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Professional Pilot

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Introduction Little-known fact: Delaware State operates the only full-service, university-based flight school in the mid-Atlantic area. We offer very affordable fees, expert professional pilot instructors, and a state-of-the-art fleet of planes. Students spend hundreds of hours in the cockpit, while getting classroom instruction on airplane mechanics, air traffic control, engines and instruments, aviation, law, and other aspects of flight operations. Upon completion of their Aviation Professional Pilot degree, students are qualified to operate commercial airlines, charter planes, corporate jets, and military aircraft. With the nation’s pilot workforce rapidly aging, employment prospects are bright for young pilots: Experts project the industry will soon need to hire 9,000 or more new pilots per year. In the 20-year history of Delaware State’s flight school, 100 percent of our graduates have gone on to careers in the aviation industry. Professional Preparation In the course of fulfilling Professional Pilot program requirements, students will earn their FAA licenses for Private Pilot, Instrument, Commercial, Multi-Engine, Certified Flight Instructor, Certified Flight Instructor-Instrument. The flight program is approved by the State of Delaware Education Department for Veterans Flight Training. Faculty All members of the Delaware State flight school faculty have spent many years working in flight operations. Their backgrounds cover all sectors within the industry, including military, commercial, and private planes; airport management; air traffic control; safety and regulation; and aerodynamic engineering and product design. As a result, students are exposed to a broad range of perspectives and insights. All of our faculty are committed to the program values of dedication, safety, unity, an attitude of success, and professionalism. Research and Experience The Aviation Professional Pilot program offers many opportunities for career development and networking. Our internship agreements with Continental Airlines and DuPont Aviation enable students to develop real-world experience and skills within the flight operations industry. We also maintain close ties with the local chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen and the Organization of Black Airline Pilots (OBAP), offering an Aviation Career Education (ACE) Camp and the OBAP Solo Flight Academy.     
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Aviation Management

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Introduction  In addition to educating pilots, the Aviation Program at Delaware State lays a strong foundation for a wide range of careers in the aviation industry. With an Aviation Management degree, students gain first-hand experience and knowledge in subjects such as airport management air and ground safety economics and finance personnel management aviation law and regulations Employers seek out Delaware State’s aviation graduates because the program has such a good track record. Our students have access to excellent facilities and a first-rate faculty, and they have gone on to great success as airport administrators, air traffic controllers, industry analysts, transportation regulators, and executives for aviation corporations. In the 20-year history of our flight school, 100 percent of our graduates have gained employment within the aviation industry. Professional Preparation A new generation of leaders is needed in air traffic control and airport administration, as the current generation is rapidly approaching retirement age. With an Aviation Management degree, graduates will be qualified to fill those vacancies. We have an excellent working relationship with the Delaware River and Bay Authority (DRBA). Many of our undergraduates have work-study jobs with DRBA during school, and/or gain full-time jobs there after graduation. The Aviation program is approved by the State of Delaware Education Department for Veterans Flight Training. Faculty All members of the Delaware State flight school faculty have spent many years working in the aviation industry. Their backgrounds cover all sectors within the industry, including military, commercial, and private planes; airport management; air traffic control; safety and regulation; and aerodynamic engineering and product design. As a result, students are exposed to a broad range of perspectives and insights. All our faculty are committed to the program values of dedication, safety, unity, an attitude of success, and professionalism. Research and Experience The Aviation Management program offers many opportunities for professional development and networking. Our internship relationships with Continental Airlines, DuPont Aviation, and the DRBA enable students to develop real-world experience and skills within the aviation industry. We also maintain close ties with the local chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen and the Organization of Black Airline Pilots (OBAP), offering an Aviation Career Education (ACE) Camp and the OBAP Solo Flight Academy.  airport management air and ground safety economics and finance personnel management aviation law and regulations  
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•  DSU Aviation Home

•  Aviation Management

      - Curriculum for
       Aviation Management
 

      - Flight Training Fees

•  Professional Pilot

•  Graduate (MBA) Program

 

 

 

 

 

