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Business Economics Curriculum

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    Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 41-191 University Seminar I ^ 1 41-192 University Seminar II^ 1 25-121 College Algebra ^ 3 25-125 Finite Math^ 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness & Wellness ^ 2 52-105 Microcomputer Applications 3 01-101 English Composition I ^ 3 01-102 English Composition II ^ 3 xx-xxx Natural Science Elective # 3 xx-xxx Social Science Elective # 3 34-xxx History Elective # 3 xx-xxx Foreign Language I ^ 3               Total Credits 15   Total Credits 16 Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 01-xxx Literature Elective # 3 xx-xxx Arts/Humanities Elective # 3 xx-xxx Foreign Language II ^ 3 41-208 Intro to Statistics 3 42-201 Accounting I 3 41-205 Management Processes 4 25-225 Calculus for Business ^ 3 42-203 Accounting for Decision Making 3 40-201 Macroeconomics 3 40-202 Microeconomics 3 41-255 Professional Development I 1                     Total Credits 16   Total Credits 16 Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 01-200 Speech ^ 3 31-395 Global Societies ^ 3 43-300 Managerial Finance 3 42-302 Legal Environment 3 40-301 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 41-306 Operations Management 3 41-305 Management Information Systems 3 41-256 Professional Development II 1 46-300 Principles of Marketing 3 40-308 Statistical Analysis II 3       41-201 Managerial Communications * 3               Total Credits 15   Total Credits 16 Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 41-325 Organizational Behavior  3 41-445 Strategic Management ** 3 41-440 International Management 3 40-414 Money and Banking 3 40-400 Managerial Economics 3 40-xxx Economics Elective 3 40-xxx Economics Elective 3 xx-xxx COB Elective 3 xx-xxx Free Elective 3                     Total Credits 15   Total Credits 12 ^ Must receive a “C” or better in all COB courses and all courses marked with a “^” # See catalog for acceptable electives, 1 course must cover African American Experience *Writing Intensive ** Senior Capstone in College of Business Total Credits: 121    

Curriculum for Management with a Concentration in General Management

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Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 41-191 University Seminar I 1 41-192 University Seminar II 1 25-121 College Algebra 3 25-225 Calculus for Business 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness & Wellness 2 52-105 Microcomputer Applications 3 01-101 English Comp I 3 01-102 English Comp II 3 xx-xxx Natural Science Elective 3 xx-xxx Foreign Language I 3 34-203 or 34-204 History Elective 3 36-201 Intro to General Psychology 3   Total Credits 15   Total Credits 16 Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr xx-xxx Foreign Language II 3 31-101 Critical Thinking or Foreign Language III 3 42-201 Accounting I 3 42-203 Accounting for Decision Makers 3 25-125 Finite Math 3 41-208 Intro to Statistics 3 40-201 Macroeconomics 3 40-202 Microeconomics 3 41-255 Professional Development I 1 41-256 Professional Development II 1 01-201 or 01-205 World Literature I or African American Literature I   3   41-205 Management Processes   4   Total Credits 16   Total Credits 17 Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 01-200 Speech 3 31-395 Global Societies 3 42-302 Legal Environment 3 53-320 Personnel/HR Management 3 43-300 Managerial Finance 3 46-300 Principles of Marketing 3 41-305 Management Info Systems 3 41-306 Operations Management 3 41-201 Managerial Communications* 3 41-xxx General Mgmt Requirement 3               Total Credits 15   Total Credits 15 Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 41-325 Organizational Behavior 3 41-445 Strategic Management** 3 41-440 International Management   3 43/46/ 52/53 Specific Management Requirement   3 41-xxx General Mgmt Requirement   3 43/46/ 52/53 Specific Management Requirement   3 41-xxx General Mgmt Requirement 3 xx-xxx COB/Free Elective 3 43/46/ 52/53 Specific Management Requirement   3         Total Credits 15   Total Credits 12                 ** Senior Capstone *  Writing Intensive Course(s) Grade of ‘C’ or better required for all courses      

Curriculum for Hospitality and Tourism Management

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    First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-121 College Algebra 3 41-191 University Seminar I 1 45-100 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry 3 52-100 Microcomputer Applications 3     15 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 25-125 Finite Math 3 41-105 Management Processes 4 41-192 University Seminar II 1 45-108 Introduction to Tourism Concepts 3 XX-XXX Natural Science Elective 3     17 Second Year First Semester     01-XXX Literature I 3 25-225 Calculus for Business 3 40-201 Macroeconomics 3 41-255 Professional Development I 1 42-201 Accounting I 3 45-207 Sanitation & Safety 3     16 Second Semester     01-XXX Literature II 3 40-202 Microeconomics 3 41-208 Introductory Statistics 3 42-203 Accounting for Decision Makers 3 45-214 Internship I 1 XX-XXX Natural Science Elective 3     15 Third Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 45-305 Hospitality Cost Control and Information Systems 3 45-311 Food Production Management 3 45-355 Lodging Operations Management 3 46-300 Principles of Marketing 3     15 Second Semester     31-395 Global Societies 3 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3 41-256 Professional Development II 1 45-314 Internship II 3 45-445 Restaurant Management 3 45-XXX HTM Elective 3     16 Fourth Year First Semester     41-257 Professional Development III 1 41-325 Organizational Behavior 3 41-440 International Management 3 45-405 Supervision in Hospitality Management 3 45-490 Event Planning and Management 3 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3     16 Second Semester     41-445 Strategic Management (Senior Capstone Course) 3 45-349 Managerial Finance for HTM 3 45-417 Hospitality Law and Legal Environment 3 42-430 Advanced Accounting 3 XX-XXX Art/Humanities Elective 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     15   Total credits 12  

