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Internships Experiences

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Delaware State University
Early Childhood Laboratory School

Education & Humanities Center, Rm 116
7:30 am - 5:30 pm, Monday-Friday
302.857.6731

 
clwilliams@desu.edu

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Internships Experiences are a culminating experience, that provide extensive, as well as intensive, hands-on work experience opportunities. The intern, while a student, is expected to assume a responsible and comprehensive role that commensurate with that of a full-time professional. Credit hours assigned to internships range from twenty to two-hundred hours, depending on the requirements of various concentrations. Contact Ms.Williams at 857.6731 to discuss placement.  

Early Field Experiences

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DSU Student Early Field Experiences (EFE) The Early Field Experience (EFE) is a vital and integral part of pre-service teacher preparation.  First hand experience exposes students to the realities of the classroom.  In general, student experiences fall into one of the two categories below: 1) Observation that requires the students to quietly observe or participate in a teacher’s aide capacity. (10 hours) 2) Practicum enables the student to actively participate as directed and guided by the classroom teacher.  The student is involved in teaching activities in a variety of group settings.  The student’s college instructor visits the classroom during this experience.  (20-30 hours) It is the responsibility of the DSU student to meet with the classroom teacher prior to the start of their early field experience.  This meeting provides the opportunity to set a schedule that is convenient for the teacher.  Classroom teachers are not expected to alter their teaching styles, curriculum, classroom routine, or daily plans for the student.  It is our hope that this experience will be beneficial to the student, the cooperating teacher and the school. EFE Student Notice: Expectations for Observing/Participating in the DSU Early Childhood Lab School If students select or are selected to complete their Early Field Experience hours in the DSU Early Childhood Lab School: Please remember to sign in and out for verification of your visit. Obtain an EFE badge upon entering if you will be in classrooms. (Badge not needed if in the observation room) Have assigned Teacher, Ms. Mitchell or Mrs.Williams sign your verification form after each visit.   EFE Students are considered volunteers.  Volunteers will be present less than seven (7) hours a week, are not counted toward staff/child ratios and must be under the supervision of at least an Early Childhood Teacher, and under the direct observation of at least an Early Childhood Assistant Teacher, at all times and not be alone with the children at any time.   Observation Students will complete structured observations of the classrooms and children from the Observation Room.  Follow your course guidelines for completing your observation.   Practical Experience Students will pre arrange assessments and lesson plans with the classroom teacher prior to interacting with the children.  Follow your course guidelines for completing your assignments.    If you are required to complete multiple hours for different courses, contact your Instructors to determine if multiple sites are required.   Remember to dress appropriately to work with children and their parents. No open toed shoes, low-cut blouses, or short skirts. Please refer to the guidelines distributed by the Office of Clinical and Field Experiences.   No more than (4) four adults permitted per classroom. Please use observation room until the ratio of adults to children decreases.

Kid's Corner

Description: 

Delaware State University
Early Childhood Laboratory School

Education & Humanities Center, Rm 116
7:30 am - 5:30 pm, Monday-Friday
302.857.6731

clwilliams@desu.edu
 

 
 

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Kid's Corner Resources DSU Early Childhood Lab School Daily Schedules - Daily classroom schedules from Toddlers to PreK 5.  DE Early Learning Foundations for School Success - A plan to support the development of quality of early care and education system throughout the State. I Can Problem Solve - The DSU Learning Lab's management and guidance of classroom explained.  Delaware Help Me Grow- Info on promoting  healthy child development in the early years. Great Starts Delaware - Information and services to help give kids a great start in life. Parenting  - Some Useful Tips Healthy Children - Info on children health issues, safety & prevention, family life just to name a few. Immunization Requirement for the State of Delaware Child Fun - A cool site to go to when Kids are out of school, e.g.: school closures, weekends, evenings... Kids Delaware - A lot to read, but some really cool stuff; I'm sure you will find something of interest. A Safe Place to Learn and Play - Another cool site to go to when Kids are out of School.  

Meet our Team

Description: 

Delaware State University
Early Childhood Laboratory School

Education & Humanities Center, Rm 116
7:30 am - 5:30 pm, Monday-Friday
302.857.6731
clwilliams@desu.edu

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Mrs. Sands-Johnson Education: Bachelor of Arts in Psychology. Experience: Early Childhood Education; I have worked with children over the last 5 years at the Lab School as well as recreational summer camps. My areas of expertise are lesson planning and developing open communication with parents. About me:  “I am a very happy and outgoing person. I love to make everyone comfortable while making things fun and comical. I love to teach and learn from others every chance I get”. Ms. Sheila Sudler Education: Associates Degree Early Care and Education Experience:  Early Childhood Education:  15+ years; worked in many facets of Early Education including Military and Christian-based learning About me:  “I enjoy being with the children and seeing the growth process”. Ms. Connie Williams Education: Bachelor of Arts in Sociology minor in Psychology, Master of Education with a concentration in Early Childhood Education, ABD (Doctor of Philosophy in Education, concentration in Early Childhood Education) Experience:  Early Childhood Education: 20+ years serving children birth -5 years of age and their families.  My area of expertise is in early intervention as a child life/child development specialist.  I also serve as an instructor in Higher Education over the past 10 years. About me:  “I love photography, sports and teaching others the joys of working with young children.  I stay motivated through reading poetry and quotations”. Mrs. Doreen Scott-Baker Education:  I’ve received both my Bachelor of Science degree, (Early Childhood/Exceptional Education) and Master of Education Degree (Curriculum & Instruction concentration) from Delaware State University (DSU).  Prior to the current assignment, I taught in the Virginia Public School system for 3 years.  I also serve as an adjunct English Instructor for DSU’s Department of English & Foreign Languages. Experience:  Early Childhood Education: I have been the kindergarten/ pre-kindergarten teacher at the EC Lab School for ten years. About me:  “My hobbies include spending time with family, traveling, and running.  I also enjoy attending church, and providing outreach and missionary assignments to my community.  I am also a Mentor for the Capital School District.   I’ve been happily married for 15 years and have two wonderful sons!” Ms. Erin Mitchell Education: Bachelors in Elem. Education; Masters in Special Education and Early Childhood. Experience:  Started in Lab School as a volunteer in 2004, then later went on to be a student intern, graduate assistant and now a full time employee. Personal Information: “By learning you will teach, by teaching you will learn” (Quote Unknown). Ms. Denise L. Henry Education: Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education from Delaware State College Experience: 32 years of experience in the field of Early Childhood Education.  Almost 24 years serving the Delaware State University Lab School. Personal Information: I love spending time with my family, reading, listening to Gospel music and doing crafts.  My favorite color is purple and I love sunflowers. Favorite Quote: "Be nice to your friends and they will be nice to you."  " I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me" Ms. Jane Harris Education: High School College Prep Diploma and credit bearing courses in nutrition and health promotion Experiences: 27 years at the Early Childhood Lab School, 20 years at the City of Dover after-school program and 10 years for Head Start Favorite quote: “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.”              

Lab School Closing

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Weather Alerts In the event of inclement weather the following radio stations (WDOV 1410 AM, WDSD 92.9 FM) and television station WBOC channel 47 will advise of delayed openings, closings and early dismissals for Capital School District http://schoolclosings.delaware.gov/  and Delaware State University. You may also call 857-SNOW.  

Early Childhood Laboratory School

Description: 

Education & Humanities Center, Rm 116
7:30 am - 5:30 pm, Monday-Friday
302.857.6731 
clwilliams@desu.edu
 

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Mission and Purpose: As a university laboratory school, we aim to lead through excellence and innovation as we train undergraduate and graduate students in child development theory, research and its applications, while implementing national and state standards for quality toddler, preschool and kindergarten programs. We provide resources to parents and community members in child development and strategies for meeting the needs of special populations, including dual language learners. We welcome all university majors to observe, participate and learn in a nurturing, diverse educational environment. Philosophy: The Lab School believes in providing each individual child with appropriate tools, equipment and accommodations for enhancing their gross motor control, eye-hand coordination, speech/language development, socialization abilities, emotional development, and cognitive/intellectual skills. We believe in teaching children how to make choices and decisions, find solutions, share, respect, and interact with others harmoniously, and understand who they are as vibrant caring human beings and future contributors to society. At the Lab School, young children are offered meaningful experiences to help them understand the World around them. Children explore and discover their environment through touch, sight, sound, work, and play. Their learning experiences include classroom centers of interest, outdoor expression, and freedom of creativity while also participating in planned field trips to enhance their ability to process new information. Classroom Management & Guidance: The Lab School promotes positive behavior management techniques to prevent challenging behaviors. We arrange the classrooms for active exploration and individual decision making opportunities. Clear age appropriate class rules and expectations are posted and reviewed daily. We use redirection, active listening, modeling and positive reinforcement to encourage positive behavior. The staff is encouraged to give attention to and reward appropriate behavior. Inappropriate behavior is ignored. However, if the behavior cannot be ignored, the child is verbally reminded of the classroom rules and expectations. If the verbal appeals are unsuccessful, the child will be asked to move to a quiet area in the classroom away from the learning centers until he/she can behave appropriately. If the challenging behavior persists, a parent-teacher conference will be scheduled to determine strategies to improve age appropriate behaviors and consequences for inappropriate behaviors. In an effort to solve problems in a productive manner, children are guided through a series of lessons providing techniques and language specified in the Interpersonal Cognitive Problem-Solving Program by Dr. Myrna B. Shure (ICPS) also known as: "I Can Problem Solve." To learn more, please click here: A Reach toward Excellence

