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Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Music Education

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      First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 06-1XX Major Applied Instrument 1 06-107 or 115 Chorus or Marching Band 1 06-113 Music Theory I and Ear Training I 3 06-120 Piano Class I 1 06-126 or 06-128 Woodwinds or Brasses 1 06-191 University Seminar I 1 25-101 Survey of Mathematics I 3 XX-XXX Humanities Elective (Introduction to Music is highly recommended) 3     17 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 01-200 Speech 3 06-1XX Major Applied Instrument 1 06-108 or 116 Chorus or Concert Band 1 06-114 Music Theory II and Ear Training II 3 06-121 Piano Class II 1 06-192 University Seminar II 1 25-102 Survey of Mathematics II 3   Required to take PPST/PRAXIS 16 Second Year First Semester     01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 06-130 or 06-132 Strings or Percussion 1 06-2XX Major Applied Instrument 1 06-207 or 215 Chorus or Marching Band 1 06-213 Music Theory III and Ear Training III 3 06-323 Music History and Literature I 2 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3 36-201 Introduction to General Psychology 3     17 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 06-2XX Major Applied Instrument 1 06-208 or 216 Chorus or Concert Band 1 06-214 Music Theory IV and Ear Training IV 3 12-204 Philosophical Foundations of Education 3 12-313 Introduction to Education of Exceptional Children 3 36-204 or 36-316 Educational Psychology or Developmental Psychology I 3     17   Required to pass PPST/PRAXIS Admission to Teacher Education Program   Third Year First Semester     06-3XX Major Applied Instrument 1 06-301 Elementary General and Vocal Music Methods (K-8) 3 06-307 or 315 Chorus or Marching Band 1 06-309 or 06-310 Vocal Conducting or Instrumental Conducting 2 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3 XX-XXX Natural Science Elective 3     15 Second Semester     06-3XX Major Applied Instrument 1 06-302 Secondary General and Vocal Music Methods (7-12) 3 06-308 or 316 Chorus or Concert Band 1 12-318 or 31-395 Multicultural Education or Global Societies 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3 XX-XXX Natural Science Elective 3     14 Fourth Year First Semester     06-4XX Major Applied and Senior Recital 1 06-407 or 415 Chorus or Marching Band 1 06-4XX Major Applied Instrument & Senior Recital (Senior Capstone) 1 12-302 Reading in the Content Areas 3 12-357 Effective Teaching Skills and Classroom Management 3 12-416 Analysis of Student Teaching 1 XX-XXX Free Elective 3     13 Second Semester     12-400 Preservice / Student Teaching (Senior Capstone) 12     12   Total credits 121  

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Art Management

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B.A. DEGREE IN ARTS MANAGEMENT Effective Fall 2010 Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr ART103 Intro to Drawing   3   ART108 Surv of MacIntosh   3   ART191 Univ. Seminar I   1   ART104 2 D-Design   3   ENGL101 English Comp I   3   ART192 Univ. Sem II   1   MTSC101 Survey of Math I   3   ENGL102 English Comp II   3   SPSC100 Lifetime Fitness   2   MTSC102 Survey of Math II   3   xx-xxx Humanities Elective:   3                                   Total Credits 15     Total Credits 13   Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr ART205 Intermediate Drawing   3   ART304 Intro to Painting (I)   3   ART206 3-D Design   3   ART301 Sculpture I   3   xx-xxx Foreign Language I   3   HIST2xx History   3   xx-xxx Natural Sci Elective   3   xx-xxx Elective   3   ENGL201 or 205 World Lit I or Afro-Amer Lit I   3   ENGL200 Speech   3                                             Total Credits 15                             Total Credits 15   Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr ART308 Life Drawing   3   ART307 Watercolor Painting (II)   3   ART302 Ceramics   3   ART318 Art History II   3   ART317 Art History I   3   ART325 Photography   3   ART207 or 208 Computer Graphics   3   ART333 Printmaking   3   ECON201 Macro Economics   3   ART229 Arts Mgmt Seminar   3   xx-xxx Elective   3   HIST395 Global Societies   3                         Total Credits 18     Total Credits 18   Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr ART315 or 316 African Amer Art or Modern Art History   3   ART429 Comm Arts Intern (**Senior Capstone)   12   ART408 Adv Painting (III)   3             ART329 Univ Gallery Internship   3             MKT300 Prin of Marketing     3             xx-xxx Elective   3               Total Credits 15     Total Credits 12    

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Studio Art

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B.A. DEGREE IN STUDIO ART Effective Fall 2010 Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr ART103 Intro to Drawing (f)   3   ART108 Surv of MacIntosh (v)   3   ART191 Univ. Seminar I (f)   1   ART104 2 D-Design (so)   3   ENGL101 English Comp I   3   ART192 Univ. Sem II (so)   1   MTSC101 Survey of Math I   3   ENGL102 English Comp II   3   SPSC100 Lifetime Fitness   2   MTSC 102 Survey of Math II   3   xx-xxx Art/Human. Elective   3   xx-xxx Business Elective   3     Total Credits 15     Total Credits 16   Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr ART205 Intermediate Drawing (f)   3   ART304 Intro to Painting (I) (s)   3   ART206 3-D Design (f)   3   ART301 Sculpture I (s)   3   ART207 or 208 Computer Graphics (v)   3   xx-xxx Elective   3   xx-xxx Natural Sci Elective   3   ENGL 200 Speech     3   xx-xxx Foreign Language I   3   HIST2xx American History   3   ENGL201 or 205 World Lit I or Afro-Amer Lit I   3     201,202,203 or 204                           Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr ART308 Life Drawing (f)   3   ART307 Watercolor Painting (II) (s)   3   ART302 Ceramics (f)   3   ART318 Art History II (s)   3   ART317 Art History I (f)   3   ART325 Photography (s)   3   HIST395 Global Societies   3   ART333 Printmaking (s)   3   xx-xxx Social Science   3   xx-xxx Elective   3                                             Total Credits 15     Total Credits 15   Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr ART315 or 316 African Am. Art or Modern Art History (v)   3   ART450 Senior Exp Art (Capstone Exper.) (v)   9   ART408 Adv Painting (III) (f)   3   ARTxxx Elective or Adv Comp Graphics (v)   3   ART-xxx Selected Topics in Art   3             xx-xxx Elective   3             xx-xxx Elective   3                                   Total Credits 15     Total Credits 12                               Credits  <  121 >      ** Senior Capstone           SO  –  Spring Only  *Writing Intensive      FO  –  Fall Only    B   –    Both Sem.    V  –    Variable