Management Course Descriptions

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  Economics (40) 40-201. MACROECONOMICS. 3:3:0 This course is a study of the operation and function of the American economic system. Attention is given to current economic problems, such as those relating to income, employment, business cycles, money and banking, growth, and development. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. Credit, three hours. 40-202. MICROECONOMICS. 3:3:0 This course is a study of price and output determination in a free enterprise economy, with the assumption of consumer maximization of utility and producer maximization of profits. Prerequisite: 40-201. Credit, three hours. 40-301. INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS. 3:3:0 This course provides a comprehensive analysis of macroeconomic concepts and theories, including the following: the aggregate economic activities of national output, employment, price levels, and interest rates; the aggregate theory of consumption, investment, and the demand and supply of money; economic growth, and inflation; unemployment, and the effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policies. The course also addresses classical, neoclassical, Keynesian, new classical, monetarist, and rational expectations models of closed and open economies. Prerequisites: Economics 201 and 202. Credit, three hours. 40-303. QUANTITATIVE ECONOMIC ANALYSIS. 3:3:0 This course addresses the logic and structure of mathematics as applied to economics. Use of mathematics in the fundamental propositions of microeconomics and macroeconomics is emphasized. Topics covered include mathematical programming, differential and difference equations, and game theory, as well as other deterministic and stochastic modes. Prerequisites: Economics 202, Management 208, and Math 225. Credit, three hours. 40-308. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS II FOR BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS. 3:3:0 This course focuses on applications of statistical techniques to economics and business. The course addresses the chi-square distribution, analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression analysis, time-series analysis, and forecasting. Statistical software packages are utilized. Prerequisite: Management 208. Credit, three hours. 40-310. INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRIC ANALYSIS. 3:3:0 This course examines statistical methods applied to the analyses of economic models and data. It emphasizes multiple regression analysis, multicollinearity, seasonality, heteroscedasticity, auto correlation, dummy variables, time series analysis, distribution laps, and simultaneous equations. Statistical software packages are utilized. Prerequisite: Management 208 and Economics 308. Credit, three hours. 40-400. MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS. 3:3:0 This course focuses on the application of microeconomic principles to the firm, from the perspective of the manager. Topics covered include demand analysis, production and cost analysis, linear programming, market structure and competitive strategies, pricing practices, decision making under uncertainty, and capital budgeting. Prerequisites: Economics 202, and Management 208. Credit, three hours. 40-401. PUBLIC FINANCE. 3:3:0 This course is a study of the theory of public finance, principles and practices of federal, state, and local taxation, expenditures and budgeting, the public debt and fiscal policy, including their impacts upon aggregate economic activities and resource allocation. Prerequisite: Finance 300. Credit, three hours. 40-414. MONEY AND BANKING. 3:3:0 This course is a study of the commercial banking system, non-bank financial institutions, the Federal Reserve System, monetary theory and policy, and debt management. Prerequisites: Economics 201 and 202. Credit, three hours. 40-415. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS AND TRADE. 3:3:0 This course examines the theory and practice of international trade and finance. It includes consideration of the following: the theories of comparative advantage and international specialization, trade policies and trade restrictions, foreign exchange markets and balance of payments, international trade systems, financial problems of foreign operations, transfer of funds and investment decisions. The course emphasizes operational and financial problems of multinational business entities. Prerequisites: Economics 301. Credit, three hours. 40-450. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 3:3:0 This course provides an opportunity for students to participate in special research projects or to study contemporary issues in Business Economics. Prerequisite: Permission of departmental chairperson. Credit, one to three hours. 40-XXX. SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This course is an in-depth study of a topic of current interest in the Business Economics areas. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Credit, three hours. 40-490. INTERNSHIP. 3:3:0 This course provides an opportunity for students to gain practical experience in business economic analysis through on-the-job assignments in businesses, government agencies, and/or other work- organizations. Prerequisite: Permission of the departmental chairperson. Credit, three to six hours. General Management (41) 41-105. MANAGEMENT PROCESSES. 4:4:0 This is a cornerstone Integrated Management Course (IMC) which will orient students to the opportunities and challenges managers face in contemporary organizations. Students are introduced to the inter-relationships among the organizational functions of marketing, management, production and finance. Students will develop competencies of teamwork, communication, creative thinking, and change management. They will be charged with the responsibility to develop, operate, and exit a new enterprise. Prerequisite: 12 Credit Hours. Credit, four hours. 41-201. MANAGERIAL COMMUNICATIONS. 3:3:0 This is a practical intensive course focusing on both written and oral presentation skills. Problems, issues and technology of organizational communication are analyzed through written and oral presentations, case studies, experiential exercises and projects. Students will learn to write and speak clearly and effectively by focusing on style, organization, strategy, and persuasion. The course will also include a discussion of speaking formats, delivery, organization, and use of multi-media technology. The course is intended to improve managerial effectiveness in negotiation, persuasion and communication Prerequisite: English 102. Credit, three hours. 41-208. INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS. 3:3:0 This course introduces the concept of applied statistics. It addresses the following topics: data presentation; measures of central tendency; measures of variation, skewness, and kurtosis; basis probability concepts; probability distributions; sampling distributions estimation; and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: Math 121. Credit, three hours. 41-305. MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 The application of information systems to organizational decision-making and operations is the focus of this course. Topics include: fundamentals of information system development, management and structures of databases, query processing and report generation using computer and non-computer concepts, computer-human interface, end-user computing, and data communications and network. (Not open to Accounting Majors). Prerequisites: Management 105 and MIS 100. Credit, three hours. 41-306. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 Production and Operations planning concepts and analytical systems will be the central theme of this course. Designing and managing production processes, facilities, and process control are discussed. Topics include demand forecasting, material planning, acquisition techniques, scheduling, total quality management, and continuous improvement concepts and methods. Prerequisites: Management 105, Management 208, and Math 225. Credit, three hours. 41-325. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR. 3:3:0 This course addresses the application of behavioral science theories and research to understanding the behavior of persons in the work place, with emphasis on factors that impact workers' morale, group dynamics, and worker efficiency. Prerequisites: Management 105 and Junior Standing. Credit, three hours. 41/03-341. BUSINESS ETHICS. 3:3:0 This course will be devoted to an examination of some of the ethical issues that arise in the field of business. Specific topics to be considered include: business ethics and ethical theory, the moral status of corporations, ethical codes of conduct in business, truth and advertising, the rights and duties of employees, affirmative action, and environmental issues in business. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. Credit, three hours. 41-425. ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & CHANGE. 3:3:0 This course offers an examination of major behavioral issues in the management of organizations. Topics include power and influence in organizations, conflict management, individual and group behavior, communication, attitudes, values, organizational politics, leadership, motivation and performance. Students will also discuss factors that influence organizational change, strategies for planned change, the role of organizational culture in the change process, and the development of support systems and structures. Prerequisite: HR 320. Credit, three hours. 41-435. ENTREPRENEURSHIP. 3:3:0 The entrepreneurial model is used as a prototype. It is the basics of developing a new enterprise. Students begin with the elements of how to identify: new business ideas and opportunities, sources of venture ideas, and franchising opportunities. They develop a business plan for a start-up firm; establish the feasibility for the new idea; prepare a marketing audit to determine the potential organization’s strategic position; and develop strategies, budgets, tactics, and activities to implement the new business idea. This is an applied course, and students are expected to work in small groups to create and to implement a new venture idea. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. Credit, three hours. 41-437. MANAGERIAL DECISION-MAKING & PROBLEM SOLVING. 3:3:0 This course offers an analysis of rational management decision making under conditions of risk and uncertainty, with emphasis on the analysis of problems with multiple, competitive objectives in industry and government. Prerequisites: Finance 105, HR 320. Credit, three hours. 