NCATE STANDARD 6

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  STANDARD 6. UNIT GOVERNANCE AND RESOURCES   The unit has the leadership, authority, budget, personnel, facilities, and resources, including information technology resources, for the preparation of candidates to meet professional, state, and institutional standards.  [In this section the unit must include (1) initial and advanced programs for teachers, (2) programs for other school professionals, and (3) off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, noting differences when they exist.] 6a. Unit Leadership and Authority  6a.1. How does the unit manage or coordinate the planning, delivery, and operation of all programs at the institution for the preparation of educators? Governance of the Unit is guided by a vision derived from a theme, shared by all members from across academic departments, which is: “Effective Teachers and Leaders within Diverse Populations for the Twenty-first Century.” The Unit manages and coordinates the planning, delivery, and operation of all programs for the preparation of educators. Policy is formulated and reviewed by the Council for Professional Education (CPE), a standing committee of the University Faculty Senate, and then forwarded to the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs via the Faculty Senate (Professional Education Unit Administrative Chart 1 and Chart 2). According to the By-laws of the CPE, the Chair of the Education Department chairs the CPE. The Vice Chairperson is selected by the Unit members and must be a member of a department outside of the Education Department. This organization structure enables the PEU to manage and coordinate all programs involved with the preparation of educators.    The CPE has jurisdiction over all polices and procedures related to teacher education; these include: (A) Approval of criteria for admission, readmission, and transfers relating to the Teacher Education Program (TEP); (B) Approval of all candidates for admission to the TEP; (C) Approval of criteria for admission of candidates to Student Teaching; (D) Approval of all candidates for admission to Student Teaching; (E) Forwarding of Administrative recommendations and actions to the vice-president of Academic Affairs through Faculty Senate; (F) Transmission of policy changes affecting teacher education curriculum and/or programs for approval of Faculty Senate; (G) Transmission of policy changes affecting Graduate teacher education curriculum and/or programs to the Graduate Council for approval.   6a.2. What are the unit's recruiting and admissions policies? How does the unit ensure that they are clearly and consistently described in publications and catalogues? The University assumes the responsibility for recruitment of students.  The Unit has the capacity to interact with the Admissions Office (which does recruitment) to participate in recruitment efforts. Admission to the University is determined by University policy. However, the Unit sets policies for preparation, retention, and admission into the Teacher Education Program (TEP).   The TEP requirements and student teaching guidelines are clearly and consistently laid out in the University Catalogue and PEU publications - Student Information Handbook 2008-2009. The handbooks address questions that prospective Education majors have regarding students' responsibilities, General Education prerequisites, PRAXIS, GPA, and the interview process. These publications are approved and maintained by the Dean of the College, Counsel and Dean of Graduate Studies, and the Professional Education Unit. The following activities are conducted by the office of student services in the College of Education Health and Public Policy: 1.)   Participate in university Open House and Hornet Day's activities, (2.)  Host an annual Future Educators of America (FEA) Day each spring FEA chapters from the state of Delaware are invited to campus for a briefing, q & a on campus tour, (3.) Building partnerships with various school districts – Graduates from our programs are employed across the state and region. These teachers assist the Unit in recruiting new teacher education students, (4.)  Praxis Prep Classes, Plato Web online tutorial, and workshops presented by ETS representatives each year for Praxis prep, (5.)  STEP Scholarships for Delaware residents-covers full tuition, 6. Majors Fair-March ((recruit from within), (7.)  JROTC Day-March, (8.)  Data bases of student emails are updated regularly to send information about activities and opportunities for students. The unit ensures that recruiting and admissions policies are clearly and consistently described in publications and catalogues.   6a.3. How does the unit ensure that its academic calendars, catalogues, publications, grading policies, and advertising are accurate and current?  The Unit ensures that its academic calendars, catalogues, publications, grading policies, and advertising are accurate and current through the work of several committees and administrative departments. These documents and procedures are university wide. The Unit provides input on changes or additions after they have been approved by the CPE.   The Academic Calendar Committee is comprised of Administrators, faculty and staff members from across the university. They interact with all components across the University to ensure that all events impacting academics are published in the university calendar. The Undergraduate University Catalog is developed based on submissions from the Unit. The Graduate University Catalog  is developed in the same manner. This process enables the university to have better quality control over its general information provided to the public.   6a.4. How does the unit ensure that candidates have access to student services such as advising and counseling? The Unit ensures that all students have access to student services such as advising and counseling. To ensure that support services are tailored to the needs of individual students, the Unit assigns an academic advisor to each student. A comprehensive list of advisors and advisees is posted in the Education and Humanities Building. In addition, the Unit has its own Office of Student Services which has an open door policy to all students at all times. Several clubs and professional organizations also act as resources for workshops, updates, and networking opportunities. The university also has a disabilities service office to support students with learning disabilities in accessing curricular. The university also has a full service counseling office that addresses relational and other issues students may have. This office is situated in the same location as the Unit.  Other university-wide support services are available from the Office of Mentoring and Advising as well as the Division of Academic Enrichment. These offices provide assistance through individual tutoring, group study sessions, academic success and study skill classes, workshops programs and courses, as well as assistance to students with learning disabilities. (On-line description of Academic Support Center and Office of Mentoring and Advising) and (Counseling Services)  6a.5. Which members of the professional community participate in program design, implementation, and evaluation? In what ways do they participate? The by-laws of the CPE clearly state the purpose, authority, membership, description and duties of officers, the meeting days of the Council, and the sub-committees (Vide: Council for Professional Education Bylaws). The CPE involves all faculty representing professional education programs as well as teacher candidates in the process of preparing “effective teachers and leaders within diverse populations for the twenty-first century.”  Partners who participate in the design, implementation and evaluation are Community Advisory Board, School Partners, teacher candidates, and alumni. Through regular meetings, all PEU members are involved in policy, program design, implementation, and evaluation.   Policy and program changes are directed by the “shared” vision and the DIRECT standards. Program design and modification is channeled through the curriculum committee of each respective department. The department then gets approval from CPE and from Faculty Senate. Implementation is managed by the department. In addition, each program conducts its own review and evaluation according to the standards set forth by the state Department of Education, NCATE, and respective professional bodies. Policy and program changes are documented in the CPE minutes which are maintained by the Chair of the Education Department. (Council for Professional Education minutes, located in room EH 109).   All proposed changes by department are shared with members of the Community Advisory Board, school partners, and alumni for their input. Their input is taken into consideration by the Unit in program design implementation and evaluation.  6a.6. How does the unit facilitate collaboration with other academic units involved in the preparation of professional educators? The collaboration with academic units involved in the preparation of professional educators is facilitated through CPE which has representation of all the program coordinators, department chairs and deans. Issues relating to curriculum revision and changes, clinical and early field experiences, exit criteria and other pertinent issues concerning teacher preparation in the specialty areas are discussed and resolved through collaboration of the CPE members.   6a.7. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to unit leadership and authority may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]  6b. Unit Budget  6b.1. What is the budget available to support programs preparing candidates to meet standards? How does the unit's budget compare to the budgets of other units with clinical components on campus or similar units at other institutions?   Unit Budget For a vision to be realized, financial support is vital. The University’s commitment to financially supporting the Unit is demonstrated in the dramatic increase of dollars spent per education major since 2007/8.  In 2007/8, 205 undergraduate and 87 graduate education students in the College of Education received $4,325.59 per student. In 2008/9, 159 undergraduate and 91 graduate education students in the College of Education received $7, 737.86 per student. In 2009/10, 205 undergraduate and 111 graduate education students in the College of Education received $6055.27 per student. The $1682.59 per student difference from academic year 2008/9 to academic year 2009/10 reflects a significant increase in education students (66) during a difficult economic year which resulted in budgets being decreased. However, it must be noted that there is still an increase of $1729.68 per student since the academic year 2007/8, so the quality of the programs has been positively affected.   The Unit budget for fiscal year 2010 is as follows: Operating budget $214, 225.00 Salary budget $1, 699, 239.97 STEP Scholar $200,000.00 Total budget amount $2, 113, 464.97     The Unit receives additional financial support for faculty enrichment from the Professional Development Fund, Academic Enrichment fund and Title III grants. Awards for the 2008/9 and 2009/10Academic Years are as follows:  2008/2009: Professional Development STEP Scholarship Academic Enrichment Title III Grants $5695.79 $200,000.00 $6557.88 $310,000.00    2009/2010:  Professional Development STEP Scholar Academic Enrichment Title III Grants $5175.50 $200,000.00 $2346.62 310,000.00     While the university provides base-level funding to support the quality of all its programs, some programs are better positioned than others. For example, Education had state STEP scholarship to support its students. On the other hand, Nursing Department receives specialized money from the State and the federal government to support curriculum, faculty and students relative their professional programs. Therefore, the total amount of resources available to such programs is contingent upon a number of variables.   6b.2. How adequately does the budget support all programs for the preparation of educators? What changes to the budget over the past few years have affected the quality of the programs offered? There are two types of budgets: basic institutional and specialized. The basic budget has assured a minimal level of functioning that supports a quality program with no frills. Over the past few years the Unit has been able to secure specialized funding. These consist of Title III and State Scholar Teacher Education Program (STEP) funds. With the specialized finding the Unit has been able to give more scholarships and to support equipment and technology upgrades. In addition to specialized funds the Unit has been able to augment development for faculty through Professional Development Academic Enrichment funds.   6b.3. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the unit's budget may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]  6c. Personnel  6c.1. What are the institution's and unit's workload policies? What is included in the workloads of faculty (e.g., hours of teaching, advising of candidates, supervising student teachers, work in P-12 schools, independent study, research, administrative duties, and dissertation advisement)? Full-time unit members, whose primary responsibility is teaching, are obligated over the Academic Year to carry a teaching load of twenty-four (24) credit hours, normally divided into two semesters of twelve (12) hours each.  Faculty members assigned to teach graduate courses receive 1.33 credit hours of teaching load for each credit hour of a graduate course.  Individual supervision (Independent Study, Student Teaching Observation, Internships and Field Placement) is calculated at two-third (0.67) hour of workload for each student supervised (CBA-12.2.1) Other supporting documents are located in room EH 109. By CBA faculty are obligated to provide a minimum of six clock hours across four day for advising, and office obligations.  The chair and the dean have the capacity to provide release-times and workload adjustments to support research and administrative assignments of faculty. In addition, workloads can be adjusted by the chair and the dean for relevant service with the mission and scope of the Unit and the college.  6c.2. What are the faculty workloads for teaching and the supervision of clinical practice? Unit members, whose primary responsibility is teaching, are obligated over the Academic Year to carry a teaching load of twenty-four (24) credit hours, normally divided into two semesters of twelve (12) hours each.  Faculty members assigned to teach graduate courses receive 1.33 credit hours of teaching load for each credit hour of a graduate course.  Individual supervision (Independent Study, Student Teaching Observation, Internships and Field Placement) is calculated at two-third (0.67) hour of workload for each student supervised (CBA-12.2.1)  For internships/clinical practice, the faculty workload rule is heighten in the proceeding discussion. More specifically, faculty members receive 0.67 credit for each student in clinical practice. Consequently if a full workload for faculty members for supervision of clinical practice would be six students (6 x .67 = 4.02). Related documents are located in room EH 109.  6c.3. To what extent do workloads and class size allow faculty to be engaged effectively in teaching, scholarship, and service (including time for such responsibilities as advisement, developing assessments, and online courses)? Workloads and class sizes typically allow faculty members to be engaged effectively in teaching, scholarship and service. Student faculty ration at the undergraduate level is approximately 14:1. When you take into consideration that the division of student services provides guidance and advisement to freshmen and sophomore students the advising loads on faculty is significantly reduced. This occurs because Unit faculty members are freed-up to provide guidance and advising to junior and senior students only. At the advanced level the ratio between faculty and students is much smaller than at the undergraduate level. With the exception of foundation courses, class sizes are usually capped at 25.   