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Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in History

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  A student who chooses this major must complete the requirements of the current history curriculum. A total of 36 hours of history are required and the student must earn a "C" or better in each course. A student must complete History 101, 102, 201 and 202, or 101, 102, 203 and 204, and must also take twenty-four hours on the 300 and 400 levels. In the upper division sections, each student must complete a twelve-hour program of either United States, European, African American, or World History, which will comprise his/her area of specialization. The remaining twelve hours must be taken in areas outside of the field of specialization, including at least three hours in each area. First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-XXX Mathematics 3 34-101 World Civilization to the Eighteenth Century 3 34-191 University Seminar I 1 XX-XXX Science 3-4     18-19 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 25-XXX Mathematics 3 33-200 American National Government 3 34-102 World Civilization from the Eighteenth Century 3 34-192 University Seminar II 1 XX-XXX Science 3-4     16-17 Second Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 32-101 or 32-201 Human Geography or World Regional Geography 3 34-201 or 34-203 American Civilization to 1865 or The African American Experience to 1865 3 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3     15 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 03-101 Critical Thinking 3 34-202 or 34-204 American Civilization from 1865 or The African American Experience from 1865 3 34-290 Introduction to Historical Methods 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     15 Third Year First Semester     34-300 Delaware History 3 34-XXX American History (300-400) 3 34-XXX European History (300-400) 3 XX-XXX Art/Humanities Elective ** 3 XX-XXX Open Elective 3     15 Second Semester     31-395 Global Societies 3 34-446 Research Methods in History 3 34-XXX African-American History (300-400) 3 34-XXX World History (300-400) 3 XX-XXX Open Elective 3     15 Fourth Year First Semester     34-475 Senior Capstone 3 34-XXX History Concentrations (300-400) 6 XX-XXX Social Science Elective ** 3 XX-XXX Open Electives 3     15 Second Semester     34-XXX History Concentration 3 XX-XXX Art/Humanities Elective ** 3 XX-XXX Social Science Elective ** 3 XX-XXX Open Electives 6     15   Total credits 124-126   **Social Science elective may be met with 300-400 level courses in Economics, Sociology, Psychology, Political Science, or Physical Geography. Art/Humanities upper-level electives may be met with 300-400 level courses in Art, Art History, Philosophy, English, or a Foreign Language.  

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Political Science

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    First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-XXX Mathematics 3 33-103 Introduction to Political Science 3 34-191 University Seminar I 1 XX-XXX Science 3-4     15-16 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 25-XXX Mathematics 3 32-101 Human Geography 3 34-101 or 34-102 World Civilization to the Eighteenth Century or World Civilization from the Eighteenth Century 3 34-192 University Seminar II 1 XX-XXX Science 3-4     16-17 Second Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 33-200 American National Government 3 34-201 or 34-203 American Civilization to 1865 or The African American Experience to 1865 3 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3     15 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 03-101 Critical Thinking 3 33-220 Comparative Government 3 34-202 or 34-204 American Civilization from 1865 or The African American Experience from 1865 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     15 Third Year First Semester     03-XXX Philosophy Elective 3 33-210 Contemporary Political Ideologies 3 33-230 International Politics 3 33-410 or 37-314 Research Methods in Political Science or Methods of Sociological Research 3 40-201 Macroeconomics 3     15 Second Semester     31-395 Global Societies 3 33-XXX Political Science Electives 6 40-202 Microeconomics 3 XX-XXX Arts / Humanities Elective 3     15 Fourth Year First Semester     33-475 Senior Capstone 3 33-XXX Political Science Electives 6 XX-XXX Open Electives 6     15 Second Semester     33-XXX Political Science Electives 6 XX-XXX Open Electives 9     15   Total credits 121-122  