41-440. INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 A survey of the major issues which face a manager operating in an international environment is the focus of this course. The aim of the course is to examine how different national and cultural environments affect the way that multinational companies (MNCs) operate from one country to the next. Topics include: an overview of global management, cultural environment, why firms internationalize operations, international human resource management, cross-cultural communication and decision-making, international strategies, and organizing international enterprises. Prerequisites: Senior standing. Credit, three hours. 41-445. STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 This senior capstone Integrated Management Course is intended to apply theoretical concepts to a variety of organizational situations from a top-management perspective. This course also satisfies our General Education Requirement for a senior capstone course. The concepts and techniques of strategic management in organizations will be the focus of this course. Topics include developing a strategic vision, setting objectives and crafting a strategy. Students will be expected to develop a competitive analysis portfolio, match strategy to an organization’s situation, build resource capabilities, support systems, budgets, policies, align culture and strategy, and structure the organization to implement the organization’s strategic vision in a dynamic global marketplace. This course is team taught. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Credit, three hours. Finance and Banking (43) 43-300. MANAGERIAL FINANCE. 3:3:0 The role of financial management in profit and nonprofit business enterprises includes financial analysis, planning needs for short-term and long-term funds, capital budgeting and raising funds to finance growth of business enterprise. Prerequisites: Economics 201, Economics 202, Accounting 202 or Accounting 203. Credit, three hours. 43-315. FINANCIAL MARKETS & INSTITUTIONS. 3:3:0 This course examines structures and functions of various financial markets such as stock, bond, mortgage, and money markets. It also addresses financial management aspect of different financial institutions including banks, savings and loans association, investment companies, and pension funds. Prerequisite: Finance 300. Credit, three hours. 43-316. RISK MANAGEMENT & INSURANCE. 3:3:0 This course provides examination of credit and risk and their importance in personal and business activities. The focus is on the process involved in supplying credit to borrowers by financial institutions and methods of handling credit and risk. Prerequisite: Finance 300. Credit, three hours. 43-320. CONSUMER FINANCIAL PLANNING. 3:3:0 This course offers the basics of financial planning, and addresses the relationships between consumers of financial services and the products offered by financial intermediaries, investment brokerages, insurance companies, credit agencies & nonbank financial institutions. The course addresses checking and money market accounts, budgeting, taxes, investments, real estate, insurance, retirement, and estate planning in order to live better financially. Prerequisite: None. Credit, three hours. 43-418. INVESTMENTS. 3:3:0 This course addresses principles in determination of investment vehicles for individual and institutional portfolios. The focus is on sources of investment information, instruments, features, and appropriateness of various securities as investment for individuals and institutions. Prerequisite: Finance 300. Credit, three hours. 43-420. COMMERCIAL BANK MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 This course addresses the functioning and management of commercial banks and other financial institutions including the flow of funds and role of interest rate in money and capital markets; asset and liability management; interest rate risk management; supply of loan funds and demand for funds in mortgage loan market, consumer credit market, corporate securities markets, and municipal obligations; and the effects of Federal Reserve and Treasury policies on financial markets. Prerequisite: Finance 300. Credit, three hours. 43-424. NEW VENTURE FINANCE & INVESTMENT. 3:3:0 In this course the process and techniques of financing new ventures and investing in fledgling companies are examined in detail. The issue of debt versus equity financing, and a variety of financing vehicles will be examined in the context of new and small ventures in the process of expansion and emerging. E-Commerce/E-Business enterprises are discussed. Case studies will be utilized to illustrate creative solutions to the structuring of new venture financing. Prerequisite: Finance 300. Credit, three hours. 43-441. INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 This course examines the international financial environment and financial management of multinational corporations including foreign exchange risk management, financing foreign operations, foreign investment analysis, and multinational working capital management. Prerequisites: Finance 300, Finance 315, Senior Standing. Credit, three hours. 43-449. SENIOR SEMINAR IN FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 This course offers selected topics on current issues pertaining to finance and other related areas of interest, which includes derivatives, mergers and acquisitions, and financial engineering. Prerequisites: Finance 300, Finance 315, Senior Standing. Credit, three hours. 43-450. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-3:1-3:0 This course provides an opportunity for students to participate in special research projects or to study contemporary issues in Finance. Prerequisite: Permission of departmental chairperson. Credit, one to three hours. 43-462. SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This course is an in-depth study of a topic of current interest in the Finance area. Prerequisite: Senior Standing. Credit, three hours. 43-490. INTERNSHIP. 3-6:3-6:0 This course provides an opportunity for students to gain practical financial experience through on- the-job assignments at businesses and institutions. Prerequisite: Permission of the departmental chairperson. Credit, three to six hours. Hospitality and Tourism Management(45) 45-100. INTRODUCTION TO THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY. 3:3:0 This course provides a basic understanding of the lodging, food services, tourism, and casino management industries, emphasizing the tracing of the hospitality industry’s growth and development, reviewing the organization of hotel, food, and beverage operations, and focusing on industry opportunities and future trends. Prerequisite: None. Credit, three hours. 45-108. INTRODUCTION TO TOURISM CONCEPTS. 3:3:0 This course is designed to provide students with basic knowledge of tourism and travel-related concepts and with the practical experience that will enable them to effectively apply those concepts to the hospitality industry. Prerequisite: None. Credit, three hours. 45-207. SANITATION & SAFETY. 3:3:0 This course covers the principles and practices of sanitation and hygiene as applied to the food industry. Emphasis is placed upon the training of supervisory personnel in sanitation procedures. Students will have an opportunity to apply their knowledge in a practical, on-the-job learning experience by implementing self-inspection and training for food service establishments. Successful completion of the course will qualify students for National Institute of the Food Service (NIFI) National Sanitation Certification. Prerequisite: None. Credit, three hours. 45-210. HOSPITALITY PURCHASING. 3:3:0 This course introduces the student to methods of purchasing hospitality goods and services in large quantities. It emphasizes hospitality product standards and specifications, purveyor-customer relationships, buying procedures, and control systems. Prerequisite: Hospitality 311. Credit, three hours. 45-214. INTERNSHIP I. 1:1:0 This course requires off-campus hospitality work experience that introduces students to the challenges faced by managers in the hospitality industry. It requires that students complete research assignments (to investigate hospitality industry problems), one lecture per week, and one summer work experience in the hospitality industry. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Credit, one hour. 45-305. HOSPITALITY COST CONTROL. 3:3:0 This course provides requisite competencies related to the application of cost controls, development and implementation of systems of controls, based on mission, goals and objectives of the hospitality operations related to foods and beverages, labor and supplies. An analysis of techniques currently used to generate revenue while controlling cost drivers is emphasized. 45-311. FOOD PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 This course addresses the study of food groups, their nutritional value, methods of preparation, cooking presentations, holding, and service techniques. Some attention will be given to the application of scientific principles in the preparation of a wide variety of foods. Students will prepare recipes, menus, and production schedules, as well as acquire the ability to recognize properly prepared foods -- through preparing, tasting, and evaluating foods. Students will also develop an awareness of potential production problems, especially in the areas of sanitation and safety, and how to troubleshoot them. Students will attend one lecture and four lab hours per week. Prerequisite: Hospitality 207. Credits, three hours. 45-314. INTERNSHIP II. 3:3:0 Students are required to work a minimum of nine weeks (on a full-time basis) during the summer, Fall or Spring Semester in a supervised work experience. Prerequisite: Hospitality 214. Credit, three hours. 45-327. FACILITIES DESIGN AND MAINTENANCE. 3:3:0 This course includes a study of basic engineering, public safety, building codes, equipment selection, and design procedures related to the hospitality industry. Students must complete a hospitality facilities design project. Prerequisite: None. Credit, three hours. 45-349. HTM MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE. 3:3:0 This course provides an analysis and practical applications of hospitality and tourism accounting and finance systems currently used. Special emphasis is placed on Yield Management, Revenue Management, Revenue per Available Room, Property Management Systems and concepts designed to control costs and increase revenue. Prerequisites: Junior Status, Accounting 201. Credit, three hours. 