6c.4. How does the unit ensure that the use of part-time faculty contributes to the integrity, coherence, and quality of the unit and its programs? The Unit employs a strategy for ensuring that part-time faculty members contribute to maintaining the integrity, coherence, and quality of the Unit and its programs. Adjunct faculty members are screened by the personnel committee of the Department and Department Chair.  Adjunct faculty members participate in orientation sessions to prepare them to teach in the Unit. Courses syllabi are shared with adjuncts, and, students evaluate course delivery. If they are teaching two courses, they are encouraged to attend faculty meetings and professional development sessions.   6c.5. What personnel provide support for the unit? How does the unit ensure that it has an adequate number of support personnel? There are several personnel providing support for the Unit. First, there is a dedicated student services staff member for education majors. She is complimented by others in this Unit. Second there is a dedicated Technical Analyst staff member who is responsible to assist students with technology needs. Third, there is an office of Clinical and Field Experiences which is staffed with a Director, EFE Coordinator a secretary and a graduate assistant. Fourth, the Unit has three secretaries to support the chair, graduate programs and the faculty. Fifth, there are three additional graduate assistants who provide support to the Unit. Six, the Unit hired a Praxis Coordinator who is assisted by a student worker.  Outside the department the Director of Center for Teaching and Learning and the Center for Distance Learning personnel provide additional services. A list of support and other related documents are located in room EH 109. The Dean of the College of Education Health and Public Policy determines the need for support personnel and seeks funds from the university to fill the need.   6c.6. What financial support is available for professional development activities for faculty? There are several venues for financial support for faculty member’s professional development activities. The Unit has been fortunate in the past several years to secure competitive funding from Title III. As a result, funds have been available for professional development activities for faculty. As a result of the CBA, the Department provides $200 for professional development. The University also has Professional Development Funds (per CBA) that can be used for faculty development activities. In addition the University also has Academic Enrichment Funds from the Provost Office as per CBA. Faculty can apply for funds to enhance their academic growth. The table below indicated the funds that have been available to the Unit.  Professional Development Academic Enrichment Title III Grants $5695.79 $476.97 $310,000.00      6c.7. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to personnel may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]  6d. Unit facilities  6d.1. How adequate are unit--classrooms, faculty offices, library/media center, the technology infrastructure, and school facilities--to support teaching and learning? [Describe facilities on the main campus as well as the facilities at off-campus sites if they exist.]  Currently, classrooms are equipped with standard chalkboards and a limited number of WIFI internet access. Plans are in place to upgrade several classrooms with multimedia capability. Meanwhile, faculty can reserve rooms with whiteboards, an AV central console, and computer wiring in nearby buildings. The University has a plan for total upgrading and enhancing the entire Education Humanities Building (EH) with cutting edge technological resources. A large, attractive room is available in the EH building for student seminars and special functions. In addition, most of the graduate courses are taught in a classroom with technology resources. The pre-school laboratory which is conveniently located in the EH building has adequate technology and space. There is a dedicated computer lab that is used to teach instructional technology to teacher candidates. The Center for Teaching and Learning, that offers professional development programs for faculty, is located in an adjacent building and is easily accessible by PEU members.  All faculty members serving the Unit have adequate office space equipped with computers and other accessories. Faculty members of the Unit have adequate offices in the Education and Humanities (EH) building and Memorial Hall with easy access to the dean and the department chair. Other PEU faculty members have adequate offices within their departmental locations. Every faculty member has a personal computer with access to the internet and Banner, the electronic source of student data.  The William C. Jason Library Learning Center is a modern building located in the center of campus. The Library has 4,551 AV, 3,169 Video Library, 240,084 printed volumes, 268,561 microfiche, 30,489 bound periodicals, 35,067 E-books, and 39,811 e-journals. In addition, the library offers many support services for all students and faculty. The library has a modern computer lab with 100 state of the art computers, having access to many databases.  A comfortably furnished writing center, with ten new computers, is located on the second floor and is open Monday through Thursday 10:00 am to 9:00 pm and on Sundays 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm for a total of 48 hours per week. The Comprehensive Learning Center, also located on the second floor, provides credit courses and support services, including services for students with disabilities. These convenient and central services support education students in their endeavors to become effective teachers. One hundred computers are available in the library every day of the week during specified hours. In addition, the agreement with the public schools clearly states that teacher candidates “be given the opportunity and benefits of using public school facilities” (School District Agreement). Therefore, teacher candidates have adequate access to technology on the DSU campus and within the public schools.   A Technological Assessment System (TK20) has been introduced in the Unit in order to facilitate collection and analyses of candidates’ performance data. Each PEU faculty can use this system for assessment of students’ performance and for improvement of instruction. Program coordinators can use the assessment data generated through this system for program evaluation and improvement.    The Center for Distance Education and Learning Technologies, housed in the EH building, is convenient for faculty members who offer web enhanced and on line courses. The Blackboard Learning Management system allows faculty to electronically provide their students with necessary information and with an avenue to communicate with the professor or peers online. The Blackboard Instructors Lab at the Center has seven computers, software and cameras for recording video-instructional modules. The Unit faculty members use the on-line course development training facilities at this Center. The Center also provides Blackboard training to the teacher candidates on request by the instructors. The campus has an adequate number of computer labs available for student use. 6d.2. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to unit facilities may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]  6e. Unit resources including technology   6e.1. How does the unit allocate resources across programs to ensure candidates meet standards in their field of study?  To ensure candidates meet standards in their respective fields of study, a wide variety of resources are available for the Unit members including teacher candidates. The William C. Jason Library Learning Center provides a variety of resources and support. Instructional technology tools are available to both faculty and students throughout the campus.  Faculty and students have access to ongoing training and support in the area of teacher education and distance learning using the Blackboard learning system. Also, CampusTools HigherEd (TK20) is a technological assessment system being used by the Unit. This system provides a standards-based form of assessment tracking for data management for the PEU. The department chair judiciously apportions resources across programs to ensure that candidates meet standards in their respective field of study.  6e.2. What information technology resources support faculty and candidates? What evidence shows that candidates and faculty use these resources? Faculty members in the Unit have access to the internet resources, LCD projectors, Laptop computers and televisions. All these resources are integrated in various lessons as evidenced in course syllabi and through peer and chair observations. In this case faculty members model the application of technology in the lessons for candidates. As a result, candidates develop lesson plans that have evidence of various types of technology. Candidates also integrate technology in their presentation in classroom, and capstones (internship practices, action research/multimedia presentations, thesis and dissertations).  The Center for Distance Education and Technologies uses The Blackboard Learning system in which faculty members conduct threaded and non-threaded discussion forums with candidates.  In this case student are actively engages in using technology.  6e.3. What resources are available for the development and implementation of the unit's assessment system?  Technological Assessment System (TK20) was introduced to the Unit in order to effectively and efficiently capture, store, and analyze students’ and faculty data. A Technology Analyst was hired by the Unit to assist with the collection and analysis of candidates’ and faculty data. In addition, a Unit Assessment Committee was created to review the assessment tools for the Unit and its programs.  The integration of this technology assisted assessment plan has been very useful in monitoring teacher candidates’ progress through their professional preparation and coursework. An early alert system has recently been upgraded to help track the progress of all students and alerts advisors and instructors of potential shortfalls in academic success of students.  6e.4. What library and curricular resources exist at the institution? How does the unit ensure they are sufficient and current?  Faculty and teacher candidates have access to resources at the William C. Jason Library Learning Center. The library has aggressively pursued securing resources to support quality that are appropriate for methods courses. AV volumes have increased 15.3% since 1999. Printed volumes have increased 3.9% since 1999, microfiche by 87.5% and bound periodicals by 10.1% (Library Holdings Report). The library allocates budget funds specifically for departments (Library budget). In addition, the library maintains an upgraded computer lab. These computers have access to online databases. Librarians trained in technology are available to help students and faculty. The resources include inter-library loan and updated virtual references. The list below itemizes the resources: ·         AV                                   4,551 ·         video library                    3,169 ·         printed volumes              240,084 ·         microfiche                       268,561 ·         bound periodicals            30,489 ·         e-books                          35,067 ·         e-Journals                       39,811  6e.5. How does the unit ensure the accessibility of resources to candidates, including candidates in off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, through electronic means? The Unit ensures accessibility of resources to candidates through several electronic means.  The Unit faculty and students have unencumbered access to online teaching and learning tools as well as resources at off campus locations such as Wilmington and Georgetown Sites, which both are equipped with instructional computing labs. To support these resources and off campus learning, the Center for Distance Education and Technologies provides tools and resources for online instruction and learning. This center controls and implements the Blackboard learning management system for both online and web-enhanced courses. The University has now mandated the use of University e-mail addresses for all faculty and students. This mandate significantly improves the ability of Unit faculty members and students in communicating via technology. 6e.6. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to unit resources, including technology, may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]  Optional   1. What does your unit do particularly well related to Standard 6? There are six practices that the Unit executes particularly well. Shared governance is established such that every member of the unit has an opportunity to participate in policies involving curricular changes. The Unit has put in place a system of orienting adjunct faculty members such that the integrity of the quality of the programs is maintained. The hiring of the Technology Analyst has tremendously enhanced the Unit’s ability to manage its assessment process. In addition, the office of student services within the Unit has improved the advisement and tracking of education majors during their early matriculation years (first two years). Finally, the addition of the Praxis Coordinator and the acquisition of the Title III grant have increased the number of students passing Praxis I and II. Passing of these exams make these students eligible for admission into Teacher Education and Internship experiences respectively. Descriptions of the unit governance structure, including organization charts Unit’s Administrative structure, are shown in Chart 1 and Chart 2 2. What research related to Standard 6 is being conducted by the unit or its faculty? Exhibits 1.      Policies on governance and operations of the unit polices and procedures related to teacher education 2.      Descriptions of the unit governance structure, including organization charts Professional Education Unit Administrative Chart 1 and Chart 2 3.      Minutes of meetings of unit governance committees (Located in EH 109) 4.      Unit policies on student services such as counseling and advising advising and counseling and On-line description of Academic Support Center and Office of Mentoring and Advising) and (Counseling Services) 5.      Recruiting and admission policies recruiting and admission policies 6.      Academic calendars, catalogues, unit publications, grading policies, and unit advertising Academic Calendar Committee, Undergraduate University Catalog and the Graduate University Catalog 7.      Unit budget, with provisions for assessment and technology See Table 6.b.1. 8.      Budgets of comparable units with clinical components on campus or similar units at other campuses See Table 6.b.1. 9.      Faculty workload policies CBA-12.2.1 10.  Summary of faculty workloads  (Located in EH 109) 11.  List of faculty by full-time and part-time status (Located in EH 109) 12.  List of support personnel in unit (Located in EH 109) 13.  Faculty development expenditures Professional Development Funds,   14.  List of facilities, including computer labs and curriculum resource centers computer labs, The Center for Distance Education and Technologies Center for Teaching and Learning William C. Jason Library Learning Center 15.  Description of resources related to the unit assessment system and the use of information technology by faculty and candidates Technological Assessment System (TK20)     16.  Description of library resources, including electronic resources William C. Jason Library Learning Center 17.  Description of resources for distance learning The Center for Distance Education and Technologies        