History Course Descriptions

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SURVEY COURSES WORLD HISTORY 34-101. WORLD CIVILIZATION TO THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 3:3:0 A survey of the growth of the great cultures from ancient times to the 18th century. Credit: three hours. 34-102. WORLD CIVILIZATION FROM THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 3:3:0 A survey of the growth of the great cultures of the modern world from the 18th century to the present. The major emphasis of the course is on the trends and developments of the 20th century. Credit: three hours. 34-104. HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT OF DELAWARE. 1:1:0 A survey course in the history and government of Delaware. Credit: one hour. 34-201. AMERICAN CIVILIZATION TO 1865. 3:3:0 A course that covers the period from 1492 to the close of the Civil War. Cultural and economic developments are given emphasis. Credit: three hours. 34-202. AMERICAN CIVILIZATION FROM 1865. 3:3:0 A study that concentrates on the United States from 1865 to the present with emphasis on the trends and developments of the 20th century. Credit: three hours. 34-203. THE AFRICAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE TO 1865. 3:3:0 An historical and analytical study of African Americans from the colonial era to the end of the Civil War. It includes the study of the cultural heritage of African Americans, their contributions to the building of America, including the economic and political institutions, and the role of African Americans in the expansion of American freedom, liberty, and democracy. Credit: three hours. 34-204. THE AFRICAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE FROM 1865. 3:3:0 A study of African American life from Reconstruction to the present. It focuses on the challenges of achieving racial justice and equality in the face of adversity. This course looks at protest movements leading to institutional reform, African American contributions to the creation of a modern urban culture, overall American economic prosperity, and global power and leadership. Credit: three hours. 34-333. AFRICAN AMERICANS IN COLONIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA. 3:3:0 This course covers African American history from the first arrival of Africans at Jamestown in 1619. It looks at the development of an African American culture, the contribution of African Americans to the building of America, and their role in the American Revolution. It ends with the adoption of the United States Constitution. Prerequisite: History 201 and History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-334. AFRICAN AMERICANS AND THE BUILDING OF A NATION, 1789-1865. 3:3:0 An upper division course which covers a study of African Americans and their contribution to the establishment of a republic in America, westward expansion, defense of the country, and the establishment of freedom for millions during the Civil War. Prerequisite: History 201 or History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-335. AFRICAN AMERICANS FROM RECONSTRUCTION THROUGH WORLD WAR I. 3:3:0 A study of African Americans' struggle to achieve racial justice and equality during the Reconstruction Era and the challenge to their freedom during the Jim Crow Era. This course also covers African Americans and the settlement of the West, the farming the South, and the industrialization of the North. It also investigates their role in the wars fought by the United States covering federal military occupation in the South, the Plains Native American Wars, the Spanish American War, the Philippines War, and World War I. Prerequisite: History 202 or History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-336. AFRICAN AMERICANS AND MODERN AMERICA, 1919 TO THE PRESENT. 3:3:0 This covers the contributions of African Americans to the establishment of an urban-based, modern culture in the United States beginning with the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s. It will cover the challenges of surviving the devastation of the Great Depression, fighting Jim Crow and the fascists in World War II, and the struggle for Civil Rights during the Cold War Era. It will end with the contemporary America in the Post Modern and Post Cold War World taking a global perspective. Prerequisite: History 202 or History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-420. AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY FROM THE COLONIAL ERA THROUGH 1877: SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on a selected topic in African American history from colonial times through the end of Reconstruction. Credit: three hours. 34-421. AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY, 1877 TO THE PRESENT: SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in African American history from the end of Reconstruction to present. Credit: three hours. UPPER DIVISION COURSES: UNITED STATES HISTORY CONCENTRATION 34-323. COLONIAL AMERICA, 1492-1763. 3:3:0 This course will cover Native American history before European contact with a focus on North America. It will investigate the cultural, political, economic institutions of the Native Americans. It will study the exploration and settlement of the New World by the Europeans, especially the English colonies in North America, and the development of colonial society. Prerequisite: History 201 or History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-324. REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA AND THE EARLY REPUBLIC, 1763-1814. 3:3:0 A study of the American Revolution, the framing of the Constitution, and the formation of the early republic through the second war for independence, the War of 1812. Prerequisites: History 201 or History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-325. NATIONAL PERIOD, 1815-1877. 3:3:0 The study of the development of the new American nation, its westward expansion, cultural, political, and economic patterns, sectionalism leading to the Civil War, and the effect of that conflict on American life during Reconstruction. Prerequisites: History 201 or History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-326. THE GILDED AGE, 1877-1896. 3:3:0 A study of the battle for the West, the development of a nationwide industrial and commercial system, growth of urban life, major cultural developments produced by social and intellectual revolutions, the New South and Jim Crow, and workers' and farmers' protest movements. Prerequisites: History 202 and History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-327. THE PROGRESSIVE AND MODERN ERA, 1896-1945. 3:3:0 This course focuses on the end of isolationism beginning in the 1890s through the emergence as a global power in 1945 studying the Spanish- American, the Philippines War, World War I, and World War II. It covers progressive reform movements focusing on business regulation, urban, state, and national political reform, social work, and rural reform. Beginning with the 1920s, it will study the emergence of modern American and the second industrial revolution producing economic and cultural change through the challenges of the Great Depression. Prerequisites: History 202 and History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-328. AMERICA FROM 1945 TO THE PRESENT. 3:3:0 A study of the changes in American life since 1945, new global perspectives, and the problems of contemporary life in America. Prerequisites: History 202 and History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-433. COLONIAL HISTORY (1492-1763): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in American colonial history from 1492 to 1763. Credit: three hours. 34-434. REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA (1763-1790): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the American Revolutionary Era to the ratification of the Constitution. Credit: three hours. 34-435. THE EARLY REPUBLIC (1790-1815): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:30 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the early republic years through the end of the War of 1812. Credit: three hours. 34-436. THE NATIONAL PERIOD (1815-1860). 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the National Period from the end of the War of 1812 through the beginning of the Civil War Era. Credit: three hours. 34-437. THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION (1860-1877): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the Civil War ERA through Reconstruction. Credit: three hours. 34-438. THE GILDED AGE (1877-1896): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the Gilded Age, 1877-1896. Credit: three hours. 34-439. THE PROGRESSIVE ERA (1896-1919): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the Progressive Era, 1896-1919. Credit: three hours. 34-440. THE EARLY MODERN ERA (1920-1941). 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the early modern era, 1920-1941. Credit: three hours. 34-441. THE WORLD WAR II ERA THROUGH THE KOREAN WAR (1941-1952): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of World war II and the beginning of the Cold War through the Korean War. Credit: three hours. 34-442. MODERN AMERICAN HISTORY (1953-1975): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in American History from 1953 through 1975 covering cultural history and the Vietnam War. Credit: three hours. 34-443. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN (1975 TO THE PRESENT): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in contemporary American history from 1975. Credit: three hours. 34-461. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 201 or 34-107 African-American Experience to 1865 and History 202 or History 108 Recent Black Experience, depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. 34-466. SEMINAR IN BLACK STUDIES. 3:3:0 Credit: three hours. UPPER DIVISION COURSES: EUROPEAN HISTORY CONCENTRATION 34-301. ENGLAND TO 1688. 3:3:0 The founding of the English national state and the political, cultural, and economic development of early modern England and the Commonwealth. Prerequisite: History 101. (May be offered as a European History elective.) Credit: three hours. 34-302. ENGLAND AND THE BRITISH COMMONWEALTH FROM 1688. 3:3:0 Political, economic, and cultural growth of modern England and the Commonwealth. Prerequisite: History 102. (May be offered as a European or World History elective). Credit: three hours. 34-319. ANCIENT HISTORY TO THE FIFTH CENTURY A.D. 3:3:0 This course details the evolution of ancient civilizations in Mesopotamia and Egypt and describes the contributions of the Greeks, Hellenistic, and Roman cultures. Prerequisite: History 101. Credit: three hours. 34-320. MEDIEVAL EUROPE FROM 500 A.D. TO 1500 A.D. 3:3:0 The history and civilization of Europe is examined with particular attention being paid to the development of institutions and ideas that characterize Western Culture. Prerequisite: History 101. Credit: three hours. 34-321. EARLY MODERN EUROPE FROM 1500 A.D. TO 1815 A.D. 3:3:0 The Renaissance, Reformation, and Enlightenment are highlighted with particular emphasis on the emergence of Humanism, Science, and Rationalism. Prerequisite: History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-322. MODERN EUROPE FROM 1815 TO THE PRESENT. 3:3:0 A study of the principal cultural, economic, and political developments in Europe since the French Revolution and an introduction to recent historical scholarship. Prerequisite: History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-332. HISTORY OF RUSSIA. 