Bachelor's Programs

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  Accounting In Delaware State’s accounting program, students learn to think strategically and perform complex analysis of real-world business problems. Through a combination of classroom lecture and hands-on experience, students develop the professional skills and knowledge to succeed in this profession, while getting full preparation to gain one or more credentials as a certified management accountant (CMA), certified internal auditor (CIA), or certified public accountant (CPA). Because many states require students to complete 150 hours before sitting for the CPA exam, Delaware State offers a five-year, 150-hour program in which students earn both an undergraduate accounting degree and an MBA. Business Economics The Business Economics concentration will prepare students for careers in business, government, law, or academics by providing them with a sound understanding of economic theory and the ability to apply the tools of economic analysis in decision making. The analytical and quantitative skills developed in this concentration will enhance the students’ career opportunities in a rapidly changing economy, which requires that individuals be able to absorb new information quickly. The concentration in Business Economics consists of 18 credit hours. Twelve (12) of these credits are required, and six (6) may be satisfied by choosing elective courses in Business Economics. The additional hours must be selected in consultation with the student’s advisor. Finance And Banking Students choosing to concentrate in Finance & Banking will master the functional areas of the field including the study of financial management, investments, financial markets and institutions, international finance and new venture financing. Students are prepared as professionals skilled in the acquisition, development, and utilization of funds for economic and social purposes. Students can also choose the option of pursuing graduate studies. The concentration in Finance & Banking consists of 18 credit hours. Twelve (12) of these credits are required, and six (6) may be satisfied by choosing from elective courses in Finance and Banking listed. The additional hours must be selected in consultation with the student’s advisor.  

Delaware Center for Enterprise Development

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Welcome! The Delaware Center for Enterprise Development (DCED) has a proven record of providing programs and services for entrepreneurs in the state of Delaware.  DCED assists in starting and growing businesses through an array of services. The mission of the Delaware Center for Enterprise Development is to educate current and prospective entrepreneurs and enterprise managers through training programs, technical and managerial assistance and by providing access to capital.  DCED provides business training and entrepreneurial education for youth and adults; operates a commercial kitchen incubator; provides specialized classes and workshops for small business owners, offers one-on-one technical assistance to entrepreneurs and operates a mobile training classroom.   DCED can also arrange consulting services for Spanish speaking business owners. The DCED staff can provide technical assistance in all areas of business start-up and development.  Many clients are in the pre-venture stage and require basic knowledge for starting a business. DCED assists these clients by offering unlimited free one-on-one consulting sessions to guide each business through the start-up process.  DCED also provides free or low-cost workshops and training to support business success and growth.  Some workshops offered include: QuickBooks, Successful Proposal Writing, Remarkable Marketing, Financing your Business and ServSafe® Food Safety Certification.  The strengths of DCED are primarily in its ability to deliver timely, high quality training and consulting services to entrepreneurs while assisting them with access to markets and networks.   If you are a start-up or established business owner who needs to strengthen your business knowledge and skills to move to the next level; I hope you will take advantage of the services offered by DCED.  We welcome the opportunity to help turn your entrepreneurial dreams into a reality!  We look forward to serving you! Lillie Crawford Director Programs Food Business Incubator Center Small Business Workshops Junior Entrepreneurs in Training (JET) Wall Street 101 Mobile Entrepreneurial Training (MET) Success Stories
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Staff Profile


Lillie Crawford
Director
Phone: 302.857.6954

Audrey Scott-Hynson
Manager Food Business Incubation Center and JET Instructor
Phone:  302.857.6951
 