NCATE STANDARD 5

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  STANDARD 5. FACULTY QUALIFICATIONS, PERFORMANCE, AND DEVELOPMENT   Faculty are qualified and model best professional practices in scholarship, service, and teaching, including the assessment of their own effectiveness as related to candidate performance; they also collaborate with colleagues in the disciplines and schools. The unit systematically evaluates faculty performance and facilitates professional development.   [In this section the unit must include the professional education faculty in (1) initial and advanced programs for teachers, (2) programs for other school professionals, and (3) off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, noting differences when they exist.]   5a. Qualified Faculty  5a.1. What are the qualifications of the full- and part-time professional education faculty (e.g., earned degrees, experience, and expertise)? Please complete Table 11 or upload your own table at Prompt 5a.5 below. [Professional Education Faculty information compiled by AIMS from earlier reports submitted for the national review of programs and updated by your institution (see Manage Faculty Information page in your AIMS workspace) can be imported into Table 11. For further guidance on completing this table, see the directions provided below (select link "click here") as well as in the Help document (click on "Help" in the upper right corner of your screen.] The professional educational full-time faculty is qualified to teach in the areas of their expertise. They earned their terminal degrees. Many of them have earned certification in their discipline area. The faculty has varied experiences in the areas of scholarship, teaching, and service as evident in the Table 11 data.  The faculty is engaged scholars who do research and publish in refereed journals, present papers in various state, regional, national and international conferences related to their discipline and write research proposals to grant funding agencies. Many of these faculty members have received awards and honors/fellowships both internally and externally.  Faculty members also review journal manuscripts and hold offices in leadership positions in regional and national professional associations.    Table 11  5. 1 Faculty Qualifications Summary – Faculty Information 5a.2. What expertise qualifies professional education faculty members who do not hold terminal degrees for their assignments? All full-time faculty members have terminal degrees to qualify for their assignments. The adjunct faculty is hired with a minimum of a Master's degree and on the basis of their discipline so that teaching assignments can be matched. These adjuncts do not teach at the master's level (600 and higher) or at doctoral level classes. When adjunct faculty are employed by Delaware State University, they have to produce an official transcript, vita, certification and letters of recommendation for determination of their area of expertise and experience in delivering effective instruction. On the basis of these criteria they are hired as adjuncts.    5a.3. How many of the school-based faculty members are licensed in the areas they teach or are supervising? How does the unit ensure that school-based faculty members are adequately licensed? The school faculty members are recommended by their principals. When they send in their completed applications forms, a copy of their licensure is also included.  The school-based faculty with whom the teacher candidates are placed for student teaching are all licensed.  So, 100% of this school faculty is licensed. When they are hired at a school, they have to provide official evidence of their degree and certification. The table of school faculty members lists those names where students were placed for student teaching assignments. Their licensure information is available on the DE Teacher Certification web index website.  Exhibit 5a. 3.  List of school faculty members, Files 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. Located in TK20    5a.4. What contemporary professional experiences do higher education clinical faculty members have in school settings? Many of the faculty members are involved in their State Associations, school curriculum committees, or they participate in Standards Development in their discipline, or they offer professional development workshops to the school faculty, as is evident from the faculty qualifications data. Full-time professional faculty members have a background in K-12 education and most faculty work regularly with students in K-12 classrooms and develop programs responding to the school district needs.  5a.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to faculty qualifications may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]  5b. Modeling Best Professional Practices in Teaching  5b.1. How does instruction by professional education faculty reflect the conceptual framework as well as current research and developments in the fields? In the Unit, teacher education courses reflect the D.I.R.E.C.T. conceptual framework. The conceptual framework is included on all course syllabi and shows alignment with the Professional Education Unit (PEU) standards. The key course objectives are aligned with Delaware State Teaching Standards and the Specialized Professional Association (SPA) Standards for each Program. Unit faculty keep current in their respective fields through professional development opportunities ( i.e. conference participation, workshops, internal and external grants, and other professional resources) that are well supported by Delaware State University.  As a result, faculty members remain current in their field and continue to grow and develop with cutting edge instructional methodologies that are evident in the classroom.  Both curriculum and instruction are aligned with the conceptual framework, and in keeping with the current research which emphasizes social construction of knowledge and skills and collaboration. The instructional strategies that are used for implementation of the conceptual framework are varied and include across the board methods such as Lecture, Discussion, Cooperative Learning Strategies, Instructional Technology (smart board), Demonstration, Problem Solving, Peer Observation and Evaluation, Videotape Evaluation, and Self-Critique. As far as technology is concerned many of the classes use Blackboard Learning Platform to supplement and enrich classroom experiences, Observation Software for Teaching Effectiveness Assessment, Electronic submission of written materials (i.e. reports, papers, projects) to TK20.  Some others use Labquest probes or calculator based rangers to collect and analyze laboratory data, access real time data during class from laptop computers.  Videoconferencing to connect students from all over the world to discuss case studies on environmental issues in real time is utilized.    Exhibit 5b. Candidate evaluation of faculty teaching and summaries of result  With five years of data Unit members are consistently rated high on candidates evaluation of faculty teaching.   5b.2. How do unit faculty members encourage the development of reflection, critical thinking, problem solving, and professional dispositions? The Unit Faculty, as evident in course syllabi, uses a variety of assignments to encourage candidates to think critically and perform systematic reflection. For example, during the student teaching experience all teacher candidates are required to complete the Teacher Work Sample (TWS); a document designed for teacher candidates to measure student learning in an effort to determine teaching effectiveness. More specifically, this assignment provides  teacher candidates with an opportunity to design an action research study on their students in which the teacher candidate must reflect on pre- and post-assessment data and then analyze the extent to which the students learned as a result of the teacher candidate’s instructional abilities. This particular assignment encourages significant critical thinking in the planning and implementation stages as well as significant reflection when analyzing and providing the results of the TWS. In addition, reflective journals, school based projects, online discussion groups, research readings, small and large group discussions, unit and lesson planning, and case studies are some of the many activities that the Unit faculty utilizes to promote additional reflection and critical thinking.  The development and assessment of professional dispositions is an integral and ongoing part of all teacher education programs. Teacher candidates are continually evaluated Unit-wide, and this approach has been aligned with the Unit’s conceptual framework, and the assessment of professional dispositions. (Link to Disposition Assessment and Dispositions Flow Chart) 5b.3. What types of instructional strategies and assessments do unit faculty members model? Unit faculty employ a wide range of instructional strategies in the various teacher education programs that include the following: lecture, lab exercises, case studies, videotaping and analysis, web-based instruction, in-class small and large group problem-solving activities, individual reflections, discussions, use of appropriate audio-visual materials for multimedia presentation, demonstration, guest speakers, cooperative learning activities, thematic topics, hands-on-activities, web-search on issues and topics, interactive journals, and more to address the varied learning styles of candidates. In an effort to meet the needs of all students (learners), faculty encourage and model the use of various teaching strategies as an example of what teacher candidates should consider in their practice with students in P-12 schools.  Currently, faculty has placed an extremely high value on assessment Unit-wide. The assessments are aligned with the instructional modes and the pedagogical knowledge, skills, and dispositions. The Unit’s rubric assessments have been modified and are used to determine their effectiveness for meeting student learning goals and measuring course outcomes. This past year, all Teacher Education Programs revisited their major program assessments and performed significant revision and alignment with all assessments and their SPA (Specialty Programs Area) or state standards.    Exhibit 5b.3 Instructional Strategies and Technology information   Located in TK20    5b.4. How do unit faculty members incorporate the use of technology into instruction? The Unit faculty uses and integrate various types of technology in their teaching. Most instructional practices use PowerPoint lecture, with Web-based Links (internet).  Some courses are taught through the Blackboard Learning System. Correspondences with teacher candidates are done through the University Email system. In addition videoconferencing with international universities for class discussion, online class delivery, and video streaming are incorporated in instruction.    5b.5. How do unit faculty members systematically engage in self-assessment of their own teaching? The Unit faculty members engage in a process of self-assessment through candidate evaluations of the classes they teach, Annual Reports and informal feedback from the candidates.  In addition, each faculty member is assessed by their peers and Department Chairs through classroom observation and through their own observations and reflection and through their Individualized Development Plans (IDP) which are roadmaps for improvement to overcome any stated deficiencies. Other informal ways are discussions among colleagues and/or any workshops they attend pertaining to assessment through the Center for Teaching and Learning.   5b.6. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to faculty teaching may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]  5c. Modeling Best Professional Practices in Scholarship  5c.1. What types of scholarly work are expected of faculty as part of the institution's and unit's mission?  The types of scholarly work expected of faculty as part of the institution’s and unit’s mission is specified in the Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA).The CBA, between the faculty and the Board of Trustees (BOT) of Delaware State University, outlines the types of scholarly work that would demonstrate the continued enhancement of the faculty qualifications. There are qualifications for appointment and for promotion for each of the levels, Instructor, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor and Professor, and more rigorous standards for tenure.    As far as the scholarly work required for receiving promotion: research, publication, and evidence of creative works are emphasized. Publication of scholarly books, monographs, and articles in refereed journals in the discipline are considered to be professional recognition.  Included in this category are external consultation, working with peers and advanced students on research and scholarly projects individually or in collaboration. Proposal writing to obtain grants to do research, teaching, and service are also considered invaluable in this category. Visibility and networking in the various societies of chosen disciplines in the form of holding office in national and state professional associations and providing service in various forms are also considered part of the scholarly work. The institution and the unit’s missions are served by research and good teaching and preparing the students to be able to work in a global society. Tenured faculty members are expected to be engaged scholars who are involved in scholarly academic work. Other forms of scholarship include grants and fellowship from external and internal sources, awards and honors from professional associations, and professional consultancies.    5c.2. In what types of scholarship activities are faculty members engaged? How is their scholarship related to teaching and learning? What percentage of the unit's faculty is engaged in scholarship? (Review the definition of scholarship in the NCATE glossary.) [A table could be attached at Prompt 5c.3 below to show different scholarly activities in which faculty members are involved and the number involved in each activity.] The faculty members are engaged in several types of scholarship activities. They are doing research and publishing in refereed journals, and writing chapters for books, or editing a collection of chapters for books. The faculty is also engaged in writing grant proposals so that grant money can be obtained to further research, teaching or service. Faculty members hold offices in the national organizations or regional organizations. Other faculty members contribute as judges in their discipline for competitions for k-12 activities. Still, others provide their expertise on the advisory board for student organizations or the Center for Teaching and Learning.  Faculty members are mentors to students to help them do research presentations for both the Honors Day Program and the McNair Program on campus.  Faculty members also serve on the Advisory Board of Journals and are manuscript reviewers.   Some faculty members participate in the State k-12 partnerships to improve teaching and learning.  Faculty also help the students in research presentations to participate in outside venues such as NASA Pre-service Teacher Conferences. Based on the evidence provided, 100% of faculty members are engaged fully in scholarship activities.    Exhibit 5c. 2. Faculty Scholarly Activities (Research)  Located in TK20 5c.3. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to faculty scholarship may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]  5d. Modeling Best Professional Practices in Service  5d.1. What types of service are expected of faculty as part of the institution's and the unit's mission?  The types service expected of faculty as part of the institution’s and the Unit’s mission are stated or implied in the Collective Bargaining Agreement. There are essentially three types of services: services to the University Community, service to the broader community, and service to the professional associations (professional community). Within the University, faculty members serve as senators on the faculty senate and they serve on the committees of the faculty senate.  In addition, these faculty members serve on various University, College and Department (unit) committees and task forces. Essentially, faculty members are expected to serve on elected committees, standing committees and ad-hoc committees. Many of the faculty members have served as elected chair of a university a committee, They have served on search committees for executive level administrators, on committees related to strategic plan, and Middle States Accreditation. In providing services to the broader community, faculty members serve on local, state-wide and regional boards of directors. They also provide time as consultants and volunteers to many organizations.  As for service to professional associations, faculty members serve in various capacities.  While many are members of their professional associations, some hold offices, others serve on advisory panels in their respective associations. The faculty also serves on editorial board, advisory board, and reviewers for journals and books and conferences.    5d.2. In what types of service activities are faculty members engaged? Provide examples of faculty service related to practice in P-12 schools and service to the profession at the local, state, national, and international levels (e.g., through professional associations). What percentage of the faculty is actively involved in these various types of service activities? [A table could be attached at Prompt 5d.3 below to show different service activities in which faculty members are involved and the number involved in each activity.] Faculty members are engaged in a wide variety of services to the community and to the profession. These include providing professional development workshops to teachers in schools, assisting in developing teaching modules for P-12 students for the state, reviewing manuscripts, serving on advisory boards of refereed journals. In addition faculty members engage in judging science competitions through the learned societies, and holding office in the professional associations. Faculty collaboration on improvement of education or Vision 2015 is also a significant contribution to the state. One hundred percent of the faculty is involved in service to either the department, or to P-12 schools and the profession.    Faculty members have traveled to other countries to assess education systems and build collaborations. In addition, the Unit supports visiting Education professors from other countries.  Exhibit 5d. 2. Faculty Service Activities  Located in TK20 5d.3. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to faculty service may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]  5e. Unit Evaluation of Professional Education Faculty Performance  5e.1. How are faculty evaluated? How regular, systematic, and comprehensive are the unit evaluations of adjunct/part-time, tenured, and non-tenured faculty, as well as graduate teaching assistants?  There are provisions in the CBA which spell out how the faculty will be evaluated.  A probationary faculty (tenure-track) is evaluated once a year by the Department Chair and two tenured peers of same rank or higher rank. The evaluation instrument used by the chair is very detailed, taking into consideration the teaching, scholarship and service components. The peer evaluation is based on the same three components of evaluation, namely, teaching, scholarship and service. The adjunct/part-time faculty is also evaluated by the same instruments in similar fashion.   The faculty is also evaluated by students for their teaching. Every course taught requires students to do an evaluation each semester. These evaluations are also used for promotion and tenure purposes. The tenured faculty is evaluated by student evaluations. The unit does not have any graduate teaching assistants. Therefore no evaluations are conducted for this group. It is mandatory that tenured professors be reviewed every three years as outlined in the CBA.  Promotion and Tenure Policies link: http://www.desu.edu/sites/default/files/2010-2015%20CBA.pdf 5e.2. How well do faculty perform on the unit's evaluations? [A table summarizing faculty performance could be attached at Prompt 5e.4 below.) The data indicated in Table 5.e.2 indicates that faculty members have performed well on the Unit’s evaluations.(See Table 5.e.2). The table presents one year of data that illustrates faculty performance based upon peer and chair evaluations.   5e.3. How are faculty evaluations used to improve teaching, scholarship, and service? The evaluations are used to improve all three areas; teaching, scholarship, and service, by addressing the deficiencies identified by the instruments. For this purpose, an Individual Professional Development Plan is developed by the mutual agreement of the chair and the affected faculty member to help fill in the gaps. A detailed plan, outlining the activities to be undertaken by the faculty member with the support of the chair are agreed to and implemented.   Summaries of faculty evaluations for the Academic Year 2009-2010 are attached.  Exhibit 5e 1 Sample of Faculty Evaluation Form (Chair and Peer)  Located in TK20 Exhibit 5e. 2. Summary of faculty evaluations  See Table 5.e.2 5e.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the unit's evaluation of professional education faculty may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]  5f. Unit Facilitation of Professional Development  5f.1. How is professional development related to needs identified in unit evaluations of faculty? How does this occur? The professional development is directly related to the needs identified in the Unit evaluation of the faculty. Analysis of faculty evaluations, the department chair identifies areas for faculty professional development. Plans are then designed and/or developed for addressing deficiencies.  Some of the needs might relate to a small grouping, in this instance, the Unit uses entities like Center for Teaching and Learning, to address those deficiencies. Some of the needs might be individual in nature. Then with the support of the chair, faculty members are supported through Academic Enrichment Funds, Professional Development Fund, and Departmental Funds to acquire the knowledge, skills, etc. to remove any deficiencies.    5f.2. What professional development activities are offered to faculty related to performance assessment, diversity, technology, emerging practices, and/or the unit's conceptual framework?  There a number of professional development activities offered to faculty related to performance assessment, diversity, technology, emerging practices, and/or the Unit’s conceptual framework. There are workshops and professional forums offered through the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) on assessment, best practices, performance assessment, diversity issues, effective classroom management, and technology.    Workshops are offered to faculty members by the Distance Learning Center for developing web-enhanced courses and for developing on-line courses on Blackboard.  Sponsored Research Office offers workshops on all facets of grant writing to enhance and educate the faculty in the nuances of the process and procedures used by governmental agencies.  The College offers workshops to the Professional Education Unit related to the NCATE requirements. The Education Department has provided opportunities to faculty to attend various technology workshops related to TK20 (comprehensive performance based assessment system) training at other sites and colleges. In addition, when new equipment has been purchased, training workshops are usually offered to acquaint the users.  Exhibit 5f. 2.1 Professional Development offered by unit   Exhibit 5f. 2.2 Professional Development offered by unit   5f.3. How often does faculty participate in professional development activities both on and off campus? [Include adjunct/part-time, tenured, and non-tenured faculty, as well as graduate teaching assistants.]  Faculty members participate in the periodic professional developments based on their specific individual needs. The professional developments are offered on and off campus by various centers and/or organization in pursuit to respective those needs.  Faculty members attend conferences and present papers at least once a year, if not more.  They also take part in training relevant to their interests and department needs.  Both tenured and non-tenured faculty members participate in these activities.  Adjunct and part-time faculty members are offered professional development workshops related to their duties and needs.  There are no graduate teaching assistants.   Unit policies related to professional development are consistent with CBA.  More details can be accessed in the pages 43-52 of the CBA via the following link: http://www.desu.edu/sites/default/files/2010-2015%20CBA.pdf (5f.3.1) Exhibit 5f.3.1 Faculty PD Participation   Located in TK20 (5f.3.2) Exhibit 5f.3.2 Faculty PD Participation   Located in TK20 (5f.3.3) Exhibit 5f.3.3 Faculty PD Participation   Located in TK20 5f.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the unit's facilitation of professional development may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]   Optional  1. What does your unit do particularly well related to Standard 5?  2. What research related to Standard 5 is being conducted by the unit or its faculty?    Exhibits 1.   Summary of faculty qualifications and assignments (See the Manage Faculty Information section in the institution’s AIMS workspace for an optional method of compiling this information for Table 11 in the Institutional Report.) 5. 1 Faculty Qualifications Summary – Faculty Information 2.   Licensure of school-based clinical faculty (e.g., cooperating teachers, internship supervisors) DE Teacher Certification web index; Exhibit 5a. 3.  List of school faculty members, Files 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. Located in TK20 3.   Summary of instructional strategies, including the use of technology, used by faculty Exhibit 5b.3 Instructional Strategies and Technology information   Located in TK20 4.   Candidate evaluations of faculty teaching and summaries of results Exhibit 5b. Candidate evaluation of faculty teaching and summaries of result 5.   Samples and summary of faculty scholarly activities Exhibit 5c. 2. Faculty Scholarly Activities (Research)  Located in TK20 6.   Summary of projects completed by faculty in service and/or collaboration with professional community (e.g., grants, evaluations, task force participation, provision of professional development, offering courses, etc.) Exhibit 5d. 2. Faculty Service Activities  Located in TK20 7.   Promotion and tenure policies and procedures http://www.desu.edu/sites/default/files/2010-2015%20CBA.pdf 8.   Samples of faculty evaluation forms Exhibit 5e 1 Sample of Faculty Evaluation Form (Chair and Peer) 9.   Summary of faculty evaluations Exhibit 5e. 2. Summary of faculty evaluations   Located in TK20 10. Professional development activities offered by the unit Exhibit 5f. 2.1 Professional Development offered by unit , Exhibit 5f. 2.2 Professional Development offered by unit 11. Professional development activities in which faculty have participated (5f.3.1) Exhibit 5f.3.1 Faculty PD Participation   Located in TK20 (5f.3.2) Exhibit 5f.3.2 Faculty PD Participation   Located in TK20 (5f.3.3) Exhibit 5f.3.3 Faculty PD Participation   Located in TK20 12. Unit policies related to professional development http://www.desu.edu/sites/default/files/2010-2015%20CBA.pdf        