3:3:0 A study of Russian History from the emergence of the first Slavic settlements to the rise of the modern Soviet state. Political, economic, and intellectual trends are highlighted. Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102. (May be offered as a European or World History elective.) Credit: three hours. 34-344. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN HISTORY. 3:3:0 An intensive investigation of a topic within the discipline of History under the guidance of a faculty member. Course requirements include regular conferences relating to a research paper or other appropriate project. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor, execution of a written agreement describing the subject and scope of the research project prior to enrollment, and 15 hours of prior course work in History. Credit: three hours. 462. SEMINAR IN EUROPEAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102 depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. UPPER DIVISION COURSES: WORLD HISTORY CONCENTRATION 34-313. LATIN AMERICA TO 1824. 3:3:0 The history of Latin American from pre-Colombian times through the wars of independence. Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-314. LATIN AMERICA SINCE 1824. 3:3:0 The history of Latin America since independence, with special emphasis on conditions today, including the relations of Latin America with the United States and the rest of the world. Prerequisite: History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-315. AFRICAN HISTORY TO 1884. 3:3:0 The history of Africa from earliest times to the Berlin Conference which signaled the division of Africa by the European powers. Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-316. AFRICAN HISTORY SINCE 1884. 3:3:0 The history of colonialism in Africa, the movement toward independence, and conditions in selected countries since independence. Prerequisite: History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-463. SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102 depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. 34-464. SEMINAR IN ASIAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102 depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. 34-465. SEMINAR IN AFRICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102 depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. NOTE: The list of seminar classes each semester will show the specific topic to be covered. Example: Seminar in American History-American Diplomatic History. UPPER DIVISION ELECTIVES AND SPECIALTY COURSES 34-290. INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL METHODS. 3:3:0 This course is designed to introduce history majors, and others, to history as a social science discipline. The major emphasis of the course is on research methods, historical analysis, historical interpretation, historiography, and writing formal research papers. This course is a prerequisite for all History majors seeking to enter 300-400 level History course. 34-300. HISTORY OF DELAWARE. 3:3:0 The development of Delaware from colonial times to the present, the land, the people, the culture, the institutions. Resources of the state will be used and special projects will enable the students to play a part in preserving the rich heritage of the state. Prerequisite: History 201 or History 202. (May be offered as an American History elective). Credit: three hours. 34-312. AMERICAN MILITARY HISTORY. 3:3:0 This course examines the history of American military forces from the Revolution against Britain through the Gulf War. The causes of war, as well as its prevention, are emphasized. Credit: three hours. 34-445. TEACHING HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3:3:0 Instruction in current methods, materials and appropriate activities for effective teaching of social science in secondary schools including preparation of lesson plans, units and projects, demonstrations, visits to schools and discussions on special problems in teaching social science. Emphasis is placed on technological advances and their application to the modern classroom experience. Emphasis is placed on technological advances and their application to the modern classroom experience. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit: three hours. 34-446. RESEARCH METHODS IN HISTORY. 3:3:0 This an advanced level course which focuses on methods of historical research, including the use of archives, library research skills, and accessing government documents. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three hours. 34-447. COMPUTER SKILLS IN HISTORICAL RESEARCH. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on the use of the computer, including word processing, spread sheets, data bases, graphics and publishing programs. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three hours. 34-448. HISTORIOGRAPHY OF AMERICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on the study of various schools of thought and interpretation in the writing of American History. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three hours. 34-429. A HISTORIOGRAPHY OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on the study of various schools of thought and interpretation in the writing of African American History. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three hours. 34-470. HISTORY INTERNSHIP. 3:3:0 Students interested in an internship experience with a private historical group or a local, state, or federal government agent should consult with the department chairperson for program information. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three to twelve hours.  (34) SURVEY COURSES WORLD HISTORY 34-101. WORLD CIVILIZATION TO THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 3:3:0 A survey of the growth of the great cultures from ancient times to the 18th century. Credit: three hours. 34-102. WORLD CIVILIZATION FROM THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 3:3:0 A survey of the growth of the great cultures of the modern world from the 18th century to the present. The major emphasis of the course is on the trends and developments of the 20th century. Credit: three hours. 34-104. HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT OF DELAWARE. 1:1:0 A survey course in the history and government of Delaware. Credit: one hour. 34-201. AMERICAN CIVILIZATION TO 1865. 3:3:0 A course that covers the period from 1492 to the close of the Civil War. Cultural and economic developments are given emphasis. Credit: three hours. 34-202. AMERICAN CIVILIZATION FROM 1865. 3:3:0 A study that concentrates on the United States from 1865 to the present with emphasis on the trends and developments of the 20th century. Credit: three hours. 34-203. THE AFRICAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE TO 1865. 3:3:0 An historical and analytical study of African Americans from the colonial era to the end of the Civil War. It includes the study of the cultural heritage of African Americans, their contributions to the building of America, including the economic and political institutions, and the role of African Americans in the expansion of American freedom, liberty, and democracy. Credit: three hours. 34-204. THE AFRICAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE FROM 1865. 3:3:0 A study of African American life from Reconstruction to the present. It focuses on the challenges of achieving racial justice and equality in the face of adversity. This course looks at protest movements leading to institutional reform, African American contributions to the creation of a modern urban culture, overall American economic prosperity, and global power and leadership. Credit: three hours. 34-333. AFRICAN AMERICANS IN COLONIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA. 3:3:0 This course covers African American history from the first arrival of Africans at Jamestown in 1619. It looks at the development of an African American culture, the contribution of African Americans to the building of America, and their role in the American Revolution. It ends with the adoption of the United States Constitution. Prerequisite: History 201 and History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-334. AFRICAN AMERICANS AND THE BUILDING OF A NATION, 1789-1865. 3:3:0 An upper division course which covers a study of African Americans and their contribution to the establishment of a republic in America, westward expansion, defense of the country, and the establishment of freedom for millions during the Civil War. Prerequisite: History 201 or History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-335. AFRICAN AMERICANS FROM RECONSTRUCTION THROUGH WORLD WAR I. 3:3:0 A study of African Americans' struggle to achieve racial justice and equality during the Reconstruction Era and the challenge to their freedom during the Jim Crow Era. This course also covers African Americans and the settlement of the West, the farming the South, and the industrialization of the North. It also investigates their role in the wars fought by the United States covering federal military occupation in the South, the Plains Native American Wars, the Spanish American War, the Philippines War, and World War I. Prerequisite: History 202 or History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-336. AFRICAN AMERICANS AND MODERN AMERICA, 1919 TO THE PRESENT. 3:3:0 This covers the contributions of African Americans to the establishment of an urban-based, modern culture in the United States beginning with the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s. It will cover the challenges of surviving the devastation of the Great Depression, fighting Jim Crow and the fascists in World War II, and the struggle for Civil Rights during the Cold War Era. It will end with the contemporary America in the Post Modern and Post Cold War World taking a global perspective. Prerequisite: History 202 or History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-420. AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY FROM THE COLONIAL ERA THROUGH 1877: SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on a selected topic in African American history from colonial times through the end of Reconstruction. Credit: three hours. 34-421. AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY, 1877 TO THE PRESENT: SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in African American history from the end of Reconstruction to present. Credit: three hours. UPPER DIVISION COURSES: UNITED STATES HISTORY CONCENTRATION 34-323. COLONIAL AMERICA, 1492-1763. 3:3:0 This course will cover Native American history before European contact with a focus on North America. It will investigate the cultural, political, economic institutions of the Native Americans. It will study the exploration and settlement of the New World by the Europeans, especially the English colonies in North America, and the development of colonial society. Prerequisite: History 201 or History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-324. REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA AND THE EARLY REPUBLIC, 1763-1814. 3:3:0 A study of the American Revolution, the framing of the Constitution, and the formation of the early republic through the second war for independence, the War of 1812. Prerequisites: History 201 or History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-325. NATIONAL PERIOD, 1815-1877. 