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Food Business Incubator Center

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  The mission of the Food Business Incubator Center (FBIC) is to nurture, support, and sustain food and agricultural industries in the Delaware region by providing business and technical training, resources for product and process evaluation and incubation, and a trusted source for information and guidance. The kitchen incubator at Delaware State University (DSU) is managed by the Delaware Center for Enterprise Development in collaboration with the Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management (HTM). The commercial kitchen incubator is located in the Bank of America Building on DSU's Dover, Delaware campus. The incubator provides a low-cost commercial and licensed facility that can be used by food producers. Incubator tenants will time-share space according to the amount of time needed while saving considerable expense over equipping their own kitchens. The FBIC provides low-cost kitchen facilities that can be used to produce food items for business. The commercial, licensed and certified kitchen is available by appointment and provides dry and cold storage, on-site assistance and access to computers, printers, fax, copier and a variety of office equipment. If you would like additional information about the kitchen incubator, please contact Audrey Scott Hynson, Incubator Manager at (302)857-6943.

Accounting Curriculum

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    Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 41-191 University Seminar I ^ 1 41-192 University Seminar II ^ 1 25-121 College Algebra ^ 3 25-125 Finite Math^ 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness & Wellness^ 2 52-105 Microcomputer Applications 3 01-101 English Composition I ^ 3 01-102 English Composition II ^ 3 xx-xxx Natural Science Elective # 3 xx-xxx Social Science Elective# 3 34-xxx History Elective # 3 xx-xxx Foreign Language I ^ 3               Total Credits 15   Total Credits 16 Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 01-xxx Literature Elective # 3 xx-xxx Arts/Humanities Elective # 3 xx-xxx Foreign Language II ^ 3 41-205 Management Processes 4 42-201 Accounting I 3 42-202 Accounting II 3 25-225 Calculus for Business ^ 3 41-208 Intro to Statistics 3 40-201 Macroeconomics 3 40-202 Microeconomics 3 41-255 Professional Development I 1                     Total Credits 16   Total Credits 16 Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 31-395 Global Societies ^ 3 01-200 Speech ^ 3 43-300 Managerial Finance 3 42-302 Legal Environment 3 42-305 Intermediate Accounting I 3 42-306 Intermediate Accounting II 3 42-307 Cost Accounting 3 42-308 Managerial Cost Accounting 3 46-300 Principles of Marketing 3 41-201 Managerial Communications * 3       41-256 Professional Development II 1               Total Credits 15   Total Credits 16 Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 41-325 Organizational Behavior 3 41-445 Strategic Management ** 3 41-440 International Management 3 42-405 Accounting Information Systems 3 42-423 Auditing I 3 42-430 Advanced Accounting 3 42-311 Individual Taxation 3 42-427 Governmental Accounting 3 42-402 Business Law 3 42-xxx Accounting Elective 3               Total Credits 15   Total Credits 15 ^ Must receive a “C” or better in all COB courses and all courses marked with a “^” # See catalog for acceptable electives, 1 course must cover African American Experience *Writing Intensive **Senior Capstone in College of Business Total Credits: 124