NCATE STANDARD 4

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   STANDARD 4. DIVERSITY   The unit designs, implements, and evaluates curriculum and provides experiences for candidates to acquire and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates can demonstrate and apply proficiencies related to diversity. Experiences provided for candidates include working with diverse populations, including higher education and P-12 school faculty; candidates; and students in P-12 schools.  [In this section the unit must include (1) initial and advanced programs for teachers, (2) programs for other school professionals, and (3) off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, noting differences when they exist.]  4a. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of Curriculum and Experiences  4a.1. What proficiencies related to diversity are candidates expected to develop and demonstrate?  The proficiencies related to diversity that the Unit candidates are expected to develop and demonstrate are presented in the following narrative. The centrality of diversity is indicated in Delaware State University’s mission statement: “… the University serves a diverse student population with a broad range of programs in instruction service, and research (See Institutional Report – http://www.desu.edu/fact-book-2009-10 ).” (Documentation 4-1: University Mission Statement- http://www.desu.edu/fact-book-2009-10 ). Preparing students in all majors to interact professionally with people from other cultures fits with the institutional mission: “Making our Contribution to a Global Society" (Documentation 4-2: University’s Vision Statement).  The Unit has been extremely active in making diversity an institutional priority, and has identified four fronts simultaneously: student diversity, faculty and staff diversity, curriculum diversity, community diversity and inclusiveness (Documentation 4.3). In addition, within the outcomes of the conceptual framework for the Unit, standards are designed to develop specific teaching skills, competencies, and dispositions that relate to diversity.  The Unit standards are designed to develop specific teaching skills related to diversity. The following are performance indicators for the Standard (D) Diversity:  Teacher candidates will demonstrate awareness of (D) diversity issues that impact effective teaching and Learning.  Performance Indicator 1: Teacher candidates are aware of the types of diversity and their impact on the teaching/learning process.  Performance Indicator 2: Teacher candidates are able to identify and compile resources with respect to diversity that will enhance the teaching/learning process.  Performance Indicator 3: Teacher candidates will develop activities and teaching materials that reflect pluralism and global perspectives.  Performance Indicator 4: Teacher candidates will interact with diverse populations in a professional manner.  The Professional Education Unit Standards and their respective Performance Indicators are included in course syllabi (4:5: Diversity Plan See Exhibit Room EH 109; See Syllabi in Electronic Exhibit Room in TK20 Document Room).  4a.2. What required coursework and experiences enable teacher candidates and candidates for other school professional roles to develop: awareness of the importance of diversity in teaching and learning; and l   the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions to adapt instruction and/or services for diverse populations, including linguistically and culturally diverse students and students with exceptionalities? All teacher candidates are required to complete General Education courses, which include substantial exposure to diversity, such as, ENGL 201and 202 World Literature I and II, ENGL 205 and 206 African American Literature I and II, GEOG 201 World/Regional Geography, and the student’s choice of a Foreign Language (Spanish, French, Japanese, Arabic, and Fulani) ENGL 201 and 102 Foreign Language HIST 201 American History to 1865. In addition, foundation level courses have strands that deal with diversity, such as EDUC-204 Philosophical Foundations of Education, EDUC-318/395 Multi-cultural Education and Global Societies, and EDUC-313 Introduction to the Education of Children with Exceptional Needs. Methods courses in Education include strands and approaches that enable candidates to learn to individuate instruction based on student background, strengths and needs. Some examples are Differentiated Instruction, Response to Intervention, strategies for teaching English language learners. Practica experiences are attached to all Methods courses. During student teaching, Interns complete Teacher Work Sample components in which they are required to connect Contextual Factors with Assessment and Instruction. In addition, candidates’ dispositions are assessed using the Unit-wide rubric at three points throughout their education program, at foundation level, in Methods courses, and during their clinical experience.  The combined impact of the diversity strand in the General Education curriculum and the first standard of the Professional Education Unit (D) comprise a major focus on diversity throughout the Teacher Education Program (Documentation 4.6: Delaware State University’s Undergraduate Catalog-General Education Program).   Advanced students in the Unit are required to complete a course in diversity EDUC-640 Diversity in Education. These students are required to design and implement instructional lessons that accommodate the background of diverse learners. They are also required to critique journal articles related to diversity in teaching and learning.  Delaware State University has a formal agreement with the Caesar Rodney School District called the “Transition Partnership Agreement” (Documentation 4.8: Transition Partnership Agreement). This Partnership is designed to provide opportunities for teacher candidates and professional education faculty to engage in professional activities with P-12 special populations in their quest to enter the workforce (Documentation 4.5: Diversity Plan). Teacher candidates are involved in the Transition Partnership instructional, social and development activities.  The project provides teacher candidates with the opportunity to experience “hands-on” exposure in a laboratory setting to groups of P-12 students with exceptional needs.   Teacher candidates also utilize the Delaware State University Child Development Center (lab School) to engage in laboratory experience with diverse groups of young learners (from birth through kindergarten).  4a.3. What key assessments provide evidence about candidates' proficiencies related to diversity? How are candidates performing on these assessments?  The key assessments that provide evidence about candidate proficiencies related to diversity consist of the following: Methods courses provide adequate strategies for meeting the needs for English language learners, learners with exceptional needs, and culturally diverse students. Teacher education candidates demonstrate the application of that knowledge in core courses, content courses, the teacher work-sample and in student teaching. Based on the data collected, analysis of the diversity strand across components indicates that early on in their clinical experience some candidates had difficulty identifying contextual factors that impact student learning. However, by the assessment and planning components, this weakness was overcome. Analysis of student learning indicated positive impact on P-12 learning. Table 4.b.1 Teacher Work Sample Diversity Summary shows results across components. The assessments for the work sample and for student teaching evaluation include component sections on adapting and differentiating lessons for students, based on contextual factors (located in TK20 Document Room). See TWS Data 4.b.1 Diversity Summary. This table indicates candidates met the target level (8-10). With an overall minimum mean of 8.3 across four semesters of data; this indication that the Unit is performing well in these areas.  4a.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to diversity proficiencies and assessments may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]  4b. Experiences Working with Diverse Faculty  4b.1. What opportunities do candidates (including candidates at off-campus sites and/or in distance learning or alternate route programs) have to interact with higher education and/or school-based faculty from diverse groups?  The University provides many opportunities throughout the year to blend diverse groups of students, faculty, and community. DSU hosts traditional festivals, choral and band concerts, dance recitals, Art expositions, guest lecturers, and academic workshops. DSU faculty and students regularly attend NASA Sponsored pre-teacher conferences. The university hosts the Delaware State Science Fair (K-12). In addition, many Sports and Wellness functions are provided. In 2010, the Unit hosted the Statewide Future Teachers’ Conference.  Teacher Candidates interact with diverse Unit faculty, professional education adjunct faculty, faculty from other units within the institution, and school based faculty. This University is a microcosm of global society. The faculty in the Unit represents a wide variety of backgrounds in academic training, cultural experiences, and linguistic abilities.   (Documentation 4: Office of Institutional Research-Professional Educational Faculty). http://www.desu.edu/fact-book-2009-10 Chart 4.2.1 profiles the diversity of the Professional Education Unit Faculty by Gender.  Gender Diversity  Professional Education Unit Faculty Year Female Male Fall 2008 15 14 Fall 2009 12 18    Diversity by Racial/Ethnic Origin  Chart 4.2.2 is a summary of data related to the racial and ethnic origins of Unit faculty. In terms of professional education unit faculty members as reported in 2008 to 2009, African Americans comprise the greater percentage of professional education faculty members with Whites being second, Asian/Pacific Americans were third in terms of representation by racial/ethnic origin. Candidates interact with a diverse professional education faculty who come from five main different categories of ethnicity as demonstrated by the data in Chart 4.2.2.  Professional Education Unit Faculty  Year Alaskan Native/American Indian Asian/Pacific American Black, not Hispanic Origin Hispanic White, not Hispanic Origin Fall 2008 0 3 16 1 9 Fall 2009 0 4 16 1 9      Chart 4.2.3 profiles the adjunct Professional Education Unit faculty by gender for the fall semesters 2008 through 2009 (Documentation 4. 11: Office of Institutional Research-professional Education Faculty Adjuncts). http://www.desu.edu/fact-book-2009-10    Chart 4.2.3  Diversity by Gender Adjunct Professional Education Faculty Year Female Male Fall 2008 5 2 Fall 2009 7 1    Some variance is revealed by the fall semester statistics. This chart shows female adjunct faculty members outnumber male. by 2:1. Candidates interact with adjunct professors who are diverse in terms of gender. Diversity Plan located in EH109.    Chart 4.2.4 reveals that the adjunct faculty who interacted with teacher candidates was of diverse racial and ethnic origin. The highest number of adjunct faculty from fall 2008 to fall 2009 was white. Blacks comprise the second highest number of adjunct faculty.   Chart 4.2.4 Diversity by Racial/Ethnic Origin  Adjunct Professional Education Faculty  Year Alaskan Native/American Indian Asian/Pacific American Black, not Hispanic Origin Hispanic White, not Hispanic Origin Fall 2008 0 0 1 0 6 Fall 2009 0 0 6 0 2    School Faculty Chart 4.2.5  School Faculty Delaware Educator Data System (DEEDS) is a vehicle for tracking educators in the State of Delaware. It enables viewing credentials, ethnicity, specialty areas, and teaching performance. These factors can be considered when placing students with mentors for Early Field Experiences and Clinical Practice.  https://deeds.doe.k12.de.us/public/deeds_pc_findeducator.aspx Chart 4.2.5 is indicative of the diversity of the school faculty who interacted with teacher candidates during the last two years relative to gender. Analysis of the data reveals a diverse population of school faculty who interacted with teacher candidates during the past two years relative to gender.  Chart 4.2.5 Diversity by Gender Year Female Male Fall 2008 13 19 Fall 2009 24 13    4b.2. What knowledge and experiences do faculty have related to preparing candidates to work with students from diverse groups?  The knowledge and experiences that faculty have related to preparing candidates to work with students from diverse groups is varied. All Unit faculty members hold terminal degrees in their respective areas of specialization. All faculty hold continuing membership in the professional associations related to their areas of specialization. These organizations provide program structure and professional development for faculty. Some faculty members mentor candidates through student organizations, such as Council for Exceptional Children, National Association for the Education of Young Children, and National Middle School Association.  The varied experiences of the faculty have contributed to their preparation for addressing the candidates’ ability to work with students from diverse backgrounds. Examples of these experiences include: 1.) Teaching in an Orthodox Jewish K-8 School (Pittsburgh, PA), (2.) Teaching in an Alternative School (Columbus Ohio), (3.) Teaching in an Inner City Middle School, (The Bronx, NY), (4.) Membership in Friends of the Southern Law Center, (5.) Membership in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, (6.) Secretary for the Conference on Black Basic Education - Western Region, (7.) Member of the National Association of Black School Educators, and (8.) Member of the National Association of Negro Musicians.  