45-355. LODGING OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 This course is an analysis of the historical development of lodging and innkeeping. Principles of operation, lodging classifications and ratings, as well as, aspects of the interactions between the guest services department, housekeeping, accounting, reservations, food and beverage, and other departments will be studied. Thirty hours of work experiences required in a lodging setting. Prerequisite: Junior Status Hospitality 355. Credit, three hours. 45-405. SUPERVISION IN HOSPITALITY AND TOURSIM MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 An analysis of service requirements that predict supervision requirements in the Hospitality and Tourism industry and quantifiable standards are discussed based on required behavior of supervisors. Aspects of current labor laws, standards of the industry, supervisory assessments, and industry practices are emphasized. Prerequisite: Hospitality 355. Credit, three hours. 45-408. FOOD SERVICE SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 This course examines the organization, administration, and application of managerial techniques in food service systems. It also addresses production, distribution, selection, and storage of food commodities, specification writing, personnel training, job analysis, morale, motivation, and computer applications. Prerequisite: Hospitality 311. Credit, three hours. 45-415. CATERING MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 This course explores off-premises catering for management and social functions. Other types of catering operations, such as sports and special events, will be explored as well. Topics include the following: organizational structure of catering operations, legal aspects of catering businesses, menu design for special functions and its operational implications, marketing from a caterer’s point of view, function planning and management, staff recruitment, training and supervision, and post-event analysis. Prerequisite: Hospitality 311. Credit, three hours. 45-417. HOSPITALITY LAW AND LEGAL ENVIRONMENT. 3:3:0 An analysis and assessment of laws related to the operation of each of the Hospitality and Tourism components. Laws related to human resources, licensure requirement, contract negotiations, civil rights, food and beverage service, innkeeping and travel are emphasized. Financial systems, such as yield management and REVPAR are emphasized. Case analysis, forums assessing court cases and research related to lawmaking are included. Prerequisite: Senior Status. 45-418. CLUB OPERATIONS/BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 This course includes a detailed study of the classification, production, identification, and service of beverages (including alcohol). Emphasis is placed on the planning, development, operation, and management of clubs. Prerequisites: Hospitality 210, Hospitality 305 and Hospitality 311. Credit, three hours. 45-419. GAMING. 3:3:0 This course introduces students to the multi-billion dollar gaming industry. It includes a historical overview of gaming and examines legal, social, and economic issues within the industry. The course also reviews the various games played in casinos, the current trends, and the most popular casino destinations in the world. Special attention is devoted to the growth of casinos on cruise ships, on Indian reservations, and on riverboats in the United States. Prerequisite: Accounting 201. Credit, three hours. 45-420. RESORT AND RECREATIONAL MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 The course emphasizes a comprehensive approach to the operations of resort and recreational properties. Beginning with historical development, details are presented in planning, development, financial investment management, and marketing that deal with the unique nature of the resort business. The course also examines the future and the impact of the condominium concept, time sharing, technological changes, and the increased cost of energy and transportation. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Credit, three hours. 45-425. TOURISM AND CASINO MARKETING. 3:3:0 This course provides an analysis of current and future marketing strategies designed to promote the growth and development of the hospitality and tourism. Marketing Research will be conducted as a component of the course. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Credit, 3 hours. 45-445. RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 This course requires each student to participate as a manager of a full-service restaurant operation. Lectures will include topics relating to the general management of restaurants. These topics will address the issues involved in defining a service philosophy, improving profit margins, securing adequate supplies, identifying target markets, and planning for organizational growth. Many aspects of production and service in a full-service restaurant will be experienced, discussed, and demonstrated. Prerequisite: Hospitality 311. Credit, three hours. 45-450. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 3:3:0 This course provides an opportunity for students to participate in special research projects or to study contemporary issues in Hospitality and Tourism Management. Prerequisite: Permission of Chairman. 45-462. SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This course is an in-depth study of a topic of current interest in the Hospitality and Tourism Management areas. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Credit, three hours. 45-490. EVENT PLANNING AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 This course is designed to provide students with aspects of event planning. Special emphasis will be placed on marketing, planning, costing, executing, and evaluating of events. Students will learn basic components of meeting/event setups, travel and lodging, and transportation information. Based on client and guest needs, a plan of development will be designed. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Credit, three hours. Marketing (46) 46-300. PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING. 3:3:0 This course addresses concepts and issues underlying the modern practice of marketing, including the following: the environmental forces affecting the marketing decision maker; organization and planning of the marketing function; market segmentation; marketing mix; and other relevant topics. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit, three hours. 46-303. SELLING AND SALES MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 This course provides an introduction to selling management and the personal selling components of marketing management. The role of the sales manager in recruiting, directing, motivating, and rewarding a sales force are discussed and analyzed. This course has an emphasis on the selling process, the buyer-seller dyad, market analysis, formulation of sales strategies, the sales presentation, and account and territory management. Prerequisite: Management 105 and Marketing 300. Credit, three hours. 46-315. BUYER BEHAVIOR. 3:3:0 This course identifies major factors that influence how both consumers and institutional buyers process and learn marketing information. Emphasis is on the role culture and personal and interpersonal influences have on buyer behavior. Examination of marketing strategies to best reach the needs of diverse market segments is part of the course offering. Prerequisite: Management 105 and Marketing 300. Credit, three hours. 46-320. RETAIL MERCHANDISING. 3:3:0 This course examines principles and practices of organizing, operating, and managing retail establishments, with emphasis on planning, control, pricing, distribution, promotion of merchandise, retail inventory methods, and other relevant topics. Prerequisite: Management 105 and Marketing 300. Credit, three hours. 46-376. SMALL ENTERPRISE MARKETING. 3:3:0 This course focuses on the specific marketing needs of small enterprises. It includes the development of strategic marketing plans within limited budgets, segmentation strategies, and developing promotional activities for targeted markets. Prerequisite: Management 105. Credit, three hours. 46-407. PROMOTIONAL STRATEGY. 3:3:0 This is a project-oriented course focused on integrated marketing communications. Topics include advertising organization and design, measurement of advertising effectiveness, sales promotion, the personal selling, and public relations. Prerequisite: Management 105 and Marketing 300. Credit, three hours. 46-410. ORGANIZATION-TO-ORGANIZATION MARKETING. 3:3:0 This course assesses marketing opportunities among organizations. Strategies will be developed based on analysis of the organizational environment both internal and external. Marketing mix strategies will address the needs of large multi-national corporations and organizations (public and private) as well as the relationship among smaller organizations. Prerequisites: Senior Standing, Management 105 and Marketing 300. Credit, three hours. 46-412. SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 This course considers the components of modern-day physical distribution and logistics systems, with emphasis on facility location, transportation, warehousing, inventory control, and communications. While emphasis is placed on physical distribution flows, additional topics covered include the flow of information, and the flow of money in a supply chain. Prerequisites: Marketing 410, Management 105 and Marketing 300. Credit, three hours. 46-415. MARKETING RESEARCH. 3:3:0 This course is the study of applied research methods in the analysis of marketing problems and the utilization of research findings in the formulation of marketing policies. Emphasis is on research design, sampling, data collection, psychological scaling, techniques of statistical analysis, preparation and presentation of the research report, and other relevant topics. Prerequisite: Management 208, Marketing 315. Credit, three hours. 46-420. INTERNATIONAL MARKETING. 3:3:0 This course addresses the social, cultural, political, and economic environmental differences of countries in relation to marketing practices. Consideration is also given to the role of multinational corporations. Prerequisite: Management 105 and Marketing 300. Credit, three hours. 