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Art Education

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Effective Fall 2010 Freshman Fall Semester Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr ART103 Intro to Drawing (fo) 3 UNIV191 Univ. Seminar I (fo) # 1 ENGL101 *English Comp I 3 MATH101 Survey of Math I 3 EDUC204 *Phil Foundation of Edu 3 ART201 *Art Educ Theory (fo) # 3 Total Credits 16 Course Course Name Cr ART108 Surv of MacIntosh (B) 3 ART104 2 D-Design (so) 1 ART192 Univ. Sem II (so) # 3 ENGL102 English Comp II 3 MATH102 Survey of Math II 3 PSYC201 Intro to Psychology 3 Total Credits 16 Sophomore Fall Semester Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr ART205 Intermediate Drawing (fo) 3 ART206 3-D Design (fo) 3 ENGL200 Speech 3 xx-xxx Natural Sci Elective 3 xx-xxx Foreign Language I 3 ENGL201/205 World Lit I/Afro-Amer. Lit I 3 Total Credits 18 Course Course Name Cr ART304 Intro to Painting (I) (so) 3 ART301 Sculpture I (so) 3 SPSC100 Lifetime Fitness 2 EDUC318 Multicult. Educ/global societies 3 xx-xxx Foreign Language II 3 PSYC316 Dev Psychology I 3 Total Credits 17 Junior Fall Semester Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr ART308 Life Drawing (fo) 3 ART302 Ceramics (fo) 3 ART317 Art History I (fo) * 3 ART341 Meth & Matls Sec. Art (fo) **# 3 HIST34-2xx History 3 Total Credits 15 Course Course Name Cr ART307 Watercolor Painting (II) (so) 3 ART318 Art History II (so) * 3 ART333 Photography (so) 3 ART333 Printmaking (so) 3 ART-342 Meth & Matls Sec. Art (so) **# 3 Total Credits 15 Senior Fall Semester Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr ART340 Art for Spec Educ (fo) * 3 ART408 Adv Painting (III) (fo) 3 EDUC302 Reading Content Area (B) 3 EDUC357 Effective Teaching (B) 4 EDUC416 Analysis of Student 1 Total Credits 14 Course Course Name Cr ART307 Seminar Art Ed ** (B 1 ART318 Student Teach in Art (B) * ** 12 Total Credits 13 ** - Senior Capstone (05-410 & 12-400) * - Writing Intensive # - Student must apply and be accepted into TEP prior to taking 7th sem. Ed. Classes so - Spring Only fo - Fall Only B - Both Semester V -   Variable