4b.3. How diverse are the faculty members who work with education candidates? [Diversity characteristics in addition to those in Table 8 can also be presented and/or discussed, if data are available, in response to other prompts for this element.] Please complete Table 8 or upload your own table at Prompt 4b.5 below.  See table 8 uploaded at 4b.5   4b.4. What efforts does the unit make to recruit and retain a diverse faculty? As an equal opportunity employer, the University has maintained its position to recruit and retain diverse faculty. This process occurs through postings with diverse readership in journals such as the Chronicle of Higher Education, higheredjobs.com, and job announcements throughout urban and rural settings. In addition, the University’s data bank for minority faculty and staff from local, state and, national sources provides a list of possible candidates for search committees. 4b.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to faculty diversity may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]   Table 8  Faculty Demographics   All Faculty in the Institution 2008-2009  All Faculty in the Institution 2009-2010   4c. Experiences Working with Diverse Candidates  4c.1. What opportunities do candidates (including candidates at off-campus sites and/or in distance learning or alternate route programs) have to interact with candidates from diverse groups? The Unit provides multiple opportunities for candidates to interact within and across diverse groups at the undergraduate and advanced level. Some candidates interact with each other through participation in students’ organizations (Teachers in Progress, Student National Educational Association, Council for Exceptional Children, Kappa Delta Pi) and others have the opportunity to interact with each other during internship seminars throughout the student teaching experience. These seminars allow students to share ideas and experiences, and reflect on successful teaching and learning experiences.   Candidates in Advanced Programs are required to demonstrate diversity competences similar to those in the licensure preparation programs. Advanced level candidates attend summer seminars where their research proposals are shared and feedback is provided by a diverse professional audience from numerous intuitions. Advance candidates’ research activities are presented to a panel of diverse faculty members. In addition, advance candidates complete course based field projects that expose them to diverse settings in order to meet specific course performance standards required by the Unit. These course field based experiences include strategic planning, technology policy planning, and a internship.   Our education programs provide considerable opportunities for interaction between peers within the classroom and during field experiences. The faculty is committed to interactive, multicultural and global approaches to instruction. Candidates interact with peers from different countries, different cultures, different traditions, and different ethnicities and those with different learning needs. These interactions take place in both a structured and unstructured environment. There are numerous group projects that interact around educational, community and global issues, i.e., walk for aids, breast health awareness, green habitat, and Whitney’s Lights for the Prevention of Violence Against Women.  Every year our candidates are provided with opportunities to interact with peers from diverse groups. These candidates have toured, performed, and had educational exchanges between peer groups in countries such as South Africa, China, Serbia, England, and France. Last summer, candidates toured and performed in Germany. Another instrumental group lived at a Summer Music camp in Upstate New York. While there, they interacted with peers of diverse ethnicities and socio-economic backgrounds. These activities culminated in a grand collaborative performance. In addition, every year, at Kennedy Center, these candidates rehearse and perform with peers from throughout the United States. They also host and sing with seven-eight other HBCU’s  at Delaware State University.      4c.2. How diverse are the candidates in initial teacher preparation and advanced preparation programs? [Diversity characteristics in addition to those in Table 9 can also be presented and discussed, if data are available, in other prompts of this element.] Please complete Table 9 or upload your own table at Prompt 4c.4 below. Table 9 Located in TK20 Exhibit Room  Candidate Demographics Diversity of Geographic Area Served by Institution  4c.3. What efforts does the unit make to recruit and retain candidates from diverse groups? The Unit engages in the continuous efforts to recruit candidates from diverse groups. Some of the efforts are listed below as follows:  1.  Participate in university Open House and Hornet Day’s activities  2.  Host an annual Future Educators of America (FEA) Day each spring    FEA chapters from the state of Delaware are invited to campus for a briefing, q & a on campus tour.  3. Building partnerships with various school districts – Graduates from our programs are employed across the state and region. These teachers assist the Unit in recruiting new teacher education students.    4.  Praxis Prep Classes, Plato Web online tutorial, and workshops presented by ETS representatives each year for Praxis prep  5.  STEP Scholarships for Delaware residents-covers full tuition  6. Majors Fair-March (recruit from within)  7. JROTC Day-March  8. Data base of student emails updated regularly to send information about activities and opportunities for students   4c.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to candidate diversity may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]  4d. Experiences Working with Diverse Students in P-12 Schools   4d.1. How does the unit ensure that candidates develop and practice knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions related to diversity during their field experiences and clinical practice? The Unit has multiple approaches to ensuring that candidates develop and practice knowledge skills and professional dispositions related to diversity during their filed experiences and clinical practice. The Unit imparts knowledge, skills and dispositions for diverse populations to candidate through all phases of clinical and field practice. Candidate’s early field experiences, placements are varied n schools that are representative of different gender, race, socioeconomic status, exceptionalities and ethnicities in the surrounding Dover Delaware area. Candidates must identify the needs of diverse students as they relate to lesson preparation and delivery in early field experiences and course practica. Candidate reflections and Mentor Teacher evaluations of each candidate’s EFE experience documents acquired knowledge, skills and dispositions appropriate to address diversity. All interns in the clinical phase of the program must successfully complete a teacher work sample/unit during the 14 week placement. The first component of the Teacher Work Sample (contextual factors) requires the candidate to identify the diverse needs and modalities of the learners. The factors are not only identified but are infused throughout planning, assessment and delivery of the unit. The interns also receive a combined total of 6 formal evaluations from university supervisors and site based mentor teachers that also identify the candidate’s knowledge, skills and disposition attainment for teaching diverse learners.    4d.2. How diverse are the P-12 students in the settings in which candidates participate in field experiences and clinical practice? Please complete Table 10 or upload your own table at Prompt 4d.4 below. [Although NCATE encourages institutions to report the data available for each school used for clinical practice, units may not have these data available by school. If the unit uses more than 20 schools for clinical practice, school district data may be substituted for school data in the table below. In addition, data may be reported for other schools in which field experiences, but not clinical practice, occur. Please indicate where this is the case.]   Table 10 Demographics on Sites for Clinical Practice in Initial and Advanced Programs  4d.3. How does the unit ensure that candidates use feedback from peers and supervisors to reflect on their skills in working with students from diverse groups? The unit provides several opportunities for candidates to reflect upon interactions with diverse populations. The interns’ evaluation feedback from evaluators and informal discussions are initiated during the 12-400 seminars. Interns share their experiences and are given the task to formulate practical solutions that peers can assess. The site based mentor teacher and the university supervisors maintain both formal and informal communications that assist teacher interns develop strategies for instruction of diverse populations at the school sites. During the construction of the teacher work sample, interns discuss their individual classroom contextual factors and how they plan to address the diversity of students. The final evaluation of the teacher work sample, intern surveys and teaching evaluations are discussed with students at the exit interview to ensure students are knowledgeable and comfortable working with diverse populations.    4d.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the diversity of P-12 students in schools in which education candidates do their field experiences and clinical practice may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.] The Unit assures that teacher candidates are placed in a diverse array of internship settings. The Unit’s partners range from high needs to low needs schools in urban and rural settings. The following table indicates this range of settings by number of candidates from Fall 07 to Spring 09.  DEEDS School Profile Link  Optional Diversity-Based Report on Field Experience Located in TK20 Exhibit Room 1. What does your unit do particularly well related to Standard 4? Diversity is one of the strategic priorities of Delaware State University. The Unit has made extraordinary efforts in celebrating diversity in several ways, beginning with focus on its Conceptual Framework, faculty members are committed to address diversity within social, cultural, economic, and political concerns by infusing diversity throughout all programs within the unit, and continually strives to work toward candidates developing cultural competence. The Unit provides a Unit-wide required course at both initial and advance levels that focuses on diversity and its implications for teaching and learning. At both levels, students are required to research and present their findings to peers and faculty. This experience provides students with the opportunity to question their own beliefs, values, preconceived notions, and, to develop more global perspectives regarding cultural differences and commonalities. The Transition Partnership Project between Delaware State University and Caesar Rodney School District, located on campus in Delaware Hall, provides a unique opportunity for our students to observe and work with high school students who have disabilities, enabling them in making smooth transitions to adult living and careers. As a consequence of Memorandum of Understanding with universities in other countries, the Unit has been fortunate to host visiting scholars in teaching and research within the Unit.   2. What research related to Standard 4 is being conducted by the unit or its faculty?  (4d.4.1)Achievement Gap Research Located in TK20 Exhibit Room (4d.4.2)Achievement Gap Research Article  Located in TK20 Exhibit Room Exhibits 1.      Curriculum components that address diversity issues (This might be a matrix that shows diversity components in required courses.)  2.      List of proficiencies related to diversity that candidates are expected to develop (TWS Contextual Factors Located on TK20) 3.      Assessment instruments and scoring guides related to diversity (Cross-reference with Standard 1 as appropriate.) (Located on TK20) 4.      Summary of data from assessments of candidate performance related to diversity. (Cross-reference with Standard 1 as appropriate.) See table 1b.4: TWS - ST Data Sp 09-SP10. 5.      Unit policies, practices, and/or procedures that facilitate experiences with faculty from diverse groups http://www.desu.edu/fact-book-2009-10 6.      Demographics on diversity of faculty, including but not limited to race/ethnicity and gender http://www.desu.edu/fact-book-2009-10 7.      Policies and practices for recruiting and retaining a diverse faculty (Located in EH 109, Diversity Plan) 8.      Unit policies, practices, and/or procedures that facilitate experiences with candidates from diverse groups   9.      Demographics of candidates, including but not limited to race/ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status  Diversity of Geographic Area Served by Institution 10.  Policies and practices for recruiting and retaining diverse candidates 11.  Unit policies, practices, and/or procedures that facilitate experiences with students from diverse groups See 4.c.3 12.  Demographics of the student population in the schools in which candidates are placed, including but not limited to race/ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, English language learners and students with disabilities        