46-426. MARKETING MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 This course provides opportunities for advanced study of marketing functions, from the point of view of the marketing manager. It emphasizes formulation and implementation of marketing policies, including marketing planning, buyer behavior, in addition to product, channel, promotion, and pricing strategies. Prerequisite: Senior Standing, during the final semester of course work, and Marketing 300. Credit, three hours. 46-450. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 3:3:0 This faculty-supervised study offers students the opportunity to undertake independent research projects to study contemporary issues in marketing. Prerequisite: Permission of departmental chairperson. Credit, one to three hours. 46-478. E-MARKETING. 3:3:0 This course focuses on the development of marketing programs and strategy that integrates the Internet and World Wide Web. Specific topics include the application of the Internet to the development of product, pricing, promotion, and distribution strategies, customer relationship management, segmentation, differentiation, and positioning strategies. Additional topics covered include cyber law as it applies to marketing, issues of privacy, and ethics. Prerequisites: Management 105 and Marketing 300. Credit, three hours. 46-462. SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This course is an in-depth study of a topic of current interest in the Management or Accounting major. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. Credit, three hours. 46-490. INTERNSHIP. This course allows students to gain practical experiences in marketing, through on-the-job work assignments with various businesses and institutions. Prerequisite: Permission of the departmental chairperson. Credit: three to six hours. Management Information Systems (MIS) (52) 52-100. MICROCOMPUTER APPLICATIONS. 3:3:0 The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to computers and information processing for students desiring to learn what a computer is, how it functions, how it is applied to the solution of business and related problems in a modern society, and the future trends in computer applications. A “hands-on” approach will be employed with commercially available microcomputer software packages for word processing, electronic spreadsheets, database management, and graphical presentations, and web design methods using HTML. Computer career opportunities will also be discussed. Credit, three hours. 52-200. APPLIED IS TECHNOLOGY. 3:3:0 This course introduces students to the uses, trends, and applications of information technology. It is designed to expose students to technologies relating to computer hardware, computer software, telecommunications, network technology, the Internet and World Wide Web, and multimedia. Computer career opportunities and topics relating to ethical issues within the Information Systems field will also be discussed. Credit, three hours. 52-313.WEB DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION (INTERNET BASED DEVELOPMENT). 3:3:0 This course provides in-depth understandings of Web services, including how to write HTML, set up and configure a variety of popular Web servers, and capture information to external databases. Students will set up their own Web servers, develop text and graphic intensive Web pages, use hyperlinks, and examine the potential of Java, JavaScript, PHP, ASP and Shockwave. Prerequisites: MIS 314. Credit, three hours. 52-314. VISUAL BASIC. 3:3:0 This course introduces students to visual basic programming in the windows environment. Concepts of structured, and objects oriented programming are introduced. Prerequisite: Management 305, MIS 200. Credit, three hours. 52-450. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 3:3:0 This course provides an opportunity for students to pursue topics of in-depth study that is tailored to their personal interests. This course is open only to students with advanced standing with the consent of the faculty and under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. Credit, one to three hours. 52-460. ADVANCED PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES (LOGIC & DESIGN). 3:3:0 This course offers the fundamental structures of programming languages; rudiments of machine and assembly level languages; elements of procedural, non-procedural and fourth-generation languages; object-oriented extensions to languages; and design, implementation, and comparison of programming languages. Prerequisites: Management 305 and MIS 314. Credit, three hours. 52-475. NETWORKING AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS. 3:3:0 Architecture, goals and structure of an operating system, and hardware architecture are components of this course. Process and memory management; resource allocation and scheduling; secondary storage management; file and directory systems; protection and security; distributed operating systems; OS support for human interaction; OS interoperability and compatibility; OS utilities, tools, commands and shell programming; systems administration and management are also addressed in this course. Prerequisites: Management 305 and MIS 460 Credit, three hours. 52-470. DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 This course offers an extended study of modern database technology, which is designed to expose students to the development of database management systems. Prerequisite: Management 305, MIS 460. Credit, three hours. 52-474. TELECOMMUNICATIONS. 3:3:0 This course is an introduction to the transmission media used in digital communications. The course focuses on the study of the concepts, components and issues involved in the design, and implementation and management of computer communications networks. Prerequisite: Management 305. Credit, three hours. 52-480. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS & DESIGN. 3:3:0 An examination of the concepts, tools, and techniques used to develop and support computer based information system is offered in this course. Prerequisite: Management 305. Credit, three hours. 52-XXX. SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This course is an in-depth study of a topic of current interest in the Information Systems area. Prerequisite: Senior Standing. Credit, three hours. 52-490. INTERNSHIP. 3:3:0 This course provides an opportunity for students to gain practical experience in the area of Information Systems through on-the-job assignments with approved organizations. Prerequisite: Permission of the departmental chairperson, Management 305. Credit, three to six hours. 52-496. SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT PROJECT. 3:3:0 Participating in this course’s team systems development projects challenges the students’ analysis and design skills. Topics covered include case and project management, feasibility analysis, and interpersonal skills. Prerequisites: Management 305, MIS 480. Credit, three hours. Human Resource Management (53) 53-320. PERSONNEL/HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 A comprehensive study of the functions and responsibilities of the Human Resource Manager is offered in this course. Topics include: employee selection, job-design, performance appraisal, training and development, career planning and management, managing a diverse workforce, safety, health and the role of the labor relations manager. Responsibilities and relationships with other managers and employees are covered. Discussion of the HR function in other countries is also included. Prerequisites: Management 105 and Junior Standing. Credit, three hours. 53-330. MANAGEMENT/EMPLOYEE RELATIONS. 3:3:0 This course is a survey of the collective bargaining system in the U.S. The development of managerial approaches is provided to achieve labor-management cooperation, negotiations between management and employees’ organizations, the nature and significance of collective bargaining, procedures of collective bargaining, bargaining issues, contract administration, current practices and the future directions of unions. Prerequisite: HR 320. Credit, three hours. 53-352. LEGAL ISSUES IN HR MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 This course provides a critical review of current and proposed legislation and institutions pertaining to the management of an organization’s human resources. Contemporary employment practices and the law are explained in detail. Title V11 of the 1964 Civil rights Act, the Equal Pay Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Civil Rights Act of 1967, and federal affirmative action programs are among the many issues discussed. Prerequisite: Accounting 302. Credit, three hours. 53-430. COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 This course is an in-depth study of the development and administration of monetary and non- monetary reward programs, job pricing, benefit packages, job analysis and evaluation systems, and individual and group incentive plans. Prerequisites: Finance 300 and HR 320. Credit, three hours. 53-440. HUMAN RESOURCE PLANNING AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 This course is a survey of concepts and techniques of human resource planning, with special emphasis on forecasting human resource requirements and the development of succession plans. An examination is done of the practical and conceptual issues in the development, acquisition and application of Human Resource Information Systems and other data management techniques. Prerequisites: HR 430, and HR 320. Credit, three hours. 53-450. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 3:3:0 This course provides an opportunity for students to participate in special research projects or to study contemporary issues in Human Resources Management. Prerequisite: Permission of departmental chairperson. Credit, one to three hours. 53-452. STAFFING AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 This course provides an examination of recruiting, selection, and performance appraisal and for an understanding of all facets of performance management including training and development, developing reward systems, performance measurement, equal employment practices, counseling and promotion processes. Discussions will also include strategies to recruit, retain and develop a diverse workforce. Prerequisite: HR 430, HR 320. Credit, three hours. 53-XXX. SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This course is an in-depth study of a topic of current interest in the Human Resource Management field. Prerequisite: Senior Standing. Credit, three hours. 53-490. INTERNSHIP. 3:3:0 This course provides an opportunity for students to gain practical Human Resources Management experience through on-the-job assignments with approved organizations. Prerequisite: Permission of the departmental chairperson. Credit, three to six hours.

