their own practice and the profession? [A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1c.5 below.] N/A: At this time, DSU does not have programs that serve advanced teacher candidates. 1c.4. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' preparation related to professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate? [If these survey data are included in a previously attached table, refer the reader to that attachment; otherwise, a table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills could be attached at Prompt 1c.5 below.] Please see table Graduate Survey and description in 1a.4. The data for the graduate surveys administered in the spring semesters of 2009 and 2010 indicate that candidates felt unprepared in the areas of classroom management and assessment, including the Teacher Work Sample. With the exception of Early Childhood majors, all candidates take EDUC 357, Effective Teaching Strategies and Classroom Management. In this course, candidates create a classroom management plan. This assessment will need to be revisited when we review the findings of the NCATE self-study and review. Additionally, all candidates take a course in assessment (EDUC 423 or EDUC 401) in which they explore forms and types of assessment available to the classroom teacher. Although both of these courses appear late in the candidates’ programs, the approach to the content is primarily theoretical, rather than practical. This is another area that will be revisited and evaluated, based upon discussion and further student feedback.  Please see table 1a.4: Employer Survey SU 2008 and the description of the data. The 2008 follow up survey was heavily weighted toward pedagogical knowledge and skills with six of the ten questions devoted to planning, implementation and assessment. Comprehensive mean scores (2.7 out of a maximum score of 3) indicate that employers believe our candidates are very well prepared to teach.   1c.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills of teacher candidates may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]  See table 1b.4: TWS - ST Data Sp 09-SP10.  table 1c.2 Persuasive Essay  table 1c.2 Article Critique  1d. Student Learning for Teacher Candidates. [In this section the unit must address (1) initial teacher preparation programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels and, if the institution offers them, (2) licensure and non-licensure graduate programs for teachers who already hold a teaching license.]   1d.1. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation programs can assess and analyze student learning, make appropriate adjustments to instruction, monitor student learning, and develop and implement meaningful learning experiences to help all students learn? [Data for initial teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1d.4 below.]  All of our programs have been nationally reviewed with the exception of Art Education and Music Education, which are reviewed by the state. State review for these programs is in progress.   1d.2. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that advanced teacher candidates demonstrate a thorough understanding of the major concepts and theories related to assessing student learning; regularly apply them in their practice; analyze student, classroom, and school performance data; make data-driven decisions about strategies for teaching and learning; and are aware of and utilize school and community resources that support student learning? [Data for advanced teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1d.4 below.]  All of our programs have been nationally reviewed with the exception of Art Education and Music Education, which are reviewed by the state. State review for these programs is in progress.   1d.3. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' ability to help all students learn? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate? [If these survey data are included in a previously attached table, refer the reader to that attachment; otherwise, a table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to the ability to help all students learn could be attached at Prompt 1d.4 below.]  Please see table in 1a.4 Graduate Survey and description.  In the past, graduate surveys did not include information on this element. New survey data will be available in the exhibit room (EH 109).  Please see table 1a.4 Employer Follow-up Survey SU 2008 and the description of the assessment. The employer follow up survey of 2008 did not include information on this element. New survey data will be available in the exhibit room (EH 109).  1d.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to student learning may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]   1e. Knowledge and Skills for Other School Professionals  1e.1. What are the pass rates of other school professionals on licensure tests by program and across all programs (i.e., overall pass rate)? Please complete Table 5 or upload your own table at Prompt 1e.4 below.   The State of Delaware does not require licensure for administrators. Therefore, candidates in the Leadership programs at DSU do not take licensure tests.  Table 5  Pass Rates on Licensure Tests for Other School Professionals   For Period:     Program   Name of Licensure Test   # of Test Takers % Passing State Licensure Test Overall Pass Rate for the Unit (across all programs for the preparation of other school professionals)           1e.2. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from other key assessments indicate that other school professionals demonstrate the knowledge and skills delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards? [Data for programs for other school professionals that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1e.4 below.] All of our programs have been nationally reviewed with the exception of Art Education and Music Education, which are reviewed by the state. State review for these programs is in progress.   1e.3. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about the knowledge and skills of other school professionals? If survey data are being reported, what was the response rate? [A table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to knowledge and skills could be attached at Prompt 1e.4 below. The attached table could include all of the responses to your follow-up survey to which you could refer the reader in responses on follow-up studies in other elements of Standard 1.] The graduate follow-up survey is currently under revision and will be administered during spring 2011. Until this review, the Advance level programs did not have a system for collecting follow-up data. A new assessment has been created for Advance level follow-up survey and employers survey and will be administered during spring 2011. See exhibit 1e.3: Educational Leadership satisfaction and competence Survey.   1e.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the knowledge and skills of other school professionals may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]  1f. Student Learning for Other School Professionals   1f.1. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that candidates can create positive environments for student learning, including building on the developmental levels of students; the diversity of students, families, and communities; and the policy contexts within which they work? [Data for programs for other school professionals that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1f.3 below.] All of our programs have been nationally reviewed with the exception of Art Education and Music Education, which are reviewed by the state. State review for these programs is in progress.   1f.2. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' ability to create positive environments for student learning? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate? [If these survey data are included in a previously attached table, refer the reader to that attachment; otherwise, a table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to the ability to create positive environments for student leaning could be attached at Prompt 1f.3 below.]  Until this review, the Advance level programs did not have a system for collecting follow-up data. A new assessment has been created for Advance level follow-up survey and employers’ survey and will be administered during spring 2011. See exhibit 1e.3: Educational Leadership satisfaction and competence Survey.   1f.3. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to other school professionals' creation of positive environments for student learning may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]  1g. Professional Dispositions for All Candidates. [Indicate when the responses refer to the preparation of initial teacher candidates, advanced teacher candidates, and other school professionals, noting differences when they occur.]   1g.1. What professional dispositions are candidates expected to demonstrate by completion of programs? Currently, undergraduate candidates are assessed using rubrics that address basic professionalism such as attendance, punctuality, attire, preparation, and conduct. The rubrics assess skill sets required for teaching: communication, critical thinking, collaboration, and technology integration. Dispositions were supposed to be carefully tracked as the candidate progressed from pre-education to TEP. This review alerted us that dispositions assessments were entered into TK20 less frequently than we had believed. As a result, we developed a flow chart that identifies staff members responsible for disseminating the data and developing an improvement plan with the candidate. See Exhibit 1g1a: Dispositions Flow Chart. As of Spring 2011, undergraduate candidates will be assessed with newly developed dispositions rubrics. Several of the dispositions from the current assessments are included in the new assessments. See Exhibit 1g1b: Comparison of New Disposition Assessments to Current Assessments. Although these dispositions assessments were approved and adopted by the PEU in Spring, 2010, they will not be available on TK20 for faculty use until Spring 2011. These dispositions assessments are much better aligned with NCATE Standards and INTASC but remain closely aligned to unit standards. The university classroom dispositions assessment also addresses attendance, punctuality, attire, preparation, and conduct but goes beyond by addressing scholarship, reflective learning, problem solving, and commitment to professional growth. Additionally, the new disposition surveys address the issues of fairness and respect for all and the belief that all children can learn. Finally, the new disposition surveys allow instructors/ supervisors to indicate where the evidence for meeting these criteria was recorded. See Exhibit 1g1c: New Dispositions Assessments. The dispositions assessment for graduate students is aligned with core competencies for all graduate students and aligned with ELCC and ISLLC. This assessment targets dispositions predominantly linked to leadership qualities: leadership, vision, decision-making, adaptability, consideration, and attitude. As a consequence of assessments and review, it was determined that the rubric did not adequately address diversity. Therefore, the rubric is under revision.  