Marketing

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  Introduction The marketing major offers preparation for professional leadership roles in a wide variety of careers. Graduates of the program commonly go into advertising, product management, public relations, customer service, sales, retailing, research, market analysis and data management. Delaware State’s international faculty provide students with the global perspective to compete successfully for jobs in the growing fields of transnational marketing, trade, and distribution. Marketing students cultivate superior communication skills, which are crucial to the success of any organization in the media-driven environment of the 21st century. They also tackle project-based assignments that involve real-world problems, while developing the ability to think creatively, strategically, and analytically. Professional Preparation The three-course Professional Development sequence, required of all majors in the College of Business, provides career enrichment and preparation. Spread out across the sophomore, junior, and senior years, it cultivates success-oriented attitudes, behaviors, and habits of mind. Students develop specific skills such as public speaking and presentations writing networking time management negotiation dressing for success teamwork and leadership Most program courses meet in the Bank of America building, a professional learning environment that features multimedia classrooms, seminar rooms, distance-learning capabilities, and state-of-the-art computer facilities. Faculty Diversity is a major strength for the Delaware State business faculty. We call our department the “mini-United Nations,” because our professors come from six different countries. Faculty are heavily involved in research and actively publish their findings in leading journals in their respective fields. They also are well connected professionals who use their networks and personal experience to guide students in their career development. Delaware State instructors offer a lot of individual attention and mentorship, including guidance in the job market. Research and Experience All students in the College of Business gather first-hand observations and experience by completing as a management exposure experience (MEE), a 200-hour internship or mentoring relationship. In addition, all College of Business students can take part in programs sponsored by the Delaware Center for Enterprise Development, headquartered right on the DSU campus.          

Management Information Systems

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  Introduction In the business environment of the 21st century, no resource is more valuable than information. It drives strategic planning, personnel decisions, marketing, investment, product development, and nearly every other aspect of an organization. A degree in Management Information Systems (MIS) prepares students for leadership roles in this critical, exciting discipline. Delaware State’s program is built around interactive assignments that build highly marketable, workplace-ready skills. Students gain first-hand experience working with computer hardware and software networking programming languages specialized software communications software the Internet Graduates enter the job market with a suite of professional skills and a broad, multidisciplinary understanding of management, organizational behavior, the economy, technology, and global competition. Professional Preparation Graduates with a management information systems degree can compete successfully for employment in positions such as software designer, network analyst, programmer, database administrator, and research specialist. The three-course Professional Development sequence, required of all majors in the College of Business, provides career enrichment and preparation. Spread out across the sophomore, junior, and senior years, it cultivates success-oriented attitudes, behaviors, and habits of mind. Students develop specific skills such as public speaking and presentations writing networking time management negotiation dressing for success teamwork and leadership Most program courses meet in the Bank of America building, a professional learning environment that features multimedia classrooms, seminar rooms, distance-learning capabilities, and state-of-the-art computer facilities. Faculty Diversity is a major strength for the Delaware State business faculty. We call our department the “mini-United Nations,” because our professors come from six different countries. Faculty are heavily involved in research and actively publish their findings in leading journals in their respective fields. They also are well connected professionals who use their networks and personal experience to guide students in their career development. Delaware State instructors offer a lot of individual attention and mentorship, including guidance in the job market. Research and Experience All students in the College of Business gather first-hand observations and experience by completing as a management exposure experience (MEE), a 200-hour internship or mentoring relationship. In addition, all College of Business students can take part in programs sponsored by the Delaware Center for Enterprise Development, headquartered right on the DSU campus.        

General Management

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  Introduction The General Management major at Delaware State provides a broad foundation for leadership careers in all types of organizations, including corporations, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations. Our faculty is extremely diverse and offers an international perspective, with valuable insights into the global economy of the 21st century. Students in the general management program gain a solid understanding of current issues in organizational management, the global competitive environment, economic trends, and cutting-edge technology. They also develop specific problem-solving skills and gain practical experience through internships, team- and project-based assignments, and real-world case studies. Delaware State’s hands-on orientation, and the global perspective of our faculty, provide our graduates with two big competitive advantages when they enter the job market. Professional Preparation The three-course Professional Development sequence, required of all majors in the College of Business, provides career enrichment and preparation. Spread out across the sophomore, junior, and senior years, it cultivates success-oriented attitudes, behaviors, and habits of mind. Students develop specific skills such as public speaking and presentations writing networking time management negotiation dressing for success teamwork and leadership Most program courses meet in the Bank of America building, a professional learning environment that features multimedia classrooms, seminar rooms, distance-learning capabilities, and state-of-the-art computer facilities. Faculty Diversity is a major strength for the Delaware State business faculty. We call our department the “mini-United Nations,” because our professors come from six different countries. Faculty are heavily involved in research and actively publish their findings in leading journals in their respective fields. They also are well connected professionals who use their networks and personal experience to guide students in their career development. Delaware State instructors offer a lot of individual attention and mentorship, including guidance in the job market. Research and Experience All students in the College of Business gather first-hand observations and experience by completing as a management exposure experience (MEE), a 200-hour internship or mentoring relationship. In addition, all College of Business students can take part in programs sponsored by the Delaware Center for Enterprise Development, headquartered right on the DSU campus.