MBA Course Descriptions

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  600. INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT This course introduces the students to the uses, trends, and applications of information technologies in organizations. The course will expose the students to computer hardware, computer software, telecommunications, network technology, Internet, World Wide Web, multimedia, and other topics in information technology. Credit, three hours. 601. ECONOMICS FOR MANAGERIAL DECISION MAKING This course examines the applied micro-economic theory of the firm. Economics concepts covered include demand analysis, production and cost analysis, linear programming applications, pricing policies, and government regulation of the firm. This course also provides an analysis of macro-economic factors influencing business activity and their implications for strategic management and business policy. Credit, three hours. 602. MARKETING MANAGEMENT This course examines the strategic marketing planning process. Emphasis is placed on the development of product lines, sales promotion, and distribution strategies. Prerequisite: CBK requirements in Principles of Economics and Marketing. Credit, three hours. 603. ACCOUNTING FOR DECISION-MAKING This course emphasizes the study of accounting as it relates to internal reporting, managerial decision-making, planning, and control. Topics covered include the following: cost-volume-profit analysis; budgeting; responsibility accounting; product costing; cost behavior; and variance analysis. Prerequisite: CBK requirement in Accounting. Credit, three hours. 604. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT This course addresses the principles of financial management. Topics covered include the following: capital acquisition; working capital management; capital budgeting; valuation theories; and dividend and long-term financial policies. Prerequisite: CBK requirements in Economics, Finance, and Accounting. Credit, three hours. 605. ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP & BEHAVIOR This course concentrates on the behavior of individuals in small, informal groups and formal organizations. It examines the following topics: leadership, in the context of group behavior; job satisfaction; supervision; planning; and conflict resolution. Prerequisite: CBK requirement in Management. 606. QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR DECISION MAKING This course considers the use of quantitative techniques in business. Topics covered include the following: forecasting techniques; inventory control models; linear and dynamic programming; transportation and assignment problems; statistical quality control; decision theory; and computer applications in the areas of accounting, finance, marketing, and production. Prerequisite: CBK requirements in Math and Statistical Concepts. Credit, three hours. 610. QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS This course is devoted to study of methods and techniques in business research. Topics covered include the following: problem identification and definition; hypotheses formulation and testing; literature review; and data collection and analysis. Prerequisite: Business 606. Credit, three hours. 611. MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS This course addresses the needs of information and information technology in the organization in today's competitive business environment. The course will explore the information function within the organization, the nature and characteristics of computerized information systems, usage of information systems and technology to change the organizational structure, work process, and culture. Information system analysis and design are also discussed. Prerequisite: Bus 600. Credit, three hours. 612. LEGAL AND REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT OF THE ORGANIZATION This course addresses the impact of legal and ethical factors pertinent to the effective management of business organizations. Legal considerations, both common law and regulatory, are a constant concern for management executives in terms of decision making. Contracts, consumer protections, secured transactions and credit, employment and other currently relevant areas will be examined, in depth, from the perspective of the decision maker, the company, applicable regulatory bodies if any, and the consumer. Students will consider the ethical and legal implications inherent in each of these areas, from each of the four perspectives. Credit, three hours. 616. APPLIED STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT This course is a study of policy formulation and implementation by middle- and senior-level management. This course integrates previous course work in the other core courses. This capstone (integrated management course) is intended to apply theoretical concepts to a variety of organizational situations from a top-management perspective. The concepts and techniques of strategic management in organizations will be the focus of this course. Topics include developing a strategic vision, setting objectives and crafting a strategy. Students will be expected to develop a competitive analysis portfolio; match strategy to an organization's situation; build resource capabilities, support systems, budgets, align culture and strategy; and structure the organization to implement the organization's strategic vision in a dynamic global marketplace. Prerequisite: Completion of all other core course requirements. Credit, three hours. 617. FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS This course provides the fundamentals managers need to analyze financial statements in making non-routine decisions, as well as in discharging their day-to-day operating responsibilities. Accordingly, it addresses the following issues: (1) basic accounting and applications in the context of financial statement analysis; (2) analyses of financial position, results of operations, and cash flows; (3) intercorporate investments; (4) financial statement data issues, including "other financial data" and information economics; and (5) financial statement audit opinions. Prerequisite: Business 603. Credit, three hours. 618. ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS This course addresses the analysis, design, and installation of accounting systems, including understanding the control procedures required (with emphasis on computer-based systems). Prerequisite: Business 603. Credit, three hours. 625. INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT An exploration of the issues which face a manager operating in an international environment. The course will expose students to the constraints and opportunities in the global economy to provide an understanding strategic and functional aspects of international business management. Topics include: an overview of global management, cultural, legal, and political influences on international management; international trade and investment; transnational operations and marketing; international human resource management; cross-cultural communication and decision-making; international strategies; and organizing international enterprises. Credit, three hours. 626. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT An advanced study of the human resource management function and its importance in organizations. Discussion topics include human resource planning, selection, training and development, performance appraisal, compensation, equal employment opportunity, safety and health, and employee labor relations. The impact of laws and business trends on the human resource function is presented. The manager's role in dealing with the challenges presented by human resources is emphasized. 627. ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT A study of the models, intervention strategies, processes, and techniques for planned organizational change and development. Focus will be on system-wide change and development in complex organizations and the application of behavioral science knowledge to the planned creation and reinforcement of organizational structures, strategies, and cultures for improving organizational effectiveness. Prerequisite: Bus 605. Credit, three hours. 631. STRATEGIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS This course examines the use of information technology to achieve competitive advantage, effective decision-making, and efficient operations. The course will explore the usage of many kinds of information systems and technology in organizations and analyze their role, functions, and effects on competitive strategy and organizational operations. Prerequisite: Bus 600. Credit, three hours. 632. MANAGING ELECTRONIC COMMERCE With an emphasis on managing electronic organizations, this course examines electronic commerce infrastructures, various types of electronic commerce, issues in designing and managing on-line business, electronic payments as receivables and payables and Internet security issues. Additional topics such as database marketing will be discussed. Prerequisite: Business 600. Credit, three hours. 633. TOPICS IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS Information technology is continuously evolving as so is the usage of information systems in the ever-changing business environment. Managers need to adapt operations and processes to the latest trends in information systems and technology. This course will deal with various topics and problems in many functional areas, such as marketing, accounting, production, human resources, and management information systems with information systems and technology. Case studies and lectures will reinforce lectures. 641. INVESTMENTS AND PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT This course addresses principles in determining investment vehicles for individual and institutional investors. It focuses on investment information sources, features of various securities instruments, as well as strategies and techniques for portfolio construction, management and protection. Prerequisite: Business 604. Credit, three hours. 642. DERIVATIVE SECURITIES AND RISK MANAGEMENT This course examines the fundamental issues in risk management by utilizing futures, options, swaps, and various other derivative securities. Other topics include hedging techniques, mergers and acquisitions, and financial engineering. Prerequisite: Business 641. Credit, three hours. 643. DOMESTIC AND GLOBAL FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONS This course examines structures and functions of international and domestic financial markets such as stock, bond, mortgage, and money markets. It also addresses financial management aspect of different financial institutions including banks, savings and loans association, investment companies, and pension funds. Theories of comparative advantage, foreign exchange markets, financial risk management, and funds transfer and investments will be discussed. Prerequisite: Business 604. Credit, three hours. 645. ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL ENVIRONMENT OF THE ORGANIZATION This course examines the macroeconomic and financial environment within which the organization operates. The course focuses on identifying and assessing the macroeconomic and financial factors affecting the organization and on developing strategies to deal with changes in the macro environment. Prerequisites: Business 604. Credit, three hours. 646. INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MARKETS This course examines the theory and practice of international trade and financial management issues faced by multinational corporations. The topics include theories of comparative advantage and international specialization; international trade policies and restrictions; foreign exchange markets and balance of payments; financial risk management of foreign operations; and transfer of funds and investment decisions. Prerequisite: Business 604. Credit, three hours. 650. INTERNATIONAL MARKETING This course explores the globalizations of markets and the challenges presented to business managers. The course will examine the impacts of international market segmentation, product attributes, cultural differences, economics differences, differences in product and technical standards, global advertising, and international pricing, etc. on transnational business operations. Credit, three hours. 651. SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT This course considers the components of modern-day distribution systems, with emphasis on facility location, transportation, warehousing, inventory control, and communication. Students will develop a conceptual understanding of issues relating to designing, planning, control, product design, information systems, inventory management, quality control and warehousing. Prerequisite: Business 602. Credit, three hours. 680. MBA CASE PROJECT The MBA Case Project tests the student's strategic thinking and analytic skills. There are three different approaches to the Case Project: 1) Students will be provided with the income statement and balance sheet, annual reports, and other pertinent information to make recommendations on a broad range of strategic issues facing a company. 2) Students will be provided with a portfolio and other pertinent information to make trades on investments and maximize their portfolios. 3) Students will be given a series of general management cases that cover a broad range of strategic issues facing companies. The students will submit a final presentation discussing their analysis and recommendations of the company or real-world cases they have investigated. A Project Thesis is required. Credit, three hours.  

Curriculum for Professional Pilot

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Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr AVIA-191 University Seminar I** 1 AVIA-192 University Seminar II** 1 MTSC-121 College Algebra** 3 MTSC-122 Trigonometry** 3 MVSC-100 Lifetime Fitness & Wellness** 2 MIS-105 Microcomputer Applications** 3 ENGL-101 English Composition I** 3 ENGL-102 English Composition II** 3 AVIA-321 Meteorology** 3 AVIA-103 Instrument Rating** 3 AVIA-102 Private Pilot Certification** 3 AVIA-103L Instrument Rating Lab** 1 AVIA-102L Private Pilot Lab** 1         Total Credits 16   Total Credits 14 Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr ENGL-xxx Literature I* 3 ENGL-xxx Literature II* 3 PHYS-111 Intro to Physics I 3 PHYS-112 Intro to Physics II 3 PHYS-111 Intro to Physics I Lab 1 PHYS-112 Intro to Physics II Lab 1 MTSC-251 Calculus I** 4 MGMT-205 Management Processes** 4 AVIA-201 Basic Aircraft Systems** 3 AVIA-310 Flight Safety* 3 AVIA-201L Commercial Pilot Lab I** 1 AVIA-202 Commercial Pilot Certification** 3       AVIA-202L Commercial Pilot Lab II .67   Total Credits 14-15   Total Credits 17.67 Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr PSYC-201 Intro to Psychology 3 ENGL-327 Interpersonal Communications 3 xx-xxx Foreign Language I 3 xx-xxx Foreign Language II 3 AVIA-307 Advanced Aircraft Systems** 3 AVIA-350 Air Traffic Control** 3 AVIA-307L Commercial Pilot Lab III** 1 AVIA-301 Multi-Engine Rating** 1 AVIA-305 Adv Aero & Aircraft Perf** 3 AVIA-361L Multi-Engine Rating Lab** .33 ENGL-200 Speech* 3 MGMT-305 Management Information Sys** 3       GLST-395 Global Societies** 3   Total Credits 16   Total Credits 16.33 Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr HIST-xxx History Elective 3 AVIA-450 International Air Transport*** 3 AVIA-317 Human Factors in Aviation** 3 xx-xxx Arts/Humanities Elective 3 AVIA-333 Crew Resource Management** 3 AVIA-489 Aviation Legislation** 3 MGMT-325 Organizational Behavior** 3 AVIA-402 CFI-Instrument** 3 AVIA-401 CFI-Airplane** 3 AVIA-431L CFI-Instrument Lab** .33 AVIA-401L CFI-Lab** .67                     Total Credits 15.67   Total Credits 12.33                   *    Writing Intensive Course(s) **   Grade of “C” or better required in all Management Core (40/41/42/46/520 and       Aviation Major Requirements (49) *** Senior Capstone Course, which also satisfies the General Education Requirements Total Credits: 122-123  

