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Political Science Course Descriptions

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  33-103. INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE. 3:3:0 A survey of the major concepts, issues, and controversies in the discipline of political science and its various sub-fields. Credit: three hours. 33-200. AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT. 3:3:0 An examination of the structure and operation of the Presidency, Congress, Bureaucracy, and Supreme Court and the role of political parties, elections, interest groups, and the news media in American politics. Credit: three hours. 33-210. CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES. 3:3:0 A study of political ideologies which shape the values, beliefs, and actions of contemporary regimes and political movements. The focus will be on democracy, socialism, communism, anarchism, and fascism. Credit: three hours. 33-220. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT. 3:3:0 A study of the government and politics of Great Britain, France, Germany, Russia and various nations of Africa. The choice of governments may vary depending on the interests of the students and the instructor. Credit: three hours. 33-230. INTERNATIONAL POLITICS. 3:3:0 A study of the economic, diplomatic, military, and legal relationships among states. Designed to provide a conceptual framework leading to a better understanding of world affairs. The course will cover such topics as the nation-state system, the sources of national power, conflict and conflict resolution, international law, and organization. Credit: three hours. 33-250. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT. 3:3:0 A study of state and urban governments with special emphasis on Delaware. Credit: three hours. 33-307. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW. 3:3:0 The principles of constitutional law as interpreted by Supreme Court decisions on the allocation of powers to the state and between the three branches of the federal government. Prerequisite: Either Political Science 103 or Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-308. CIVIL LIBERTIES. 3:3:0 An examination of the Supreme Court's interpretation of constitutional freedoms under the First Amendment (press, speech, religion, assembly, and petition), the Due Process Clause (racial and sexual equity), and criminal rights (arrests, search and seizure). Prerequisite: Either Political Science 103 or Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-310. AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT. 3:3:0 The evolution of American political thought from colonial times to the present with an emphasis on how ideas influence government policy and political behavior. Prerequisite: History 201 and History 202. Credit: three hours. 33-315. PARTIES, CAMPAIGNS, AND ELECTIONS. 3:3:0 The nature and function of political parties in the American two-party system; the role of money and television in modern campaigns;. voting behavior and electoral reform. Prerequisite: Either Political Science 103 or Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-320. BLACK POLITICS IN AMERICA. 3:3:0 An investigation of black political movements and thought; participation of blacks in the American political process; power structures in black communities. Prerequisite: Either Political Science 103 or Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-325. POLITICS OF DEVELOPING NATIONS. 3:3:0 A study of political development and change in the nations of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Credit: three hours. 33-330. FIELD WORK IN POLITICAL SCIENCE. 3:3:0 A supervised experience designed to give the student firsthand knowledge of some aspect of political behavior. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Credit: three hours. 33-340. GOVERNMENT AND BUSINESS. 3:3:0 A survey of corporate-government relations in the United States focusing on how corporations influence government decision-makers and how government policies affect business operations. Credit: three hours. 33-355. AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY. 3:3:0 A study of the American foreign policy-making process and the role of the United States in international relations. Prerequisite: Either Political Science 103 or Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-400. THE PRESIDENCY. 3:3:0 A study of the office, powers, and behavior of the president with an analysis of his major roles as chief administrator, legislator, opinion leader, foreign policy-maker, and commander-in-chief. Prerequisite: Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-403. THE CONGRESS. 3:3:0 A study of the U.S. Congress to include the structure of the House and Senate (the committee system, legislative rules and procedures, party leadership, and caucuses) and congressional behavior (campaigning, constituency representation, and decision-making). Prerequisite: Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-405. THE SUPREME COURT. 3:3:0 The organization and powers of the federal judiciary; the selection of federal judges; judicial philosophy and behavior; judicial decision-making and the impact of the Supreme Court on the political process. Prerequisite: Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-408. BUREAUCRACY AND PUBLIC POLICY. 3:3:0 The role of bureaucracy in modern American government; bureaucratic power and politics; decision-making and the implementation of public policy; political constraints on bureaucracy. Prerequisite: Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-410. RESEARCH METHODS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE. 3:3:0 Research design techniques including hypothesis testing, sampling, questionnaire construction, and aggregate data analysis. Students will be introduced to the elements of survey research (polling) and conduct either an individual or group research project. No prior knowledge of statistics is necessary. Required for political science majors in junior or senior year. Prerequisite: minimum junior level status and consent of the instructor. Credit: three hours. [An equivalency for this course is Sociology 314.] 33-420. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN POLITICAL SCIENCE. 3:3:0 An intensive investigation of a topic within the discipline of political science under the guidance of a faculty member. Course requirements include regular conferences, reading assignments, and a research paper. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor and 15 hours of prior course work in political science. Credit: three hours. 33-466. SEMINAR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE. 3:3:0 A specific topic will be developed and publicized at registration each time this course is offered. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Credit: three hours. 33-470. POLITICAL SCIENCE INTERNSHIP. 3:3:0 Students interested in an internship experience with a local, state, or federal government agency should consult with the department chairman for program information. Credit: three to nine hours. <--Back to Philosophy Course Descriptions