Internship Program

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  Purpose Employment while attending college provides a unique opportunity for students to bring together corporate experience and business concepts. As students strive to prepare to meet the dynamic challenges of the business world they must also incorporate the more practical processes and skills necessary as a foundation for long-term success. Internships and Cooperative Education Programs not only provide exposure to the work place while attending college, they can also improve the participants' chances for permanent employment. Moreover, students develop a work ethic, a sense of accomplishment, and increased self-confidence as a result of the experience. College of Business majors are encouraged to pursue internship opportunities as early as possible, preferably at the beginning of the sophomore year. The Advisement Center and the Department Chairpersons assist students in their internship search strategies. Three to six credit hours are applied to the student's curriculum depending on the type and length of the position. Procedures The COB Advisement Center assists students in their internship search strategies. Once a student obtains an internship the student must register for the internship class for that semester that he/she is planning to participate in the internship program. Students in search of internships may seek assistance from the COB Advisement Center (COBAC). COBAC maintains a log of various internship programs and opportunities offered by an array of businesses. Moreover, internship information from the University's Office of Career Services is filtered through the Advisement Center. The Director guides students through the process of obtaining an internship search, selection, application, interviewing, and assignment. Once a selection has been made, the student must register for the internship as they would for a class, in either COBAC or their Department Chairperson's Office so that the student may receive credit towards the completion of their degree requirements. In addition, the student should complete an application and submit it accompanied by a resume to COBAC. Benefits Students: An opportunity to introduce our majors to corporate culture and begin to cultivate professional "habits of mind" early in their matriculation. Internship Providers: An opportunity to participate in the development of potential employees. An opportunity to "give back"; community service. Positive advertisement Qualifications Student: At least a 2.75 GPA (unless otherwise approved by the Department Chairperson) Posses U.S. residency or citizenship Sophomore-senior classification (unless otherwise approved by the Department Chairperson) Successfully completed Professional Development I Course, 41-255 Meet the qualifications of the employer Internship Provider: Provide a clearly defined job title and description of tasks. Number of hours and days intern will work per week Rate of compensation Location of internship Time period of internship Name of interns supervisor Employment benefits intern is eligible for if any Termination The internship may be terminated at any time for any of the following reasons: Student: Written letter of resignation Failure to maintain academic standards Medical disability Internship Provider: Administrative reasons (e.g., budget constraints, misconduct) Unsatisfactory performance Note: If a student leaves a job without prior approval of the COB and the employer he/she will receive a failing grade for the internship and be dropped from the Program. If a student is dismissed by an employer and the Internship Coordinator and Department Chairperson agree that there was due cause for dismissal, the student will receive a failing grade for the internship and will be dropped from the Program. If the student experiences serious difficulties with an internship position, he/she should discuss this with the employer as soon as possible. Poor performance by students may jeopardize other participants in the program by losing valuable job placements for the program. The student must abide by all guidelines outlined in the College of Business Internship Program.