Course Descriptions

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  40-201. MACROECONOMICS This course is a study of the operation and function of the American economic system. Attention is given to current economic problems, such as those relating to income, employment, business cycles, money and banking, growth, and development. Credit Hours: 3. 40-202. MICROECONOMICS This course is a study of price and output determination in a free enterprise economy, with the assumption of consumer maximization of utility and producer maximization of profits. Credit Hours: 3 40-301. INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS This course provides a comprehensive analysis of macroeconomic concepts and theories, including the following: the aggregate economic activities of national output, employment, price levels, and interest rates; the aggregate theory of consumption, investment, and the demand and supply of money; economic growth, and inflation; unemployment, and the effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policies. The course also addresses classical, neoclassical, Keynesian, new classical, monetarist, and rational expectations models of closed and open economies. Credit Hours: 3 40-303. QUANTITATIVE ECONOMIC ANALYSIS This course addresses the logic and structure of mathematics as applied to economics. Use of mathematics in the fundamental propositions of microeconomics and macroeconomics is emphasized. Topics covered include mathematical programming, differential and difference equations, and game theory, as well as other deterministic and stochastic modes. Credit Hours: 3 40-308. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS II FOR BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS This course focuses on applications of statistical techniques to economics and business. The course addresses the chi-square distribution, analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression analysis, time-series analysis, and forecasting. Statistical software packages are utilized. Credit Hours: 3 40-310. INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRIC ANALYSIS This course examines statistical methods applied to the analyses of economic models and data. It emphasizes multiple regression analysis, multicollinearity, seasonality, heteroscedasticity, auto correlation, dummy variables, time series analysis, distribution laps, and simultaneous equations. Statistical software packages are utilized. Credit Hours: 3 40-400. MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS This course focuses on the application of microeconomic principles to the firm, from the perspective of the manager. Topics covered include demand analysis, production and cost analysis, linear programming, market structure and competitive strategies, pricing practices, decision making under uncertainty, and capital budgeting. Credit Hours: 3 40-401. PUBLIC FINANCE This course is a study of the theory of public finance, principles and practices of federal, state, and local taxation, expenditures and budgeting, the public debt and fiscal policy, including their impacts upon aggregate economic activities and resource allocation. Credit Hours: 3 40-414. MONEY AND BANKING This course is a study of the commercial banking system, non-bank financial institutions, the Federal Reserve System, monetary theory and policy, and debt management. Credit Hours: 3 40-415. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS AND TRADE This course examines the theory and practice of international trade and finance. It includes consideration of the following: the theories of comparative advantage and international specialization, trade policies and trade restrictions, foreign exchange markets and balance of payments, international trade systems, financial problems of foreign operations, transfer of funds and investment decisions. The course emphasizes operational and financial problems of multinational business entities. Credit Hours: 3 40-450. INDEPENDENT STUDY This course provides an opportunity for students to participate in special research projects or to study contemporary issues in Business Economics. Credit Hours: 3 40-490. INTERNSHIP This course provides an opportunity for students to gain practical experience in business economic analysis through on-the-job assignments in businesses, government agencies, and/or other work- organizations. Credit Hours: 3 40-XXX. SELECTED TOPICS This course is an in-depth study of a topic of current interest in the Business Economics areas. Credit Hours: 3 41/03-341. BUSINESS ETHICS This course will be devoted to an examination of some of the ethical issues that arise in the field of business. Specific topics to be considered include: business ethics and ethical theory, the moral status of corporations, ethical codes of conduct in business, truth and advertising, the rights and duties of employees, affirmative action, and environmental issues in business. Credit Hours: 41-105. MANAGEMENT PROCESSES This is a cornerstone Integrated Management Course (IMC) which will orient students to the opportunities and challenges managers face in contemporary organizations. Students are introduced to the inter-relationships among the organizational functions of marketing, management, production and finance. Students will develop competencies of teamwork, communication, creative thinking, and change management. They will be charged with the responsibility to develop, operate, and exit a new enterprise. Credit Hours: 4 41-201. MANAGERIAL COMMUNICATIONS This is a practical intensive course focusing on both written and oral presentation skills. Problems, issues and technology of organizational communication are analyzed through written and oral presentations, case studies, experiential exercises and projects. Students will learn to write and speak clearly and effectively by focusing on style, organization, strategy, and persuasion. The course will also include a discussion of speaking formats, delivery, organization, and use of multi-media technology. The course is intended to improve managerial effectiveness in negotiation, persuasion and communication Credit Hours: 3 41-208. INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS This course introduces the concept of applied statistics. It addresses the following topics: data presentation; measures of central tendency; measures of variation, skewness, and kurtosis; basis probability concepts; probability distributions; sampling distributions estimation; and hypothesis testing. Credit Hours: 3 41-305. MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS The application of information systems to organizational decision-making and operations is the focus of this course. Topics include: fundamentals of information system development, management and structures of databases, query processing and report generation using computer and non-computer concepts, computer-human interface, end-user computing, and data communications and network. (Not open to Accounting Majors). Credit Hours: 3 41-306. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Production and Operations planning concepts and analytical systems will be the central theme of this course. Designing and managing production processes, facilities, and process control are discussed. Topics include demand forecasting, material planning, acquisition techniques, scheduling, total quality management, and continuous improvement concepts and methods. Credit Hours: 3 41-325. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR This course addresses the application of behavioral science theories and research to understanding the behavior of persons in the work place, with emphasis on factors that impact workers' morale, group dynamics, and worker efficiency. Credit Hours: 3 41-425. ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & CHANGE This course offers an examination of major behavioral issues in the management of organizations. Topics include power and influence in organizations, conflict management, individual and group behavior, communication, attitudes, values, organizational politics, leadership, motivation and performance. Students will also discuss factors that influence organizational change, strategies for planned change, the role of organizational culture in the change process, and the development of support systems and structures. Credit Hours: 41-435. ENTREPRENEURSHIP The entrepreneurial model is used as a prototype. It is the basics of developing a new enterprise. Students begin with the elements of how to identify: new business ideas and opportunities, sources of venture ideas, and franchising opportunities. They develop a business plan for a start-up firm; establish the feasibility for the new idea; prepare a marketing audit to determine the potential organization’s strategic position; and develop strategies, budgets, tactics, and activities to implement the new business idea. This is an applied course, and students are expected to work in small groups to create and to implement a new venture idea. Credit Hours: 41-437. MANAGERIAL DECISION-MAKING & PROBLEM SOLVING This course offers an analysis of rational management decision making under conditions of risk and uncertainty, with emphasis on the analysis of problems with multiple, competitive objectives in industry and government. Credit Hours: 41-440. INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT A survey of the major issues which face a manager operating in an international environment is the focus of this course. The aim of the course is to examine how different national and cultural environments affect the way that multinational companies (MNCs) operate from one country to the next. Topics include: an overview of global management, cultural environment, why firms internationalize operations, international human resource management, cross-cultural communication and decision-making, international strategies, and organizing international enterprises. Credit Hours: 41-445. STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT This senior capstone Integrated Management Course is intended to apply theoretical concepts to a variety of organizational situations from a top-management perspective. This course also satisfies our General Education Requirement for a senior capstone course. The concepts and techniques of strategic management in organizations will be the focus of this course. Topics include developing a strategic vision, setting objectives and crafting a strategy. Students will be expected to develop a competitive analysis portfolio, match strategy to an organization’s situation, build resource capabilities, support systems, budgets, policies, align culture and strategy, and structure the organization to implement the organization’s strategic vision in a dynamic global marketplace. This course is team taught. Credit Hours: 49-101. INTRODUCTION TO AERONAUTICS Presents an overview of aviation, enabling the student to gain an appreciation of the complexities of the field of aeronautics. Course content includes historical background, fundamentals of flight and aeronautical technology, the social and economic impact of aerospace and future development, and government regulation. Credit Hours: 3 49-102. PRIVATE PILOT CERTIFICATION Academic studies in preparation for the experience of flying and preparation for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) written and oral examinations for the Private Pilot Certification. Materials covered include basic aerodynamics, elementary aircraft systems, aviation navigation, safety, weather, aviation physiology, and FAA Regulations. Incorporates 45 hours of ground instruction and 45 hours of flight instruction. Three (3) hours lecture. Credit Hours: 3 49-102L. PRIVATE PILOT LAB Provides the students with the flight time and instruction to complete all maneuvers and operations required to earn the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Private Pilot Certificate. Course includes all dual and solo flights, and evaluation flights and oral and flight examinations administered by the FAA or appointed examiners. Course consists of 45 hours of flight training. Three flight hours and one and one-half hours pre- & post-flight briefing per week. Credit Hours: 1 49-103. INSTRUMENT RATING Academic studies in preparation for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) written and oral examinations for the Instrument Rating. Information covered includes aircraft instrument systems, ground-based instrument systems, normal and emergency practices and procedures related to flying under Instrument Meteorological conditions, and FAA Regulations related to flying under Instrument Flight Rules (IFR). Consists of 45 hours of ground instruction and 45 hours of flight training. Three hours lecture per week. Credit Hours: 3 49-103L. INSTRUMENT RATING LAB Provides the student with the flight time and instruction to complete all maneuvers and operations required to earn the FAA Instrument Rating. Course includes all evaluation flights and certification and oral examinations administered by the FAA or its appointed examiners. Course consists of 45 hours of flight training. Three flight hours and one and one-half hour pre- & post-flight briefing per week. Credit Hours: 1 49-201. BASIC AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS Academic studies in preparation for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) written and oral examinations for the Commercial Pilot Certificate. Materials covered include intermediate aircraft systems, safety, aviation physiology, aircraft avionics, and CRM. Consists of 45 hours of flight instruction and 45 hours of ground instruction. Three hours lecture per week. Credit Hours: 3 49-201L. COMMERCIAL PILOT I LAB Provides the student with the flight time and instruction to learn and practice commercial pilot maneuvers and advanced cross-country flying in preparation for the FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate. Course includes an evaluation. All flights are performed in single engine airplanes with fixed landing gear. Course consists of 50 hours of flight training. Three flight hours and one and one-half hours of pre- & post-flight briefing per week. Credit Hours: 1 49-202. COMMERCIAL PILOT Academic studies in preparation for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) written and oral examinations for the Commercial Pilot Certificate. Materials covered include intermediate aerodynamics, intermediate aircraft systems, intermediate aviation navigation under Visual Flight Rules (VFR), safety, weather, aviation physiology, and FAA Regulations related to the commercial pilot. Consists of 45 hours of flight instruction. Credit Hours: 3 49-202L. COMMERCIAL PILOT II LAB Provides the student with the flight time and instruction to complete all maneuvers required to earn the FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate. Course includes all evaluation flight and certification and oral examinations administered by the FAA or its appointed examiners. Course consists of 50 hours of flight training. Three flight hours and one and one-half hour pre- & post-flight briefing per week. Credit Hours: 1 49-301. MULTIENGINE RATING Academic studies in preparation for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA oral examination for the Multiengine Airplane Class Rating. Information covered includes multiengine aerodynamics and systems, safety, and FAA Regulations relevant to multiengine flight. Consists of 15 hours of ground instruction and 12 hours of flight training. One hour lecture per week. Credit Hours: 1 49-305. ADVANCED AERODYNAMICS AND AIRCRAFT PERFORMANCE Academic studies covering advanced aerodynamic theories and their application. Includes airfoil shape, drag, velocity, lift, thrust, stability and control. Also included are advanced principles of performance including airplane capabilities and limitations, performance design criteria, load factors, weight and balance, comparative analysis of aircraft and aircraft certification. Three hours lecture per week. Credit Hours: 3 49-307. ADVANCED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS The study of advanced systems currently in use in aircraft flown by the airlines. This course provides knowledge necessary to successfully complete the FAA Flight Engineer written examination. Three hours lecture per week. Credit Hours: 3 49-310. FLIGHT SAFETY Presentation and analysis of factors and procedures relating to aviation safety. Discusses techniques for accident prevention, development of safety programs, procedures used in accident investigation, physiological and psychological factors relating to aviation safety, the role weather plays in safety. Three hours lecture per week. Credit Hours: 3 49-312. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Management techniques and administrative functions as they apply to the aviation industry. Includes planning, economic and resource considerations, problems, current issues and future trends related to aviation operations. Three hours lecture per week. Credit Hours: 3 49-317. HUMAN FACTORS IN AVIATION A study of cockpit resource management as applied in commercial air carriers. Includes pilot-in-command responsibilities; decision making; cockpit communications; interpersonal relationships; cockpit procedures; physiological and psychological factors and their role in accidents. A study is made of advances in aircraft and equipment and procedures to minimize human error and its effects. Credit Hours: 3 49-321. METEOROLOGY Basic theories of weather, atmospheric conditions, and climate, as they apply to flight. Explores the physical processes affecting the atmospheric environment and their relationships. Includes the principles of forecasting and an introduction to meteorological instrumentation. Three hours lecture per week. Credit Hours: 3 49-350. AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL A study of the national air traffic control system with emphasis on basic air traffic control procedures; the roles of Center, Approach Control, Tower, and Flight Service Station. Includes communications, navigation procedures, radar operations, facilities. Three hours lecture per week. Credit Hours: 3 49-360. THE NATIONAL AIRSPACE SYSTEM An overview of the proposed NAS. Covers problems encountered in implementing the system, airspace allocation and usage, facilities, safety considerations, new developments in electronic navigation and control systems, economic impact, social and political implications. Three hours lecture per week. Credit Hours: 3 49-361. MULTIENGINE FLIGHT LAB Provides the student with the flight time and instruction to complete all maneuvers and operations required in preparation to earn the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Multiengine Airplane Class Rating. Course includes an evaluation flight and Certification oral and practical examinations administered by the FAA or its appointed examiners. One hour flight, one-half hour pre- & post-flight briefing per week. Credit Hours: 0.33 49-370. AIRPORT PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT A comprehensive study of airport operations and management. Includes the analysis of the role of the airport manager in planning, finance and administration, public relations, social, political and environmental considerations; operational requirements and facility maintenance. Three hours lecture per week. Credit Hours: 3 49-401. CFI-AIRPLANE Academic studies in preparation for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) written and oral examination for the Flight Instructor Airplane Certificate. Information covered includes the fundamentals of instruction in classrooms, in one-to-one situations, and in airplane cockpits. Also included is analysis of student performance and evaluation of aviation students in academics and in practical situations and the regulatory responsibilities of the Certificated Flight Instructor (CFI). Consists of 25 hours of flight and 25 hours of ground instruction. Credit Hours: 3 49-401L. CFI-AIRPLANE LAB Provides the student with the flight time and instruction to demonstrate, teach, and evaluate performance of students in all maneuvers and operations required to earn the Private Pilot and Commercial Pilot Certificates. The student will be prepared to successfully complete the FAA Flight Instructor-Airplanes (CFI-A) oral and practical examinations administered by the FAA or its appointed examiners. Two hours flight, one hour pre- & post-flight briefing per week. Credit Hours: 0.66 49-402. CFI-INSTRUMENT Academic studies in preparation for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) written and oral examinations for the Flight Instructor (CFI) Instruments Certificate. Information covered includes a review of the body of knowledge required of the Instrument rated pilot, and methods of imparting this knowledge to students. The regulatory responsibilities of the Certificated Flight Instructor (CFI) are reviewed and emphasized. Consists of 25 hours of ground instruction and 25 hours of flight instruction. Three hours lecture per week. Credit Hours: 3 49-431. CFI-INSTRUMENT LAB Provides the student with the flight time and instruction to demonstrate, teach, and evaluate performance of students in all maneuvers and operations required to earn the FAA Instrument Rating. The student will be prepared to successfully complete the FAA Certificated Flight Instructor-Instrument (CFI-I) oral and practical examinations administered by the FAA or its appointed examiners. Credit Hours: 0.33 49-440. CONCEPTS OF AIR TRANSPORT UTILIZATION A study of the factors involved in the effective use of aircraft in the transportation of passengers and cargo. Includes aircraft design, suitability, cost effectiveness, operational and marketing considerations and social implications. Three hours lecture per week. Credit Hours: 3 49-444. SENIOR CAPSTONE Provides the student with an understanding of the aviation professions, his/her role in professions in the near- and long-term, and strategies for gaining employment within the profession. Three hours lecture per week. Credit Hours: 3 49-450. AIR TRANSPORTATION A survey of the historical development of the air transportation system covering facilities, impact of regulations, problems encountered in commercial air transportation, future requirements, airline operations, economics, and social implications. Three hours lecture per week. Credit Hours: 3 49-470. CFI-MULTIENGINE Academic studies in preparation for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) written and oral examinations for the Flight Instruct or Multiengine Certificate. Information covered includes a review of the body of knowledge required of the multiengine rated pilot, and methods of imparting this knowledge to students. The regulatory responsibilities of the Certificate Flight Instructor (CFI) are reviewed and emphasized. Consists of 15 hours of multiengine ground instruction and 15 hours of multiengine flight instruction. Three hours lecture per week. Credit Hours: 2 49-471. CFI-MULTIENGINE LAB Provides the student with the flight time and instruction to demonstrate, teach and evaluate performance of students in all maneuvers and operations required to earn the FAA Multiengine Rating. The student will be prepared to successfully complete the FAA Certificated Flight Instructor-Multiengine (CFI-ME) oral and practical examinations administered by the FAA or its appointed examiners. One hour flight, one-half hour pre- & post-flight briefing per week. Credit Hours: 0.33 49-489. AVIATION LEGISLATION This course emphasizes legal concepts concerning aviation as related to operation, contracts, insurance and liability, regulatory, statutes, law and case law. Credit Hours: 3 49-499. PRACTICUM Involves selected practical experience in aviation, appropriate to the degree option being pursued. Experience may be within the Delaware State University environment or elsewhere within the aviation industry. Credit Hours: 1