History/ Political Science/ Philosophy Course descriptions

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  PHILOSOPHY (03) 03-101. CRITICAL THINKING. 3:3:0 The course is designed to develop and refine students' ability to think more clearly and more logically. The means to this end is a study of elementary logic. Credit: three hours. 03-105. CONTEMPORARY MORAL ISSUES. 3:3:0 A critical examination of such major current moral issues as abortion, euthanasia, pornography, retribution and capital punishment, affirmative action and reverse discrimination, social and economic justice and ethical issues in agriculture and the environment. Credit: three hours. This course is a foundation course for lifelong learning in the University's general education program. 03-201. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY. 3:3:0 Topics typically include: the general goals and methods of philosophy, the existence of God, the problem of evil, the immortality of the soul, the meaning of life, and free will. Credit: three hours. This course is a foundation course for lifelong learning in the University's general education program. 03-202. ETHICS. 3:3:0 Ethics is concerned primarily with the inquiry concerning various rules of conduct and "ways of life." Such fundamental ethical issues as egoism and altruism, freedom and determination, and the nature of moral decision-making will be highlighted through a critical examination of some of the writings of several classic ethical theorists, e.g., Plato, Mill, Kant, and Rawls. Credit: three hours. This course is a foundation course for lifelong learning in the University's general education program. 03-206. LOGIC. 3:3:0 A study of the methods and principles used to distinguish correct from incorrect reasoning, both deductive and inductive. Designed to help students reason more effectively themselves and to develop the ability to cogently criticize the reasoning of others. Credit: three hours. 03-231 (331 AND 431). SELECTED TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY. 3:3:0 Information on the content of these offerings is available, prior to pre-registration, from philosophy faculty. Credit: three hours. 03-300. HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY. 3:3:0 The course covers classical philosophers starting in the sixth century B.C. through the Pre-Socratic period, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, epicureanism, stoicism, and skepticism ending with the second century A.D. Credit: three hours. 03-302. HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY. 3:3:0 A study of the major European philosophers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries: Bacon, Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Credit: three hours. 03-304. POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY. 3:3:0 Political philosophy is concerned primarily with the nature of the concept of justice and its application in society. Some of the arguments that support particular forms of government, e. g., democratic, oligarchic, autocratic, etc., will be dealt with through a critical examination of several classic writers in the field, e. g., Hobbes, Rousseau, Mill, Locke, and Rawls. Credit: three hours. 03-322. MEDICAL ETHICS. 3:3:0 Issues examined here are in such areas as the relationship between biomedical ethics and ethical theory; the physician and patient relationship; the nurse and patient relationship; experimentation on humans; involuntary mental hospitalization and behavior control; the refusal of life-saving treatment; euthanasia; and health, disease and values. Credit: three hours. 03/41-341. BUSINESS ETHICS. 3:3:0 This course will be devoted to an examination of some of the ethical issues that arise in the field of business. Specific topics to be considered include: business ethics and ethical theory, the moral status of corporations, ethical codes of conduct in business, truth and advertising, the rights and duties of employees, affirmative action, and environmental issues in business. Credit: three hours. 03-399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 3:3:0 Qualified students, cooperation with a philosophy faculty member, may develop a course in some area of philosophy which they wish to study in depth. Arrangements for such a course must be made by the end of the semester preceding the one in which the course is to be taken. Credit: three hours. 03-407. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION. 3:3:0 A study of some of the philosophical issues inherent in religious belief; e.g., the existence of God, the attributes of God, the nature of religious experience, revelation, faith, and the possibility of religious knowledge. Credit: three hours.   GEOGRAPHY (32) 32-101. HUMAN GEOGRAPHY. 3:3:0 A course concerned with the relationship between man and the land with changes brought about through the growth of applied science. Credit: three hours. 32-201. WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY. 3:3:0 A Sophomore-level course designed to make the student aware of the peoples and cultures of the contemporary world. This course fulfills the World Regional Geography requirement for elementary and secondary education majors. Credit: three hours.   Political Science Next page-->