3:3:0 The study of the development of the new American nation, its westward expansion, cultural, political, and economic patterns, sectionalism leading to the Civil War, and the effect of that conflict on American life during Reconstruction. Prerequisites: History 201 or History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-326. THE GILDED AGE, 1877-1896. 3:3:0 A study of the battle for the West, the development of a nationwide industrial and commercial system, growth of urban life, major cultural developments produced by social and intellectual revolutions, the New South and Jim Crow, and workers' and farmers' protest movements. Prerequisites: History 202 and History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-327. THE PROGRESSIVE AND MODERN ERA, 1896-1945. 3:3:0 This course focuses on the end of isolationism beginning in the 1890s through the emergence as a global power in 1945 studying the Spanish- American, the Philippines War, World War I, and World War II. It covers progressive reform movements focusing on business regulation, urban, state, and national political reform, social work, and rural reform. Beginning with the 1920s, it will study the emergence of modern American and the second industrial revolution producing economic and cultural change through the challenges of the Great Depression. Prerequisites: History 202 and History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-328. AMERICA FROM 1945 TO THE PRESENT. 3:3:0 A study of the changes in American life since 1945, new global perspectives, and the problems of contemporary life in America. Prerequisites: History 202 and History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-433. COLONIAL HISTORY (1492-1763): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in American colonial history from 1492 to 1763. Credit: three hours. 34-434. REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA (1763-1790): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the American Revolutionary Era to the ratification of the Constitution. Credit: three hours. 34-435. THE EARLY REPUBLIC (1790-1815): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:30 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the early republic years through the end of the War of 1812. Credit: three hours. 34-436. THE NATIONAL PERIOD (1815-1860). 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the National Period from the end of the War of 1812 through the beginning of the Civil War Era. Credit: three hours. 34-437. THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION (1860-1877): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the Civil War ERA through Reconstruction. Credit: three hours. 34-438. THE GILDED AGE (1877-1896): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the Gilded Age, 1877-1896. Credit: three hours. 34-439. THE PROGRESSIVE ERA (1896-1919): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the Progressive Era, 1896-1919. Credit: three hours. 34-440. THE EARLY MODERN ERA (1920-1941). 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the early modern era, 1920-1941. Credit: three hours. 34-441. THE WORLD WAR II ERA THROUGH THE KOREAN WAR (1941-1952): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of World war II and the beginning of the Cold War through the Korean War. Credit: three hours. 34-442. MODERN AMERICAN HISTORY (1953-1975): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in American History from 1953 through 1975 covering cultural history and the Vietnam War. Credit: three hours. 34-443. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN (1975 TO THE PRESENT): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in contemporary American history from 1975. Credit: three hours. 34-461. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 201 or 34-107 African-American Experience to 1865 and History 202 or History 108 Recent Black Experience, depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. 34-466. SEMINAR IN BLACK STUDIES. 3:3:0 Credit: three hours. UPPER DIVISION COURSES: EUROPEAN HISTORY CONCENTRATION 34-301. ENGLAND TO 1688. 3:3:0 The founding of the English national state and the political, cultural, and economic development of early modern England and the Commonwealth. Prerequisite: History 101. (May be offered as a European History elective.) Credit: three hours. 34-302. ENGLAND AND THE BRITISH COMMONWEALTH FROM 1688. 3:3:0 Political, economic, and cultural growth of modern England and the Commonwealth. Prerequisite: History 102. (May be offered as a European or World History elective). Credit: three hours. 34-319. ANCIENT HISTORY TO THE FIFTH CENTURY A.D. 3:3:0 This course details the evolution of ancient civilizations in Mesopotamia and Egypt and describes the contributions of the Greeks, Hellenistic, and Roman cultures. Prerequisite: History 101. Credit: three hours. 34-320. MEDIEVAL EUROPE FROM 500 A.D. TO 1500 A.D. 3:3:0 The history and civilization of Europe is examined with particular attention being paid to the development of institutions and ideas that characterize Western Culture. Prerequisite: History 101. Credit: three hours. 34-321. EARLY MODERN EUROPE FROM 1500 A.D. TO 1815 A.D. 3:3:0 The Renaissance, Reformation, and Enlightenment are highlighted with particular emphasis on the emergence of Humanism, Science, and Rationalism. Prerequisite: History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-322. MODERN EUROPE FROM 1815 TO THE PRESENT. 3:3:0 A study of the principal cultural, economic, and political developments in Europe since the French Revolution and an introduction to recent historical scholarship. Prerequisite: History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-332. HISTORY OF RUSSIA. 3:3:0 A study of Russian History from the emergence of the first Slavic settlements to the rise of the modern Soviet state. Political, economic, and intellectual trends are highlighted. Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102. (May be offered as a European or World History elective.) Credit: three hours. 34-344. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN HISTORY. 3:3:0 An intensive investigation of a topic within the discipline of History under the guidance of a faculty member. Course requirements include regular conferences relating to a research paper or other appropriate project. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor, execution of a written agreement describing the subject and scope of the research project prior to enrollment, and 15 hours of prior course work in History. Credit: three hours. 462. SEMINAR IN EUROPEAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102 depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. UPPER DIVISION COURSES: WORLD HISTORY CONCENTRATION 34-313. LATIN AMERICA TO 1824. 3:3:0 The history of Latin American from pre-Colombian times through the wars of independence. Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-314. LATIN AMERICA SINCE 1824. 3:3:0 The history of Latin America since independence, with special emphasis on conditions today, including the relations of Latin America with the United States and the rest of the world. Prerequisite: History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-315. AFRICAN HISTORY TO 1884. 3:3:0 The history of Africa from earliest times to the Berlin Conference which signaled the division of Africa by the European powers. Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-316. AFRICAN HISTORY SINCE 1884. 3:3:0 The history of colonialism in Africa, the movement toward independence, and conditions in selected countries since independence. Prerequisite: History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-463. SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102 depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. 34-464. SEMINAR IN ASIAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102 depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. 34-465. SEMINAR IN AFRICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102 depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. NOTE: The list of seminar classes each semester will show the specific topic to be covered. Example: Seminar in American History-American Diplomatic History. UPPER DIVISION ELECTIVES AND SPECIALTY COURSES 34-290. INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL METHODS. 3:3:0 This course is designed to introduce history majors, and others, to history as a social science discipline. The major emphasis of the course is on research methods, historical analysis, historical interpretation, historiography, and writing formal research papers. This course is a prerequisite for all History majors seeking to enter 300-400 level History course. 34-300. HISTORY OF DELAWARE. 3:3:0 The development of Delaware from colonial times to the present, the land, the people, the culture, the institutions. Resources of the state will be used and special projects will enable the students to play a part in preserving the rich heritage of the state. Prerequisite: History 201 or History 202. (May be offered as an American History elective). Credit: three hours. 34-312. AMERICAN MILITARY HISTORY. 3:3:0 This course examines the history of American military forces from the Revolution against Britain through the Gulf War. The causes of war, as well as its prevention, are emphasized. Credit: three hours. 34-445. TEACHING HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3:3:0 Instruction in current methods, materials and appropriate activities for effective teaching of social science in secondary schools including preparation of lesson plans, units and projects, demonstrations, visits to schools and discussions on special problems in teaching social science. Emphasis is placed on technological advances and their application to the modern classroom experience. Emphasis is placed on technological advances and their application to the modern classroom experience. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit: three hours. 34-446. RESEARCH METHODS IN HISTORY. 3:3:0 This an advanced level course which focuses on methods of historical research, including the use of archives, library research skills, and accessing government documents. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three hours. 34-447. COMPUTER SKILLS IN HISTORICAL RESEARCH. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on the use of the computer, including word processing, spread sheets, data bases, graphics and publishing programs. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three hours. 34-448. HISTORIOGRAPHY OF AMERICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on the study of various schools of thought and interpretation in the writing of American History. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three hours. 34-429. A HISTORIOGRAPHY OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on the study of various schools of thought and interpretation in the writing of African American History. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three hours. 34-470. HISTORY INTERNSHIP. 3:3:0 Students interested in an internship experience with a private historical group or a local, state, or federal government agent should consult with the department chairperson for program information. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three to twelve hours. <------Back to Political Science Course Descriptions