Visiting Management Professionals Forum

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Introduction The Visiting Management Professionals Forum is a valuable resource to the students of the College of Business for the following reasons: Professionals from the business community will share information regarding the companies they represent and the industries they are involved in. You will have the unique opportunity to network with the representatives from prestigious and successful organizations. Our guests will offer you words of wisdom and encouragement to assist you as you strive for excellence in your developmental process. Primary Objectives Inform students of current business trends, techniques, and opportunities; Provide positive role models; Motivate students to pursue vigorously the precepts of excellence and achievement; Leadership development. Attire Appropriate business attire is mandatory to attend the forums and is suggested attire when attending other professional development activities on campus. The ultimate professional attire for both males and females is a suit. We understand that everyone may not possess a suit. However, it would behoove you, as managers and executives of the future, to begin forming a professional wardrobe. Professional attire will be an essential part of your professional persona. The following attire is permissible for attending the forum and other professional development activities on campus: Young Ladies: Suits - dark blue, black or gray in color; Jacket/blazer with trousers or an at least knee length skirt, and white shirt or white blouse; and hosiery or socks; Dress shoes; no open toe sandals will be permitted. Young Men: Suits - dark blue, black or gray in color; Jacket/blazer with dress trousers and white dress shirt with conservative colored tie and socks; Dress shoes. Please be advised that the following attire is not permissible in the forums: denim clothing of any kind, khaki pants, sneakers, combat or steel-toed boots, tight fitting clothing or low -cut blouses; shorts; sandals; tanks or halter tops; Capri pants; mini skirts; long or short skirts with thigh-high slits, comical ties and bare legs. Students who are not dressed in appropriate business attire, as previously outlined, will be turned away at the door. Volunteer You are welcome to visit the College of Business Advisement Center, Suite 108, Bank of America Building, or contact us at (302) 857-6971, 6904, 6905, 6943 or 6907 to volunteer for the following activities: Distributing handouts as students enter the Longwood Auditorium; Introducing our guest speaker(s) and Presenting our guest speaker(s) with a token of our appreciation. Forum Luncheon Following each Forum, a luncheon will be served in the University Club, on the third floor, of the Bank of America Building, room 308 to accommodate our guest(s) and a few students. ONLY 8-10 people will be served. If you would like to attend a luncheon, please note the following: If you would like to have lunch with a certain speaker, you must come to the Advisement Center to sign-up to attend a luncheon prior to the speakers' designated presentation date. If you realize that you will not be able to attend the luncheon, please contact the Advisement Center as soon as possible so that we can arrange for another student to attend in your absence. House Rules Please Do Not: expect to be admitted into the Lecture Hall after 11:10 a.m.; appear unpleasant; bring CD players, radios, and the like into the Lecture Hall; wear headphones while the Forum is in session; chew gum, eat food, or drink beverages in the Lecture Hall; sit in the back when there a plenty of seats in the front; blurt out questions or comments. Wait until your raised hand has been acknowledged; talk while the speaker is talking; ask the speakers personal probing questions; and attempt to leave the Lecture Hall until you have been dismissed (except in the case of an emergency). Remember to: dress in appropriate business attire; use the restroom and to take care of any personal needs prior to entering the Lecture Hall. Once the program begins, students will not be excused from the Lecture Hall except in the case of an emergency or prior approval has been given; turn off all pagers and cell phones; come professionally dressed and prepared to converse with the speaker(s); stand and speak strongly and clearly when addressing the speakers; remove your hats, bandanas, [hair] do rags, scarves (unless the scarf is a headdress), and the like from your head prior to entering the Lecture Hall; be attentive; and get a ticket before you exit the Lecture Hall if you are required to. Know that if you leave the Lecture Hall without receiving a ticket, you will be denied a ticket if you return to request one. Please note: It is mandatory for students enrolled in University Seminar courses and any Professional Development courses to attend the Forums. Should a student be unable to attend a Forum for any reason, you are responsible for make-up assignments assigned by the instructor and in accordance with the course syllabus.