See Summary Exhibit 1g1d:Graduate Dispositions and Table of Summary Data.   1g.2. How do candidates demonstrate that they are developing professional dispositions related to fairness and the belief that all students can learn? [A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1g.5 below.] Candidates are able to demonstrate that they have developed dispositions related to fairness and the belief that all children can learn in the TWS and Student Teaching Evaluation. Nine Elements of the TWS: 1.3, 1.4,1.5 from Contextual Factors, 3.5 Assessment Plan, 4.5 Design for Instruction, 5.2 Instructional Decision-Making, 6.4 Student Learning, and 7.1, & 7.2 Reflection & Self-Evaluation represented these dispositions well. The common denominator for these elements was the relationship to identifying, understanding and meeting diverse student needs through instructional planning and implementation, as well as candidate reflection and self-evaluation. Means for TWS scores on the selected elements consistently fell in the target range with three exceptions. The mean for reflection on least successful learning goals was also in the acceptable range (7.83). Overall means for each element over seven semesters were well within the range for target scores. One of the highest means posted was for instructional modifications based on analysis of student learning (9.22). Candidates demonstrated the most proficiency in discussing the most successful aspects of their teaching. Making adaptations based on the needs of individual students proved to be an area of programmatic weakness although the overall mean of 8.50 was within target range. Still, this was the lowest overall performance mean. Three elements were identified in the student teaching assessment, Planning 3, Implementation 2, and Reflection 3, that demonstrate addressing the needs of diverse students, and demonstration of professional dispositions that support student learning and fairness. Note that scoring for final student teaching assessment changed to a 3-point scale in Fall 2009. In both 2008, 2009 and Spring 2010, candidates consistently showed proficiency in planning and teaching diverse learners, as evidenced by high mean scores for each of these categories. The Fall 2009 student teachers' scores represented the lowest score means recorded over the 5 semesters reported, though these scores were still in the acceptable range.  These data have provided evidence that our students do develop and act upon a strong belief that all children can learn. See Exhibit: Summary Table 1g2 TWS-ST.   1g.3. What data from key assessments indicate that candidates demonstrate the professional dispositions listed in 1.g.1 as they work with students, families, colleagues, and communities? [A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1g.5 below.]  Each SPA in the PEU demonstrated through its own standards that our candidates demonstrate professional dispositions with students, families, colleagues and communities. A survey distributed to employers of our graduates demonstrated that employers see these dispositions in our graduates as evidenced by survey mean scores of 2.8, 2.7, and 2.5 out of a possible 3, for working with students, parents and families, and school staff & administration, respectively. See table table 1a.4: Employer Survey SU 2008   1g.4. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' demonstration of professional dispositions? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate? [If these survey data are included in a previously attached table, refer the reader to that attachment; otherwise, a table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to professional dispositions could be attached at Prompt 1g.5 below.]  Graduates from academic year 2009 and Spring 2010 responded to a survey. In this survey, program completers showed evidence of the following dispositions assessed by the current assessment: communication, collaboration, and professional demeanor. Graduates showed evidence of the following dispositions that will be assessed in the new dispositions surveys: flexibility and perseverance (problem solving). See Attachment Table 1a4: Graduate Survey 2009-2010 Employers responded to a survey requesting feedback about DSU graduates employed in their schools or districts. This survey provided evidence of the following dispositions, expressed as means based on a scale of 3: effective lesson planning – 2.7, effective instruction- 2.7, proper assessment- 2.7, effective classroom management- 2.7, technology integration- 2.7, plan for profession growth- 2.7, model professional dispositions- 2.7, address needs of diverse learners- 2.8, collaboration with parents and community- 2.7, and collaboration with staff and administration- 2.7. Employers of our graduates provide evidence that these students have developed the professional dispositions we actively cultivated during their experiences at DSU. See Exhibit 1a4: Raw Data Employer SU 2008. Until this review, the graduate program did not have a system for collecting follow-up data. A new assessment has been created for graduates and employers and will be administered by telephone prior to the BOE visit. Data will be available in the Evidence Room 109. See Exhibit 1e3: Ed Leadership Post-Graduate and Employer Surveys.   1g.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to professional dispositions may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]    Optional   1. What does your unit do particularly well related to Standard 1? The Education Department at DSU requires that all students pass the PRAXIS I prior to admission into the Teacher Education Program and that all students pass the PRAXIS II in their field prior to admission to student teaching. Although this policy has resulted in low numbers in our upper level education courses, we have not wavered as we believe that it is essential that our candidates have a firm foundation before they student teach. In recent years, we have been able to implement several interventions for students who take the PRAXIS I and II tests. First, with help from a Title III grant, we were able to hire a full time Praxis coordinator, provide online tutorials and cover registration fees for the students. Additionally, the PRAXIS coordinator has collaborated with the Instructor for University Seminar in Education to provide instruction. The result is that our students’ PRAXIS scores have improved, increasing our enrollment in the Teacher Education Program and the number of student teachers each year. We have found that our Teacher Work Sample is a solid assessment to measure candidates’ abilities to ensure student learning. Almost all candidates perform well on this assessment and are able to speak articulately about the ways in which their students have learned. The TWS has proven to be a comprehensive assessment for us, meeting the needs of many standards across professional, university student learning goals, and state institutions.   2. What research related to Standard 1 is being conducted by the unit or its faculty?    Grant  Professional Development Partnership to improve Content knowledge and teaching skills in mathematics.   Published Research (see Standard 5)  Middle school readers as expert knowers: We learned what to expect from a book.  An examination of the multidimensionality of situational interest in elementary school physical education  Effects of perceptual motor training on perceptual motor abilities and intelligence among mentally challenged children  Ongoing Research   Factors influencing selection of STEM disciplines by undergraduate students  Team teaching in inclusive classrooms  The achievement gap, inquiry instruction in science methods classes  Math pedagogy and student achievement in math.   Exhibits 1.      Program review documents or state program review documents (Program review documents will be available in NCATE’s database, AIMS, for programs reviewed through the national program review process. If programs were reviewed through the national process or through a state process that required the review of assessments and assessment data, then no other assessment data for those already reviewed programs are required for this element.) (IN AIMS) 2.      State licensure test scores aggregated by program area and reported over multiple years (Title II data reported to the state for the last year must be available to the team.) ETS Pass Rates 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09. 3.      Data tables and summaries that show how teacher candidates (both initial and advanced) have performed on key assessments over the past three years. (Located in Standard 2) 4.      Key assessments and scoring guides used by faculty to assess candidate learning against standards and the outcomes identified in the unit’s conceptual framework. Table showing State, Professional, and institutional standards and See  See Table 2a.6.1 5.      Samples of candidate work (e.g., portfolios at different proficiency levels) Exhibit located in EH 109. 6.      Follow-up studies of graduates and data tables of results. See  See table 1a.4: Graduate Survey 2009-2010) 7.      Employer feedback on graduates and summaries of the results. See table 1a.4: Employer Survey SU 2008 8.      Items 1, 6, & 7  (for programs that underwent national or similar state program review) or Items 3-7 above related to pedagogical content knowledge and skills of initial and advanced teacher candidates. 9.      Items 3-7 above related to professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills of initial and advanced teacher candidates. 10.  Items 1, 6, & 7 (for programs that underwent national or similar state program review) or Items 3-7 above related to student learning of initial and advanced teacher candidates. 11.  Items 3-7 above related to knowledge and skills for other school professionals. 12.  Items 1, 6, & 7 (for programs that underwent national or similar state program review) or Items 3-7 above related to student learning for other school professionals. 13.  List of candidate dispositions, including fairness and the belief that all students can learn. See 1g1b: Comparison of New Disposition Assessments to Current Assessments. 14.  Assessments used to determine dispositions. See 1g1b: Comparison of New Disposition Assessments to Current Assessments. 15.  Summary of candidate performance on those assessments. See See Exhibit: Summary Table 1g2 TWS-ST. 16.  Items 6-7 above related to professional dispositions for all candidates      

NCATE INSTITUTION REPORT OVERVIEW