Political Science Course Descriptions

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  33-103. INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE. 3:3:0 A survey of the major concepts, issues, and controversies in the discipline of political science and its various sub-fields. Credit: three hours. 33-200. AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT. 3:3:0 An examination of the structure and operation of the Presidency, Congress, Bureaucracy, and Supreme Court and the role of political parties, elections, interest groups, and the news media in American politics. Credit: three hours. 33-210. CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES. 3:3:0 A study of political ideologies which shape the values, beliefs, and actions of contemporary regimes and political movements. The focus will be on democracy, socialism, communism, anarchism, and fascism. Credit: three hours. 33-220. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT. 3:3:0 A study of the government and politics of Great Britain, France, Germany, Russia and various nations of Africa. The choice of governments may vary depending on the interests of the students and the instructor. Credit: three hours. 33-230. INTERNATIONAL POLITICS. 3:3:0 A study of the economic, diplomatic, military, and legal relationships among states. Designed to provide a conceptual framework leading to a better understanding of world affairs. The course will cover such topics as the nation-state system, the sources of national power, conflict and conflict resolution, international law, and organization. Credit: three hours. 33-250. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT. 3:3:0 A study of state and urban governments with special emphasis on Delaware. Credit: three hours. 33-307. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW. 3:3:0 The principles of constitutional law as interpreted by Supreme Court decisions on the allocation of powers to the state and between the three branches of the federal government. Prerequisite: Either Political Science 103 or Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-308. CIVIL LIBERTIES. 3:3:0 An examination of the Supreme Court's interpretation of constitutional freedoms under the First Amendment (press, speech, religion, assembly, and petition), the Due Process Clause (racial and sexual equity), and criminal rights (arrests, search and seizure). Prerequisite: Either Political Science 103 or Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-310. AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT. 3:3:0 The evolution of American political thought from colonial times to the present with an emphasis on how ideas influence government policy and political behavior. Prerequisite: History 201 and History 202. Credit: three hours. 33-315. PARTIES, CAMPAIGNS, AND ELECTIONS. 3:3:0 The nature and function of political parties in the American two-party system; the role of money and television in modern campaigns;. voting behavior and electoral reform. Prerequisite: Either Political Science 103 or Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-320. BLACK POLITICS IN AMERICA. 3:3:0 An investigation of black political movements and thought; participation of blacks in the American political process; power structures in black communities. Prerequisite: Either Political Science 103 or Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-325. POLITICS OF DEVELOPING NATIONS. 3:3:0 A study of political development and change in the nations of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Credit: three hours. 33-330. FIELD WORK IN POLITICAL SCIENCE. 3:3:0 A supervised experience designed to give the student firsthand knowledge of some aspect of political behavior. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Credit: three hours. 33-340. GOVERNMENT AND BUSINESS. 3:3:0 A survey of corporate-government relations in the United States focusing on how corporations influence government decision-makers and how government policies affect business operations. Credit: three hours. 33-355. AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY. 3:3:0 A study of the American foreign policy-making process and the role of the United States in international relations. Prerequisite: Either Political Science 103 or Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-400. THE PRESIDENCY. 3:3:0 A study of the office, powers, and behavior of the president with an analysis of his major roles as chief administrator, legislator, opinion leader, foreign policy-maker, and commander-in-chief. Prerequisite: Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-403. THE CONGRESS. 3:3:0 A study of the U.S. Congress to include the structure of the House and Senate (the committee system, legislative rules and procedures, party leadership, and caucuses) and congressional behavior (campaigning, constituency representation, and decision-making). Prerequisite: Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-405. THE SUPREME COURT. 3:3:0 The organization and powers of the federal judiciary; the selection of federal judges; judicial philosophy and behavior; judicial decision-making and the impact of the Supreme Court on the political process. Prerequisite: Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-408. BUREAUCRACY AND PUBLIC POLICY. 3:3:0 The role of bureaucracy in modern American government; bureaucratic power and politics; decision-making and the implementation of public policy; political constraints on bureaucracy. Prerequisite: Political Science 200 or approval of the political science advisor. Credit: three hours. 33-410. RESEARCH METHODS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE. 3:3:0 Research design techniques including hypothesis testing, sampling, questionnaire construction, and aggregate data analysis. Students will be introduced to the elements of survey research (polling) and conduct either an individual or group research project. No prior knowledge of statistics is necessary. Required for political science majors in junior or senior year. Prerequisite: minimum junior level status and consent of the instructor. Credit: three hours. [An equivalency for this course is Sociology 314.] 33-420. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN POLITICAL SCIENCE. 3:3:0 An intensive investigation of a topic within the discipline of political science under the guidance of a faculty member. Course requirements include regular conferences, reading assignments, and a research paper. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor and 15 hours of prior course work in political science. Credit: three hours. 33-466. SEMINAR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE. 3:3:0 A specific topic will be developed and publicized at registration each time this course is offered. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Credit: three hours. 33-470. POLITICAL SCIENCE INTERNSHIP. 3:3:0 Students interested in an internship experience with a local, state, or federal government agency should consult with the department chairman for program information. Credit: three to nine hours. <--Back to Philosophy Course Descriptions