Curriculum for Aviation Management

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Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr AVIA-191 University Seminar I** 1 AVIA-192 University Seminar II** 1 MTSC-121 College Algebra** 3 MTSC-125 Finite Math** 3 MVSC-100 Lifetime Fitness & Wellness** 2 MIS-105 Microcomputer Applications** 3 ENGL-101 English Composition I** 3 ENGL-102 English Composition II** 3 HIST-xxx History Elective 3 PSYC-201 Intro to Psychology 3 AVIA-102 Private Pilot Certification** 3 ENGL-xxx Foreign Language I 3 AVIA-102L Private Pilot Lab** (optional) 1         Total Credits 15-16   Total Credits 16 Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr ENGL-xxx Literature I(201,202,205,206)* 3 ENGL-xxx Literature II(201,202,205,206)* 3 xx-xxx Foreign Language II 3 MGMT-205 Management Processes** 4 PHYS-111 Intro to Physics I 3 PHYS-112 Intro to Physics II 3 PHYS-111 Intro to Physics I Lab 1 PHYS-112 Intro to Physics II Lab 1 MTSC-225 Calculus for Business & Social Sci.** 3 AVIA-310 Flight Safety* 3 ENGL-200 Speech* 3 MGMT-208 Intro to Statistics**         or         MTSC-341 Probability 3   Total Credits    16   Total Credits  17 Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr AVIA-370 Airport Planning & Management* 3 HRM-320 Human Resources Management 3 ACCT-201 Accounting I** 3 ACCT-203 Accounting for Decision Making** 3 GLST-395 Global Societies** 3 MGMT-305 Management Info Systems** 3 xx-xxx Free Elective 3 MTSC-350 Air Traffic Control** 3 ECON-201 Macroeconomics** 3         Total Credits 15   Total Credits 12 Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr HRM-330 Management/Employee Relations 3 AVIA-450 International Air Transport*** 3 AVIA-333 Crew Resource Management** 3 MKT-300 Principles of Marketing** 3 ENGL-327 Interpersonal Communications 3 AVIA-489 Aviation Legislation** 3 MGMT-325 Organizational Behavior** 3 AVIA-312 Operations Management** 3 MGMT-440 International Management** 3 AVIA-440 Airline Management* 3   Total Credits 15   Total Credits 15                   *     Writing Intensive Course(s) **   Grade of “C” or better required in all Management Core (40/41/42/46/520 and        Aviation Major Requirements (49) *** Senior Capstone Course, which also satisfies the General Education Requirements.   Total Credits: 121-122