CoB Research Forum

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  Objectives of the Research Forum To provide a platform for faculty members to share their research and exchange ideas Promote collobarative research among CoB faculty members Encourage and enhance research productivity among faculty members Starting from 2009, Department of Business Administration will be conducting an annual mini-conference open to College of Business faculty members and others. The first mini-conference was conducted successfully in Spring 2009 and the second mini-conference is scheduled for Spring 2010. For further information on research forum, please contact Dr. Constant Beugre cbeugre@desu.edu.  
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Contact


Coordinator:
Dr. Constant Beugre
Chair, Department of Business Administration
cbeugre@desu.edu

Small Business Development Center (SBDC)

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Dover center of DE SBDC is located in the Bank of America building. The center offers counseling and workshops to businesses in the area. For additional information or to know more about upcoming events, please visit www.dsbtdc.org. Alternately, you can contact Al Paoli apaoli@udel.edu.
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Staff Profile


Al Paoli
apaoli@udel.edu

 

CoB Centers

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Advisement Center The College of Business Advisement Center’s mission is to provide academic advisement to students pursuing a degree program in Business during the freshmen and sophomore years. Our professional advisors offer services based on current curriculum requirements to assist students with aligning their academic goals with career opportunities as they transition into graduate studies and the world of work.    Delaware Center for Enterprise Development (DCED) The Delaware Center for Enterprise Development (DCED) at Delaware State University has assisted in the development of enterprises since 1992. DCED is the community outreach arm of the College of Business. It provides business training and entrepreneurial education for youth and adults, supports community economic development initiatives and offers one-on-one technical assistance to entrepreneurs. The mission of the Delaware Center for Enterprise Development (DCED) is to educate current and prospective entrepreneurs and enterprise managers through training programs, technical and managerial assistance and by providing access to capital. Small Business Development Center (SBDC) Dover SBDC is located in the Bank of America building. For additional information to learn more about Dover SBDC or contact Al Paoli apaoli@udel.edu    

Delaware Center for Transportation

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  Vision Statement  The objective of the Delaware Center for Transportation Management is to become a premier resource in the State of Delaware for teaching, training, and research in transportation management. The Center will be housed in the College of Business at Delaware State University. The Center will be headed by a Director with project based staff support. The Center will work closely and collaboratively with the Delaware Department of Transportation (DELDOT), Federal highway Administration (FHA), Federal Transit Administration (FTA) and business and industry in Delaware. The aims and objectives of the center can be broadly classified under four different areas: Teaching To promote the training of minorities and women for careers in transportation. To develop a curriculum related to Transportation Management. The curriculum will primarily be based in the College of Business and draw upon other departments from the university where appropriate.  To integrate theory with practice in curriculum development. Consequently DCTM will work closely with an advisory board consisting of experts from a variety of different areas that have an impact on transportation management. Applied learning will be an integral and critical part of curriculum development. The applied learning could be in the form of internships, consulting projects, case development, and field experience. Training To assist DELDOT with their short-term and long-term training needs. To develop short-term courses and certificate programs to meet the needs of the transportation industry. Initial focus of training will be in the areas of project management, GIS, human resource management, public relations and marketing, negotiation, civil rights, and basic quantitative skills. Summer Transportation Institute To continue to offer the Summer Transportation Institute to help develop high school students with a potential for careers in the transportation sector of the economy. To continue to develop an innovative and creative curriculum for the Summer Transportation Institute in collaboration with DELDOT and FHA. Research To support interdisciplinary research with a focus on transportation management. To generate funding opportunities for research from grants. To develop a database of transportation related data for research. To meet the research needs of DELDOT, FHA, FTA and business and industry in the area of transportation management. Resources DCTM will be headed by a Center Director whose primary responsibility will be to help the Center achieve its aims and objectives. The Center is equipped with computers consisting of twelve desktop computers, two laptop computers, and a printer. The computers are equipped with GIS and other basic software related to research and training needs of the center. DCTM will be supported by staff as and when needed for projects. Subsequent to the expansion of DCT, full-time support staff will be hired.   
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Contact


Dr. Nanda K. Viswanathan
Director, Delaware Center for Transportation
nviswanathan@desu.edu

 