History/ Political Science/ Philosophy Course descriptions

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PHILOSOPHY (03) 03-101. CRITICAL THINKING. 3:3:0 The course is designed to develop and refine students' ability to think more clearly and more logically. The means to this end is a study of elementary logic. Credit: three hours. 03-105. CONTEMPORARY MORAL ISSUES. 3:3:0 A critical examination of such major current moral issues as abortion, euthanasia, pornography, retribution and capital punishment, affirmative action and reverse discrimination, social and economic justice and ethical issues in agriculture and the environment. Credit: three hours. This course is a foundation course for lifelong learning in the University's general education program. 03-201. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY. 3:3:0 Topics typically include: the general goals and methods of philosophy, the existence of God, the problem of evil, the immortality of the soul, the meaning of life, and free will. Credit: three hours. This course is a foundation course for lifelong learning in the University's general education program. 03-202. ETHICS. 3:3:0 Ethics is concerned primarily with the inquiry concerning various rules of conduct and "ways of life." Such fundamental ethical issues as egoism and altruism, freedom and determination, and the nature of moral decision-making will be highlighted through a critical examination of some of the writings of several classic ethical theorists, e.g., Plato, Mill, Kant, and Rawls. Credit: three hours. This course is a foundation course for lifelong learning in the University's general education program. 03-206. LOGIC. 3:3:0 A study of the methods and principles used to distinguish correct from incorrect reasoning, both deductive and inductive. Designed to help students reason more effectively themselves and to develop the ability to cogently criticize the reasoning of others. Credit: three hours. 03-231 (331 AND 431). SELECTED TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY. 3:3:0 Information on the content of these offerings is available, prior to pre-registration, from philosophy faculty. Credit: three hours. 03-300. HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY. 3:3:0 The course covers classical philosophers starting in the sixth century B.C. through the Pre-Socratic period, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, epicureanism, stoicism, and skepticism ending with the second century A.D. Credit: three hours. 03-302. HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY. 3:3:0 A study of the major European philosophers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries: Bacon, Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Credit: three hours. 03-304. POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY. 3:3:0 Political philosophy is concerned primarily with the nature of the concept of justice and its application in society. Some of the arguments that support particular forms of government, e. g., democratic, oligarchic, autocratic, etc., will be dealt with through a critical examination of several classic writers in the field, e. g., Hobbes, Rousseau, Mill, Locke, and Rawls. Credit: three hours. 03-322. MEDICAL ETHICS. 3:3:0 Issues examined here are in such areas as the relationship between biomedical ethics and ethical theory; the physician and patient relationship; the nurse and patient relationship; experimentation on humans; involuntary mental hospitalization and behavior control; the refusal of life-saving treatment; euthanasia; and health, disease and values. Credit: three hours. 03/41-341. BUSINESS ETHICS. 3:3:0 This course will be devoted to an examination of some of the ethical issues that arise in the field of business. Specific topics to be considered include: business ethics and ethical theory, the moral status of corporations, ethical codes of conduct in business, truth and advertising, the rights and duties of employees, affirmative action, and environmental issues in business. Credit: three hours. 03-399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 3:3:0 Qualified students, cooperation with a philosophy faculty member, may develop a course in some area of philosophy which they wish to study in depth. Arrangements for such a course must be made by the end of the semester preceding the one in which the course is to be taken. Credit: three hours. 03-407. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION. 3:3:0 A study of some of the philosophical issues inherent in religious belief; e.g., the existence of God, the attributes of God, the nature of religious experience, revelation, faith, and the possibility of religious knowledge. Credit: three hours.   GEOGRAPHY (32) 32-101. HUMAN GEOGRAPHY. 3:3:0 A course concerned with the relationship between man and the land with changes brought about through the growth of applied science. Credit: three hours. 32-201. WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY. 3:3:0 A Sophomore-level course designed to make the student aware of the peoples and cultures of the contemporary world. This course fulfills the World Regional Geography requirement for elementary and secondary education majors. Credit: three hours.   Political Science Next page-->

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree Television Production

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First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 25-101 Survey of Mathematics I 3 55-191 University Seminar I 1 55-208 Introduction to Mass Communications 3 55-261 Broadcast Writing I 3 XX-XXX Natural Science Requirement 1 3     16 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-102 Survey of Mathematics II 3 55-192 University Seminar II 1 55-215 TV and Radio Announcing 3 55-223 Sound Production I 3     15 Second Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 33-103 or 40-201 Introduction to Political Science or Macroeconomics 3 55-216 TV Production I 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 1 3 XX-XXX Arts / Humanities Requirement 3     18 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3 55-371 TV Production II 3 55-409 Broadcast Writing II 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 2 3     15 Third Year First Semester     31-395 Global Societies 3 55-373 Television Production III 3 55-372 Broadcast News Gathering and Reporting 3 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3 XX-XXX Natural Science Requirement 2 3     15 Second Semester     55-334 Media Research Techniques 3 55-450 Internship 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 3 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     12 Fourth Year First Semester     55-425 Mass Communications Practicum 3 55-440 Telecommunications Management 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 4 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 5 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 6 or Elective 3     15 Second Semester     55-407 Media Law and Ethics 3 55-460 Senior Project (Senior Capstone) 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 7 or Elective 3 XX-XXX Minor Course Requirement 8 or Elective 3 XX-XXX Elective 3     15   Total credits 121  