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  OVERVIEW This section sets the context for the visit. It should clearly state the mission of the institution. It should also describe the characteristics of the unit and identify and describe any branch campuses, off-campus sites, alternate route programs, and distance learning programs for professional school personnel. A. Institution                                                                                                                           A.1. What is the institution's historical context? Delaware State University was established in 1891 under the Morrill Act of 1890 as a segregated land-grant college opportunity for individuals of color. Five courses of study leading to a baccalaureate degree were offered: Agricultural, Chemical, Classical, Engineering, and Scientific. A three-year normal course leading to a teacher's certificate was initiated in 1897. Teacher Education was extended to four years in 1911. In 1917, a Model Grade School was established, and a high school diploma was granted on completion of a four-year course of study. In 1923, a Junior College Division was added. Four-year curricula in Arts and Sciences, Elementary Education, Home Economics, Agriculture, and Industrial Arts were established in 1932. In 1944, the College received provisional accreditation by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. In 1947, the name of the institution was changed to "Delaware State College" by legislative action. At the end of 1952, the High School Division was discontinued. In April 1957, the College was accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE). MSCHE in 1962, 1972, 1982, 1987, 1992, 1997, 2002, and 2007 reaffirmed this accreditation. The Teacher Education Program was accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) 1998, and 2003. On July 1, 1993, Delaware State College was renamed Delaware State University. Accreditations now include the National League of Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC), the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), Accreditation Council for Programs in Hospitality Administration (ACPHA), the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), and Commission on Accreditation for Dietetic Education (CCDE). The University’s College of Business is nationally and internationally accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). A.2. What is the institution's mission? Delaware State University is a public, comprehensive 1890 land-grant institution. The mission of the University is to provide, for the people of Delaware and others who are admitted, meaningful and relevant education that emphasizes both liberal and professional aspects of higher education. Within this context, the University provides educational opportunities to all qualified citizens of this state and other states at a cost consistent with the economic status of the students as a whole. While recognizing its historical heritage, the University serves a diverse student population with a broad range of programs in instruction, service, and research so that its graduates will become competent, productive and contributing citizens. Evolving from the mission are core values set for the institution by the formulated Blue Ribbon Panel. These core values are Outreach, Community, Scholarship, Diversity, and Integrity in the (Spring 2010).   A.3. What are the institution's characteristics [e.g., control (e.g., public or private) and type of institution such as private, land grant, or HBI; location (e.g., urban, rural, or suburban area)]?  Since 1957, the University has grown in stature as a center for teaching, research, and public service. The purpose of the University has broadened in keeping with changing times. Recognizing its heritage, the University is among the premier Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in the country, while serving a diverse student population. Faculty and students comprise a microcosm of global society with linkages to twenty six other Universities around the world. Undergraduate studies are organized into five colleges that contain a total of 20 academic departments, which offer 64 bachelor degrees.  The College of Graduate Studies comprises advance level programs offering 22 master degrees and five doctoral degrees.  Delaware State University serves Delaware’s three counties, Kent, New Castle, and Sussex and is located in the State Capital, Dover. These counties span the range from urban to rural settings. In addition, there has been an expansion in the student population from surrounding states in the region and other countries around the world. The University community believes in equality of opportunity thus, it recognizes that exquisite talent is often hidden in students whose finest development requires extraordinary support educationally, personally, and financially. Delaware State University graduates are recognized in their respective fields for their contributions in a global society. Current enrollment has topped 3,609 students from various racial, cultural and ethnic backgrounds. Student demographic profiles are available in the DESU Fact-book for 2009. See student enrollment profiles in http://www.desu.edu/sites/default/files/09enrprofile(3).pdf  A.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the institutional context may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]   A.4.1 A copy of the Unit’s notice soliciting 3rd Party testimony. B. The unit   B.1. What is the professional education unit at your institution and what is its relationship to other units at the institution that are involved in the preparation of professional educators? Delaware State University Professional Education Unit (PEU) is a collaborative assemblage and network of dedicated Faculty from across curricula involved in the following rigorous and comprehensive teacher education programs: Elementary Education, Early Childhood Education, Elementary and Secondary Special Education, Physical Education, Middle Level Education, Physical Science Education, Mathematics Education, Chemistry Education, Physics Education, Art Education, Music Education, English Education, Foreign Languages Education; including all college that offer Education related program. Teacher candidates who complete these programs demonstrate excellent levels of content and pedagogical knowledge, skills, and dispositions for teaching. The Dean of The College of Education Health and Public Policy serves as Head of the Professional Education Unit. The Council for Professional Education (CPE) is a formal standing committee of the Faculty Senate. This body is representative of Unit faculty members. The CPE membership establishes policies and procedures and deliberates on exceptions to policy. The Education Department Chair is the head of CPE.  B.2. How many professional education faculty members support the professional education unit? Please complete Table 1 or upload your own table at Prompt B.7 below.   As indicated in the table below, there are a total of 35 professional faculty who support the unit. Table 1 Professional Education Faculty Professional Education Faculty  Full-time in the Unit Full-time in the Institution, but Part-time in the Unit Part-time at the Institution & the Unit (e.g., adjunct faculty) Graduate Teaching Assistants Teaching or Supervising Clinical Practice Total # of Professional Education Faculty Number of faculty 22 8 5 0 35     B.3. What programs are offered at your institution to prepare candidates for their first license to teach? Please complete Table 2 or upload your own table at Prompt B.7 below.   Table 2 is TK20 Document Room   * National Recognition through NCATE is accepted by the State Department of Education in lieu of state approval. (For all cells in this column)   B.4. What programs are offered at your institution to prepare advanced teacher candidates and other school professionals? Please complete Table 3 or upload your own table at Prompt B.7 below. Table 3 Advanced Preparation Programs and Their Review Status    Program  Award Level (e.g.,  Bachelor's or Master's) Number of Candidates Enrolled or Admitted Agency or Association Reviewing Programs (e.g., State, NAEYC, or Bd. of Regents) Program Report Submitted for National Review (Yes/No) State Approval Status (e.g., approved or provisional)  Status of National Recognition of Programs by NCATE Secondary Special Education MA   CEC Yes  * National Recognition with Conditions Elementary Special Education MA   CEC Yes   National Recognition with Conditions Curriculum and Instruction MA   No SPA identified No Approved   Education Leadership at School Building Level MA   ELCC Yes   Needs Further Development Education Leadership at School District Level Ed. D. in Education Leadership   ELCC Yes   Needs Further Development   * With the exception of Curriculum and Instruction, National Recognition through NCATE is accepted by the State Department of Education in lieu of state approval. (For all cells in this column)   B.5. Which of the above initial teacher preparation and advanced preparation programs are offered off-campus or via distance learning technologies? What alternate route programs are offered? [In addition to this response, please review the "Institutional Information" in AIMS and, if updating is needed, contact NCATE with details about these programs.] At this time, no initial teacher preparation or advanced preparation programs are offered off campus or through distance learning technologies. Also, no alternative route programs are currently offered. The Professional Education Unit at Delaware State University provides course offerings on main campus and at two sites off-campus, Wilmington and Georgetown. All courses offered at off-campus sites conform to the elements of the Unit’s Conceptual Framework and to the Unit’s assessment system. Undergraduate courses offered off-campus are in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, and Special Education. Advance level courses in Curriculum and Instruction and Educational Leadership are taught at both locations as arranged. In addition, the connected degree programs in Early Childhood Education and Elementary Education which are articulated with Delaware Technical and Community College, necessitate some course offerings off-campus. (See the following Articulation Agreements for connected degree programs, located EH 109 and see programs on DTCC Website: http://www.dtcc.edu/connecteddegree/pdfs/early_child_ed_birth_second_dsu.pdf http://www.dtcc.edu/connecteddegree/pdfs/elem_education.pdf B.6. (Continuing Visit Only) What substantive changes have taken place in the unit since the last visit (e.g., added/dropped programs/degrees; significant increase/decrease in enrollment; major reorganization of the unit, etc.)? [These changes could be compiled from those reported in Part C of the AACTE/NCATE annual reports since the last visit.]  The Conceptual Framework establishes the shared vision for the Unit’s efforts in educating teachers to effectively work in P-12 schools. It provides direction for programs, courses, candidate performance, scholarship, service, and Unit accountability. The Unit is knowledge-based, articulated, shared, coherent, consistent with the Unit’s mission and values, and continuously evaluated. The conceptual framework was reviewed in a strategic planning retreat workshop held by the Unit in Fall 2008. The construct was determined to remain viable and relevant to guide the Unit. The Council for Professional Education considered this input and determined the model to be appropriate for all levels of teacher and teacher leader education. Passage of the PRAXIS II exam was added to the Conceptual Framework Model in 2008. Some faculty members voiced concerns that the model does not seem to cover advance level expectations. To remedy these concerns, during Fall 2010, slight semantic modifications were made to the transition points in the conceptual framework model. For example, “teacher candidacy” was changed to “candidacy” and “admission to student teaching” has been changed to “admission to internship.” Since 2006 the unit has experienced a decline in enrollment as indicated in Standard 3. The table represents eligible candidates for student teaching and completers. Semester/Year Eligible Candidates Candidate Completers Spring/06 19 19 Fall /06 14 14 Spring /07 12 12 Fall /07 9 9 Spring/08 13 13 Fall /08 9 8 Spring/09 13 13 Fall /09 4 4 Spring /10 16 15 Total 109 107   In spring, 2009, the College of Education was merged into a new configuration with the College of Health and Public Policy, to form the College of Education Health and Public Policy. The rationale was to bring the professional education programs together for sharing of resources and administrative supports. This reconfiguration, however, did not affect the function of the Professional Education Unit, which involves several colleges that have teacher education related courses across the University. B.7. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the unit context may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]  CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK  This section provides an overview of the unit's conceptual framework(s). The overview should include a brief description of the framework(s) and its development. C.1. How does the unit's conceptual framework address the following structural elements? [Please provide a summary here. A more complete description of the conceptual framework should be available as an electronic exhibit.]  l   the vision and mission of the unit l   philosophy, purposes, goals, and institutional standards of the unit l   knowledge bases, including theories, research, the wisdom of practice, and educational policies that drive the work of the unit l   candidate proficiencies related to expected knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions, including proficiencies associated with diversity and technology, that are aligned with the expectations in professional, state, and institutional standards l   summarized description of the unit's assessment system   Vision Teacher candidates in the Professional Education Unit programs will be able to demonstrate excellence in the design and delivery of instruction and assessment, exhibit research capabilities, and have a passion for outreach and service to local, state, regional, national and international constituencies. Upon completion of the Unit’s programs, teacher candidates are able to deliver quality instruction through “best practices” for optimal teaching effectiveness, demonstrate professionalism in various settings, employ current technology advances to enhance teaching and learning, and can differentiate instruction to allow all students to access the curriculum. Mission The Professional Education Unit’s mission is consistent with the University’s mission, and is as follows: The Professional Education Unit is committed to excellence in offering a comprehensive program that addresses the needs of all its students. The Professional Education Unit offers a strong pedagogical base within the context of teaching, research, and service, and continues to build on its historical heritage in serving multicultural populations.  Philosophy Education is the very foundation of our democracy. People govern themselves and pursue happiness through the acquisition of knowledge, skills and dispositions. The P-12 school system is a primary source of such knowledge, skills, and dispositions, where teachers prepare youth to lead fruitful, productive lives and to become intelligent, contributive citizens who can meet the demands of the 21st Century. Thus, teachers have an awesome responsibility to the future. To meet this supreme challenge, teachers must be prepared through a first-rate education, which enables them to be instrumental in the teaching and creation of knowledge, acquire positive dispositions, and to develop critical thinking and creative skills in their students.  Purpose  The purpose of the Professional Education Unit at Delaware State University is to design and implement high quality teacher education (P-12) programs that address standards-driven performance competencies. Those standards-based performance competencies are aligned with Delaware State Teaching Standards, the Specialty Area Standards, and with Professional Education Unit Standards. These standards are identified by the acronym, DIRECT. The model is described as follows: 1.) Teacher candidates will demonstrate an awareness of diversity issues that impact teaching and learning, (2.) Teacher candidates will demonstrate effective interpersonal communication, (3.) Teacher candidates will demonstrate meaningful reflection in their practice, (4.) Teacher candidates will use effective instruction and assessment strategies, (5.) Teacher candidates will be proficient in the content area and use theories of teaching and learning to effectively address issues and concerns related to teaching and learning, (6.) Teacher candidates will demonstrate appropriate technological literacy in the content areas. In addition, the aim of the Unit is to permeate teacher education with concepts focusing on the development of professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions required of highly qualified teachers in the 21st Century. The Theme that is emergent from these goals remains, “Effective Teachers within Diverse Populations for the 21st Century.”  Theoretical Knowledge Bases   Knowledge base documents are categorized according to the Professional Education Unit standards. Included under each category are those documents that are used in the development of content and assessment. PEU Standard 1. Diversity Effective teachers realize that understanding and adapting to diversity is an essential component of effective teaching in the 21st Century. Thus, effective teachers understand the impact educational equity has on schooling, the foundations and impact of racism, multiple points of view for a global society, and diversity in learning styles and aptitudes. Effective teachers strive to strengthen cultural consciousness and intercultural competence of self and others (Robinson and Howard-Hamilton, 2000; Banks, 2001, Diaz, 2001; Grieshaber & Cannelli, 2001; Brown & Kysilka, 2002; Robins, K. N., Lindsay, R. B., Lindsay, D. B., & Terrell, R. D., 2006 Johnson, R.S., 2002, and Gay, 2002) (C.4 PEU Standards Selected Bibliography). PEU Standard 2. Interpersonal Communication Interpersonal skills are essential to effective teaching. Thus, effective teachers possess communication skills and attitudes needed in a workplace that values trust, self-esteem, reflection, self-improvement, expertise sharing, collaboration and productivity. They are members of a learning community that collaborates with peers, parents, and students to plan programs, implement effective instruction, manage classrooms, and resolve conflicts. (Barbour & Barbour, 2001; Brooks & Brooks, 1999; Friend, M. & Cook, L. 2003; Vance & Weaver, 2002) (C.4 PEU Standards Selected Bibliography). PEU Standard 3. Reflection The construct of reflective teaching dates back to John Dewey, an early 20th Century educational philosopher, who defined reflective action as, “that which involves active, persistent, and careful consideration of any belief or practice in light of the reasons that support it and further consequences to which it leads” (Zeichner & Liston, 1996, p. 9). Reflective teaching requires metacognitive processes and exercises that frame what teachers do in teaching and learning. Connected to reflection is an examination by teachers of their personal, professional beliefs, attitudes, and values toward the learners. Reflective practice requires that teachers assess critical levels of pedagogy: 1.) Who is the learner, (2.) What is to be taught, learned, and assessed, (3.) under what conditions should the learning occur, (4.) How should the content be delivered, and (5.) How relevant is the selected content? (Henderson, 1992; Eby et al., 1992) (C.4 PEU Standards Selected Bibliography). PEU Standard 4. Effective Teaching Strategies and Assessment Effective teachers understand and plan instruction and assessment in accordance with the most updated research-based models (Kauchak & Eggan, 2003). They plan, using acceptable lesson and unit planning formats, logically sequenced goals, activities and assessments (Guskey, 2003; Pellegrino, Chudowski, & Glasser, 2001). They reflect on their practices for instructional improvement. They also make pedagogically sound decisions for adaptations and accommodations to ensure that all students access the curriculum. Moreover, they foster critical thinking and self-determination skill development in students (McLesky, Rosenberg, & Westling, 2010) (C.4 PEU Standards Selected Bibliography). PEU Standard 5. Content and Pedagogical Knowledge The Professional Education Unit has developed a knowledge base grounded in best practices and trends necessary for tomorrow’s teachers. Content and pedagogical knowledge form the knowledge base for teaching that encompasses specialization of content areas and how content knowledge is understood, learned, and retained by all students. Content mastery by teacher candidates and domain-specific context of teaching are crucial for successful mastery learning (Kauchak & Eggan, 2003; .Thompson, Kushner-Benson, Pachnowski, & Salzman, 2001) (C.4.2  PEU Standards Selected Bibliography).https://desu.tk20.com/campustoolshighered/start.do PEU Standard 6. Technology The effective teacher is aware of increasing technological needs and trends of the 21st Century and is comfortable and confident with using technology in a variety of ways for instruction. Thus, the effective teacher strives to integrate technology into curriculum, instruction, and assessment in ways that improve teaching and student learning (Roblyer, 2006). In addition, the effective teacher can apply technology to lighten administrative tasks and to differentiate instruction via adaptations and accommodations or assistive technologies to ensure that all students access the curriculum (Reiser & Dempsey, 2006) (Link to C.4 PEU Standards Selected Bibliography) (C.4 PEU Standards Selected Bibliography). Candidate Proficiencies See C.1.1 Professional Education Unit’s Standards with Performance Indicators Unit’s Assessment System  Assessment plays a vital role in the analysis of the quality of program completers. The Unit has designed a comprehensive, performance-based assessment system that addresses the assessment of teacher candidates, advance level students, professional education faculty, unit operations, and program evaluations. Prospective teacher candidates and advance level students are assessed at specific transition points in the Professional Education Unit’s knowledge-bases. These transition points for teacher candidates are Admission (including General Education), Teacher Candidacy, Admission to Student Teaching, Program Completion, and Workforce Induction. General Education coursework is evaluated on an independent basis via Grade Point Average (GPA). Each syllabus contains evaluation methods and the minimal criteria for successful completion of the course. To meet general education requirements, each student must successfully complete, or be in the semester of completing, the core courses and the foundation courses except for the senior capstone at the time of applying for admittance to the Teacher Education Program (TEP). 1. Program Admittance Each undergraduate student, desiring to enter the teacher education program, is assessed during the semester of completing or by completing 45-60 semester hours of study in the general education core curriculum by GPA (2.5). Each content course taken must show evidence of being completed with a minimum grade of C. The PRAXIS I examination must be passed with an independent area score. Each Advance level applicant, desiring to enter an education program, is assessed through GRE/MAT score, personal statement (essay), application form, letters of recommendation and GPA (3.0). Undergraduate students must formally apply to enter the TEP. 2. Candidacy Teacher candidates must maintain a 2.5 cumulative GPA. Students may reapply to the TEP when minimal criteria are met. In addition to their course of study, teacher candidates organize a working portfolio according to the Unit standards, DIRECT, and collect their documentation and artifacts indicating how they have met each standard. Advanced level candidates must possess and maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 and matriculate in a program of study (knowledge, dispositions, skills, and working portfolio). 