Music course descriptions

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Music (06) 06-100. AFRICAN-AMERICAN MUSIC. 3:3:0 The purpose of this course is to develop students' knowledge and understanding of African and African-American music. Emphasis will be placed on the African diaspora, the origins of African-American music, and composers and musicians who represent various African-American musical styles. Credit: three hours. 06-101. INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC. 3:3:0 A course designed to acquaint non-music majors with the broad field of music. Emphasis is placed upon the development of musical interests and elementary skill in music reading and writing through participation and listening. Credit: three hours. 06-103. CHAMBER ENSEMBLE (elective). 1:1:0 Performance of music literature for small woodwind, brass, string and percussion ensembles. Instruction will be provided in performance techniques and focused on the chamber music of various stylistic periods. Credit: one hour. 06-105-106, 205-206, 305-306, 405-406. APPLIED CLASSICAL GUITAR. 1:1:0 Credit: one hour. 06-125. PIANO (Non-Music Majors). 1:1:0 Credit: one hour. 06-135-136, 235-236, 335-336, 435-436. APPLIED PIANO MAJOR. 1:1:0 06-145-146, 245-246, 345-346, 445-446. APPLIED VOICE. 1:1:0 06-165-166, 265-266, 365-366, 465-466. APPLIED BRASSES. 1:1:0 06-175-176, 275-276, 375-376, 475-476. APPLIED WOODWINDS. 1:1:0 06-185-186, 285-286, 385-386, 485-486. APPLIED PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS. 1:1:0 06-195-196, 295-296, 395-396, 495-496. APPLIED STRINGS. 1:1:0 Credit: one hour each. Open to Music Majors only. 06-107-108, 207-208, 307-308, 407-408. CHORUS. 2:2:0 A study of choral works with emphasis on reading, diction, tone quality, interpretation and aesthetics. Attention will be given to the languages and cultures associated with the particular choral literature, i.e. English and dialects used in Negro Spirituals, Latin, Italian, German, and French. Credit: two hours. 06-113. MUSIC THEORY I AND EAR TRAINING I. 4:4:0 The study of principle triads and their inversions. Analyze and compose melodies using simple meter and simple rhythm. Develop basic ear training skills through ear training and dictation studies. Triadic studies and basic rhythm. Melodic studies in major keys. Prerequisite: Music Major. Credit: four hours. 06-114. MUSIC THEORY II AND EAR TRAINING II. 4:4:0 The continued study of principle triads and their inversions. Analyze and compose melodies using simple meter and simple rhythm. Develop basic ear training skills through ear training and dictation studies. Triadic studies and basic rhythm. Melodic studies in major keys. Prerequisite: Music 113. Credit: four hours. 06-115, 215, 315, 415. MARCHING BAND. 2:5:6 Marching band; formation drill and the techniques of football half-time shows. Five meetings per week. Credit: two hours. 06-116, 216, 316, 416. CONCERT BAND. 2:3:6 Study of concert literature, performance techniques, and repertoire. Three meetings per week. Credit: two hours. 06-120. PIANO CLASS I. 1:2:0 This course is designed for music majors/minors whose principal instrument is not piano, and to teach functional piano, basic keyboard techniques, and the performance of keyboard compositions at a very elementary level. Prerequisite: Music Major or Music Minor. Credit: one hour. 06-121. PIANO CLASS II. 1:2:0 This course is a continuation of developing students' functional piano skills, basic keyboard techniques and the performance of keyboard compositions. Prerequisite: Music 120. Credit: one hour. 06-126. WOODWINDS. 1:2:0 Clarinet, saxophone, flute. Beginning class instruction in accepted methods of tone production, embouchure building, fingerings, techniques, and attention to problems confronting the beginning woodwind player. Oboe, bassoon. Beginning class instruction in breath control, embouchure formation, intonation problems, making and adjusting double reeds. Credit: one hour. 06-128. BRASSES. 1:2:0 Trumpet, horn. Class instruction in embouchure development, tone production, breath control, and tonguing. Also, practical use of alternate fingerings and attention to special problems confronting the player. Trombone, baritone, tuba. Class instruction in embouchure development, tone production, breath control, and tonguing. Also, practical use of alternate fingerings and attention to special problems confronting the player. Credit: one hour. 06-130. STRINGS. 1:2:0 Violin, viola, cello and bass. A survey of the fundamentals of tone production, bowing, fingerings, and positions. Special attention is given to the methods of tuning. Credit: one hour. 06-132. PERCUSSION. 1:2:0 Snare and bass drums, cymbals, traps. Class instruction includes playing of percussion instruments of indefinite pitch with special emphasis placed on performance on the snare drum. Notation methods and the roll receive special attention. Credit, one hour. Timpani, bells, xylophone, marimba. Class instruction on percussion instruments of definite pitch. Emphasis on correct mallet and hand position and tuning timpani. Credit: one hour. 06-155, 255, 355, 455. JAZZ ENSEMBLE. 1:0:2 Performance of jazz music in both small and large ensembles. Instruction will be provided in improvisation and ensemble performance techniques for various styles of jazz from the Swing Era to contemporary styles. Prerequisite: Permission by instructor. Credit: one hour each. 06-197. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONIC MUSIC. 3:3:0 Introduction to Electronic music will give students a basic understanding of sound synthesis, MiDi sequencing, analyzing, and arranging primary recording techniques. Credit: three hours. 