Center for IT Services

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  Mission The Center’s mission is to provide professional IT services to the government agencies, non-profits and small business enterprises in and around Delaware through active student involvement & learning and applied research. Purpose of the Center Offer professional IT services to non-profits, government agencies, and business organizations located in and around Delaware at affordable cost Maintain relationships with government agencies and industry in and around Delaware Provide real life experience to students in the area of IT services and project management Provide internship and full-time employment opportunities for Information Systems students Conduct applied research in the field of Information Systems in collaboration with other scholars in the field Promote open-source technologies Provide increased visibility to Department of Business Administration in the community Strive to secure external funding from Private, State, and Federal agencies Objectives of the Center Provide affordable IT Services at very low pricing structure through student and faculty involvement to government agencies, non-profits and small business enterprises. These services include but not limited to the following: Offer Web Design, Development, Hosting, and Maintenance Offer Information Technology Consulting Offer IT Infrastructure Design and Consulting Provide opportunities to CoB Students to gain: Real life work experience in subject specific areas Experience with Open-Source Technologies Experience in the area of client consulting, requirements determination, and project management Improvement in written and oral communication skills Internship and full-time employment opportunities Provide opportunities to the Department of Business Administration to: Enhance industry-academic partnership Provide increased visibility to the department’s MIS faculty members Understand industry trends that help in improving course curriculum, new courses, new programs, and teaching methodologies Provide a consistent revenue stream Provide opportunities to College of Business and Delaware State University to: Enhance industry-academic partnership Provide increased visibility to the College and University Opportunity for Promoting sponsorships and donations from Private, State, and Federal agencies Relation to Department programs and course curriculum The center will be housed in the Department of Business Administration, College of Business. Students involved in the activities of the center will augment their academic knowledge with real life experience in different areas of MIS such as Web-Design and development, system analysis and design, networking and telecommunications, and database development depending on specific requirements of the clients. Through their involvement in the center, students will be exposed to emerging and existing open-source technologies, thereby enhancing their skills. Oral and written communication, an integral part of DSU’s academic, will also be enhanced for the students participating in the center’s activities. The center will also provide research opportunities and challenges to the existing MIS faculty of the department through collaborations. Industry interactions will also enhance faculty understanding of industry needs which in turn will help design better curriculum.  
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Contact


Dr. Chittibabu Govindarajulu
Director, Center for IT Services
Chitti@desu.edu

 