NCATE STANDARD 3

Body: 
   STANDARD 3. FIELD EXPERIENCES AND CLINICAL PRACTICE   The unit and its school partners design, implement, and evaluate field experiences and clinical practice so that teacher candidates and other school professionals develop and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn.  [In this section the unit must include (1) initial and advanced programs for teachers, (2) programs for other school professionals, and (3) off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, noting differences when they exist.]   3a. Collaboration between Unit and School Partners   3a.1. Who are the unit's partners in the design, delivery, and evaluation of the unit's field and clinical experiences? Introduction The Unit’s Clinical and Field Experience process is an important component of the teacher education program. Teacher candidates and interns have the opportunity to participate in practical experiences during the different phases of the program. The unit has a variety of diverse settings for the teacher candidates and interns. Through effective collaboration with many public school partners, The Unit is able to design, implement and evaluate student’s progress toward becoming effective teaching professionals.      3(a) Collaboration between unit and school partners  1.     Who are the unit’s partners in the design, delivery, and evaluation of the  unit’s field and clinical experiences? The unit involves both primary and secondary school placements in the design, delivery and evaluation of clinical and field experiences. There are 19 public school districts within the state of Delaware. The university collaborates with all Delaware school districts; however, the majority of our students are placed in Capital, Caesar Rodney, Smyrna, Poly tech, Red Clay, Brandywine, Christina, Milford and Lake Forest school districts.  There are also private and charter sites, such as the Academy of Dover and Eastside Charter of Wilmington, that support candidates in practical experiences. Schools that are selected as internship and practica sites for candidates must adhere to the quality standards of Delaware certification regulations as well as meet the expectations of the Unit. (See 3a-1.1)- Delaware collaborative P-12 Schools Listings Delaware State University maintains collaborative agreements that explain the policies and procedures for clinical and field experiences for the candidates. Quarterly meetings with district office, administrators for curriculum, human resources and policy consultants help to guide decision making for the teacher preparation unit .(See 3a1.2)-Quarterly meeting agendas. In the advanced programs the students are directed to conduct the internships that are appropriate to their program of study within their home schools or surrounding approved venues. Public school sites listed above as well as private schools are utilized for educational leadership sites. There are plans underway to deepen collaborative relationships that will strengthen the school site selection process. The following documents depict the processes of site selection for advanced level candidates. Applied Educational Administration Internship, Portfolio Requirements, Summer Internship Sites.      3a.2. In what ways have the unit's partners contributed to the design, delivery, and evaluation of the unit's field and clinical experiences? The Unit’s partner school districts critique and respond to yearly collaborative agreements that indicate they will continue to support and assist in the mentorship of candidates  (See 3a-2.1)-District collaborative agreement form. There are formal and informal meetings that help the Unit to design and implement strategies for the initial and graduate programs. Collaboration with district personnel and site principals enables the Unit to tailor its programs to align with the conceptual framework as well as the goals and objectives for student learning in the districts. All candidates participate in EFE (Early Field Experiences) to develop effective teaching strategies.  During the early field observation stage, goals and objectives are established by individual course instructors regarding observations and initial teaching experiences.  During this phase students spend 10 hours per course for observation in entry level courses and 20 hours per course for practicum experiences in methods courses. The EFE coordinator provides placement information packets to university instructors to determine the best sites for particular course objectives for each student (See 3a2.2)-EFE Placement packet. After  student’s information is returned to the coordinator, the collaborating schools that meet the needs of the students are contacted. The building principal and instructional staff assist the coordinator to identify the appropriate classroom teachers for the placements. After the placements are confirmed, the course instructor then follows up with detailed information concerning course objectives and expectations. In conjunction with building principals, clinical interns are placed for the 14 week placement utilizing the intern placement form.  The members of the Community Advisory Board (Binder in EH 109) are education professionals, parents, alumni and local business operators who collaborate with the Unit to give input in areas for improvement of the program. Annual collaboration agreements are sent out to the participating school districts that outline the mission and scope of our unit’s teacher preparation program. The district superintendents and human resources personnel agree to provide students with enriched learning environments that promote student learning.  During the EFE phases of the program, mentor teachers evaluate the performances of the students that interact within their classrooms. Course instructors and the coordinator for EFE receive a performance evaluation for each student that is reflected in the course grade. As supervisors visit the sites, they are able to also collect informal data that assist the coordinator to recommend changes as needed to improve the program.            During the Clinical phase, mentor teachers complete a mid-term and final evaluation to determine the knowledge, skills and dispositions of each teacher intern. (3a-2.3) Clinical Evaluation form This information is submitted electronically via the TK20 data collection system. The university supervisors also collect informal data from the school partners that are used to make informed decisions for the following school year.    3a.3. What are the roles of the unit and its school partners in determining how and where candidates are placed for field experiences, student teaching, and internships? Clinical and Field placements are approved through careful collaboration with our partner school districts within diverse school settings.  Direct collaboration with district and school site administrators assists us in determining the optimum placements for teacher interns (See 3a-3.1 Students Placement form).  The placements are viewed, discussed and finally approved by the director and coordinator for the Offices of Clinical and Field Experiences respectively. Some of the districts have designated specific persons to serve as liaisons to assist in locating proper placements of teacher interns.  Based upon the content of the course, as well as previous placements, candidates are placed with mentor teachers that best fit the course objectives (See 3a-3.2) EFE Mentor Teacher Selection Form. The number of contact hours in the early field phases is based on the level of coursework. Official request forms are sent out to districts by the Field Coordinator that identify the level of field experiences that candidates are seeking.  Levels 1and 2 early field observation hours require 10 contact hours for student candidates. The higher level-3 early field hours are practica that require 20 contact hours for teacher candidates. Principals and some district level liaisons assist the unit in the selection of highly qualified, tenured and effective classroom teachers (See 3a-3.3) DE Teacher Certification web index. The university professors also identify master teachers that have been valuable resources in teaching educational concepts in the local schools. These teachers often become mentor teachers for teacher interns during the 14 week pre-service teaching seminar. The semester prior to student teaching, the interns must submit a senior audit, criminal background checks, medical documentation, pass the Praxis II exam in their content area and successfully complete course (EDUC-416) Analysis of Student Teaching. The student placement form only identifies the student’s preference of geographic location within the state. The Unit informs students that both the Clinical and Field offices will not guarantee selected placement locations; however, we make a concerted effort to accommodate travel issues within reason.  3a.4. How do the unit and its school partners share expertise and resources to support candidates' learning in field experiences and clinical practice? All teacher interns are supervised by university and school faculty personnel that are licensed or content professionals in their designated fields. The department chair in collaboration with the clinical director assigns university content supervisors from the unit to each student intern.   The supervisor collaborates with the K-12 mentor teachers to further explain the program expectations that are described in the mentor training modules. (See 3a-4.1) Mentor Training Packet Binder. During the placement, candidates obtain feedback in the form of conferences, e-mail, seminars and TK20 evaluations that are used to monitor progress. The candidates complete pedagogical reflections during clinical and field experiences that are reviewed by course instructors to ensure that the goals of the assignment were addressed.  In addition, the clinical director attends quarterly meetings and staff development sessions for K-12 districts to ensure that best practices are current as well as applicable to the districts in which candidates serve (See 3a-4.2) DE Quarterly Meeting Agenda 3a.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to collaboration between unit and school partners may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]   3b. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of Field Experiences and Clinical Practice  3b.1. What are the entry and exit requirements for clinical practice? Initial Programs: The semester prior to student teaching, interns must enroll in course, EDUC-416 Analysis of Student Teaching, where they apply for placements for the upcoming semester. Senior audits are completed for each student by the advisors and forwarded to the student services director. Admission to clinical internship is approved by the Council for Professional Education (CPE). The candidate requirements include an overall GPA of  2.5 or greater, completion of all methods coursework, satisfactory completion of EFE hours required in their prospective program, post a passing score on Praxis II (In students designated content area), TB Testing and Health clearance completed, criminal background check clearance. The exit requirements for candidates are satisfactory completion of Course EDUC-400/500 (Internship placement), at least an overall acceptable mean score on evaluations, and satisfactory completion of the teacher work sample project. Each candidate participates in a formal exit interview with the director of clinical experiences to gather critical program feedback and reflections. A survey is also completed via TK20 for further assessment of candidate data for future program improvement. (See 3b1.1) Student Teaching Handbook located in TK20 Document Room.  Advanced Programs: In the advanced programs, candidates must be in academic good standing (GPA 3.0 or better), not presently on probation, and be a candidate for the advanced degree at the time of applying for the internship. At the time of applying for the Internship, the candidate should have completed all of the graduate coursework for the program. An application and placement process is approved by the Graduate Education Department. The advance program exit requirements are a professional portfolio containing exemplars/products generated over the course of the graduate program of study. After completing the internship, the intern will be responsible for preparing a portfolio of his or her experiences which will include the student’s reflections. The candidate also conducts an oral presentation about his or her experiences to a faculty panel for evaluation (See 3b1.2) Graduate Catalog located in TK20 Document Room.  3b.2. What field experiences are required for each program or categories of programs (e.g., secondary) at both the initial teacher preparation and advanced preparation levels, including graduate programs for licensed teachers and other school professionals? What clinical practice is required for each program or categories of programs in initial teacher preparation programs and programs for the preparation of other school professionals? Please complete Table 7 or upload your own table at Prompt 3b.9 below.   Table 7 The following table describes the minimum number of hours required for each program in the professional education unit.    Field Experiences and Clinical Practice by Program Table 3b-2.1 The following table describes the minimum number of hours required for each advanced program in the professional education unit.    Course Based Field Experiences: MA Program in Educational Leadership Table 3b-2.2  3b.3. How does the unit systematically ensure that candidates develop proficiencies outlined in the unit's conceptual framework, state standards, and professional standards through field and clinical experiences in initial and advanced preparation programs?  Initial Programs Before teacher interns are placed, the directors for student services and clinical experiences ensure that all course audits are complete, grade point averages are at or above 2.5, and that dispositions and Praxis scores are satisfactory. The assessments for interns are aligned with the unit standards as well as the Delaware Teaching Standards.  Student interns systematically receive a minimum of four evaluations by university supervisors and two evaluations from site based mentors during the 14 week placement See 3b-3.2 (Intern Evaluations, located on TK20). Teacher interns start in phase one of the placement shadowing and assisting the mentor teacher with classroom activities. During phase two the interns are granted more responsibilities and lesson planning opportunities. The third phase of the placement is the solo teaching segment. The interns are responsible for all instructional operations of the classroom under the supervision of the mentor teacher. The fourth and final phase transitions full responsibilities back to the mentor teacher and affords the intern additional opportunities for reflections See 3b-3.3 (Tentative Phase In Schedule) See TK20 Document Room.   Prior to school visits, in-class discussions are conducted concerning the goals and objectives of Early Field Experiences. In addition, the Early Field Experiences Coordinator visits classes to explain the unit’s conceptual framework and its impact in terms of teacher preparation. Instructor syllabi link EFE to the theories propounded in content materials and instructional resources. During school visits to the assigned schools, teacher candidates are given assignments that reinforce teaching strategies taught by course instructors.  Small group sessions and tutorials are also helpful for students to fully grasp how student learning occurs.  At the end of the EFE visits, teacher candidates are encouraged to reflect on their experiences using the reflection forms that are reviewed by the Field Coordinator as well as the course instructor See 3b-3.1 (EFE Reflection form). The issues raised by students in their reflections are usually discussed with students in formal classroom sessions and if necessary, with individual teacher candidates by the coordinator.  Advanced Programs In the Educational Leadership program, the applied educational leadership project serves as the program capstone. This project requires the candidate to engage in a field-based internship experience. To start this process, the doctoral candidate initially writes a proposal and obtains approval for a semester long supervised field experience with an Educational Leader at a level above the candidate current level of employment. The field experience shall involve a minimum of 240 hours of activities and projects which permit the candidate to practice/demonstrate educational leadership knowledge and skills related to ELCC standards. The internship proposal should identify activities and projects to be completed that address the ELCC standards over the internship period. At the completion of the internship, the candidate will prepare an extensive product of the experience and an oral presentation that clearly describes the activities completed during the internship in relationship to ELCC standards. This assignment is aligned with the ELCC standards and is relevant to the Educational Doctorate leadership Program outcomes for the college of Education at Delaware State University. The presented product of the internship efforts should reflect on lessons learned in relation to the ELCC standards and the actual experience. This assessment is evaluated using a rubric that identifies assessment components, describes the desired performance of the candidate, and is used to collect data. Complete APA form and style should be adhered to through the entire project (See 3b-3.5) Assignment #4 Applied Leadership Assignment  See TK20 Document Room and Rubric. See TK20 Document Room  3b.4. How does the unit systematically ensure that candidates use technology as an instructional tool during field experiences and clinical practice? The use of instructional technology is a vital component that is represented during EFE instruction and school visitations. Candidates are expected to incorporate technology into their lesson planning and delivery as they visit classrooms for practical experience. In addition, they are required to activate TK20 accounts for electronic data submissions of designated assignments from designated courses. The student interns complete all sections of the Teacher Work Sample in which they must utilize technology as an instructional tool  See 3b-4.1   3b-4.1.1 Aggregate Data Spring 2007 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment  See TK20 Document Room 3b-4.1.2 Aggregate Data Fall 2008 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room 3b-4.1.3 Aggregate Data Spring 2009 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room 3b-4.1.4 Aggregate Data Fall 2009 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room 3b-4.1.5 Aggregate Data Spring 2010 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment. See TK20 Document Room University faculty and school-based mentor teachers submit clinical experience evaluations that identify the candidate’s use of technology as an important instructional component. TK20 accounts communicate important instructional strategies and techniques to candidates from the unit as well as to the mentor teachers in the field during the placements See 3b-4.2 (data collection system binders). TK20 Document Room Faculty Guide Tk20 has user guides for both students and faculty members.  Student Guide Tk20 has user guides for both students and faculty members.  Unit candidates have access to smart boards and other instructional tools during clinical and field experiences. Mentor teachers assist students successfully plan, deliver and reflect upon innovative technology based lessons in all content areas. Candidates are also expected to integrate creative instructional strategies and other grade level appropriate technologies to enhance student learning experiences.   3b.5. What criteria are used in the selection of school-based clinical faculty? How are the criteria implemented? What evidence suggests that school-based clinical faculty members are accomplished school professionals? Mentor teachers are selected in conjunction with participating school districts and the Director of Clinical and field experiences. The Community Advisory Board is also able to give direction in terms of community/district concerns. School district contracts of collaboration provide the criteria for selection of clinical faculty. Building principals complete the mentor placement form which gives the university the option to select the mentors based upon the needs of individual students See 3b.5.1(School site selection form) students are placed within diverse settings in surrounding districts. The site principal, in conjunction with the Director of clinical and Field Experiences, makes final placement recommendations. See 3b.5.1(School site selection form) students are placed within diverse settings in surrounding districts.  The site principal in conjunction with the Director of Clinical and Field Experiences make final placement recommendations.  The teachers must hold a valid Delaware teaching certificate in the area of supervision, completed 3 plus years of satisfactory performance as a classroom teacher, successfully complete the DSU mentor orientation and demonstrate a commitment to mentoring student interns. The Delaware (DEEDS) certification website allows the unit to verify mentors’ credentials before candidates are finalized for placements.  See (3b-5.2)-DE Educator credential verification webpage or https://deeds.doe.k12.de.us/public/deeds_pc_findeducator.aspx 3b.6. What preparation do school-based faculty members receive for their roles as clinical supervisors? The preparation that school based faculty receive for their roles as Clinical supervisors is comprehensive and intense. Prior to placement, each university supervisor attends an orientation and receives a handbook that outlines the mentorship process and expectations. See  3b-6.1 (Clinical  Supervision Orientation Agenda) located in TK20 Document Room.  In addition, the school based personnel attend an orientation or electronic workshop sessions on the conceptual framework and standard operational procedures. The electronic training module method was adopted in 2009 to accommodate the needs and schedules of school site based personnel. See 3b-6.2(Electronic Training Modules) located in TK20 Document Room. The Mentor teacher responsibilities and expectations are sent via email before students arrive for placements and are followed up with phone calls for clarification. This serves as an opportunity to network, plan and answer questions before student interns report to the school site. An electronic binder is sent to each mentor teacher that explains the assessment process in depth. The binders, sent via TK20, provide on-going training and assistance to promote a quality experience for the interns. See 3b6.3 (Electronic Binders via Tk20). The binder contains all of the forms, evaluations and surveys that are required during the placement .The university supervisors that visit student interns in schools also serve as supports to assist mentor teachers as needed.   