06-201. INTEGRATING MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM. 3:3:0 The course seeks to develop elementary education majors' musical skills and knowledge of various teaching methodologies that are appropriate for integrating musical concepts in elementary school subjects. Credit: three hours. 06-213. MUSIC THEORY III AND EAR TRAINING III. 4:4:0 The continued study of diatonic harmony and ear training. The continuation of ear training skills developed through singing and dictation drills. The introduction of chromatic harmony, Neapolitan sixth chords as well as Italian sixth, German sixth, and French sixth chords. Prerequisite: Music 114. Credit: four hours. 06-214. MUSIC THEORY IV AND EAR TRAINING IV. 4:4:0 Continuation of Music Theory and Ear Training III. Modal singing and dictation studies. Study intervals, two- and three-part dictation. The study of diatonic and chromatic harmony, Neapolitan sixth chord, the Italian sixth chord, German sixth chord, and French sixth chord. Prerequisite: Music 213. Credit: four hours. 06-220. PIANO CLASS III. 1:2:0 Emphasis is placed on the development of students' functional piano techniques and piano keyboard compositions at the elementary level. Students are expected to acquire additional piano performance skills through technique, music reading, and harmonization. Prerequisite: Music 121. Credit: one hour. 06-221. PIANO CLASS IV. 1:2:0 This course is a continuation of Music 220. Additional attention is given to developing students' comprehensive piano performance skills. Prerequisite: Music 220. Credit: one hour. 06-301. ELEMENTARY GENERAL AND VOCAL MUSIC METHODS (K-8). 3:3:0 This course is designed to present music education majors with appropriate music teaching methods and materials for effective pre-school and elementary general and vocal music teaching. Credit: three hours. 06-302. SECONDARY GENERAL AND VOCAL MUSIC METHODS (7-12). 3:3:0 This course seeks to develop music education majors' musical skills and knowledge of methods and materials that are appropriate for effective general and vocal music teaching in the secondary schools. Credit: three hours. 06-309. VOCAL CONDUCTING. 2:2:0 The techniques of conducting choral organizations. Stress is placed upon basic patterns of conducting various meters, expressive and non-expressive gestures, cues, dynamics, and interpretation. Credit: two hours. 06-310. CONDUCTING. 2:2:0 The techniques of conducting with the baton and problems of score reading and transposition are stressed. Instruction, demonstration, and practice. The main purpose of this course is to equip students with sufficient knowledge and conducting technique, so they can function efficiently as elementary and secondary instrumental conductors. Beat patterns, score reading and transpositions are emphasized. Credit: two hours. 06-311. BRASSES. 1:1:0 A practical study of the brass instruments with emphasis on the trumpet. Credit: one hour. 06-312. STRINGS SURVEY. 1:1:0 A practical survey of the stringed instruments with emphasis on the violin. Credit: one hour. 06-313. PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS. 1:1:0 A practical study of the percussion instruments with emphasis on the snare drum. Credit: one hour. 06-314. WOODWINDS. 1:1:0 A practical study of the woodwind instruments with emphasis on the clarinet. Credit: one hour. 06-318. FORM AND ANALYSIS. 2:2:0 A study of music structure and the forms of instrumental and vocal music. The application of analytical techniques. Pre-requisites: Minimum grade of "C" in Music 113, 114, 213, 214, 323, and 324. Credit: two hours. 06-323-324. MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE. 2:2:0 A simultaneous study of the history and literature of music in the Western World through discussion, performance, analysis, and recording. The first semester includes the study of music from antiquity through the Renaissance period. The second semester includes the study of music from the Baroque period through the classical period. Credit: two hours each. 06-401. VOCAL METHODS. 1:1:0 A study of vocal fundamentals including diction, intonation, tone quality, and breath control. Choral literature and techniques of teaching are stressed. Credit: one hour. 06-403. ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY INSTRUMENTAL METHODS (K-12). 2:1:0 This course prepares music majors to teach pre-school and secondary instrumental music teaching by developing a sound philosophy of instrumental music education, acquiring sufficient knowledge of instrumental methods, materials, pedagogy, and procedures that are appropriate for the school instrumental program. Credit: two hours. 06-410. ORCHESTRATION. 3:3:0 A study of the fundamentals of writing for orchestral instruments. Registration, instrumentation, voicings, and technical limitations are considered. Problems of writing for the various instrumental combinations with reference to the needs of the public schools are emphasized. Prerequisite: Music 214. Credit: three hours. 06-412. VOCAL ARRANGING. 2:2:0 Methods of arranging for vocal ensembles. Music editing techniques. Prerequisite: Music 318. Credit: two hours. 06-413. BAND ARRANGING. 2:2:0 Methods of arranging for the marching and concert bands. Music editing techniques. Prerequisite: Music 318. Credit: two hours. 06-423-424. MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE III-IV. 2:2:0 A study of music during the Romantic period. The fourth semester includes a study of music of the twentieth century. Credit: two hours each.  