Center for the Study of Innovation Management

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  Antecedents The Top 100 R&D spenders along with the top 50 companies in each of the three highest-spending industries: auto, health care, and computing and electronics in the world spent more than $350 billion on R&D in 2007. This amount represent 71% of the total spends of the global innovation 1000 firms (source: Global Innovation report, Booz & Company, 2008). Fifty-five percent of these companies’ total R&D spending occurs outside their home countries. These firms search economic environments that allow lower costs, access to talent and skilled professionals, technology bases, innovation management knowledge, and market proximity and insights. In today’s demanding global marketplace, firms must innovate to survive and flourish. These firms put innovation on the front burner and approach innovation as a systematic, enterprise-wide process. More important, developing innovation management capabilities and having the right resources devoted to technology, product, and processes are cornerstones of high performing businesses. Successful entrepreneurship innovation requires rigorous process to harvest and manage ideas, allocate resources, devise metrics, and the use of cross-functionality. There is not executive task more vital and demanding than the sustained management of innovation and change. Without doubt, the development of innovation capabilities and innovation management should preclude solid growth, strategic, and financial performance as firms build their domestic and international competitiveness. The State of Delaware is not immune to these trends as these demands impact its competitive structure and economic technology base. It is known that world-class universities attract the business interest as well as their capital. Businesses partner with universities and research centers to develop new technologies, commercialize and market these technologies and derivatives, and recruit talented and well-trained workers and professionals. Moreover, these businesses prefer to locate closer to centers of new knowledge, innovation, and research. It is a strategic goal of the state of Delaware to strengthen its capacities for innovation, intellectual leadership and management, and technology commercialization as it guarantees jobs in emerging high-tech and high-wage industries (Markell, Jack: Plan for Broadening the Reach of Higher Education, 2008). As such, the Center for the Study of Innovation Management, CSIM at Delaware State University will significantly contribute to build these relationships with industry, state officials, and other Delaware-based stakeholders. More important, this center will provide innovation knowledge and leading management insights to support the nurturing of an innovation culture and the management of innovation initiatives at the regional, national, and international levels. Purpose  The Center for the Study of Innovation Management, CSIM housed in the Department of Management, College of Business at Delaware State University is a research unit focused on the study of innovation management in organizations. Innovation management is defined as the activities, processes, routines, systems that foster knowledge creation, transformation, dissemination, and sharing as it moves organization towards change and adaptation in their pursuit of value creation and competitiveness. Entrepreneurship is intrinsic to this concept of innovation. The CSIM has a multi-disciplinary orientation in its programs and activities and embraces academic research from colleagues with expertise in psychology, sociology, human behavior, cognitive science, organizational behavior, management, marketing, information systems, economics, accounting, finance, and other disciplines applicable to the study of innovation management. Mission The Center for the Study of Innovation Management, CSIM is a research unit within the College of Business focused on bringing the advances of theories, methods, and applications in the area of innovation management to the academic and curriculum endeavors and the regional industrial, commercial, and organizational communities to promote development, growth, and firms’ competitiveness at the state, national and international levels. Its Values The Center for the Study of Innovation Management is committed to: i. Academic excellence and the highest standards of quality research. ii. Professional integrity and upmost sense of honesty, transparency, and ethical behavior. iii. World-class efficiency and productivity in its research and programming activities. iv. Enhancement, nurturing, and development of the human capital associated with the center to its fullest. Functions i. Generate, promote, and disseminate research projects and news advances in the intersection of innovation, technology, product development, entrepreneurship, and knowledge management. ii. Build relationships and act as liaison with local, regional, national industries and international organizations to assist these in their efforts to incorporate center’s study findings and promote applied innovation in their markets. iii. Work in partnership with other international research centers in joint research programs in innovation management, faculty research collaboration and exchange, international consortium research projects, and other activities consistent with the mission of the center. iv. Assist and collaborate primarily with the local government and official units in the State of Delaware in the creation, design, promotion, and support of efforts to increase the innovation output and capabilities of critical small and large enterprises within a diverse manufacture, commercial, and service industries in the region. v. Provide advice as to incorporate new developments and content into the curriculum structure mainly of the academic programs in the Department of Management and College of Business, and secondly in other research programs at Delaware State University. vi. Promote and economically support interested faculty and students’ involvement to pursue new academic initiatives and new learning in the area of innovation management in the Department of Management, College of Business, and Delaware State University. Research Sustainability As a research center, the following metrics are used to assess the CSIM performance: i. Contribute to the research publication profile of the Department of Management and College of Business. As such, provide evidence of research productivity conducive to maintain the qualifications of faculty members as required by the AACSB accreditation body. ii. Generate, promote, and support Delaware State University students’ pursue of advanced degree research studies in management and related disciplines. Programs The center carries out professional activities to support the following initiatives: i. Research Program This program emphasizes the generation of knowledge, application, and practice of new advances in the area of innovation management and entrepreneurship. ii. Industry Liaison Program Support and assist regional organizations in achieving national and international competitiveness through the design and implementation of innovation initiatives and capabilities. Assist the commercial and industrial regional community in the training of employees and development of new skills and competencies at the managerial level. iii. Academic Curriculum Design Program Generate transfer mechanisms to bring the results of the Center’s research program to the development and enrichment of the Department of Management’s curriculum, executive training, and high-level senior management programs. iv. Cooperative Transferability Program Collaborate with other research centers from diverse institutions, i.e. universities, firm based research centers, colleges, universities, and technical centers in the State of Delaware and internationally in the creation and transferability of new knowledge and research in the field of innovation management. Research Themes The CSIM conducts research categorized into the following themes: i. Technology Innovation and Valuation ii. New Product Innovation and Development iii. Innovation Management and Organizational Performance iv. Models of Innovation and Internationalization Patterns v. Innovation and Entrepreneurship Organization Structure The strategic growth and management of the center is supported by the following structure and staffing: Director of the Center for the Study of Innovation Management Responsible for the strategic development and research programs carried out in the center. Administrative Assistant of the Center for the Study of Innovation Management Responsible for the operation and management of day to day activities and personnel, fiscal accountability, managing of communications and marketing, support of programs and scholarly projects, collaboration with external entities, and compliance with procedures and norms as requested by the College of Business, University, and funding entities. Faculty Research Associates Faculty from the Department of Management and other colleges at Delaware State University interested in carry out research programs and projects. Other faculty members from educational and research institutions at the national and international level will qualify under this association. Industry Associates Professionals and practitioners from organizations, firms, businesses, and corporate research centers from the State of Delaware interested in being members of research teams and task forces. Research Assistants Students that have demonstrated serious and intrinsic motivation to carry out research projects. Only students that have demonstrated a higher level of maturity, excellence, and professionalism will be invited to be associated with the center. Industry Advisory Board The center has a board of industry professionals selected from the business community in the local, region, and national areas. These members support the center’s mission and are consulted on the academic, research, industry liaison, and programming endeavors. They are active in their disciplines and reflect a strong industry composition (technology, health, electronics, manufacturing, services, etc.). The advisory board is expected to recommend and review general guidelines for programs and activities of the center in consultation with the Director of the CSIM. These recommendations should benefit the center, university, community, and other constituents. Facilities The Center for the Study of Innovation Management is housed in the College of Business at Delaware State University.   Center Services The following are the areas in which the center may offer its services to the academic, industry, and government communities: Identification of strategic industrial sectors and subsectors that may adopt new technologies such as nanotechnology, biotechnology, and other derivatives. 1. Determine the domestic and exporting potential markets for intermediate and finished products within specific industrial sectors. 2. Diagnostics and evaluation of production and manufacturing capabilities. 3. Potential impact of advanced technologies in the production process. Identify value generators of activation and assimilation. 4. Evaluation of potential use of materials and raw materials and the use of different technologies for particular production processes and technologies. 5. Use impact of technologies in: a. Production and manufacturing evaluation. b. Operation analysis of robust manufacturing and components assembly. c. Evaluation of aggregate production variations from period to period. d. Capacity analysis for production volume and manufacturing processes. e. Impact de different technologies in the manufacturing output. f. Design capabilities for products and demand satisfaction. Analysis and Diagnostic of Market Expansion Capabilities 6. Analysis of the use of specific technologies by area of application. E.g. Bioanalysis, pharmaceutics, therapy and bio medicine, biosensors, magnetic resonance, engineering of biological textiles, aerospace, information technology, consumer products, etc. 7. Product analysis at the B2B and B2C markets. 8. Aggregate value analysis and contribution of different technologies from the following perspectives: economics, markets expansion, technology integration, development of innovation capacities and development of product portfolios. Analysis and Diagnostic of Innovation Capabilities 9. Evaluation of capabilities to adopt new and improve technologies and existing methods. Determine which technologies can be adopted. 10. Identification of technology platforms and determination of resistances to the adoption of technologies. 11. Technology development and strategic network analysis. 12. Customer value model and profitability. 13. Diagnostic of existent and details of new product development models and processes and analysis of adaptation capabilities. 14. Analysis of capabilities to develop commercial prototypes. Market Estimation for Intermediate and Finished Products. 15. Estimation of potential markets for existing and new products offered by manufacturing firms (continuous innovation and penetration). 16. Estimation of potential markets for existing products with differential advantages. (market extension). 17. Market potential for innovative products (radical innovation). 18. Market potential for radically new concepts and application of Kano methodologies.