3. Admission to Internship Teacher candidates must maintain a minimum of a 2.5 GPA in order to be admitted to student teaching. Each content course must be completed with a C or better. The candidate must pass the PRAXIS II and submit a working portfolio which documents unacceptable, acceptable and target levels of performance in knowledge, skills, and dispositions. In advanced level programs that have internship, the requirements are GPA (minimum 3.0), successful completion of appropriate course work and completion of internship application. 4. Program Completion Teacher candidates are assessed at the completion of their senior capstone, student teaching. To successfully exit the Program, teacher candidates must complete the student teaching experience with a grade of C or better, submit a professional portfolio evaluated at acceptable to target level, and be eligible to meet the State of Delaware teacher certification standards. Advanced level candidates are assessed in the final semester of their program of study.  They must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 and successfully complete the internship and capstone project. 5. Workforce Induction The final transition point is after the teacher candidate has secured a position in the workforce.   Assessment focuses on program evaluation which includes courses, programs, and clinical experiences. Graduates are contacted via questionnaires, and, employers are sent satisfaction surveys (see Standard 1 data). Protocols are designed to determine the quality of the Delaware State University Teacher Education Program and to determine if revisions to the program are needed for improvement. The final transition point for advanced level candidates is also workforce induction. The assessment is captured through employer satisfaction and graduate follow-up surveys. Table showing alignment of state, professional C.2. (Continuing Visits Only)  What changes have been made to the conceptual framework since the last visit?  In 2008, the PRAXIS II exam was added to the conceptual framework model as a key assessment. Students must now pass the PRAXIS II Examination in their particular SPA area prior to enrollment in EDUC 400, student teaching. In fall 2010, the Conceptual Framework Model was revised to reflect expectations of advanced level candidates at transition points.  C.3. (First Visits Only) How was the conceptual framework developed and who was involved in its development?  C.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the conceptual framework may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.  C.4.1 Professional Education Unit Model  C.4.2 Professional Education Unit’s Standards with Performance Indicators C.4.3 Selected Bibliography Exhibits 1.    Institutional report, BOE report, and institutional rejoinder from the previous NCATE review (Continuing & Focused Visits only) (EH 109) 2.   Preconditions Report and Report from NCATE indicating that all preconditions were met (First Visits only) (N/A) 3.   Unit catalogs and other printed documents describing general education, specialty/content studies, and professional studies: Undergraduate, Graduate.  4.   Most recent report prepared for a state program review and the state’s findings (If the visit is being conducted jointly with the state, the state findings may not be available until the visit.) (pending state review) 5.   A copy of the unit’s notice soliciting third-party testimony  A.4.1 A copy of the Unit’s notice soliciting 3rd Party testimony. 6.   Syllabi for professional education courses (EH 109, N-drive) 7.   Conceptual framework(s) Documents in EH 109 8.   Table showing alignment of state, professional, and institutional standards 9.   Reports and findings of other national accreditation associations related to the preparation of education professionals (e.g., ASHA, NASM, APA, CACREP) (N/A)       Standard 1 Candidate Knowledge for Teacher Candidates Standard 2 Assessment System and Unit Evaluation Standard 3 Field Experiences and Clinical Practice Standard 4 Diversity Standard 5 Faculty Qualifications, Performance, and Development Standard 6 Unit Governance and Resources          

NCATE STANDARD 4

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STANDARD 4. DIVERSITY The unit designs, implements, and evaluates curriculum and provides experiences for candidates to acquire and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates can demonstrate and apply proficiencies related to diversity. Experiences provided for candidates include working with diverse populations, including higher education and P-12 school faculty; candidates; and students in P-12 schools.  [In this section the unit must include (1) initial and advanced programs for teachers, (2) programs for other school professionals, and (3) off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, noting differences when they exist.]  4a. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of Curriculum and Experiences 4a.1. What proficiencies related to diversity are candidates expected to develop and demonstrate?  The proficiencies related to diversity that the Unit candidates are expected to develop and demonstrate are presented in the following narrative. The centrality of diversity is indicated in Delaware State University’s mission statement: “… the University serves a diverse student population with a broad range of programs in instruction service, and research (See Institutional Report – http://www.desu.edu/fact-book-2009-10 ).” (Documentation 4-1: University Mission Statement- http://www.desu.edu/fact-book-2009-10 ). Preparing students in all majors to interact professionally with people from other cultures fits with the institutional mission: “Making our Contribution to a Global Society" (Documentation 4-2: University’s Vision Statement). The Unit has been extremely active in making diversity an institutional priority, and has identified four fronts simultaneously: student diversity, faculty and staff diversity, curriculum diversity, community diversity and inclusiveness (Documentation 4.3). In addition, within the outcomes of the conceptual framework for the Unit, standards are designed to develop specific teaching skills, competencies, and dispositions that relate to diversity. The Unit standards are designed to develop specific teaching skills related to diversity. The following are performance indicators for the Standard (D) Diversity: Teacher candidates will demonstrate awareness of (D) diversity issues that impact effective teaching and Learning. Performance Indicator 1: Teacher candidates are aware of the types of diversity and their impact on the teaching/learning process. Performance Indicator 2: Teacher candidates are able to identify and compile resources with respect to diversity that will enhance the teaching/learning process. Performance Indicator 3: Teacher candidates will develop activities and teaching materials that reflect pluralism and global perspectives. Performance Indicator 4: Teacher candidates will interact with diverse populations in a professional manner. The Professional Education Unit Standards and their respective Performance Indicators are included in course syllabi (4:5: Diversity Plan See Exhibit Room EH 109; See Syllabi in Electronic Exhibit Room in TK20 Document Room). 4a.2. What required coursework and experiences enable teacher candidates and candidates for other school professional roles to develop: awareness of the importance of diversity in teaching and learning; and l   the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions to adapt instruction and/or services for diverse populations, including linguistically and culturally diverse students and students with exceptionalities? All teacher candidates are required to complete General Education courses, which include substantial exposure to diversity, such as, ENGL 201and 202 World Literature I and II, ENGL 205 and 206 African American Literature I and II, GEOG 201 World/Regional Geography, and the student’s choice of a Foreign Language (Spanish, French, Japanese, Arabic, and Fulani) ENGL 201 and 102 Foreign Language HIST 201 American History to 1865. In addition, foundation level courses have strands that deal with diversity, such as EDUC-204 Philosophical Foundations of Education, EDUC-318/395 Multi-cultural Education and Global Societies, and EDUC-313 Introduction to the Education of Children with Exceptional Needs. Methods courses in Education include strands and approaches that enable candidates to learn to individuate instruction based on student background, strengths and needs. Some examples are Differentiated Instruction, Response to Intervention, strategies for teaching English language learners. Practica experiences are attached to all Methods courses. During student teaching, Interns complete Teacher Work Sample components in which they are required to connect Contextual Factors with Assessment and Instruction. In addition, candidates’ dispositions are assessed using the Unit-wide rubric at three points throughout their education program, at foundation level, in Methods courses, and during their clinical experience. The combined impact of the diversity strand in the General Education curriculum and the first standard of the Professional Education Unit (D) comprise a major focus on diversity throughout the Teacher Education Program (Documentation 4.6: Delaware State University’s Undergraduate Catalog-General Education Program, https://bnrweb.desu.edu/dsu/kiosk/course_cat.html). Advanced students in the Unit are required to complete a course in diversity EDUC-640 Diversity in Education. These students are required to design and implement instructional lessons that accommodate the background of diverse learners. They are also required to critique journal articles related to diversity in teaching and learning. Delaware State University has a formal agreement with the Caesar Rodney School District called the “Transition Partnership Agreement” (Documentation 4.8: Transition Partnership Agreement). This Partnership is designed to provide opportunities for teacher candidates and professional education faculty to engage in professional activities with P-12 special populations in their quest to enter the workforce (Documentation 4.5: Diversity Plan). Teacher candidates are involved in the Transition Partnership instructional, social and development activities.  The project provides teacher candidates with the opportunity to experience “hands-on” exposure in a laboratory setting to groups of P-12 students with exceptional needs. Teacher candidates also utilize the Delaware State University Child Development Center (lab School) to engage in laboratory experience with diverse groups of young learners (from birth through kindergarten). 4a.3. What key assessments provide evidence about candidates' proficiencies related to diversity? How are candidates performing on these assessments?  The key assessments that provide evidence about candidate proficiencies related to diversity consist of the following: Methods courses provide adequate strategies for meeting the needs for English language learners, learners with exceptional needs, and culturally diverse students. Teacher education candidates demonstrate the application of that knowledge in core courses, content courses, the teacher work-sample and in student teaching. Based on the data collected, analysis of the diversity strand across components indicates that early on in their clinical experience some candidates had difficulty identifying contextual factors that impact student learning. However, by the assessment and planning components, this weakness was overcome. Analysis of student learning indicated positive impact on P-12 learning. Table 4.b.1 Teacher Work Sample Diversity Summary shows results across components. The assessments for the work sample and for student teaching evaluation include component sections on adapting and differentiating lessons for students, based on contextual factors (located in TK20 Document Room). See TWS Data 4.b.1 Diversity Summary. This table indicates candidates met the target level (8-10). With an overall minimum mean of 8.3 across four semesters of data; this indication that the Unit is performing well in these areas. 