Course Descriptions for Mass Communications

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    MASS COMMUNICATIONS (MCOM) (55) MCOM-101. COMMUNICATIONS WRITING 3:3:0 This course is designed to provide our Communication students with background in all forms of writing that they will encounter as professionals. They will study traditional structures such as newspaper and news media. They will learn how writing for the ear differs from writing for the newspaper or screen. They will learn the basis of Internet writing. All these areas will be explored further by students once they move into the next more specialized phases of the program. Credit, three hours. MCOM-191. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR I – MASS COMMUNICATIONS 1:2:0 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success. Academic skills will be developed. These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the internet, and word processing. Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed. Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals. Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution, and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. Credit, one hour. MCOM-192. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR II – MASS COMMUNICATIONS 1:1:0 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success. Academic skills will be developed. These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the internet, and word processing. Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed. Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals. Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution, and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. Credit, one hour. MCOM-209. ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION 3:3:0 The course introduces students to the communication dynamics of an organization. Students discuss such topics as upward and downward communications, human relations, bargaining, and organizational culture. Credit, three hours. MCOM-216. TELEVISION PRODUCTION I 3:3:0 The course explores the principles, mechanics, techniques, tools, processes, and aesthetics of television production. Students learn to perform the basic job requirements of the camera operator, audio operator, video switcher, lighting director, floor manager, graphics operator, and director. Prerequisites: MCOM-217. Credit, three hours. MCOM-217. INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA TECHNOLOGY 3:3:0 The course is designed to introduce students to the technical and operational basics of audio, video, and multimedia production needed to be successful in the higher-level 55-classes. Credit, three hours. MCOM-218. PUBLIC RELATIONS PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES 3:3:0 The course introduces the student to the practice of public relations. The entire scope of the field will be examined with emphasis placed upon areas of specialization, media relations, and simultaneous multi-public workings. Credit, three hours. MCOM-220. SPORTS BROADCASTING 3:3:0 The course is designed to introduce students to the technical, organizational, and practical side of announcing sports on radio and television. Prerequisites: MSCM-215. Credit, three hours. MCOM-223. SOUND PRODUCTION I 3:3:0 The course introduces students to the history of sound in radio and television. Students examine the influence of television on sound perception. Students learn techniques and applications of editing and sound processing. Students utilize music/sound libraries. Prerequisites: MCOM-217. Credit, three hours. MCOM-241. REPORTING AND WRITING 3:3:0 The course gives basic instruction and practice in news gathering and writing for publication, internet, or broadcast outlet. Credit, three hours. MCOM-251. PUBLIC RELATIONS WRITING 3:3:0 The course gives students practical experience in developing written communications tools used in public relations. The student learns to prepare press releases, biographies, fact sheets, speeches, brochures, newsletters, and press kits. Prerequisites: MCOM-218. Credit, three hours. MCOM-280. PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING 3:3:0 This course introduces students to the history, nature, and function of advertising and its role in the communications process. Students are exposed to creative functions of the theoretical and practical opinions of message development and advertising media selection. Credit, three hours. MCOM-300. ADVERTISING COPYWRITING 3:3:0 This course prepares students to design, write copy and scripts for print, Internet, and broadcast commercials. Students learn about the creative side of an advertising agency, preparing them to work as copywriters, graphic designers, art directors, and creative directors. Prerequisites: MCOM-280. Credit, three hours. MCOM-307. AMERICAN CINEMA AND SOCIETY 3:3:0 Student will critically screen a selection of feature length, narrative films, and documentaries created by both well-regarded and emerging American Directors. They will consider and discuss what this medium continues to say about us and our society, both in terms of content and the timing and manner of release. Students will learn the grammar of film and to recognize techniques used by these storytellers to telegraph their own viewpoints about their subjects. Students will write about and defend in active conversation with classmates their own conclusions about the medium and films screened in class. Credit, three hours. MCOM-311. INTRODUCTION TO DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING 3:3:0 Participants will be introduced to the history, criticism, and fundamental concepts of producing documentary film and digital media. Students will screen, discuss, and deconstruct documentary films and digital media from an international body of work that represents cross section of both topics and production modes. They will gain an appreciation for the history of documentary filmmaking and the pioneers who helped to establish the documentary form. Prerequisites: MCOM-371 or MCOM-409. Credit, three hours. MCOM-334. MEDIA RESEARCH TECHNIQUES 3:3:0 The course provides experiences in the fundamentals of scientific research in general and mass media research in particular and it exposes students to a variety of research approaches and research methods, data collection, and data analysis procedures. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior status. Credit, three hours. MCOM-336. ON-LINE JOURNALISM 3:3:0 The course covers the basics of online storytelling including producing multimedia presentations, blogging, social media and examines the legal and ethical challenges created by the free flow of information on the Internet. Credit, three hours. MCOM-342. MAGAZINE WRITING 3:3:0 The course teaches students to write editorial and feature stories for magazine and newspaper publication. Students will examine the relationship between editorial/feature content and the audience market. Students are required to submit work for publication. Prerequisites: MCOM-241. Credit, three hours. MCOM-344. INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-3:1-3:0 An independent project or series of readings, research, and writing. Prerequisites: Consent of the Instructor and Department Chair. Credit, one to three hours. MCOM-351. PUBLIC RELATIONS AND THE NET 3:3:0 The course analyzes the state of contemporary media – online and off – and its impact on public relations examining key factors influencing reportorial and editorial coverage of entertainment, business, government, and not-for-profit interest. Special emphasis is on the advent of the Internet, the rise of citizen journalism, and the impact of blogs and other social media. Students will utilize a free online website development tool to develop a strategic media relations campaign aimed at publicizing a product, service, idea, or issue of their employers or other organizations, and that uses a variety of traditional and non-sensible outcomes. Credit, three hours. MCOM-352. PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGEMENT AND CAMPAIGNS 3:3:0 The course examines problems public relations practitioners have encountered in the areas of business, education, religion, and non-profit organizations. Students examine both successful and unsuccessful campaigns. Prerequisites: MCOM-251. Credit, three hours. MCOM-353. PUBLIC OPINION AND PROPAGANDA 3:3:0 The course exposes students to historical uses of persuasive communication. Students learn how to communicate persuasively. Prerequisites: MCOM-251. Credit, three hours. MCOM-361. SOUND PRODUCTION II 3:3:0 The course permits students to produce feature programs for radio or sound tracks for television. Students produce synchronous and asynchronous studio and location recordings. Students learn the art of digital and analog mixing. Prerequisites: MCOM-223. Credit, three hours. MCOM-371. TELEVISION PRODUCTION II 3:3:0 The course builds on Television Production I and incorporate administering, directing, producing, editing, and programming of television programs. Prerequisites: MCOM-216. Credit, three hours. MCOM-372. BROADCAST NEWS GATHERING AND REPORTING 3:3:0 The course enables students to gather and report news using electronic and traditional means. Students produce news segments using electronic newsgathering equipment. Credit, three hours. MCOM-373. TELEVISION PRODUCTION III 3:3:0 The course provides skills in the creation of multi-images and in the manipulation of the image size, shape, light and color, texture, and motion. The course builds on Television Production I and II. Prerequisites: MCOM-371. Credit, three hours. MCOM-405. TECHNIQUES OF LAYOUT AND DESIGN 3:3:0 The course will provide experience in newspaper and magazine make-up. Students will have hands-on experience in preparation of news copy, page layouts, pictures, and other graphic materials for newspaper publication and layout, typography for magazines, newsletters, brochures, and similar publications. Prerequisites: MCOM-241. Credit, three hours. MCOM-407. ETHICS AND THE MEDIA 3:3:0 The course examines the legal and ethical principles and standards governing print and electronics media. Furthermore, the course examines the performance of the various media of mass communications in light of ethical standards, employing case studies, lectures, and discussion sessions. Credit, three hours. MCOM-408. TECHNICAL AND SCIENTIFIC WRITING 3:3:0 The course will provide experience in writing scientific and technical material. Prerequisites: ENGL-101, ENGL-102, or consent of the Department. Credit, three hours. MCOM-430. SOUND PRODUCTION III 3:3:0 The course trains students to merge traditional writing with audio-video production in the Internet-oriented newsroom. The course will introduce the students to the technical, editorial, business, and creative demands of the online journalism market. Prerequisites: MCOM-361. Credit, three hours. MCOM-440. MEDIA MANAGEMENT 3:3:0 The course examines mass communication management problems via examination of the historical, social, cultural, legal, economic structure, and operation of American media organizations. Credit, three hours. MCOM-450. INTERNSHIP 3:3:18 The course provides a supervised program to give students knowledge and experience in the areas of concentration. Prerequisites: Consent of the Department Chair. Credit, three hours. MCOM-460. SENIOR CAPSTONE 3:3:0 The course permits students to propose, write, design, produce, and direct extended production programs. Students will also write a research paper in support of their creative project. Prerequisites: MSCM-334, Senior status, and consent of the Department Chair. Credit, three hours.  