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree Television Production

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First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 25-101 Survey of Mathematics I 3 55-191 University Seminar I 1 55-208 Introduction to Mass Communications 3 55-261 Broadcast Writing I 3 XX-XXX Natural Science Requirement 1 3     16 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-102 Survey of Mathematics II 3 55-192 University Seminar II 1 55-215 TV and Radio Announcing 3 55-223 Sound Production I 3     15 Second Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 33-103 or 40-201 Introduction to Political Science or Macroeconomics 3 55-216 TV Production I 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 1 3 XX-XXX Arts / Humanities Requirement 3     18 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3 55-371 TV Production II 3 55-409 Broadcast Writing II 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 2 3     15 Third Year First Semester     31-395 Global Societies 3 55-373 Television Production III 3 55-372 Broadcast News Gathering and Reporting 3 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3 XX-XXX Natural Science Requirement 2 3     15 Second Semester     55-334 Media Research Techniques 3 55-450 Internship 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 3 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     12 Fourth Year First Semester     55-425 Mass Communications Practicum 3 55-440 Telecommunications Management 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 4 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 5 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 6 or Elective 3     15 Second Semester     55-407 Media Law and Ethics 3 55-460 Senior Project (Senior Capstone) 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 7 or Elective 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 8 or Elective 3 XX-XXX Elective 3     15   Total credits 121  

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree Radio/Audio Production

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First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 25-101 Survey of Mathematics I 3 55-191 University Seminar I 1 55-208 Introduction to Mass Communications 3 55-261 Broadcast Writing I 3 XX-XXX Arts / Humanities Elective 3     16 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-102 Survey of Mathematics II 3 55-192 University Seminar II 1 55-215 TV and Radio Announcing 3 55-223 Sound Production I 3     15 Second Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 33-103 or 40-201 Introduction to Political Science or Macroeconomics 3 55-361 Sound Production II 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 1 3     15 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3 55-318 Seminar in Radio/Audio 3 55-409 Broadcast Writing II 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 2 3 XX-XXX Natural Science Requirement 1 3     18 Third Year First Semester     31-395 Global Societies 3 55-362 Radio Station Operations 3 55-372 Broadcast News Gathering and Reporting 3 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3 XX-XXX Natural Science Requirement 2 3     15 Second Semester     55-334 Media Research Techniques 3 55-450 Internship 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 3 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     12 Fourth Year First Semester     55-425 Mass Communications Practicum 3 55-440 Telecommunications Management 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 4 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 5 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 6 or Elective 3     15 Second Semester     55-407 Media Law and Ethics 3 55-460 Senior Project (Senior Capstone) 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 7 or Elective 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 8 or Elective 3 XX-XXX Elective 3     15   Total credits 121  