Arts course descriptions

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  The Bachelor of Arts Degree Tracks in Art: The department offers career tracks in Art Education, General Art and Arts Management Art and Art Education    Art-101. INTRODUCTION TO ART                                                                                                            3:3:0 A survey of history from prehistoric times to the present, the course offers an introduction to analysis and evaluation of the visual arts, with emphasis on the relationship of end product to design, technique, and cultural background.  The main purpose of the course is to gain appreciation for all art forms.  Lectures are presented with the use of slides/PowerPoint and other visual aids. Credit, three hours.   Art-103. INTRODUCTION TO DRAWING                                                                                    3:3:3 This is a basic drawing and composition course.  The exploration of a variety of techniques, tools, and media used in drawing.  Studies include problems in composition, line, perspective, volume, and value.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-104. TWO-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN (2D-DESIGN)                                                                        3:3:3 An introduction to the fundamental elements and principles of design and composition through studies promoting understanding and application of these concepts.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-108. SURVEY OF MACINTOSH STUDIO                                                                                          3:4:0 The course introduces basic computer literacy skills, principles, and specific applications that are related to computer graphics and multimedia applications to students who never used computers in the arts.  There will be an introduction to the World Wide Web.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-191. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR I-ART                                                                                   1:2:0 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success.  Academic skills will be developed.  These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the internet, and word processing.  Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed.  Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals.  Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution, and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. Credit, one hour.   Art-192. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR II- ART                                                                                                1:1:0 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success.  Academic skills will be developed.  These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the internet, and word processing.  Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed.  Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals.  Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution, and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. Credit, one hour.   Art-201. ART EDUCATION:  THEORY AND PRACTICE                                                    3:3:0 The course is designed to introduce elementary and art education majors to theories and practices of art education as they investigate contemporary trends in teaching art.  Course content focuses on the four (4) components of Discipline Based Art Education (DBAE):  art history, aesthetics, criticism, and production, while utilizing a holistic model that reflects state and national standards, and the use of art as a vehicle for self-expression.  Course content will also explore the growth and development of children as revealed in their art, and the integration of art into Social Science, Mathematics, Science, and Language Art curriculum.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-205. INTERMEDIATE DRAWING                                                                                                       3:3:3 The course is geared to increase students’ technical, critical, and historical knowledge as it pertains to various drawing media.  Students will be able to study multiple problems that range from basic working fundamentals and methods to complex pictorial organization and imaginative perception of objects, scenes, and mark making as a conveyor of feeling, sensation, and personal ideas.  The emphasis will be on art studio production, but will be balanced with critical dialogue lectures on techniques, historical references, and student research.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, 05-104, or consent of the Instructor.   Art-206. THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN (3D-DESIGN)                                                    3:3:3 Geared to introduce the student to studio work in three-dimensional design, basic spatial concepts, and creation of expression with attention to form, space arrangement, movement, proportion, unity, and contrast.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-207. COMPUTER GRAPHICS                                                                                                               3:3:3 Graphic Design and Typography continues to develop design concepts with an emphasis on layout and design on the Macintosh computer.  Type styles and design, pre-press color theory, and visual communication are stressed.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-208. COMPUTER IMAGING                                                                                                 3:3:3 The course treats the Macintosh computer as a fine arts tool.  Emphasis is placed on creating aesthetically pleasing works of art.  Students will create new images using drawing and painting software and will be able to manipulate existing photographs using a color scanner and image processing software.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, 05-104, 05-108, or consent of the Instructor. Credit, three hours.   Art-209. DRAWING AND PAINTING FOR NON-MAJORS                                                  3:3:3 Drawing and Painting for non-majors offers an introduction to basic studio art practices and art appreciation.  Students will have the opportunity to acquire technical artistic skills, and the chance to explore various materials and methods for drawing and painting.  Students will be encouraged to develop basic techniques of representational drawing and painting.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-229. ARTS MANAGEMENT SEMINAR                                                                                              3:3:0 This seminar is designed to introduce students to careers and opportunities in the arts management field.  Students will research current trends in arts administration and explore the diversity of career opportunities.  Students will have the opportunity to connect with a community arts organization and to develop a model project that portrays an understanding of organizational and programmatic development. Credit, three hours.   Art-300. FIBERS                                                                                                                                                3:3:3 Studio experience in fiber art forms including weaving, macramé, fiber sculpture, various loom and off-loom procedures, warp design, basic weaves and knots, and designing woven textiles.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-301. SCULPTURE I                                                                                                                                   3:3:3 Emphasis is placed on manipulation of media in sculpture design utilizing clay, plaster, wood, and other materials.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  Consent of the Instructor for non-Art majors. Credit, three hours.   Art-302. CERAMICS I                                                                                                                                      3:3:3 Hand-building techniques are covered with an introduction to the potter's wheel and other ceramics techniques including firing and glaze making.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  Consent of the Instructor for non-Art majors. Credit, three hours.   Art-303. JEWELRY DESIGN                                                                                                                        3:3:3 An introduction to basic jewelry techniques including the lost wax process.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, 05-104, 05-206, or consent of the Instructor for non-Art majors. Credit, three hours.   Art-304. INTRODUCTION TO PAINTING                                                                                                3:3:3 Introduces students to basic painting techniques and problems through the exploration of color mixture, form, content, and pictorial depth in a variety of media.  Emphasis on proper archival techniques, canvas, paper choices, and stretcher building will be included.  Historical and contemporary approaches to painting will be studied through hands-on studio demonstrations followed by concentrated student projects.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  Consent of the Instructor for non-Art majors. Credit, three hours.   Art-307. WATERCOLOR (PAINTING II)                                                                                  3:3:3 Introduces various methods of handling watercolor.  Experimentation with techniques, development of skills, discussion of methods, and styles of watercolorists will be explored.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, 05-104, 05-304, or consent of the Instructor. Credit, three hours.   Art-308. LIFE DRAWING                                                                                                                               3:3:3 Designed to help the student develop ability in drawing from life.  The course includes the drawing of the human figure and the development of an understanding of the structure of the human anatomy.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, or consent of the Instructor. Credit, three hours.   Art-315. MODERN ART                                                                                                                                  3:3:0 The development of the visual arts from the First World War to present day.  Emphasis will be on the many styles and objectives of contemporary artists and their antecedents. Credit, three hours.   Art-316. AFRICAN-AMERICAN ART HISTORY/MODERN                                                                3:3:0 Primarily concerned with the history of African-American art in the United States, the course also investigates the survival of African forms in the Caribbean and in South America.  Although the emphasis is on art history, the styles and objectives of modern artists and their antecedents, the course is interdisciplinary and draws upon visual and literary examples of an African legacy in American life.  Museum visits and an independent research and/or studio projects supplement slide lectures, video, and class discussion. Credit, three hours.   Art-317. ART HISTORY I                                                                                                                               3:3:0 A study of the development of visual art forms with an emphasis on drawing, printmaking, pottery, painting, sculpture, architecture, crafts, and the preservation of art.  The content area of study will include Prehistoric art up through the Gothic Period of art within Western Civilization.  Students will know and be able to recognize the differences between the following aspects of art:  the illustrative, the decorative, and the expressive. Credit, three hours.     Art-318. ART HISTORY II                                                                                                                             3:3:0 A study of humanism from the Proto-Renaissance up to the birth of the Modern Art Movement.  Students will examine the development of visual art forms with an emphasis on drawing, printmaking, painting, sculpture, architecture, crafts, and the preservation of art.  