Faculty Guide Tk20 has user guides for both students and faculty members.   To access the Faculty Guide, go to: https://desu.tk20.com/campustoolshighered/start.do Student Guide Tk20 has user guides for both students and faculty members.  To access the Student Guide, go to: https://desu.tk20.com/campustoolshighered/start.do It contains all the forms, evaluations and surveys that are required during the placement. The university supervisors that visit student interns in schools also serve as support systems to assist mentor teachers as needed.   3b.7. What evidence demonstrates that clinical faculty members provide regular and continuous support for student teachers, licensed teachers completing graduate programs, and other school professionals? Evidence that demonstrates that clinical faculty members provide regular and continuous support for student teachers, licensed teachers completing graduate programs and other school professionals is presented in the following narrative. Regular on site visits and informal conferences take place with interns/ mentor teachers and faculty supervisors throughout the student’s placement See 3b7.1 (Supervisor Travel logs, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ) See TK20 Document Room. Feedback is provided to all interns by university supervisors on their observed performance and evaluations (at both undergraduate and advance levels). All undergraduate interns report to the campus every two weeks for seminar class EDUC-400. These critical sessions serve as staff development support and reflection of field performance See 3b-7.2 (Semester Seminar Log).  Expert speakers and staff development personnel visit the interns on campus for sessions that link to experiences at the school site. The TK20 data system also serves as an important resource for mentors and university supervisors throughout the placement. Intern evaluations are submitted at designated intervals during the placement by both university supervisors and mentor teachers See (3a-2.3) Clinical Evaluation form ). Additionally, samples of student portfolio assessments are located in EH 109.    3b.8. What structured activities involving the analysis of data and current research are required in programs for other school professionals? The structured activities involved in the analysis of data and current research required in programs (Ed. Leadership, Masters Program) are the action research project, thesis. Each candidate develops an action research proposal as one assignment of the Action Research course.  The proposal must address an issue in an educational organization and receive the endorsement of the course instructor and building-level (or higher) administrator where the research is designed to be conducted.  As the capstone project, the candidate must execute the research as designed, prepare results and recommendations from the project, and present the research to a panel of professionals (faculty and educational leaders).  The project is assessed using the Action Research Project rubric and scoring guide. In a written detailed report, the candidate will describe a framework for the Action Research Project and include a statement of purpose for the action research investigation. Key components of the written report include an outline of the plan of action, a description of the setting, and the assumptions and limitations of the project, including figures and tables. Course EDUC-688 Action Research in Education (in TK20), Description of Assessment and Its Use (in TK20), Description of Action Research Project (in TK20)  Delaware State University, College of Education Health and Public Policy See (3b8.1), Course Based Field Experiences: MA Program in Educational Leadership See TK20 Document Room Activities that further reinforce the analysis of data and current research is the thesis/dissertation process. In the thesis project, there is a committee chair and members who guide the development of this activity.  In the Dissertation project, there is a dissertation committee chair and members who guide and supervise the dissertation research. In addition, for both processes, thesis and dissertation, it is normally required that the research process be prepared to go through the Institutional Review Board.  3b.9. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the design, implementation, and evaluation of field experiences and clinical practice may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]  (3b.9.1) Spring 2010 Intern Disposition Assessment: Faculty's Evaluation See TK20 Document Room (3b.9.2) Application for Internship See TK20 Document Room (3b.9.3) Course Based Field Experiences: MA Program in Educational Leadership See TK20 Document Room (3b.9.4) 2010 Co-operating Teacher See TK20 Document Room (3b.9.5) Delaware State University Education Department Employer Satisfaction Survey See TK20 Document Room   3c. Candidates’ Development and Demonstration of Knowledge, Skills, and Professional Dispositions to Help All Students Learn  3c.1. On average, how many candidates are eligible for clinical practice each semester or year? What percent, on average, complete clinical practice successfully? There is an average of 21 teacher candidates per year. Teacher candidate eligibility (n=64) and completion rates (n=62) show that 98% of all eligible teacher candidates at Delaware State University have successfully completed their final clinical practice experience. One teacher candidate did not complete the clinical practice due to medical issues. The other teacher candidate experienced serious medical problems in the Spring, 2010.   The data indicates the unit is extremely successful in terms of candidate eligibility and completion of the clinical practice. Semester/Year Eligible Candidates Candidate Completers Fall /07 9 9 Spring/08 13 13 Fall /08 9 8 Spring/09 13 12 Fall /09 4 4     Spring/10 16 16     Total 64 62     3c.2. What are the roles of candidates, university supervisors, and school-based faculty in assessing candidate performance and reviewing the results during clinical practice? The role of the teacher candidates and their participation within the assessment process allows them to respond to feedback from university supervisors and mentor teachers. After each observation, candidates are given the opportunity to reflect upon and question the results of their performance assessment. Each candidate maintains a self-reflecting journal which includes instructional best practices and practices in need of modification to improve P-12 student learning.  The role of the university and site-based faculty is to evaluate teacher candidate performances though a variety of instruments that are aligned with the units conceptual framework. Each clinical placement is monitored and supervised by an assigned university supervisor, of the appropriate content knowledge, in the candidate's field of study. Supervisors collaborate with school based faculty on a regular basis to monitor progress of interns throughout the placement. The interns receive a minimum of (4) evaluations from the assigned supervisor during the 14 week placement. The mentor teacher assigned to the student performs (2) evaluations. The mentor teacher’s first evaluation is administered at the midterm and the final evaluation at the conclusion of the internship.  If an intern is experiencing difficulty in any areas of the evaluation (unacceptable) an intern improvement plan (IIP) is activated by the director, supervisor and site mentor immediately to address the specific issues. This plan contains action items for the intern and completion dates for improvement.    All (6) of the evaluations are electronically submitted via TK20 for analysis by the clinical director See 3c-2.1(Intern Improvement Plan). The DSU evaluation is aligned with the (PEU) unit standards as well as the (DTS) Delaware teaching standards.  3c.3. How is time for reflection and feedback from peers and clinical faculty incorporated into field experiences and clinical practice? Time for reflection and feedback from peers and clinical faculty are incorporated into field experiences and clinical practice in that all students are required, as part of their clinical and field experience responsibilities, to complete reflective and self-evaluation summaries. Reflection is one of the major components of the Unit Conceptual Framework and is a necessary and integral part of all field experiences and clinical practice. For example, during student teaching, teacher interns maintain reflective journals and logs. In addition, the field experience Director holds a student teaching seminar every two weeks and informal reflection and self-evaluation takes place through think-pair-share and group discussion. Moreover, interns also reflect with mentor teachers and university supervisors during individual and team conferencing.  There are 6 teaching evaluations performed for each student intern. There are 2 completed by the mentor teacher (mid term and final) and 4 evaluations completed by the university supervisor throughout the semester. Immediate performance feedback from each evaluation is given to the interns when possible. The scores and commentary from the evaluation are logged into the data collection tool (TK20) for analysis (3c-3.1) Observation Reflections in TK20 Document Room.   For advance level students, there is a required opportunity for peer and faculty feedback when candidates present their internship capstone to faculty and peers within their respective cohorts. So, overall opportunities are available for both undergraduate and advance level candidates.  3c.4. What data from multiple assessments provide evidence that candidates demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions for helping all students learn in field experiences and clinical practice? Multiple assessments are conducted collaboratively during field experience and clinical practice using standards-based and rubric guided assessments.  During clinical practice, student teaching internship, the three major unit assessments (Lesson Planning, Student Teaching Evaluation, and Teacher Work Sample) are assessed electronically using TK20 as the Unit-Wide data collection system. All clinical practice assessments have been implemented in a newly designed “Binder” format and the assessments are included in tab format for easy access. This electronic binder contains all documentation needed for internship experiences of the teacher candidate. Each individual Mentor Teacher and University Supervisor is required to complete all sections of the binder as they pertain to their teacher candidate respectively.    The clinical practice provides the teacher interns with an opportunity to develop knowledge, skills, and dispositions. More specifically, the Teacher Work Sample is designed to focus the teacher candidate on short and long-term planning, K-12 student assessment, and reflection. For example, each teacher intern must assess student learning through the completion of a unit of instruction in which pre- and post-assessment occurs with data collection. The pre-assessment data is used to determine student needs and to assist the teacher candidate with future planning. The post-assessment is used to determine if indeed student learning took place, during the instructional unit, by comparing pre- and post-test scores. Finally, teacher candidates analyze the data and reflect on the unit of instruction through the completion of the Teacher Work Sample. This is one assessment used to determine teacher candidate effectiveness during the student teaching internship. Teacher candidates are evaluated during early field experiences using multiple assessments. Mentor teachers complete a field experience scoring guide for each candidate that identifies the level of proficiency of knowledge, skills and dispositions. The aggregate data reported in the scoring guide illustrates that candidates are performing on target in all components of the Teacher Work Sample. (Scoring Guide).   Another means of assessing teacher candidate performance is with the Student Teaching Evaluation. All mentor teachers and university supervisors are required to complete a mid-semester evaluation and a final evaluation of their assigned teacher candidate (s). Rubric assessment scores for both the Teacher Work Sample and the Student Teaching Evaluation are computed to determine candidates’ final grades (3c-4.1):   (3c-4.1)Aggregate Data Spring 2007 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment See TK20 Document Room (3c-4.2)Aggregate Data Fall 2008 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room (3c-4.13Aggregate Data Spring 2009 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room (3c-4.4)Aggregate Data Fall 2009 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment, See TK20 Document Room (3c-4.5)Aggregate Data Spring 2010 from a sample Rubric: Teacher Work Sample Assessment. See TK20 Document Room At advance level, knowledge, skills, and dispositions are assessed during internship using a portfolio assignment that is aligned with ELCC standards. The purpose of this assignment and activity requires the candidate to compile a professional portfolio containing exemplars/products generated throughout their course experience. The following are project specific items that must be included as part of the Portfolio: ( Action Research Project, Leading School Change Project, Accumulation of Case Studies, Strategic Plan, and Internship Project and Papers ). The candidate may elect to include other items of interest, but the listed items are mandatory. The candidate makes all effort to retain and collect important documents over the course of their graduate program of studies. The Portfolio provides reflections on the candidate’s personal growth and development in relation to ELCC standards. Course related topics for this project include: analyzing educational issues, steps in strategic planning, strategic alignment, examining organizational resources (internal and external), committee(s) identification, organizational influence on leader, alignment of curriculum, managing conflict, and facilitating change in educational organizations. As part of the field-experience, candidates have the choice to meet with any of the building administrators to shadow and to discuss aspects of the strategic plan or to retrieve pertinent information. Strategic planning is a developmental process utilizing many resources and stakeholders in a sequential process and should result in professional growth of the candidate and organization. The candidate should be able to identify the relationship between the exemplars included in the Portfolio and the ELCC standards which they exemplify. This assessment is evaluated using a rubric that identifies assessment components, describes the desired performance of the candidate, and is used to collect data. This assignment is aligned with the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) standards and is relevant to the Master in Educational Leadership Program outcomes for the College of Education at Delaware State University. See (Portfolio Rubric)    3c.5. What process is used to ensure that candidates collect and analyze data on student learning, reflect on those data, and improve student learning during clinical practice?  The process used to ensure that candidates collect and analyze data on student learning, reflect on those data, and improve student learning during clinical practice is The Teacher Work Sample (TWS). It is the primary source of assessment addressing student learning respectively and is a requirement for all candidates across initial programs. The TWS allows candidates to demonstrate proficiencies that effectively impact student learning. The TWS guides teacher candidates through a process of designing lessons based on the diverse needs of all learners. This rich and meaningful project requires candidates to synthesize the content and pedagogical knowledge and skills they have learned throughout the teacher preparation program. The TWS is comprised of seven sections, each containing its own rubric, adapted from the Renaissance Teacher Work Sampling Project. The  rubric includes the following seven sections; 1) Contextual factors; 2)Learning goals; 3) Assessment plan; 4) Design for instruction; 5) Instructional decision-making; 6) Analysis of student learning; and 7) Reflection and self-evaluation. The TWS is completed by teacher candidates as a part of their requirements for the Student Teaching Seminar which is completed concurrently during the internship.  TWS data show that teacher candidates have a clear understanding of how to initially assess students to determine a baseline for instruction. Teacher candidates progress from the early stages of understanding the context and diversity of the teaching setting, to assessing student learning, to determining the curriculum and instructional strategies by preparing focused lessons for all learners, to assessing the learning that occurs during instruction, to reflecting  on the learning and planning for future learning.  Teacher candidates score consistently high on all portions of the TWS. Additionally, it is scored by their same discipline university supervisor and one other university supervisor, to provide inter-rater reliability. The data reveals that teacher candidates develop a clear understanding of the challenges associated with learning and assessment. The Student Teaching seminar provides support to teacher interns throughout their teaching placement and creates numerous opportunities to share concerns as the TWS project evolves. This encourages a significant amount of self-reflection throughout the project. See Table (3c5.1) TWS.   3c.6. How does the unit ensure that all candidates have field experiences or clinical practice that includes students with exceptionalities and students from diverse ethnic/racial, linguistic, gender, and socioeconomic groups? The Professional Education Unit at DSU firmly believes that early field experiences and clinical experiences are vital and integral components of the teacher preparation program. As such, the curriculum of each teacher preparation program within the Unit provides opportunities for early field experiences and practicum experiences in the foundational courses and subject area methods courses. Teacher candidates are placed within K-12 student populations that represent students of different races, cultures, socioeconomic levels, family backgrounds, and academic abilities including special learning needs. In fact, most classes in which teacher candidates are placed for early field experiences and clinical experiences are inclusive classrooms that contain student populations identified as special learning needs students. The DSU teacher candidates are mostly placed in the school districts surrounding the capital city of Dover. The demographic distribution of student population as shown in the link below demonstrates that placement schools represent a diverse ethnic and racial population having a wide range of socioeconomic groups and a substantial representation of students with special needs from various categories. The description of the selection process to ensure diverse placements are available in EH109.      Student placement spread sheets (3c6.1)  The link above shows collaborating DE school demographics that assist in the process of ensuring diverse school placements for candidates and interns.  http://profiles.doe.k12.de.us/SchoolProfiles/District/Student.aspx(3c6.2)  3c.7. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the development and demonstration of knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions for helping all students learn may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]   Optional   1. What does your unit do particularly well related to Standard 3? The university supervisors and collaborating schools are always willing to assist our teacher candidates with planning and lesson delivery in all phases of field experiences. Instructors meet with students after scheduled class periods as well as during office hours to discuss specific concepts that they may be having difficulty comprehending. Our smaller class sizes afford us the opportunity to properly address the needs of each teacher candidate in the program. The mentor teachers utilized at the school sites are very receptive to developing the knowledge, skills and dispositions of our teacher candidates. The diverse classroom settings in the Dover Delaware area are excellent for our candidates to develop quality teachings strategies that positively affect learning for all students. The high degree of communication and collaboration between the supervising faculty and the Director of Clinical and Field Experiences provides a solid foundation that supports student teachers experiences in the schools. The onsite Early Childhood Lab School provides early field experiences in a number of courses across the Unit.    2. What research related to Standard 3 is being conducted by the unit or its faculty?  The following examples are evidence of faculty research related to Standard 3:   (3c.7.1) Related Research Candidates Establishing The Linkages Among Context, Assessment, and Instruction Using an Adapted Teacher Work Sample (TWS) in Rural Capstone  (3c.7.2) ACT 2007 Conference Presentation PPt. Experiences  Presentation:  Infusing Constructivist Strategies into the Capstone Clinical Experience using TWS Methodology   Exhibits 1.   Memoranda of understanding, minutes from meetings, etc. to document partnerships with schools (Located in EH 109) 2.   List of criteria for the selection of school-based clinical faculty (e.g., cooperating teachers, internship supervisors) 3b.5.1School site selection form 3.   Professional development opportunities and requirements for school-based clinical faculty 3b.6.1 Clinical  Supervision Orientation Agenda 4.   Descriptions of field experiences in programs for initial and advanced teacher candidates and other school professionals Field Experiences and Clinical Practice by Program 5.   Descriptions of clinical practice in programs for initial teacher candidates and other school professionals Early Field Experience Scoring Guide 6.   Student teaching handbook 7.   Assessments and scoring rubrics/criteria used in field experiences for initial and advanced teacher candidates and other school professionals Located in TK20 8.   Assessments and scoring rubrics/criteria used in clinical practice for initial teacher candidates and other school professionals 9.   Agendas from meetings with cooperating teachers and internship supervisors 3b.6.2 Electronic Training Modules 10. Summary results of candidate assessments upon entering and exiting field experiences (Cross-reference with Standard 1 as appropriate.) 11. Completion rates for candidates in student teaching and internships by semester Candidate Eligibility and Clinical Practice Completion Rates        

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