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree Public Relations

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  First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 25-101 Survey of Mathematics I 3 55-191 University Seminar I 1 55-208 Introduction to Mass Communications 3 55-218 Public Relations Principles and Practices 3 XX-XXX Natural Science Requirement 1 3     16 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-102 Survey of Mathematics II 3 55-192 University Seminar II 1 55-215 TV and Radio Announcing 3 XX-XXX Natural Science Requirement 2 3     15 Second Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 55-251 Public Relations Writing 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 1 3 XX-XXX Arts / Humanities Elective 3     15 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 33-103 or 40-201 Introduction to Political Science or Macroeconomics 3 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3 55-209 Organizational Communication 3 55-241 News Reporting and Editing I 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 2 3     18 Third Year First Semester     31-395 Global Societies 3 55-351 Advanced Public Relations 3 55-405 Techniques of Layout and Design 3 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 3 3     15 Second Semester     55-334 Media Research Techniques 3 55-352 Public Relations Management and Campaigns 3 55-450 Internship 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     12 Fourth Year First Semester     55-353 Public Opinion and Propaganda 3 55-425 Mass Communications Practicum 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 4 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 5 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 6 or Elective 3     15 Second Semester     55-407 Media Law and Ethics 3 55-460 Senior Project (Senior Capstone) 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 7 or Elective 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 8 or Elective 3 XX-XXX Elective 3     15   Total credits 121  

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Print Journalism

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  First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 25-101 Survey of Mathematics I 3 55-191 University Seminar I 1 55-208 Introduction to Mass Communications 3 55-241 News Reporting and Editing I 3 XX-XXX Natural Science Requirement 1 3     16 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-102 Survey of Mathematics II 3 55-192 University Seminar II 1 55-332 News Reporting and Editing II 3 XX-XXX Arts / Humanities Elective 3     15 Second Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 55-261 Broadcast Writing I 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 1 3 XX-XXX Natural Science Requirement 2 3     15 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 33-103 or 40-201 Introduction to Political Science or Macroeconomics 3 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3 55-215 TV and Radio Announcing 3 55-218 Public Relations Principles and Practices 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 2 3     18 Third Year First Semester     31-395 Global Societies 3 55-251 Public Relations Writing 3 55-335 Community Journalism 3 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 3 3     15 Second Semester     55-334 Media Research Techniques 3 55-342 Editorial and Feature Writing 3 55-450 Internship 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     12 Fourth Year First Semester     55-405 Techniques of Layout and Design 3 55-408 Technical and Scientific Writing and Editing 3 55-425 Mass Communications Practicum 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 4 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 5 3     15 Second Semester     55-407 Media Law and Ethics 3 55-460 Senior Project (Senior Capstone) 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 6 or Elective 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 7 or Elective 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 8 or Elective 3     15   Total credits 121  

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Broadcast Journalism

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First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 25-101 Survey of Mathematics I 3 55-191 University Seminar I 1 55-208 Introduction to Mass Communications 3 55-261 Broadcast Writing I 3 XX-XXX Natural Science Requirement 1 3     16 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-102 Survey of Mathematics II 3 55-192 University Seminar II 1 55-215 TV and Radio Announcing 3 55-223 Sound Production I 3 XX-XXX Natural Science Requirement 2 3     18 Second Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 55-216 TV Production I 3 55-241 News Reporting and Editing I 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 1 3     15 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 33-103 or 40-201 Introduction to Political Science or Macroeconomics 3 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3 55-371 TV Production II 3 55-409 Broadcast Writing II 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 2 3     18 Third Year First Semester     31-395 Global Societies 3 55-372 Broadcast News Gathering and Reporting 3 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 3 3 XX-XXX Arts / Humanities Elective 3     15 Second Semester     55-334 Media Research Techniques 3 55-450 Internship 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 4 3     12 Fourth Year First Semester     55-408 Technical and Scientific Writing and Editing 3 55-425 Mass Communications Practicum 3 55-440 Telecommunications Management 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 5 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 6 or Elective 3     15 Second Semester     55-407 Media Law and Ethics 3 55-460 Senior Project (Senior Capstone) 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 7 or Elective 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 8 or Elective 3     12   Total credits 121