4a.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to diversity proficiencies and assessments may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]  4b. Experiences Working with Diverse Faculty 4b.1. What opportunities do candidates (including candidates at off-campus sites and/or in distance learning or alternate route programs) have to interact with higher education and/or school-based faculty from diverse groups?  The University provides many opportunities throughout the year to blend diverse groups of students, faculty, and community. DSU hosts traditional festivals, choral and band concerts, dance recitals, Art expositions, guest lecturers, and academic workshops. DSU faculty and students regularly attend NASA Sponsored pre-teacher conferences. The university hosts the Delaware State Science Fair (K-12). In addition, many Sports and Wellness functions are provided. In 2010, the Unit hosted the Statewide Future Teachers’ Conference. Teacher Candidates interact with diverse Unit faculty, professional education adjunct faculty, faculty from other units within the institution, and school based faculty. This University is a microcosm of global society. The faculty in the Unit represents a wide variety of backgrounds in academic training, cultural experiences, and linguistic abilities. (Documentation 4: Office of Institutional Research-Professional Educational Faculty). http://www.desu.edu/fact-book-2009-10 Chart 4.2.1 profiles the diversity of the Professional Education Unit Faculty by Gender. Gender Diversity Professional Education Unit Faculty Year Female Male Fall 2008 15 14 Fall 2009 12 18     Diversity by Racial/Ethnic Origin Chart 4.2.2 is a summary of data related to the racial and ethnic origins of Unit faculty. In terms of professional education unit faculty members as reported in 2008 to 2009, African Americans comprise the greater percentage of professional education faculty members with Whites being second, Asian/Pacific Americans were third in terms of representation by racial/ethnic origin. Candidates interact with a diverse professional education faculty who come from five main different categories of ethnicity as demonstrated by the data in Chart 4.2.2. Professional Education Unit Faculty Year Alaskan Native/American Indian Asian/Pacific American Black, not Hispanic Origin Hispanic White, not Hispanic Origin Fall 2008 0 3 16 1 9 Fall 2009 0 4 16 1 9     Chart 4.2.3 profiles the adjunct Professional Education Unit faculty by gender for the fall semesters 2008 through 2009 (Documentation 4. 11: Office of Institutional Research-professional Education Faculty Adjuncts). http://www.desu.edu/fact-book-2009-10 Chart 4.2.3 Diversity by Gender Adjunct Professional Education Faculty Year Female Male Fall 2008 5 2 Fall 2009 7 1     Some variance is revealed by the fall semester statistics. This chart shows female adjunct faculty members outnumber male. by 2:1. Candidates interact with adjunct professors who are diverse in terms of gender. Diversity Plan located in EH109.  Chart 4.2.4 reveals that the adjunct faculty who interacted with teacher candidates was of diverse racial and ethnic origin. The highest number of adjunct faculty from fall 2008 to fall 2009 was white. Blacks comprise the second highest number of adjunct faculty.  Chart 4.2.4 Diversity by Racial/Ethnic Origin Adjunct Professional Education Faculty Year Alaskan Native/American Indian Asian/Pacific American Black, not Hispanic Origin Hispanic White, not Hispanic Origin Fall 2008 0 0 1 0 6 Fall 2009 0 0 6 0 2     School Faculty Chart 4.2.5 School Faculty Delaware Educator Data System (DEEDS) is a vehicle for tracking educators in the State of Delaware. It enables viewing credentials, ethnicity, specialty areas, and teaching performance. These factors can be considered when placing students with mentors for Early Field Experiences and Clinical Practice. https://deeds.doe.k12.de.us/public/deeds_pc_findeducator.aspx Chart 4.2.5 is indicative of the diversity of the school faculty who interacted with teacher candidates during the last two years relative to gender. Analysis of the data reveals a diverse population of school faculty who interacted with teacher candidates during the past two years relative to gender. Chart 4.2.5 Diversity by Gender Year Female Male Fall 2008 13 19 Fall 2009 24 13       4b.2. What knowledge and experiences do faculty have related to preparing candidates to work with students from diverse groups?  The knowledge and experiences that faculty have related to preparing candidates to work with students from diverse groups is varied. All Unit faculty members hold terminal degrees in their respective areas of specialization. All faculty hold continuing membership in the professional associations related to their areas of specialization. These organizations provide program structure and professional development for faculty. Some faculty members mentor candidates through student organizations, such as Council for Exceptional Children, National Association for the Education of Young Children, and National Middle School Association. The varied experiences of the faculty have contributed to their preparation for addressing the candidates’ ability to work with students from diverse backgrounds. Examples of these experiences include: 1.) Teaching in an Orthodox Jewish K-8 School (Pittsburgh, PA), (2.) Teaching in an Alternative School (Columbus Ohio), (3.) Teaching in an Inner City Middle School, (The Bronx, NY), (4.) Membership in Friends of the Southern Law Center, (5.) Membership in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, (6.) Secretary for the Conference on Black Basic Education - Western Region, (7.) Member of the National Association of Black School Educators, and (8.) Member of the National Association of Negro Musicians. 4b.3. How diverse are the faculty members who work with education candidates? [Diversity characteristics in addition to those in Table 8 can also be presented and/or discussed, if data are available, in response to other prompts for this element.] Please complete Table 8 or upload your own table at Prompt 4b.5 below. See table 8 uploaded at 4b.5  4b.4. What efforts does the unit make to recruit and retain a diverse faculty? As an equal opportunity employer, the University has maintained its position to recruit and retain diverse faculty. This process occurs through postings with diverse readership in journals such as the Chronicle of Higher Education, higheredjobs.com, and job announcements throughout urban and rural settings. In addition, the University’s data bank for minority faculty and staff from local, state and, national sources provides a list of possible candidates for search committees.  4b.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to faculty diversity may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]  Table 8 Faculty Demographics All Faculty in the Institution 2008-2009 All Faculty in the Institution 2009-2010 4c. Experiences Working with Diverse Candidates 4c.1. What opportunities do candidates (including candidates at off-campus sites and/or in distance learning or alternate route programs) have to interact with candidates from diverse groups? The Unit provides multiple opportunities for candidates to interact within and across diverse groups at the undergraduate and advanced level. Some candidates interact with each other through participation in students’ organizations (Teachers in Progress, Student National Educational Association, Council for Exceptional Children, Kappa Delta Pi) and others have the opportunity to interact with each other during internship seminars throughout the student teaching experience. These seminars allow students to share ideas and experiences, and reflect on successful teaching and learning experiences.   Candidates in Advanced Programs are required to demonstrate diversity competences similar to those in the licensure preparation programs. Advanced level candidates attend summer seminars where their research proposals are shared and feedback is provided by a diverse professional audience from numerous intuitions. Advance candidates’ research activities are presented to a panel of diverse faculty members. In addition, advance candidates complete course based field projects that expose them to diverse settings in order to meet specific course performance standards required by the Unit. These course field based experiences include strategic planning, technology policy planning, and a internship.  Our education programs provide considerable opportunities for interaction between peers within the classroom and during field experiences. The faculty is committed to interactive, multicultural and global approaches to instruction. Candidates interact with peers from different countries, different cultures, different traditions, and different ethnicities and those with different learning needs. These interactions take place in both a structured and unstructured environment. There are numerous group projects that interact around educational, community and global issues, i.e., walk for aids, breast health awareness, green habitat, and Whitney’s Lights for the Prevention of Violence Against Women. Every year our candidates are provided with opportunities to interact with peers from diverse groups. These candidates have toured, performed, and had educational exchanges between peer groups in countries such as South Africa, China, Serbia, England, and France. Last summer, candidates toured and performed in Germany. Another instrumental group lived at a Summer Music camp in Upstate New York. While there, they interacted with peers of diverse ethnicities and socio-economic backgrounds. These activities culminated in a grand collaborative performance. In addition, every year, at Kennedy Center, these candidates rehearse and perform with peers from throughout the United States. They also host and sing with seven-eight other HBCU’s  at Delaware State University.    4c.2. How diverse are the candidates in initial teacher preparation and advanced preparation programs? [Diversity characteristics in addition to those in Table 9 can also be presented and discussed, if data are available, in other prompts of this element.] Please complete Table 9 or upload your own table at Prompt 4c.4 below. Table 9   Candidate Demographics   Candidates in Initial Teacher Preparation Programs Fall 08 Candidates in Initial Teacher Preparation Programs Fall 09   Candidates in Advanced Preparation Program Fall 08 Candidates in Advanced Preparation Programs Fall 09  All Students in the Institution 09   Diversity of Geographic Area Served by Institution See Link Below  American Indian or Alaska Native 0 0  0 0  4   Asian 0 0  0 0   31   Black or African American, non-Hispanic 5 2  6 0   2470   Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 0 0  0 0   0   Hispanic or Latino 1 0  1 0   84   White, non-Hispanic 12 0  5 1   400   Two or more races 0 0  0 0   0   Other          75   Race/ethnicity unknown 1 0  1 0   545   Total Male 19 2 13 1     American Indian or Alaska Native 0 0 0 0 4   Asian 0 0 1 0  31   Black or African American, non-Hispanic 12 3 10 3  2470   Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 0 0 0 0  0   Hispanic or Latino 1 0 0 0  84   White, non-Hispanic 20 2 13 1  400   Two or more races 0 0 0 0  0   Other          75   Race/ethnicity unknown 0 0 0 0  545                 Total Female 33 5  25 4      Female          2184   Male          1425   Total 52 7  37 5   3609       Diversity of Geographic Area Served by Institution   4c.3. What efforts does the unit make to recruit and retain candidates from diverse groups?   