The content area of study will include the role of religion, politics, and societal change and its affect on art.  Students will know and be able to recognize the differences between the following aspects of art:  the illustrative, the decorative, and the expressive. Credit, three hours.   Art-320. AESTHETIC ISSUES IN ART EDUCATION                                                                            3:3:0 An introduction to a variety of cultural institutions and their aesthetics and criticism with an emphasis on their relationships to the artist and the viewer. Credit, three hours.   Art-325. PHOTOGRAPHY                                                                                                                             3:4:3 Photography 325 is a course that is designed to give the student an introduction to the 35mm camera and the darkroom and deals primarily with black and white photography techniques.  Previous photographic knowledge is helpful but not necessary to successfully complete the course.  Both aesthetic and technical concepts are introduced and developed from the most elementary level.  A variety of assignments are provided to challenge the student.  The production of high quality prints is stressed.  A 35-mm. camera with manual capabilities is required.  Limited enrollment restrictions apply due to the necessary provision of facilities and equipment needed for each student.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  Consent of the Instructor for non-Art majors. Credit, three hours.   Art-329. UNIVERSITY GALLERY INTERNSHIP                                                                   3:3:0 The course is designed to provide practical experience to Arts Management students in the business of running an art gallery.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-229. Credit, three hours.   Art-333. PRINTMAKING                                                                                                                                3:3:3 The course will introduce students to various fine arts methods of printmaking.  Mono-print, relief, intaglio, and serigraph processes will be explored.  Painterly and photographic approaches to creating designs suitable for printing methods will be encouraged.  Once approaches to basic media have been introduced, students will be guided to combine processes in a contemporary manner.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, 05-104, or consent of the Instructor for non-Art majors. Credit, three hours.   Art-340. ART FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION                                                                                              3:3:0 The course is designed to deal with the teaching of the exceptional children and those children with disabilities.  Educational processes and methods will be provided to augment the growth and development of the child's behavior through an integrated arts approach.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-341. METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR ELEMENTARY ART TEACHERS                        3:3:0 The course is designed to give prospective elementary art teachers current methods and practices in art education through discussions, readings, classroom observations, field trips, and visual media.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-342. METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR SECONDARY ART TEACHERS                            3:3:0 The course is designed to give prospective secondary art teachers current methods and practices in art education through discussions, readings, classroom observations, field trips, and visual media.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.     Art-408. ADVANCED PAINTING (PAINTING III)                                                                  3:3:3 Emphasizes oil painting, acrylic painting, and newer media.  The course will give further experience in painting as a means of expression.  Students will focus on a series of related works in relationship to concept, technique, and media.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, 05-104, 05-304, or consent of the Instructor for non-Art majors. Credit, three hours.   Art-410. SEMINAR IN ART EDUCATION                                                                                 1:2:0 The course will enable students to discuss situations and problems encountered in their student teaching in the context of current concepts and philosophy in Art Education.  Should be taken concurrently with 12-400. Credit, one hour.   Art-411. SCULPTURE II                                                                                                                 3:3:3 Designed to offer extensive use of building methods and some metal techniques.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, 05-104, 05-206, 05-302. Credit, three hours.   Art-412. CERAMICS II                                                                                                                                    3:3:3 This is a laboratory course with lecture.  Hand-building techniques are covered with an in-depth exploration of the potter’s wheel and other ceramics techniques including firing, and glaze making and application.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, 05-104, 05-206, 05-301. Credit, three hours.   Art-414. ADVANCED COMPUTER IMAGING                                                                                        3:3:3 Assignments will be individualized with the consent of the Instructor in the first half of the course.  Emphasis will be placed on collage and digital painting techniques, aesthetic development, color correction for multiple output options, complex masking and compositing, and acquiring control over the subtle application of special effects filters.  The second half of the course will introduce students to three-dimensional applications and/or time based media.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-425. ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY                                                                                                    3:4:3 Designed to give the students an opportunity to continue their work in black and white photographic techniques and to develop advanced camera skills.  Part of the course will involve the use of the computer for enhancing the photograph and the use of mixed media combined with the photographic image.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-325. Credit, three hours.   Art-429. COMMUNITY ARTS INTERNSHIP                                                                                           12:0:12 This capstone course is designed to introduce arts management students to the business of art through a practicum experience within a community arts setting.  Students will be assigned to an arts organization for a semester field experience. Credit, twelve hours.   Art-445. INDEPENDENT STUDY                                                                                                 3:3:0 445A (Ceramics), 445B (Painting), 445C (Watercolor), 445D (Photography), 445E (Drawing), 445F (Sculpture), 445G (Graphics), 445H (Art History), 445I (Printmaking).  The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.     Art-445A. INDEPENDENT STUDY – CERAMICS                                                                  3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.      Art-445B. INDEPENDENT STUDY – PAINTING                                                                                    3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.   Art-445C. INDEPENDENT STUDY – WATERCOLOR                                                                         3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.   Art-445D. INDEPENDENT STUDY – PHOTOGRAPHY                                                                       3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.   Art-445E. INDEPENDENT STUDY – DRAWING                                                                                    3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.   Art-445F. INDEPENDENT STUDY – SCULPTURE                                                                                3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.   Art-445G. INDEPENDENT STUDY – GRAPHICS                                                                   3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.   Art-445H. INDEPENDENT STUDY – ART HISTORY                                                                           3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.   Art-445I. INDEPENDENT STUDY – PRINTMAKING                                                                           3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.   Art-450. SENIOR EXPERIENCE IN ART                                                                                  9:9:0 The senior experience is divided into three (3) parts:  1) a senior thesis, 2) an individual show 3) and a professional portfolio.  The course is required of all Studio Art majors.  The course is taken and completed during the last semester of the Senior year.  (Lab Fee) Credit, nine hours.   Art-460. SELECTED TOPICS IN ART EDUCATION                                                                            3:3:0 This course is a continued in-depth independent study by the qualified advanced art major or minor (or under certain circumstances, a special student) that wishes to pursue a specific interest in art, based on the topic chosen.  Each student will coordinate specific goals and requirements with his or her professor.  Prerequisites:  Consent of Instructor and Chair. Credit, three hours.   Art-461. SELECTED TOPICS IN ART HISTORY                                                                   3:3:0 The course is a continued in-depth independent study by the qualified advanced art major or minor (or under certain circumstances, a special student) that wishes to pursue a specific interest in art, based on the topic chosen.  Each student will coordinate specific goals and requirements with his or her professor.  Prerequisites:  Consent of Instructor and Chair. Credit, three hours.   Art-462. SELECTED TOPICS IN STUDIO ARTS                                                                                    3:3:3 The course is a continued in-depth independent study by the qualified advanced art major or minor (or under certain circumstances, a special student) that wishes to pursue a specific interest in art, based on the topic chosen.  Each student will coordinate specific goals and requirements with his or her professor.  Prerequisites:  Consent of Instructor and Chair.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.     Art-463. SELECTED TOPICS IN ART THEORY                                                                                    3:3:0 The course is a continued in-depth independent study by the qualified advanced art major or minor (or under certain circumstances, a special student) that wishes to pursue a specific interest in art, based on the topic chosen.  Each student will coordinate specific goals and requirements with his or her professor.  Prerequisites:  Consent of Instructor and Chair. Credit, three hours.   Art-464. SELECTED TOPICS IN ARTS MANAGEMENT                                                    3:3:0 The course is a continued in-depth independent study by the qualified advanced art major or minor (or under certain circumstances, a special student) that wishes to pursue a specific interest in art, based on the topic chosen.  Each student will coordinate specific goals and requirements with his or her professor.  Prerequisites:  Consent of Instructor and Chair. Credit, three hours.   Art-495. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION                                                                                                    3-9:3:0 Cooperative Education allows students to combine academic study with on-the-job experience by working on paid training assignments coordinated by the Department.  The major objective of cooperative education is the application of classroom theory to a work environment. Prerequisites:  Consent of the Instructor & chair.  

Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice

Description: 

 

Delaware State University
Sociology & Criminal
Justice Dept.
Delaware Hall
Room 122

(302) 857-6670

Dr. Kofi Blay, Chairperson, Prof.

 

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  The Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice is committed to the principles of a liberal education and to assisting its students to think sociologically in order to better understand human society and human behavior. The Department’s curricula are designed to not only prepare students for careers and graduate studies in Sociology and Criminal Justice, but also to equip them with a far-reaching view of the world consistent with the goals of a liberal arts education and to prepare them to recognize the social institutions and patterns upon which everyday life rests. The Department offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminal Justice. The Sociology major provides a comprehensive grounding in the academic discipline of Sociology, its theories, methods, and findings. The Criminal Justice major provides a comprehensive grounding in the discipline of criminology, as well as analysis of the multitude of social factors and institutions that impact the criminal justice system. The Department also offers a minor in Sociology and a minor in Criminal Justice.   Click on following links for the curriculum for the Criminal Justice or Sociology Degrees: Criminal Justice Curriculum Sociology Curriculum Why Choose a Degree in Sociology/Criminal Justice? Sociology graduates have successful careers in such diverse occupations as non-profit business consultation, healthcare, gerontology, risk management and insurance fund-raising and advocacy groups, international relations, state and federal government agency administration, urban and community planning, military officer, career management, evaluation research, seminar and workshop consultations, public opinion polling, market research and employee relations.  Criminal Justice careers may entail law enforcement, probation and corrections, legal research, or homeland security. Preparation for professional and graduate schools includes law school or advanced degrees in Sociology. Today,  a variety of  master’s and doctoral programs are offered in criminal justice, criminology, gender studies, urban sociology, and applied sociology across the country and around the globe.   Major in Sociology In order to graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology, a student must complete at least 120 credit hours of coursework to include: (1) all required general education courses, (2) the following required Sociology courses: 37-101, 103, 203, 206, 210, 303, 310, 314, 322, 412, 420, 435 and 448; (3) three Sociology elective courses selected from a recommended list (see below); and, (4) a Social Science elective. A minimum grade of “C” is required in each Sociology course. Proposed List of Courses that would satisfy Sociology Elective Requirements:   Men and Women in Society Criminology Real/Reel Culture Law Enforcement Population Analysis Courts and Criminal Justice Sociology of Law Criminal Law Technology and Society Juvenile Delinquency Principles of Corrections Victimology Social Problems Criminal Justice Administration Social Deviance     Minor in Sociology To graduate with a minor in Sociology, a student must complete 18 hours of course work. Required courses are: Introduction to Sociology, Social Institutions, Social Psychology, Methods of Research in Sociology, Sociological Theories and an elective course in Sociology at the 300 or 400 level. Major in Criminal Justice To graduate with a Bachelors Degree in Criminal Justice, a student must complete at least 120 credit hours of coursework to include: (1) all required general education courses; (2) The following Criminal Justice and related courses (Criminal Justice 104, 208, 311, 313, 315, 316, 402, 415, 448, 450 and Sociology 101, 210, 303, 314, 322, 412, and 420); and (3) two Sociology elective courses at or above the 300 level selected from a recommended list. A minimum grade of “C” is required in each of the above courses. Proposed List of Courses that would satisfy Criminal Justice Elective Requirements:   Men and Women in Society Sociology of Law Real/Reel Culture Technology and Society Population Analysis Sociology of the Family Cultural Anthropology Juvenile Delinquency Social Problems Criminal Justice Administration Social Change Social Stratification   Minor in Criminal Justice To graduate with a minor in Criminal Justice, a student must complete 18 credit hours of course work. Required courses are: Introduction to Criminal Justice, Criminology, Law Enforcement, Courts and Criminal Justice, Methods of Research and an elective course in Criminal Justice at the 300 or 400 level. **A minimum grade of “C” is required for the following general education courses: English Composition I. English Composition II, University Seminar, Speech, Critical Thinking, Global Societies, and Lifetime Fitness and Wellness. 
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Sociology & Criminal Justice
Dept. Faculty


Dr. Kofi Blay
Professor and Chair
129 Delaware Hall
302- 857-6675
302-857-6672(Fax)
 

Teaching and Research Interest

  • Marriage and the Family
  • Cultural Anthropology
  • Complex Organizations
  • Race and Ethnic Relations
  • Comparative Sociology
  • Sociology of Development
Dr. Lee Streetman
Professor
112 Delaware Hall
302-857-6678

Teaching and Research Interest

  • Introduction to Sociology
  • Criminology
  • Juvenile Delinquency
  • Criminal Law
  • Courts and Criminal Justice

 

Dr. Dorothy Dillard
Associate Professor
129A Delaware Hall
302 857 7510
302 857 6672 (fax)

ddillard@desu.edu
 

Teaching and Research Interest

  • Research Methods
  • Corrections
  • Drug Use and American Society
  • Internship 

 

Dr. Brian Chad Starks
Assistant Professor 
115 Delaware Hall
302-857-6673

Teaching and Research Interest

  • Bail 
  • Criminology
  • Criminal Justice
  • Law Enforcement
  • Law and Society 
  • Ethnography

 

 

Nena  Sechler Craven
Instructor
118 Delaware Hall
(302) 857-6671


Teaching and Research Interest

  • Introduction to Sociology 
  • Sociological Theories 
  • Social Psychology 
  • Elementary Statistics 
  • Gender 
  • Sexuality 
  • Deviance
  • Popular Culture
  • Men and Women in Society
     

Kylie Parrotta
Instructor 
134 Delaware Hall
(302) 857-7694

kparrotta@desu.edu

Teaching and Research Interest

  • University Seminar
  • Introduction to Sociology
  • Research Methods
  • Race and Ethnic Relations
  • Deviance
  • Sentencing Disparity
  • Work-Family-Leisure Balance
  • Social Construction of Identity
  • Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

    

 

 

 

 

Department of Psychology

Description: 

 

Delaware Hall Room 221
302-857-6660
Fax: 302-857-6661

  