Frequently Asked Questions

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#How do I register for classes? #How many credit hours do I need to take to be considered full-time? #What is considered a normal course load? #What are the expectations of an academic advisor? #What are the expectations of an advisee? #How do I add/drop a class? #How do you know your student classification? #What do I do if I am having academic difficulties? #Are tutoring Services available? #Where do I go if I have a learning disability? #What is an incomplete and how long do I have to remove the “I”? #What is a prerequisite? #How do I change my major? #What are the requirements to declare a minor? #How many credits do I need to satisfy my degree requirements? #How do I transfer classes from another institution to Delaware State University?   How do I register for classes? The College of Business Advisement Center works closely with the departments during the registration process. During the pre-registration and registration period, each student must make an appointment with his/her advisor to review their selection of courses for the next semester, summer classes, or classes requested to take at another institution. Students should bring with them a course request form and a copy of their academic transcript to assure accurate advisement. How many credit hours do I need to take to be considered full-time? The minimum course load for full-time status is 12 credit hours per semester. A full-time student is normally expected to complete 30 credit hours of course-work each academic year (Fall, Spring and Summer terms); and must complete a minimum of 24 hours of course work each academic year to qualify for financial aid. In addition, full-time students must meet the academic regulations stated elsewhere in the University catalog. What is considered a normal course load? A normal load is 12-18 credit hours per semester. What are the expectations of an academic advisor? Clarify the academic and administrative processes of the College of Business and the University and the nature of its academic programs to the advisee. Seek to understand each advisee's particular concerns affecting academic progress. Help the advisee to understand the expected standards of achievement and likelihood of success in certain areas of study. Discuss the educational and career objectives suited to the advisee's demonstrated abilities and expressed interests. Help the advisee to understand the relationships among the courses, programs, undergraduate research opportunities, internships, study abroad programs, and other academic experiences provided by the College of Business and the University. Help the advisee to plan a course of study and give advice about courses and the adjustment of course loads. Inform the advisee about the prerequisites for subsequent courses in the advisee's program. Refer advisees to other resources when appropriate - University counseling service for example. What are the expectations of an advisee? Acquire the information needed to assume final responsibility for course scheduling, program planning, and the successful completion of all graduation requirements. Seek the academic and career information needed to meet educational goals. Become knowledgeable about the relevant policies, procedures, and rules of your chosen discipline, the COB, and the University. Be prepared with accurate information and relevant materials when contacting the advisor. Schedule and keep appointments with advisors at least twice semesterly. Consult with the advisor to decide on courses, review the accuracy of senior audits, check progress towards graduation, and discuss the suitability of other educational opportunities (scholarships, internships, study abroad, etc…) Maintain records and knowledge of administrative changes made during matriculation (add/drop slips, last day to drop classes, change of grade forms, transferred course information, etc…) How do I add/drop a class? To add/drop a class, students must complete an add/drop slip. The slip must be signed by the student’s advisor and instructor. Additional signatures apply outside of the calendar-defined add/drop periods. How do you know your student classification? Student classification is determined by the number of credits earned. Refer to the classification schedule below. Classification Credits Earned FRESHMAN 0-29 SOPHOMORE 30-59 JUNIOR 60-89 SENIOR 90 and above Students may review their academic progress online. What do I do if I am having academic difficulties? If you are experiencing academic difficulties speak to your instructors and your advisor. They will be able to refer you to the various support services available on campus. Are tutoring Services available? The Tutoring Center is located in Room 212 of the William C. Jason Library-Learning Resource Center. The Tutoring Center offers peer tutoring in many subject areas across the curriculum by appointment or on a drop-in basis during day and evening hours. Students should fill out a request form to receive services. All tutoring is free to students. The Tutor Coordinator can be reached at (302) 857-7435. Where do I go if I have a learning disability? Disabilities Services is committed to helping each student pursue a chosen field of study to the full measure of his or her ability. Students with a disability are admitted through the same application process as non-disabled students. There is no special or separate admissions procedure. Admissions counselors are available to answer questions and provide recommendations. Students with documented disabilities may receive reasonable accommodations to address their particular needs. Accommodations may include, but are not limited to, reading, writing, and note taking services, removal of any structural barriers, special arrangements for exams, and tutorial services. Further information regarding support services for students with disabilities may be obtained by contacting Laura Kurtz, Room 214A, William C. Jason Library at (302) 857-6388. What is an incomplete and how long do I have to remove the “I”? Incomplete course work