Course Descriptions for Mass Communications

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    MASS COMMUNICATIONS (MCOM) (55) MCOM-101. COMMUNICATIONS WRITING 3:3:0 This course is designed to provide our Communication students with background in all forms of writing that they will encounter as professionals. They will study traditional structures such as newspaper and news media. They will learn how writing for the ear differs from writing for the newspaper or screen. They will learn the basis of Internet writing. All these areas will be explored further by students once they move into the next more specialized phases of the program. Credit, three hours. MCOM-191. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR I – MASS COMMUNICATIONS 1:2:0 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success. Academic skills will be developed. These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the internet, and word processing. Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed. Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals. Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution, and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. Credit, one hour. MCOM-192. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR II – MASS COMMUNICATIONS 1:1:0 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success. Academic skills will be developed. These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the internet, and word processing. Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed. Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals. Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution, and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. Credit, one hour. MCOM-209. ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION 3:3:0 The course introduces students to the communication dynamics of an organization. Students discuss such topics as upward and downward communications, human relations, bargaining, and organizational culture. Credit, three hours. MCOM-216. TELEVISION PRODUCTION I 3:3:0 The course explores the principles, mechanics, techniques, tools, processes, and aesthetics of television production. Students learn to perform the basic job requirements of the camera operator, audio operator, video switcher, lighting director, floor manager, graphics operator, and director. Prerequisites: MCOM-217. Credit, three hours. MCOM-217. INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA TECHNOLOGY 3:3:0 The course is designed to introduce students to the technical and operational basics of audio, video, and multimedia production needed to be successful in the higher-level 55-classes. Credit, three hours. MCOM-218. PUBLIC RELATIONS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES 3:3:0 The course introduces the student to the practice of public relations. The entire scope of the field will be examined with emphasis placed upon areas of specialization, media relations, and simultaneous multi-public workings. Credit, three hours. MCOM-220. SPORTS BROADCASTING 3:3:0 The course is designed to introduce students to the technical, organizational, and practical side of announcing sports on radio and television. Prerequisites: MSCM-215. Credit, three hours. MCOM-223. SOUND PRODUCTION I 3:3:0 The course introduces students to the history of sound in radio and television. Students examine the influence of television on sound perception. Students learn techniques and applications of editing and sound processing. Students utilize music/sound libraries. Prerequisites: MCOM-217. Credit, three hours. MCOM-241. REPORTING AND WRITING 3:3:0 The course gives basic instruction and practice in news gathering and writing for publication, internet, or broadcast outlet. Credit, three hours. MCOM-251. PUBLIC RELATIONS WRITING 3:3:0 The course gives students practical experience in developing written communications tools used in public relations. The student learns to prepare press releases, biographies, fact sheets, speeches, brochures, newsletters, and press kits. Prerequisites: MCOM-218. Credit, three hours. MCOM-280. PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING 3:3:0 This course introduces students to the history, nature, and function of advertising and its role in the communications process. Students are exposed to creative functions of the theoretical and practical opinions of message development and advertising media selection. Credit, three hours. MCOM-300. ADVERTISING COPYWRITING 3:3:0 This course prepares students to design, write copy and scripts for print, Internet, and broadcast commercials. Students learn about the creative side of an advertising agency, preparing them to work as copywriters, graphic designers, art directors, and creative directors. Prerequisites: MCOM-280. Credit, three hours. MCOM-307. AMERICAN CINEMA AND SOCIETY 3:3:0 Student will critically screen a selection of feature length, narrative films, and documentaries created by both well-regarded and emerging American Directors. They will consider and discuss what this medium continues to say about us and our society, both in terms of content and the timing and manner of release. Students will learn the grammar of film and to recognize techniques used by these storytellers to telegraph their own viewpoints about their subjects. Students will write about and defend in active conversation with classmates their own conclusions about the medium and films screened in class. Credit, three hours. MCOM-311. INTRODUCTION TO DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING 3:3:0 Participants will be introduced to the history, criticism, and fundamental concepts of producing documentary film and digital media. Students will screen, discuss, and deconstruct documentary films and digital media from an international body of work that represents cross section of both topics and production modes. They will gain an appreciation for the history of documentary filmmaking and the pioneers who helped to establish the documentary form. Prerequisites: MCOM-371 or MCOM-409. Credit, three hours. MCOM-334. MEDIA RESEARCH TECHNIQUES 3:3:0 The course provides experiences in the fundamentals of scientific research in general and mass media research in particular and it exposes students to a variety of research approaches and research methods, data collection, and data analysis procedures. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior status. Credit, three hours. MCOM-336. ON-LINE JOURNALISM 3:3:0 The course covers the basics of online storytelling including producing multimedia presentations, blogging, social media and examines the legal and ethical challenges created by the free flow of information on the Internet. Credit, three hours. MCOM-342. MAGAZINE WRITING 3:3:0 The course teaches students to write editorial and feature stories for magazine and newspaper publication. Students will examine the relationship between editorial/feature content and the audience market. Students are required to submit work for publication. Prerequisites: MCOM-241. Credit, three hours. MCOM-344. INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-3:1-3:0 An independent project or series of readings, research, and writing. Prerequisites: Consent of the Instructor and Department Chair. Credit, one to three hours. MCOM-351. PUBLIC RELATIONS AND THE NET 3:3:0 The course analyzes the state of contemporary media – online and off – and its impact on public relations examining key factors influencing reportorial and editorial coverage of entertainment, business, government, and not-for-profit interest. Special emphasis is on the advent of the Internet, the rise of citizen journalism, and the impact of blogs and other social media. Students will utilize a free online website development tool to develop a strategic media relations campaign aimed at publicizing a product, service, idea, or issue of their employers or other organizations, and that uses a variety of traditional and non-sensible outcomes. Credit, three hours. MCOM-352. PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGEMENT AND CAMPAIGNS 3:3:0 The course examines problems public relations practitioners have encountered in the areas of business, education, religion, and non-profit organizations. Students examine both successful and unsuccessful campaigns. Prerequisites: MCOM-251. Credit, three hours. MCOM-353. PUBLIC OPINION AND PROPAGANDA 3:3:0 The course exposes students to historical uses of persuasive communication. Students learn how to communicate persuasively. Prerequisites: MCOM-251. Credit, three hours. MCOM-361. SOUND PRODUCTION II 3:3:0 The course permits students to produce feature programs for radio or sound tracks for television. Students produce synchronous and asynchronous studio and location recordings. Students learn the art of digital and analog mixing. Prerequisites: MCOM-223. Credit, three hours. MCOM-371. TELEVISION PRODUCTION II 3:3:0 The course builds on Television Production I and incorporate administering, directing, producing, editing, and programming of television programs. Prerequisites: MCOM-216. Credit, three hours. MCOM-372. BROADCAST NEWS GATHERING AND REPORTING 3:3:0 The course enables students to gather and report news using electronic and traditional means. Students produce news segments using electronic newsgathering equipment. Credit, three hours. MCOM-373. TELEVISION PRODUCTION III 3:3:0 The course provides skills in the creation of multi-images and in the manipulation of the image size, shape, light and color, texture, and motion. The course builds on Television Production I and II. Prerequisites: MCOM-371. Credit, three hours. MCOM-405. TECHNIQUES OF LAYOUT AND DESIGN 3:3:0 The course will provide experience in newspaper and magazine make-up. Students will have hands-on experience in preparation of news copy, page layouts, pictures, and other graphic materials for newspaper publication and layout, typography for magazines, newsletters, brochures, and similar publications. Prerequisites: MCOM-241. Credit, three hours. MCOM-407. ETHICS AND THE MEDIA 3:3:0 The course examines the legal and ethical principles and standards governing print and electronics media. Furthermore, the course examines the performance of the various media of mass communications in light of ethical standards, employing case studies, lectures, and discussion sessions. Credit, three hours. MCOM-408. TECHNICAL AND SCIENTIFIC WRITING 3:3:0 The course will provide experience in writing scientific and technical material. Prerequisites: ENGL-101, ENGL-102, or consent of the Department. Credit, three hours. MCOM-430. SOUND PRODUCTION III 3:3:0 The course trains students to merge traditional writing with audio-video production in the Internet-oriented newsroom. The course will introduce the students to the technical, editorial, business, and creative demands of the online journalism market. Prerequisites: MCOM-361. Credit, three hours. MCOM-440. MEDIA MANAGEMENT 3:3:0 The course examines mass communication management problems via examination of the historical, social, cultural, legal, economic structure, and operation of American media organizations. Credit, three hours. MCOM-450. INTERNSHIP 3:3:18 The course provides a supervised program to give students knowledge and experience in the areas of concentration. Prerequisites: Consent of the Department Chair. Credit, three hours. MCOM-460. SENIOR CAPSTONE 3:3:0 The course permits students to propose, write, design, produce, and direct extended production programs. Students will also write a research paper in support of their creative project. Prerequisites: MSCM-334, Senior status, and consent of the Department Chair. Credit, three hours.  

