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DSU and Barclays Announce New Internship Program

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Barclays has launched a new annual internship program with Delaware State University in which six DSU students will work at Barclaycard US in its Credit Risk Organization for a two-month assignment. Amer Sajed, CEO of Barclaycard US, and DSU President Harry L. Williams unveiled the new Barclays Bank Mentor Program (BBMP) during a media event at the Barclaycard site in Wilmington. Also in attendance and speaking in support of the initiative were U.S. Sen. Thomas R. Carper and U.S. Sen. Chris Coons. “This program underscores the commitment of Barclays to citizenship, community and the future of Delaware – its young people,” said Mr. Sajed.  “We’re focused on ensuring that our energy, ideas, expertise and passion are leveraged to help the different causes we support.  This program illustrates this approach in action because our colleagues will leverage their mentoring skills and share their knowledge to help young people.” Dr. Williams said the program is part of a series of new initiatives to make Delaware State University stronger and enhance its national reputation. “We are very proud that a major company agreed to provide our students with this type of support,” Dr. Williams said. "Initiatives like the Barclays Bank Mentor Program help DSU to achieve the vision by providing an opportunity for our students to build upon their academic training in the skills necessary to become the first choice of employers in this industry. " Each student will have Barclays business mentor and receive important, marketable experience through assignments in gathering data, conducting analysis, leveraging computer programs such as Excel and SAS, working on teams, implementing programs and presenting to a corporate audience. Carmen Mikhaiel, a DSU student and Barclays intern, spoke on behalf of the other interns. “In the business world, this program is great for networking and will boost our resumes -- an advantage after graduation when we go into the work force,” she said. Sen. Carper said that DSU’s partnership with Barclays is reflective of the direction the University is moving in to prepare its students for success. “DSU is breaking into the top 15 HBCUs and is working toward breaking into the top 10,” Sen. Carper said. “DSU is a school on the move.” Sen. Coons noted the importance of public-private partnerships in driving job opportunities in Delaware. “It is very important for area employers to support our educational institutions,” he said.  “This is a model of what a public-private partnership should be about.” The inaugural group of DSU-Barclays interns, their years and majors are: Clarence Banks, sophomore, finance & banking; Tiona Campbell, sophomore, accounting; Dwight Deloatch, sophomore, finance & banking; Carmen Mikhaiel, junior, accounting; Palesa Motshidi, sophomore, accounting; and Clifford Streater, senior, management information systems. Barclays has awarded a total of $120,000 in support of the BBMP during 2012.  U.S. Sen. Tom Carper, DSU President Harry L. Williams, U.S. Sen. Chris Coons and Barclaycard CEO Amer Sajed.  
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Longwood Foundation Challenge Awards $1,000,000

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Delaware State University received $1,000,000 in recent grants from the Longwood Foundation designed to support student scholarships and positively influence the overall retention rate of the student body. The funds provide scholarship support for a number of DSU students in their path toward becoming DSU graduates. The investment by the Longwood Foundation is monitored to verify that a multi-pronged approach, including financial, academic and social supports, can positively impact DSU’s retention and graduation rates. The initial $500,000 grant from the Longwood Foundation was awarded to DSU with a $500,000 matching gift challenge grant to be used for the same project. The matching gift challenge grant was a two-to-one match for funds that the DSU Foundation raised through spring 2012. The University raised $1 million in order to fully benefit from the challenge grant, thus receiving a total of $1 million in grants from the Longwood Foundation. The proposal submitted by the Office of Development team to the Longwood Foundation in fall 2010 aimed to address challenging issues facing the University regarding the retention of promising DSU students who face financial difficulties in being able to securely complete their education. While the Longwood Foundation typically funds capital projects, the proposal was received with enthusiasm and awarded in early spring 2011. The challenge was met in winter 2012.
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19th Annual Hornet Golf Classic

19th Annual Hornet Golf Classic
Come on out and join the fun at the 19th Annual Hornet Golf Classic on Tuesday April 29, 2014 at Wild Quail Country Club in Wyoming, DE. Wild Quail was voted Best Golf Course by Delaware Today magazine and consistently rated as one of the best golf courses in Delaware by Golf Digest. 

Register by April 22nd and you will qualify to be entered into a special drawing for a prize valued at $150! 