Admission Policies and Procedures

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Application Process To be considered for admission to the MBA program, applicants must submit: (1) a completed application form; (2) official transcripts of all previous undergraduate and graduate work; (3) official Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) score results; (4) two recommendation forms completed by persons acquainted with their ability for graduate study; (5) applicant's resume; and (6) the applicants' statement of philosophy, objectives and career aspirations. The MBA program has a rolling admission policy whereby applications are decided upon as they are received. Applications and supporting documentation for admission should be sent to the following address: MBA Office Delaware State University Bank of America Bldg. Rm 106 1200 North Dupont Highway Dover, DE 19901-2277 Requirements for Unconditional Admission For admission to the MBA Program, applicants must have earned a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university and possess the ability to do graduate work of high quality. For unconditional admission, candidates must have earned a minimum cumulative undergraduate grade-point-average of 2.75 (on a 4.00 point scale) and achieve a total score of at least 950 points (based on the following formula: 200 times the overall undergraduate grade-point-average plus the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) score, except that the minimum acceptable GMAT score must be 400. In addition applicants must have completed Foundations requirements. Requirements for Conditional Admission Applicants not meeting the unconditional requirements may be admitted conditionally if (1) they have a minimum cumulative undergraduate grade-point-average (GPA) of 2.50 and earn a minimum of 400 on the GMAT; (2) have an overall undergraduate GPA of 3.00 or at least 3.25 upper-division GPA and have not completed the GMAT; or (3) have completed all other requirements except the Foundations. Change of Status A candidate admitted conditionally must complete a total of three MBA core or elective courses (nine credits) and earn at least a "B". Candidates conditionally admitted must complete the Foundations requirements and submit satisfactory GMAT scores before registering for their fourth course. Satisfactory GMAT score is based on the formula: 200 times overall MBA GPA plus GMAT score equals to or greater than 950 points (200 x MBA GPA + GMAT score >= 950). Minimum acceptable GMAT score is 400. Requirements for Non-Traditional Applicants Applicants may apply for admission as non-traditional students if they have: (1) higher or professional degree beyond the baccalaureate degree; (2) significant relevant work experience; or (3) national or regional certification in a professional field. Applicants may petition for the GPA, GMAT, and CBK requirements to be waived. All requests for waivers must undergo a review and certification by the Director of the MBA Program (refer to the MBA Handbook for further information). Waiver Requirements for Non-Traditional Applicants To be considered for a non-traditional status, the student must first complete an application to the MBA program through the Graduate School. The student must then complete a Non-Traditional Consideration Request Form and submit to the Director of the MBA program. The request must include the following supporting documents: (1) Evidence of degrees beyond the baccalaureate degree (if applicable); (2) relevant work experience, that is, five years or more in a managerial or supervisory position; (3) contact person for work verification (name, title, address, and telephone number); (4) copies of national or regional certification (include state and expiration date); and (5) any other relevant information. Admission to Candidacy Status After completing a minimum of nine (9) semester hours and a maximum of fifteen (15) semester hours of MBA courses, students must apply for admission to candidacy for the MBA degree. Students may not enroll in more than 18 credit hours of the MBA Program without candidacy approval. GMAT scores must be on file and all Foundations requirements must be fulfilled in order to apply for candidacy. Students admitted conditionally must remove all conditions prior to the application for candidacy status. Transfer Credit MBA students may transfer a maximum of nine (9) graduate credits from another accredited institution toward the master's degree, provided they earned a grade of "B" or higher in the course for which transfer credit is sought. The transfer credit must be directly related to the MBA course requirements and must have been completed not more than five (5) years of the student's date of application. Scholarship and Tuition Waivers The MBA program offers (through the Graduate School) limited scholarship funds and tuition waivers to students. All financial assistance is offered to students on a first come first serve basis. Only students who have been accepted into the MBA program will be considered for the limited funds that are available. Given the limitation of available funds, students are encouraged to explore other sources of funding.   
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Why should you choose our MBA program?

1. Accelerated program geared towards working adults.

2. The best value in the Tri-State Area.

3. MBA candidates interested in pursuing full-time accelerated program can complete the degree in 12 months by taking three courses (9 credit hours) per term. Regular full-time students can complete the program within an 18-month period by taking two courses per term.

4. MBA classes are offered during the evening hours and weekends. Those interested in part-time study can complete the degree requirements within two years by attending, at least, one summer session.

5. Courses are taught by highly-trained professors who want to see you succeed.

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