The Unit engages in the continuous efforts to recruit candidates from diverse groups. Some of the efforts are listed below as follows: 1.  Participate in university Open House and Hornet Day’s activities 2.  Host an annual Future Educators of America (FEA) Day each spring    FEA chapters from the state of Delaware are invited to campus for a briefing, q & a on campus tour. 3. Building partnerships with various school districts – Graduates from our programs are employed across the state and region. These teachers assist the Unit in recruiting new teacher education students.   4.  Praxis Prep Classes, Plato Web online tutorial, and workshops presented by ETS representatives each year for Praxis prep 5.  STEP Scholarships for Delaware residents-covers full tuition 6. Majors Fair-March (recruit from within) 7. JROTC Day-March 8. Data base of student emails updated regularly to send information about activities and opportunities for students  4c.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to candidate diversity may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]  4d. Experiences Working with Diverse Students in P-12 Schools  4d.1. How does the unit ensure that candidates develop and practice knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions related to diversity during their field experiences and clinical practice? The Unit has multiple approaches to ensuring that candidates develop and practice knowledge skills and professional dispositions related to diversity during their filed experiences and clinical practice. The Unit imparts knowledge, skills and dispositions for diverse populations to candidate through all phases of clinical and field practice. Candidate’s early field experiences, placements are varied n schools that are representative of different gender, race, socioeconomic status, exceptionalities and ethnicities in the surrounding Dover Delaware area. Candidates must identify the needs of diverse students as they relate to lesson preparation and delivery in early field experiences and course practica. Candidate reflections and Mentor Teacher evaluations of each candidate’s EFE experience documents acquired knowledge, skills and dispositions appropriate to address diversity. All interns in the clinical phase of the program must successfully complete a teacher work sample/unit during the 14 week placement. The first component of the Teacher Work Sample (contextual factors) requires the candidate to identify the diverse needs and modalities of the learners. The factors are not only identified but are infused throughout planning, assessment and delivery of the unit. The interns also receive a combined total of 6 formal evaluations from university supervisors and site based mentor teachers that also identify the candidate’s knowledge, skills and disposition attainment for teaching diverse learners.   4d.2. How diverse are the P-12 students in the settings in which candidates participate in field experiences and clinical practice? Please complete Table 10 or upload your own table at Prompt 4d.4 below. [Although NCATE encourages institutions to report the data available for each school used for clinical practice, units may not have these data available by school. If the unit uses more than 20 schools for clinical practice, school district data may be substituted for school data in the table below. In addition, data may be reported for other schools in which field experiences, but not clinical practice, occur. Please indicate where this is the case.] Table 10 Demographics on Sites for Clinical Practice in Initial and Advanced Programs  4d.3. How does the unit ensure that candidates use feedback from peers and supervisors to reflect on their skills in working with students from diverse groups? The unit provides several opportunities for candidates to reflect upon interactions with diverse populations. The interns’ evaluation feedback from evaluators and informal discussions are initiated during the 12-400 seminars. Interns share their experiences and are given the task to formulate practical solutions that peers can assess. The site based mentor teacher and the university supervisors maintain both formal and informal communications that assist teacher interns develop strategies for instruction of diverse populations at the school sites. During the construction of the teacher work sample, interns discuss their individual classroom contextual factors and how they plan to address the diversity of students. The final evaluation of the teacher work sample, intern surveys and teaching evaluations are discussed with students at the exit interview to ensure students are knowledgeable and comfortable working with diverse populations.   4d.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the diversity of P-12 students in schools in which education candidates do their field experiences and clinical practice may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.] The Unit assures that teacher candidates are placed in a diverse array of internship settings. The Unit’s partners range from high needs to low needs schools in urban and rural settings. The following table indicates this range of settings by number of candidates from Fall 07 to Spring 09.  DEEDS School Profile Link    Optional Diversity-Based Report on Field Experience 12-400 200801 - Fall 2007 DATA FOR : School District Based Diversity District Name District Code Number of Placements Baltimore County School District (Loch Raven H.S.) 973 1 Capital School District 13 2 Smyrna School District 24 2 Sussex Technical School District 40 1 DATA FOR : School Based Diversity School Name School Code District Name District Code School Status Number of Placements John Bassett Moore School 686 Smyrna School District 24 Public 1 Sandra Thorstenson 1 Loch Raven High School 973 Baltimore County School District (Loch Raven H.S.) 973 Public 1 John Hanley 1 Smyrna Kindergarten Center 683 Smyrna School District 24 Public 1 Chrystal Mattox 1 South Dover Elementary School 634 Capital School District 13 Public 2 Kim Burrows 1 Sara Bushey 1 Sussex Technical High School 770 Sussex Technical School District 40 Public 1 Michelle Billings 1  DATA FOR : Course Based Diversity Term Course Number Course Name Section Number of Students Enrolled 200801 12-400-00 PRE SER TCHG & SEMINAR 12-400-00 9                         Diversity-Based Report on Field Experience Placement 12-400 200803 - Spring 2008 DATA FOR : School District Based Diversity District Name District Code Number of Placements Academy of Dover Charter School 85 1 Caesar Rodney School District 10 2 Capital School District 13 4 Colonial School District 34 1 Lake Forest School District 15 1 Polytech School District 39 1 Smyrna School District 24 1 DATA FOR : School Based Diversity School Name School Code District Name District Code School Status Number of Placements Academy of Dover Charter School 584 Academy of Dover Charter School 85 Private 1 Danielle Mackey 1 Booker T. Washington Elementary School 636 Capital School District 13 Public 3 Krista Siefert 1 Sylvia Tolson 1 Yvette Davenport 1 Central Middle School 644 Capital School District 13 Public 1 Melissa Amzibel 1 Clayton Elementary School 680 Smyrna School District 24 Public 1 Irene Hrycushko 1 Lake Forest North Elementary School 660 Lake Forest School District 15 Public 1 Ladetrich Macklin 1     Diversity-Based Report on Field Experience 12-400 200903 - Spring 2009 DATA FOR : School District Based Diversity District Name District Code Number of Placements Caesar Rodney School District 10 2 Capital School District 13 13 Red Clay Consolidated School District 32 2 Smyrna School District 24 1 St. Thomas Moore Preparatory Academy 2009 1 DATA FOR : School Based Diversity School Name School Code District Name District Code School Status Number of Placements Booker T. Washington Elementary School 636 Capital School District 13 Public 2 Latisha Robinson 1 Yvette Davenport 1 Dover High School 648 Capital School District 13 Public 3 Kristin Lupo 1 Robert Healy 1 Shawn Plews 1 Fairview Elementary School 638 Capital School District 13 Public 1 Jennifer Gray 1 Hartly Elementary School 640 Capital School District 13 Public 1 Sandy Bolyard 1 Nellie Hughes Stokes Elementary School 616 Caesar Rodney School District 10 Public 1 Lori Horton 1 North Dover Elementary School 635 Capital School District 13 Public 4 Julie Tyre 2 Rebecca Swatski 2 Smyrna High School 688 Smyrna School District 24 Public 1 Barbara Simmens 1   1. What does your unit do particularly well related to Standard 4? Diversity is one of the strategic priorities of Delaware State University. The Unit has made extraordinary efforts in celebrating diversity in several ways, beginning with focus on its Conceptual Framework, faculty members are committed to address diversity within social, cultural, economic, and political concerns by infusing diversity throughout all programs within the unit, and continually strives to work toward candidates developing cultural competence. The Unit provides a Unit-wide required course at both initial and advance levels that focuses on diversity and its implications for teaching and learning. At both levels, students are required to research and present their findings to peers and faculty. This experience provides students with the opportunity to question their own beliefs, values, preconceived notions, and, to develop more global perspectives regarding cultural differences and commonalities. The Transition Partnership Project between Delaware State University and Caesar Rodney School District, located on campus in Delaware Hall, provides a unique opportunity for our students to observe and work with high school students who have disabilities, enabling them in making smooth transitions to adult living and careers. As a consequence of Memorandum of Understanding with universities in other countries, the Unit has been fortunate to host visiting scholars in teaching and research within the Unit.   2. What research related to Standard 4 is being conducted by the unit or its faculty?  (4d.4.1)Achievement Gap Research Located in TK20 Exhibit Room (4d.4.2)Achievement Gap Research Article  Located in TK20 Exhibit Room Exhibits 1.      Curriculum components that address diversity issues (This might be a matrix that shows diversity components in required courses.) https://bnrweb.desu.edu/dsu/kiosk/course_cat.html 2.      List of proficiencies related to diversity that candidates are expected to develop (TWS Contextual Factors Located on TK20) 3.      Assessment instruments and scoring guides related to diversity (Cross-reference with Standard 1 as appropriate.) (Located on TK20) 4.      Summary of data from assessments of candidate performance related to diversity. (Cross-reference with Standard 1 as appropriate.) See table 1b.4: TWS - ST Data Sp 09-SP10. 5.      Unit policies, practices, and/or procedures that facilitate experiences with faculty from diverse groups http://www.desu.edu/fact-book-2009-10 6.      Demographics on diversity of faculty, including but not limited to race/ethnicity and gender http://www.desu.edu/fact-book-2009-10 7.      Policies and practices for recruiting and retaining a diverse faculty (Located in EH 109, Diversity Plan) 8.      Unit policies, practices, and/or procedures that facilitate experiences with candidates from diverse groups   9.      Demographics of candidates, including but not limited to race/ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status  Diversity of Geographic Area Served by Institution 10.  Policies and practices for recruiting and retaining diverse candidates 11.  Unit policies, practices, and/or procedures that facilitate experiences with students from diverse groups See 4.c.3 12.  Demographics of the student population in the schools in which candidates are placed, including but not limited to race/ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, English language learners and students with disabilities  