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Criminal Justice 2011

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    Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr ENGL-101 English Comp I B 3   ENGL-102 English Comp II B 3   SCCJ-101 Intro to Sociology* B 3   PSYC-102 Intro to Gen Psych B 3   MTSC-101 Math B 3   MTSC-102 Math B 3     Natural Science w/lab B 3-4     Natural Science w/lab B 3-4   SCCJ-104 Intro to Criminal Justice* B 3   MVSC-101 Fitness and Wellness B 2   SCCJ-191 University Seminar I F 1   SCCJ-192 University Seminar II S 1     Total Credits =15-16         Total Credits=15-17         Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr ENGL-201 World Lit I or 1-205 Afro American Lit I B 3   ENGL-202 World Lit II or 1-205 Afro American Lit II B 3   SCCJ-202 Social Deviance* F 3   SCCJ-208 Criminology* F 3     Foreign Lang Elective B 3     Foreign Lang Elective B 3   PHIL-101 Critical Thinking B 3   HIST History Elective 201, or 202, or 203, or 204 B 3   ENGL-200 Speech B 3   SCCJ-210 Race & Ethnic Relations* S 3     Total Credits = 15         Total Credits=15       Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr SCCJ-303 Social Psychology* F 3   INFO-101 Applying Computers B 3   SCCJ-311 Law Enforcement* F 3   SCCJ-313 Courts and Criminal Justice* S 3   SCCJ-314 Methods of Research in Sociology* F 3   SCCJ-322 Elementary Statistics for Social Research S 3     Arts or Humanities Elective B 3   SCCJ-315 Criminal Law* S 3   SCCJ-395 Global Societies B 3   SCCJ-316 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice* S 3     Total Credits =15         Total Credits=15       Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr SCCJ-402 Principles of Corrections F 3   SCCJ-448 Senior Seminar** B 3   SCCJ-412 Sociological Theories* F 3   SCCJ-450 Criminal Justice Internship B 3   SCCJ-420 Complex Organizations* F 3   SCCJ Sociology/CJ Elective (300 or 400 level) B 3   SCCJ-415 Victimology* F 3     Free Elective B 3     Free Elective B 3   SCCJ Sociology/CJ Elective (300 or 400 level) B 3     Total Credits=15         Total Credits=15                        GRAND TOTAL B.S. CREDITS: 121   Prerequisites 1.        For all Soc courses, 200 level or higher except SCCJ 206, SCCJ-101 and 103 2.        For all CJ courses, 200 level or higher SCCJ 101 and 104 3.        For Senior Seminar, All Soc/CJ required courses 4.        For Independent Study and Internship, written approval from Chair   Credits <XXX> ** Senior Capstone *Writing Intensive   S - Spring Only F - Fall Only B - Both Sem. ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS Men and Women in Society Sociology of Law Real/Reel Culture Technology and Society Population Analysis Sociology of the Family Cultural Anthropology Juvenile Delinquency Social Problems Criminal Justice Administration Social Change       See Elective Requirements  