Solicitation Guidelines

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Please click here to give online.   Delaware State University Fundraising, Sponsorship and Non-Monetary Support Solicitation Guidelines   There are multiple sets of rules and guidelines governing the fundraising process, solicitation for sponsorships and contributions, and acquisition of in-kind (non-monetary) donations. These rules and guidelines are necessary to comply with various governing bodies and to obtain the most support possible for DSU.   Click here for complete guidelines   Solicitation by Alumni   Alumni, and associated individuals or entities shall involve the Office of Development in the earliest stages of soliciting monetary or non-monetary support by contacting the Associate Vice President for Development or designee prior to approaching a potential donor, sponsor or contributor for support. Under no circumstances should a proposal be submitted to a corporation or foundation without first receiving written approval of the Associate Vice President for Development or the Vice President for Institutional Advancement. The approval process is as follows: Obtain a copy of the appropriate DSU solicitation review form. Complete and submit the appropriate DSU solicitation review form through the appropriate channels (Director of Alumni Relations) to the Vice President for Institutional Advancement or the Associate Vice President for Development for approval prior to solicitation. (See forms below). The required information should be completed and submitted in electronic and paper form, including any proposal or written request, to the Office of Development no fewer than 15 business days before the event date, delivery deadline, or desired mailing date.   Click here for Solicitation by Alumni form   Click here for Alumni Event Request form   Solicitation by Students   Students and student organizations shall involve the Office of Development in the earliest stages of fundraising activity by completing and submitting the appropriate DSU solicitation review form through the appropriate channels (Director of Student Leadership and Activities, Vice President for Student Affairs) and then to the Vice President for Institutional.   Advancement or the Associate Vice President for Development for approval prior to solicitation. (See forms below). The required information should be completed and submitted in electronic and paper form, including any proposal or written request, to the Office of Development no fewer than 15 business days before the event date, delivery deadline, or desired mailing date. Click here for On Campus Solicitation by Students form   Click here for Off-Campus Solicitation by Students form   Click here for Student Event Request form  Solicitation by Faculty, Staff and Administration   Faculty, staff and administrators shall involve the Office of Development in the earliest stages of fundraising activity by contacting the Assistant Vice President for Development and /or designee prior to approaching a potential donor, sponsor or contributor for support.  Under no circumstances should a proposal or other form of solicitation be submitted to a corporation or foundation without first receiving written approval from the Associate Vice President for Development or the Vice President for Institutional Advancement.  The review and approval process is as follows: Within 15 business days before the fundraising event date, delivery deadline or desired mailing date, Contact the Associate Vice President for Development to request written approval for the grant application. For academic units, the Principal Investigator/Program Director obtains the approval of the Department Chair and Dean regarding the proposal (solicitation). For non-academic units, the individual requesting funding of a proposal or planning a fundraising event must obtain the approval of the immediate manager or appropriate officer (i.e., Director, Vice President). Click here for DSU Faculty and Staff Event Request Form Click here for Proposal Registration Form   Click here for On Campus Solicitation by Employees Form   Click here for Off-Campus Solicitation by Employees form On Campus Solicitation by Other Entities   Generally, solicitation on campus by off-campus groups or individuals is discouraged.  However, activities which enhance the DSU community will be given serious consideration.   Click here for On Campus Solicitation Form  

President's Scholarship Ball

President's Scholarship Ball

Saturday, December 13, 2014
6 p.m. – 7 p.m. | Cocktail Reception
7 p.m. – 11 p.m. | Dinner – Dance

Dover Downs Hotel and Casino
Ball Room, 1st Floor
Dover, Delaware

Climate Leadership Award Recipient

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Earth-Care Pledge


Delaware State University Lab School children make a pledge to the future of sustainability.

“I will do all I can to care for the Earth so it can be a healthy and beautiful place for people, plants and animals.”