NCATE

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The Education Department at Delaware State University is pleased to announce its application for the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher education (NCATE) reaffirmation.  The Department received its initial accreditation in 1998 and was reaffirmed in 2003. The NCATE process ensures that accredited institutions have met high and rigorous standards of accountability for their teacher education programs. This process also provides an opportunity for teacher education programs to thoroughly examine their mission, goals, objectives, teaching strategies, faculty qualifications, assessment practices and performance outcomes. Although the NCATE on-site visit takes place every seven years, the teacher education program, which includes P-12 preparations, is in a continuous assessment process that provides the highest quality programs of study students. The purpose of NCATE accreditation processes is to provide assurance to the public such that professionally determined standards have been met, thereby validating the programs offered by such institutions. Graduates from NCATE-accredited schools of education master the subject matter and possess a variety of strategies to teach it effectively.  In this case, graduates can articulate why they select a particular instructional strategy; are able to manage classrooms with students from many different backgrounds; are able to use technology as an instructional tool; are reflective of their own practices and make appropriate changes; and have had a number of diverse clinical experiences in P-12 schools and studied under master teachers during a systematically designed field.  The NCATE Board of examiners is scheduled to visit our campus in March, 2011. The following six standards will be used to evaluate the unit programs: Institutional Report Overview Standard 1 Candidate Knowledge for Teacher Candidates Standard 2 Assessment System and Unit Evaluation Standard 3 Field Experiences and Clinical Practice Standard 4 Diversity Standard 5 Faculty Qualifications, Performance, and Development Standard 6 Unit Governance and Resources  
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Title II Report on Teacher Preparation 02-03

Scholars Teacher Education Program

Occupational Vocational Teacher Education (Secondary)

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  Upon completion of this major, graduates will be prepared to demonstrate competence in planning, delivery and evaluating curriculum and instruction; utilize effective interpersonal communication skills and multicultural understandings; fulfill a professional role in the school and in the community; integrate theories of teaching and learning and translate these into practice; utilize technology to enhance the teaching and learning environment; and, demonstrate commitment to the concept of life-long learning. The Occupational-Vocational Teacher Education Program offers three options for students: A certification program for current teachers of trade and industrial education requiring 66 prescribed credits. Upon successful completion of certification requirements, students may continue in the degree program presented below. A degree program for persons who plan to become teachers and who have occupational experience and/or an associate degree in an area of certification who plan to become teachers. A degree program partnership for students involving Delaware State University, University of Delaware, and Delaware Technical & Community College. Students obtain general and professional education at Delaware State University and technical specialization at a Delaware Technical & Community College campus. Full-time students who register for 12 semester hours at Delaware State University in the Occupational-Vocational Teacher Education Program will be given authorization to take 6-9 semester hours at Delaware Technical & Community College at no extra cost. Full-time students at Delaware Technical & Community College will be given authorization to take 6-9 semester hours at Delaware State University at no extra cost per the 1973 agreement. The following specialization courses are offered in the occupation area: construction, electricity/electronics, energy conversion, power mechanics, graphics communications, materials, and manufacturing processes, cosmetology, health occupations, data processing, food services and child care and guidance. The Occupational-Vocational Teacher Education Program recognizes the 60 areas offered by the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI). Up to 24 credit hours of university credit may be awarded toward a degree upon successful completion of a competency demonstration test. Arrangements to take the examination may be made with the program director after completion of 30 hours. Degree to Certification Programs*. These courses are required by the Delaware Department of Education for certification for non-teaching students with military experience, or an associate in science degree, and for pre-service and in-service teachers beginning college after July 1, 1993. While not a degree requirement, teachers seeking trade and industrial special education endorsement to certification should take these courses:   12-311 Curriculum and Materials for Children with Exceptional Learning Needs 3 12-321 Assessment of Children and Youth with Exceptional Learning Needs 3   *These courses are required by the Delaware Department of Education for certification. Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Occupational Vocational Teacher Education (Secondary) First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 12-191 University Seminar I 1 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-101 Survey of Mathematics I 3 34-204 The African-American Experience from 1865 3 XX-XXX Science Elective *** 4 XX-XXX Occupational Course ++ 3     19 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 12-112 Instructional Technology in Education 3 12-192 University Seminar II 1 25-102 Survey of Mathematics II 3 36-201 Introduction to General Psychology 3 XX-XXX Science Elective *** 3 XX-XXX Occupational Course ++ 3   Required to take PPST/PRAXIS 19 Second Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 35-107 Survey of Computer Science 3 XX-XXX Arts / Humanities Elective *** 3 XX-XXX Occupational Courses ++ 6     18 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 12-313 Introduction to Education of Children with Exceptional Learning Needs 3 12-318 Multicultural Education 3 31-395 Global Societies 3 XX-XXX Occupational Courses ++ 6   Required to pass PPST/PRAXIS 18 Third Year First Semester     12-309 Classroom Management / Behavior Modification for Teachers 3 12-351 Occupational Practicum I 3 12-355 Effective Teaching Skills 3 12-360 Instructional Evaluation in Vocational Education 3 36-204 Educational Psychology 3 XX-XXX Occupational Course ++ 3     18 Second Semester     12-322 Teaching Reading in the Secondary School 3 12-356 Shop Organization, Management and Safety 3 12-361 Curriculum Development and Evaluation in Vocational-Technical Ed. 3 12-451 Classroom Practicum I 3 12-455 Methods in Vocational Education 3 XX-XXX Occupational Course ++ 3     18 Fourth Year First Semester     12-352 Classroom Practicum II 3 12-353 Vocational Guidance 3 12-409 Methods of Teaching Exceptional Students 3 12-415 Introduction to Vocational-Technical Education 3 12-452 Classroom Practicum II 3 12-456 Youth Organizations and Activities 3     16 Second Semester     12-400 Preservice / Student Teaching and Senior Seminar (Senior Capstone) 12     12   Total credits 140     ++ Occupational courses may be taken at Delaware Technical and Community College under partnership agreement between the two institutions simultaneously. Dual enrollment may constitute full-time student status. *** Elective courses from the General Education requirements  

Curriculum for Elementary Special Education (Gr. 1-8)

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  Upon completion of this program of study, graduates will be prepared to apply acquired knowledge of characteristics of various categories of mild/moderate disabilities; plan and manage the teaching and learning environment; select and implement age-appropriate assessment tools, diagnose learning needs, and evaluate individualized education plans; manage and monitor student behavior and social interaction skills; demonstrate knowledge of the foundations of special education; and plan a culturally responsive program that effectively communicates and collaborates with parents, teachers, and the educational community. Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Elementary Special Education (Gr. 1-8) First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 05-101 Introduction to Art 3 12-191 University Seminar I 1 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-105 Math for Teachers I 3 27-207 Earth / Space Science 4     16 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 06-101 Introduction to Music 3 12-112 Instructional Technology in Education 3 12-192 University Seminar II 1 23-110 Essential Topics in Biology 3 25-106 Math for Teachers II 3   Required to take PPST/PRAXIS 17 Second Year First Semester     01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 12-205 Child Growth and Development (Ages 0-14) 3 25-205 Math for Teachers III 3 34-201 American Civilization to 1865 3 36-201 Introduction to General Psychology 3 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3     18 Second Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 12-204 Philosophical Foundations of Education 3 16-257 Motor Development / Movement Education for Children, 0-8 3 32-201 World Regional Geography 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3   Required to pass PPST/PRAXIS 18 Third Year First Semester     12-313 Introduction to Educating Children with Exceptional Learning Needs 3 12-319 Mathematics Curriculum in Early Care and Primary Education 3 12-325 Language and Literacy Development 3 12-335 Developmental Reading in the Elementary Schools 4 12-324 Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Instruction 3     16 Second Semester     12-311 Curriculum and Materials for Children with Exceptional Learning Needs 3 12-318 or 31-395 Multicultural Education or Global Societies 3 12-342 Application of Technology in Special Education Classroom 3 12-346 Behavioral Analysis and Modification for Individuals with Exceptional Learning Needs 6 27-201 Physical Science Survey 4     16 Fourth Year First Semester     12-357 Effective Teaching Skills & Classroom Management 3 12-321 Assessment of Children and Youth with Exceptional Learning Needs 3 12-328 Teaching the Learning Disabled 3 12-409 Methods of Teaching Exceptional Students 3 12-416 Analysis of Student Teaching 1 12-421 Issues in Special Education and Transition (K-12) 3     17 Second Semester     12-400 Preservice / Student Teaching and Senior Seminar (Senior Capstone) 12      

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