Course Descriptions for Aviation

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  AVIA-101. INTRODUCTION TO AERONAUTICS. 3:3:0 Presents an overview of aviation, enabling the student to gain an appreciation of the complexities of the field of aeronautics. Course content includes historical background, fundamentals of flight and aeronautical technology, the social and economic impact of aerospace and future development, and government regulation. Credit, three (3) hours. AVIA-102. PRIVATE PILOT CERTIFICATION. 3:3:3 Academic studies in preparation for the experience of flying and preparation for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) written and oral examinations for the Private Pilot Certification. Materials covered include basic aerodynamics, elementary aircraft systems, aviation navigation, safety, weather, aviation physiology, and FAA Regulations. Incorporates 45 hours of ground instruction and 45 hours of flight instruction. Three (3) hours lecture. Credit, three hours. AVIA-102L. PRIVATE PILOT LAB. 1:0:1.5 Provides the students with the flight time and instruction to complete all maneuvers and operations required to earn the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Private Pilot Certificate. Course includes all dual and solo flights, and evaluation flights and oral and flight examinations administered by the FAA or appointed examiners. Course consists of 45 hours of flight training. Three flight hours and one and one-half hours pre- & post-flight briefing per week. Prerequisite or corequisite: Airway Science 102 or permission of department Chairperson. Credit, 1 hour. AVIA-103. INSTRUMENT RATING. 3:3:0 Academic studies in preparation for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) written and oral examinations for the Instrument Rating. Information covered includes aircraft instrument systems, ground-based instrument systems, normal and emergency practices and procedures related to flying under Instrument Meteorological conditions, and FAA Regulations related to flying under Instrument Flight Rules (IFR). Consists of 45 hours of ground instruction and 45 hours of flight training. Three hours lecture per week. Credit, three hours. AVIA-103L. INSTRUMENT RATING LAB. 1:0:1.5 Provides the student with the flight time and instruction to complete all maneuvers and operations required to earn the FAA Instrument Rating. Course includes all evaluation flights and certification and oral examinations administered by the FAA or its appointed examiners. Course consists of 45 hours of flight training. Three flight hours and one and one-half hour pre- & post-flight briefing per week. Prerequisites or corequisite: Airway Science 103 or permission of department Chairperson. Credit, one hour. AVIA-201. BASIC AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 Academic studies in preparation for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) written and oral examinations for the Commercial Pilot Certificate. Materials covered include intermediate aircraft systems, safety, aviation physiology, aircraft avionics, and CRM. Consists of 45 hours of flight instruction and 45 hours of ground instruction. Three hours lecture per week. Credit, three hours. AVIA-201L. COMMERCIAL I LAB. 1:0:1.5 Provides the student with the flight time and instruction to learn and practice commercial pilot maneuvers and advanced cross-country flying in preparation for the FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate. Course includes an evaluation. All flights are performed in single engine airplanes with fixed landing gear. Course consists of 50 hours of flight training. Three flight hours and one and one-half hours of pre- & post-flight briefing per week. Prerequisite or corequisite: Airway Science 201 or permission of department Chairperson. Credit, 1 hour. AVIA-202. COMMERCIAL PILOT. 3:3:0 Academic studies in preparation for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) written and oral examinations for the Commercial Pilot Certificate. Materials covered include intermediate aerodynamics, intermediate aircraft systems, intermediate aviation navigation under Visual Flight Rules (VFR), safety, weather, aviation physiology, and FAA Regulations related to the commercial pilot. Consists of 45 hours of flight instruction. Credit, three hours. AVIA-202L. COMMERCIAL PILOT LAB II Provides the student with the flight time and instruction to continue to learn and practice the commercial pilot maneuvers and advanced cross country flying in preparation for the FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate.  Course includes an evaluation.  Course consists of 29 hours of flight training.  Prerequisite: 49-201L or permission of the program Director or department Chairperson.  Credit, .67 hours. AVIA-301. MULTIENGINE RATING. 1:1:0 Academic studies in preparation for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA oral examination for the Multiengine Airplane Class Rating. Information covered includes multiengine aerodynamics and systems, safety, and FAA Regulations relevant to multiengine flight. Consists of 15 hours of ground instruction and 12 hours of flight training. One hour lecture per week. Prerequisite: Airway Science 227 (Commercial Pilot Flight Lab VII). Credit, one hour. AVIA-305. ADVANCED AERODYNAMICS AND AIRCRAFT PERFORMANCE. 3:3:0 Academic studies covering advanced aerodynamic theories and their application. Includes airfoil shape, drag, velocity, lift, thrust, stability and control. Also included are advanced principles of performance including airplane capabilities and limitations, performance design criteria, load factors, weight and balance, comparative analysis of aircraft and aircraft certification. Three hours lecture per week. Credit, three hours. AVIA-307. ADVANCED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS. 3:3:0 The study of advanced systems currently in use in aircraft flown by the airlines. This course provides knowledge necessary to successfully complete the FAA Flight Engineer written examination. Three hours lecture per week. Credit, three hours. AVIA-307L. COMMERCIAL PILOT LAB III Provides the student with the flight time and instruction to complete all maneuvers required to earn the FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate.  Course includes all evaluation flight and certification and oral examinations administered by the FAA or its appointed examiners.  Course consists of 36 hours of flight training.  Prerequisite: 49-202L or permission of the program Director or department Chairperson.  Credit, 1 hour. AVIA-310. FLIGHT SAFETY. 3:3:0 Presentation and analysis of factors and procedures relating to aviation safety. Discusses techniques for accident prevention, development of safety programs, procedures used in accident investigation, physiological and psychological factors relating to aviation safety, the role weather plays in safety. Three hours lecture per week. Credit, three hours. AVIA-312. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 Management techniques and administrative functions as they apply to the aviation industry. Includes planning, economic and resource considerations, problems, current issues and future trends related to aviation operations. Three hours lecture per week. Credit, three hours. AVIA-317. HUMAN FACTORS IN AVIATION. 3:3:0 A study of cockpit resource management as applied in commercial air carriers. Includes pilot-in-command responsibilities; decision making; cockpit communications; interpersonal relationships; cockpit procedures; physiological and psychological factors and their role in accidents. A study is made of advances in aircraft and equipment and procedures to minimize human error and its effects. Credit, three hours. AVIA-321. METEOROLOGY. 3:3:0 Basic theories of weather, atmospheric conditions, and climate, as they apply to flight. Explores the physical processes affecting the atmospheric environment and their relationships. Includes the principles of forecasting and an introduction to meteorological instrumentation. Three hours lecture per week. Credit, three hours. AVIA-333. CREW RESOURCE MANAGEMENT The course will examine the concepts of Crew Resource Management currently practiced in military, commercial and corporate aviation.  The role of crew supervision and training, organized labor, leadership styles, and management oversight will be studied.  Students will gain an understanding of the aviation operational characteristics that gave rise to the implementation of CRM training. The CRM course has the goal to familiarize students with contemporary training models used in crew education with the intent of enabling course participants to apply learned philosophies and strategies to their individual aviation experience.  Credit, three hours. AVIA-350. AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL. 3:3:0 A study of the national air traffic control system with emphasis on basic air traffic control procedures; the roles of Center, Approach Control, Tower, and Flight Service Station. Includes communications, navigation procedures, radar operations, facilities. Three hours lecture per week. Credit, three hours. AVIA-360. THE NATIONAL AIRSPACE SYSTEM. 3:3:0 An overview of the proposed NAS. Covers problems encountered in implementing the system, airspace allocation and usage, facilities, safety considerations, new developments in electronic navigation and control systems, economic impact, social and political implications. Three hours lecture per week. Credit, three hours. AVIA-361. MULTIENGINE FLIGHT LAB. .33:0:1.5 Provides the student with the flight time and instruction to complete all maneuvers and operations required in preparation to earn the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Multiengine Airplane Class Rating. Course includes an evaluation flight and Certification oral and practical examinations administered by the FAA or its appointed examiners. One hour flight, one-half hour pre- & post-flight briefing per week. Prerequisite or corequisite: Airway Science 301. Prerequisite: Airway Science 227 (Commercial Flight Lab VII). Credit, .33 hours. AVIA-370. AIRPORT PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 A comprehensive study of airport operations and management. Includes the analysis of the role of the airport manager in planning, finance and administration, public relations, social, political and environmental considerations; operational requirements and facility maintenance. Three hours lecture per week. Credit, three hours. AVIA-401. CFI-AIRPLANE. 3:2:3 Academic studies in preparation for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) written and oral examination for the Flight Instructor Airplane Certificate. Information covered includes the fundamentals of instruction in classrooms, in one-to-one situations, and in airplane cockpits. Also included is analysis of student performance and evaluation of aviation students in academics and in practical situations and the regulatory responsibilities of the Certificated Flight Instructor (CFI). Consists of 25 hours of flight and 25 hours of ground instruction. Prerequisite: Airway Science 202. Three hours lecture per week. Credit, three hours. AVIA-401L. CFI-AIRPLANE LAB. 66:0:2.0 Provides the student with the flight time and instruction to demonstrate, teach, and evaluate performance of students in all maneuvers and operations required to earn the Private Pilot and Commercial Pilot Certificates. The student will be prepared to successfully complete the FAA Flight Instructor-Airplanes (CFI-A) oral and practical examinations administered by the FAA or its appointed examiners. Two hours flight, one hour pre- & post-flight briefing per week. Prerequisite: Airway Science 202L, Commercial Pilot Certification or permission of department Chairperson. Credit, .66 hours each. AVIA-402. CFI-INSTRUMENT. 3:3:1 Academic studies in preparation for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) written and oral examinations for the Flight Instructor (CFI) Instruments Certificate. Information covered includes a review of the body of knowledge required of the Instrument rated pilot, and methods of imparting this knowledge to students. The regulatory responsibilities of the Certificated Flight Instructor (CFI) are reviewed and emphasized. Consists of 25 hours of ground instruction and 25 hours of flight instruction. Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisite: Airway Science 202, Junior Standing. Credit, three hours. AVIA-431. CFI-INSTRUMENT LAB. .33:0:1.5 Provides the student with the flight time and instruction to demonstrate, teach, and evaluate performance of students in all maneuvers and operations required to earn the FAA Instrument Rating. The student will be prepared to successfully complete the FAA Certificated Flight Instructor-Instrument (CFI-I) oral and practical examinations administered by the FAA or its appointed examiners. Prerequisite or corequisite Airway Science 402. Credit, .33 hours. AVIA-440. CONCEPTS OF AIR TRANSPORT UTILIZATION. 3:3:0 A study of the factors involved in the effective use of aircraft in the transportation of passengers and cargo. Includes aircraft design, suitability, cost effectiveness, operational and marketing considerations and social implications. Three hours lecture per week. Credit, three hours. AVIA-444. SENIOR CAPSTONE. 3:3:0 Provides the student with an understanding of the aviation professions, his/her role in professions in the near- and long-term, and strategies for gaining employment within the profession. Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisite, Senior Standing. Credit, three hours. AVIA-450. AIR TRANSPORTATION. 3:3:0 A survey of the historical development of the air transportation system covering facilities, impact of regulations, problems encountered in commercial air transportation, future requirements, airline operations, economics, and social implications. Three hours lecture per week. Credit, three hours. AVIA-470. CFI-MULTIENGINE. 1:1:0 Academic studies in preparation for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) written and oral examinations for the Flight Instruct or Multiengine Certificate. Information covered includes a review of the body of knowledge required of the multiengine rated pilot, and methods of imparting this knowledge to students. The regulatory responsibilities of the Certificate Flight Instructor (CFI) are reviewed and emphasized. Consists of 15 hours of multiengine ground instruction and 15 hours of multiengine flight instruction. Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisite: Airway Science 301 and Airway Science 402, Senior Standing. Credit, two hours. AVIA-471. CFI-MULTIENGINE LAB. .33:0:1.5 Provides the student with the flight time and instruction to demonstrate, teach and evaluate performance of students in all maneuvers and operations required to earn the FAA Multiengine Rating. The student will be prepared to successfully complete the FAA Certificated Flight Instructor-Multiengine (CFI-ME) oral and practical examinations administered by the FAA or its appointed examiners. One hour flight, one-half hour pre- & post-flight briefing per week. Prerequisite or Corequisite: Airway Science 470. Credit, .33 hour. AVIA-489. AVIATION LEGISLATION. 3:3:0 This course emphasizes legal concepts concerning aviation as related to operation, contracts, insurance and liability, regulatory, statutes, law and case law. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. Three hours lecture per week. Credit, three hours. AVIA-499. PRACTICUM. 1-3:0:0 Involves selected practical experience in aviation, appropriate to the degree option being pursued. Experience may be within the Delaware State University environment or elsewhere within the aviation industry. Prerequisite: Senior Standing. Credit, one to three hours.  

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