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The Department of Psychology recognizes and supports the overall mission of Delaware State University by providing students with the necessary education for entry level positions in human service related fields and preparing students for graduate studies. More specifically, the psychology program is designed to empower and affirm undergraduate students through broad based training in the foundations of psychology, which emphasizes the need to understand human behavior through critical thinking and scientific endeavors.   The department recognizes and supports the mission of the American Psychological Association (APA) which is "to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people's lives" (APA. [2009]. APA Mission Statement. Retrieved July 27, 2009 from http://www.apa.org/about/). In addition to teaching, the Psychology faculty are engaged in a variety of research and service activities and involve students in many of these activities.   What is Psychology? Psychology is the field of science devoted to understanding behavior and mental processes.  This includes biological and social influences on behavior, how the world is experienced via the five senses, consciousness, learning, memory, thinking, intelligence, language, development across the life span, motivation, emotion, sexuality and gender, stress and health, personality, and psychological disorders and therapies.  In addition to advancing our basic understanding of the above topics, psychology also aims to apply that knowledge to solve a wide variety of real-world problems, such as developing methods of teaching that more effectively promote student learning, designing work environments that increase morale and productivity, or helping athletes to prepare mentally for participation in sports.   Careers with a Degree in Psychology Bachelor's Degree A bachelor’s degree in psychology can be highly flexible and adaptable to many different kinds of careers (Landrum & Davis, 2007; Schwartz, 2000). In the 1994-1995 Psychology Baccalaureate Survey conducted by the American Psychological Association (Grocer & Kohout, 1997), people with bachelor’s degrees in psychology found careers in the following areas:   ·      education and teaching ·      consulting and statistical analysis ·      administration or clerical services ·      professional services ·      sales ·      health and health-related services ·      research and development or research and development management   Other possible careers include marketing researcher, social worker, and communications specialist (Landrum & Davis, 2007; Schwartz, 2000). With its emphasis on critical thinking and empirical observation, psychology trains people for a variety of potential workplace environments and requirements. (Ciccarelli & White, 2009, pp. B4-B5) Graduate Degree In addition to preparing students for careers such as those above, a bachelor’s degree in Psychology also prepares students to pursue graduate studies in a variety of fields, including business, law, child and family studies, education, social work, management, and, of course, psychology. Some of the careers open to individuals with a graduate degree in Psychology are psychiatry*, psychoanalysis, psychiatric social work, clinical or counseling psychology, or teaching and/or research in any area of psychology. (*Psychiatry requires an M.D.)   The Psychology Program Psychology Major All students who select Psychology as a major must complete both the general education requirements (see General Education Program) and the requirements of the Psychology major.  In all, 120 total credit hours are required for a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology.  The complete list of requirements can be found at the links below: Current (Fall 2011) Psychology Curriculum (for all students entering the Psychology major on or after May 12, 2011) Fall 2009 Psychology Curriculum (for students who entered the Psychology major between Fall 2009 and May 11, 2011) Fall 2008 Psychology Curriculum (for students who entered the Psychology major during the 2008-2009 academic year)   Psychology Minor The requirements for a minor in Psychology can be found at the links below: Current (Fall 2011) Psychology Minor Requirements (for students entering the Psychology minor on or after May 12, 2011) July 2009 Psychology Minor Requirements (for students who entered the Psychology minor between July 2009 and May 11, 2011)   Request for more information      
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Faculty Profile


Dr. Gwendolyn Scott-Jones
Associate Professor and Chairperson

Dr. Padmini (Nina) Banerjee
Associate Professor

Dr. Brian Friel
Associate Professor

Dr. Rachel Pulverman
Assistant Professor

Dr. John D Rich, Jr.
Associate Professor

Dr. Amy Rogers
Associate Professor

Dr. Darla Scott
Assistant Professor

Ms. Heidi Hoffman
Adjunct Instructor and Practicum Coordinator

Dr. James P. Kurtz
Adjunct Associate Professor

Dr. Roy A. Lafontaine
Adjunct Associate Professor

Ms. Tawanda Morgan
Adjunct Instructor

Dr. Francene Perry-Brown
Adjunct Assistant Professor

 

Staff


Ms. Terri (Nichols) Harrington
Administrative Secretary

 

Department of Art

Description: 

 

Education and Humanities Building Room 134A
Phone: 302.857.6680
Fax: 302.857.6681

 

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The Department of Art seeks to provide high-quality education for Art majors, as well as to provide courses for the prospective elementary and secondary teachers, while providing courses that satisfy General Education Requirements for the entire University population. Combining Your Love of Art with a Meaningful Career   If you have always had an interest in the arts but aren’t aware of the career opportunities available to you, the Department of Art will be able to guide you through an education that is not only worthwhile, but most rewarding as well. Your personal path toward graduation will enable you to pursue a variety of stimulating professions after graduation.  Delaware State University strikes a balance between general academic and major studio-related courses to support intellectual and artistic growth.  In this balance, students are able to seek a variety of courses that offer different career paths.  You will have the opportunity to work with professional artists in an environment that is conducive to high standards of intellectual and creative practice. Delaware State offers abundant facilities and state-of-the-art equipment for all majors, including studio space.  The department office is located in the Education and Humanities Building, where most of the majors’ classes are held.  All majors utilize fully equipped studios and maintains its own Arts Center/Gallery where students engage in historical and contemporary history classes.  The gallery exhibits the work of students, faculty members and nationally recognized artists, as well as featuring an array of international artifacts.  The gallery also hosts lectures and university and community-based programs in music, theatre and visual art.  Our pursuit of interdisciplinary programs enables students to utilize innumerable facilities throughout the campus for intellectual discourse and creative expression.  Delaware State University’s Department of Art believes that the arts are fundamental components of human civilization.  We believe that if you choose our program and stay on course, you will enter one of the most personally rewarding, life-enhancing professions and work with some of the most dedicated scholars you will ever encounter.  
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Chair:

Donald Becker Ed. D. M.F.A

Professor:

Roberta Tucci, Ed.D, M.F.A

Associate Professors:

Hazel Bradshaw-Beaumont, PhD

Ms. Lori Crawford, M.F.A.

Mr. George Lorio, M.F.A.

Assistant Professor

Mr. William Colbert, M.F.A.

Department Secretary

Inger Lawton

 

Department of Music

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  BA in Music: Music Industry Concentration The new Bachelor of Arts in Music: Music Industry Concentration degree in the Music Department emerges out of the existing BA in Music and includes optional minors currently offered by the DSU College of Business in either Management or Marketing. In addition to the core music courses currently offered in the BA in Music, it offers students a new series of music industry courses exploring the wide range of career options currently available in the music industry. It also allows the student to focus on one of the three main sequence areas within the new music industry concentration. Music Recording and Technology Music Business, or Commercial Composition Each of the three sequence areas above are distinguished by their own two-course sequence coupled with two years of Applied Music Industry lessons in the student's preferred area of specialization (recording, music business, or commercial composition).

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