due to reasons clearly beyond the control of the student will yield the grade "I". This grade must be removed by the end of the first six weeks of the next semester of the current academic year (i.e. for fall, the next semester is spring; for spring, the next semester is fall) unless prior arrangements are made in writing with the instructor, with a copy sent to the Registrar. Otherwise the grade "I" is automatically changed to "F" by the Office of Records and Registration. Academically suspended students who have "incompletes" may register only if they have removed the incompletes and achieved the necessary 2.00 average no later than the last day of the late registration period. What is the process for an administrative withdrawal? If a student, for some compelling reason (such as documented extreme personal difficulty or documented medical reason), requests to be administratively withdrawn from the University for a previous semester, then that student must follow the procedure listed below. Administrative withdrawal from the University is rarely granted, but some students' circumstances may require it. The provost and vice president for academic affairs approve approval for administrative withdrawal from the University: Student must submit in writing the request for administrative withdrawal from the University, along with documentation, to the appropriate academic dean. The request must state the reason(s) for the request and specify the semester to be withdrawn. The dean submits his or her recommendation to the provost and vice president for academic affairs. If the provost and vice president for academic affairs approve the request, then the student is reported to the Office of Registration and Records as "Administratively Withdrawn" and a grade of "WA" is assigned for all courses taken during that semester. The provost and vice president for academic affairs also inform the student in writing of his/her decision. A student who withdraws from the University on or prior to the last day to withdraw from the University will receive a grade of "W" in each course for which he/she is enrolled at that time. A student who officially withdraws from the University at any time after the last publicized date for withdrawal from the University will receive a "WA" grade in all courses for that semester. Note: If a student has received financial aid, including a refund, from Title IV funds and completed less than 60 percent of the semester from which he/she wishes to withdraw, then that student must refund the percentage of financial aid corresponding to the percentage of the semester the student has not completed. What is a prerequisite? A prerequisite is a foundation course that must be completed before advancing to a higher level course. How do I change my major? If students are considering changing their major, they should visit the Career Services Office for help exploring other fields. Members of other departments will be happy to consult with students during office hours. Students should also discuss their options with their current academic advisor. In order to change majors, the student must complete the "Change of Major and Declaration of Minor" form. This form can be obtained from Departmental Offices. The current and new chairpersons must sign the form. If the new major is in a different college, the Dean of the new college must also sign the form. After all signatures have been obtained, the new Department must submit the form to the Records Office. It is the responsibility of the student to follow up and make sure the change of major is accurately displayed in their BANNER records. What are the requirements to declare a minor? If students are considering declaring a minor, they should visit the Career Services Office for help exploring other fields. Members of other departments will be happy to consult with students during office hours. Students should also discuss their options with their current academic advisor. In order to declare a minor, the student must complete the "Change of Major and Declaration of Minor" form. This form can be obtained from Departmental Offices. The current and new chairpersons must sign the form. If the new minor is in a different college, the Dean of the new college must also sign the form. After all signatures have been obtained, the new Department must submit the form to the Records Office. It is the responsibility of the student to follow up and make sure the minor is accurately displayed in their BANNER records. How many credits do I need to satisfy my degree requirements? The number of credits needed to satisfy degree requirements vary by major. Refer to the catalog or your curriculum to find the exact number of credits required to earn your degree. How do I transfer classes from another institution to Delaware State University? Classes Taken Before Attending DSU If a student has already taken a college level course at another institution before attending DSU the Admissions Office and/or Department determine if the course fits into the student's curriculum. If a course is not equivalent to a DSU course, a Course Substitution Form could be filed if appropriate. If there is a question concerning whether or not a course can be used in the General Education Program, contact the Director of General Education, Genevieve Tighe (302.857.6649). Classes Taken While a DSU Student If a student wishes to take a course at another institution, a "Student Request to Enroll in Courses at Another Institution for Transfer Credit" form must be completed before the student begins taking the course. The credit transfers, but the grade earned is NOT included in the student's GPA. If a student is trying to raise the GPA, the course must be taken at DSU. The completed form must be submitted to the Records Office. A copy is kept in the student's file. Transfer Credit Matrix For a list of Delaware Technical & Community College and University of Delaware courses that are equivalent to DSU courses, refer to the online Transfer of Credit Matrix http://www.central.dtcc.edu/matrix/

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