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Sociology 2011

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    Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr ENGL-101 English Comp I B 3   ENGL-102 English Comp II B 3   SCCJ-101 Intro to Sociology B 3   MVSC-101 Fitness and Wellness B 2   MTSC-101 Math B 3   MTSC-102 Math B 3     Natural Science w/lab B 3-4     Natural Science w/lab B 3   PSYC-102 Intro to Gen Psych B 3   SCCJ-103 Social Institutions* S 3   SCCJ-191 University Seminar I F 1   SCCJ-192 University Seminar II S 1     Total Credits =15-16         Total Credits=15-17         Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr ENGL-201 World Lit I or 1-205 Afro American Lit I B 3   ENGL-202 World Lit II or 1-205 Afro American Lit II B 3   SCCJ-203 Social Problems* F 3     Social Science Elective B 3     Foreign Lang Elective B 3     Foreign Lang Elective B 3   PHIL-101 Critical Thinking B 3   SCCJ-206 Cultural Anthropology* S 3   ENGL-200 Speech B 3   SCCJ-210 Race & Ethnic Relations* S 3     Total Credits = 15         Total Credits=15       Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr SCCJ-303 Social Psychology* F 3   SCCJ-310 Social Stratification** S 3   SCCJ-314 Methods of Research in Sociology F 3   SCCJ-322 Elementary Statistics for Social Research S 3   HIST History Elective 201, or 202, or 203, or 204 B 3   HIST-395 Global Societies B 3     Arts or Humanities Elective B 3   INFO-101 Applying Computers B 3   SCCJ-351 Sociology of the Family* F 3     Social Science Elective B 3     Total Credits =15         Total Credits=15       Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr SCCJ-412 Sociological Theories* F 3   SCCJ-448 Senior Seminar** B 3   SCCJ-435 Social Change* F 3   SCCJ Sociology/CJ Elective[1] (300 or 400 level) B 3   SCCJ-420 Complex Organizations* F 3   SCCJ Sociology/CJ Elective[1] (300 or 400 level) B 3   SCCJ Sociology/CJ Elective (300 or 400 level) B 3     Free Elective B 3     Free Elective   3     Free Elective B 3     Total Credits=15         Total Credits=15                        GRAND TOTAL B.S. CREDITS: 121   Prerequisites 1.        For all Soc courses, 200 level or higher except SCCJ 206, SCCJ-101 and 103 2.        For all CJ courses, 200 level or higher SCCJ 104 3.        For Independent Study and Internship, written approval from Chair   Credits <XXX> ** Senior Capstone *Writing Intensive   S - Spring Only F - Fall Only B - Both Sem. ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS Men and Women in Society Criminology Real/Reel Culture Law Enforcement Sociology of Law Courts and Criminal Justice Technology and Society Juvenile Delinquency Social Problems Criminal Justice Administration Principles of Corrections Criminal Law Population Analysis Victimology     [1] See Elective Requirements  

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