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Delaware State University’s dedicated effort to establish sound environmental practices on campus was affirmed on June 23 when the institution received the Second Nature Climate Leadership Award from the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC). DSU President Harry L. Williams (r) receives the Second Nature Climate Leadership Awards on behalf of the University from Dr. Anthony Cortese, president of Second Nature. Presented to DSU President Harry L. Williams at the 5th annual Climate Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the award – which was in the Master’s Colleges and University category – recognizes DSU for the work it has done since it committed to be part of the ACUPCC in 2009.   Vita Pickrum, Associate Vice President for Development, Dr. Bradley Skelcher, Associate Provost, and Dr. Anthony Cortese, president of Second Nature.  DSU was the only HBCU invited to participate in the ACUPCC Regional Symposium in Boston, Nov. 2011. The University’s Go Green Sustainability Committee – led by Vita Pickrum, associate vice president of Development, and a steering committee of University vice presidents and deans – has mushroomed into seven subcommittees that include more than 80 active members from the University’s business and administration personnel, as well as students, faculty and staff from all walks of DSU academic life. In addition to accessing a diverse group of intellectual resources from among its employees, DSU’s Go Green initiative has also engaged students in the effort through the creation of a Green Ambassador organization. This student organization continues to be an active participant in the Go Green planning, related events coordination and spearheading the education effort among their student peers on campus. On April 20, 2011, Delaware State University held a daylong celebration in recognition of Earth Day and the turnout of faculty, staff, students and the community exemplified the University’s enthusiasm and efforts toward climate neutrality and sustainability that extends far beyond one celebrated day of the year. As part of the festivities, DSU art students developed a mini-exhibition entitled “Found Objects,” which used objects that had been left to go to the local landfill and were creatively converted into art sculptures. As a historically black university, the environmental marshalling of its DSU members has led the way among other HBCUs and resulted in Ms. Pickrum being invited to the Dec. 3 United Nations 16th Conference of Parties in Cancun, Mexico, where she gave a presentation on DSU’s Go Green Initiative. In addition, DSU’s environmental efforts were recognized nationally during the 2010-2011 academic year in publications of the ACUPCC, United Negro College Fund, Jet Magazine and Black College Today. During the second day of the June 21-22 ACUPCC Climate Leadership Summit, Amir Mohammadi, DSU vice president of Business & Administration, was a panel participate in a work session in which he shared how DSU has financed its sustainability projects.      
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Contact


Vita Pickrum
Associate VP of Development
Chair of DSU Green Initiative

 

President's Prayer Breakfast

Ticket’s to this year’s President's Prayer Breakfast are sold out. Thank you for your support! 


"Embracing the Spirit of Unity"

Delaware State University
Martin Luther King Student Center
Dover, Delaware
7:00 a.m., Friday September 19, 2014

(Doors open at 6:45 a.m.)

Everyday Green Tips

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Green Tip of the Week


Bring Your Own Bag
If you grocery shop once a week, in five years you’ll have kept about 250 to 1,000 grocery bags out of our landfills. When one ton of plastic bags are reused or recycled, the energy equivalent of 11 barrels of oil is saved!

 

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  Everything Old is New Again As the old adage goes, one person's junk is another's treasure. You can turn your junk into a valuable commodity by "recycling" it in innovative and useful ways: § Share appliances with your neighbors How often do you really use that steam carpet cleaner, shop vacuum, leaf or snow blower, circular saw or sewing machine? Chances are, many of your household appliances lie dormant until that time once or twice a year you pull them out for some special project. Why not start an appliance sharing program with some of your neighbors? You'll save money, stretch scarce storage space and promote good will. § Hold a yard sale You'll find plenty of relics that need a good home (yours not being one of them). Invite neighbors to bring along their vintage items, make it a community event and get ready to barter the day away! Give proceeds to your favorite charity or buy tree saplings to plant in your yard § Donate to your local non-profit thrift shop Someone somewhere will always find use for what you no longer need or want. Many local governments have created partnerships with Good Will, the Salvation Army, Purple Heart and other charities that encourage community residents to bag their donated goods and leave them for easy pick-up.   Earth Day Begins at Home There are plenty of ways you can make every day Earth Day. Improve your own small part of the planet by considering these suggestions for spring-cleaning, garden preparation, and home improvements. § Reduce paper use Use rags instead of paper towels; cloth napkins instead of paper ones. Buy post-consumer recycled paper and recycle it when you've used it. § Repair instead of replace Reupholster furniture. Resole your shoes. § Plant for the planet Strengthen your garden's resistance to pests by planting resilient plants, by rotating the fruits and vegetables you plant, and by attracting friendly bugs to prey on the pesky ones.   Fresh Air According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the air within homes and other buildings can be more seriously polluted than the outdoor air. Research indicates that people spend approximately 90 percent of their time indoors. It's also true that, unlike so many other forms of pollution, indoor air pollution is relatively easy to correct.   To keep your air as fresh as possible, consider these tips:   § Circulate the air. Wherever possible, select offices whose windows open _ and crack them open every now and then. If you install new carpeting or cabinets at home or in the office, open windows and turn on fans until the new smells dissipate. Make sure that copying machines and other equipment are located in rooms that are properly ventilated. § Ask smokers to smoke outside. It is not unreasonable to ask visitors to your home to take a smoking break out of doors. Many offices have already instituted a smoking policy that minimizes nonsmoker exposure to environmental tobacco smoke; if yours hasn't, broach the topic with your office manager. § Speak up. If you or others at your office are experiencing health or comfort problems that you suspect may be caused by indoor air pollution, discuss the issue with your supervisor. Talk with your own physician and report your problems to the company physician, nurse, or health officer so that they can make appropriate recommendation.  
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Contact


Vita Pickrum
Associate VP of Development
Chair of DSU Green Initiative

 

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