Sociology & Criminal Justice Course Descriptions

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SOCIOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS   SCCJ-101. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY                                                                                            3:3:0 The purpose of this course is to expose students to the major areas of sociological research and to develop a sociological perspective.  The course is a sampler of the diversity of sociological study including, socialization and culture, socioeconomic class and inequality, race and ethnicity, sexuality and gender, and globalization.  By the end of this course students will have a better understanding of the ways in which individuals are influenced by a society’s major institutions, structures and cultures and how they fit within a complex global web of social interconnection. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-101H. Introduction to Sociology-Honors                                                                                         3:3:0 Development and application of Sociological concepts and perspectives concerning human groups including attention to socialization, culture, organization, stratification, and societies. This class is focused on fundamental sociological concepts and research methodology.  By the end of this course students will be able to utilize sociological theories and methods to explain social patterns with a focus on social structure and culture. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-102. Principles of Sociology                                                                                                           3:3:0 This course is designed for sociology majors and examines key sociological concepts, principles, theories and methods of sociological analysis. Subject areas include culture, socialization, group dynamics, social institutions, social inequity, globalization and social change.  By the end of this course students will be able to utilize sociological theories to understand social inequality, globalization, and multiculturalism.    Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-103. SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS                                                                                                            3:3:0 This course is designed to provide a thorough examination of the major social institutions (i.e., the family, the economy, the educational system, the religious system, the political system, and the medical system) from a variety of sociological perspectives. In doing so, this class will prepares students to conduct structural analyses of society, allowing them to better understand how social structure influences individual behaviors.  This will include identifying major social institutions, explaining the potential functions social institutions may serve in society, and an introduction to current research.  Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-104. INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                                                                   3:3:0 Survey of the agencies and processes involved in the Criminal Justice System including the police, the prosecutor, the public defender, the courts, and corrections. Students will explore definitions of crime and how crime is measured. Students will examine inequality in the Criminal Justice System and will start to gain a global perspective. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-191. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR I – SOCIOLOGY                                                                                   1:2:0 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success.  Academic skills will be developed.  These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the internet, and word processing.  Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed.  Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals.  Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution, and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. Credit, one hour.   SCCJ-192. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR II – SOCIOLOGY                                                                                   1:1:0 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success.  Academic skills will be developed.  These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the internet, and word processing.  Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed.  Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals.  Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution, and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. Credit, one hour.   SCCJ-200. WRITING IN THE MAJOR                                                                                                           3:3:0 This course provides students with an intensive writing course designed to improve literature research and assessment skills as well as writing skills. The course design is recursive so that students learn to edit, correct and improve their written work. Students will examine professional social science articles, sharpening literature synthesis and evaluation abilities. Students will learn to write for the social science professions using various formats, including annotated bibliographies, outlines, literature reviews, and research papers. Pre-requisites: Passed with C or better SCCJ 101, ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-202. SOCIAL DEVIANCE                                                                                                                    3:3:0 The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the sociological study of deviance, emphasizing the role that deviance plays in the creation of social disorganization. The course will explore the social construction of deviance, specifically how deviance is defined, the role the people and society play in assigning this definition, and how social control systems respond to deviance. Topics will include subcultures, the medicalization of deviance, suicide, violence, drug use, and deviant identities and careers. Students will be exposed to criminological theories and social-psychological concepts such as stigma management and labeling processes. Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 or 104. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-203. SOCIAL PROBLEMS                                                                                                                 3:3:0 One of the central concerns of sociology is to identify and better understand the problematic and destructive aspects of a society so that we can work toward fixing these social problems.  This course will expand students understanding of social problems by examining the various ways in which problems in society are socially constructed and publically framed.  Students will learn to deconstruct social problems, critically examine their relevancy and validity, and develop perspectives on the potential for social change. Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102. Credit, three hours.          SCCJ-206. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY                                                                                                   3:3:0 This course will expose students to common forms of cultural analysis in sociology and the study of meaning in the social world. Students will explore how individuals and groups make sense of and find meaning in the world. Empirical works will be presented that exemplify various approaches, each with a different way of accounting for those theoretical matters of concern.  This course will prepare students ask sociological questions that incorporate matters of meaning and interpretation into their analysis.  Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102. Credit, three hours   SCCJ-208. CRIMINOLOGY                                                                                                                          3:3:0 The course focuses on classical and contemporary theories of offending and victimization. Students will be introduce to the causes of crime and will learn to critique and apply criminological theoretical perspectives. Additional topics address the nature and extent of crime in the United States through analyses of official data, prospects of rehabilitation and policy implications. Prerequisites: SCCJ 104. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-210. RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS                                                                                               3:3:0 The primary purpose of this course is to examine interracial and interethnic relations. Students will gain a socio-historical understanding of race and ethnic relations in the United States. Topics will include racial and ethnic identities, prejudice and discrimination, stereotypes, migration and assimilation, colorblind racism, and white privilege. Students will examine how racial inequality is reproduced through social interactions and social institutions such as the criminal justice system. Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102. Credit, three hours. SCCJ-299. TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY                                                                                                   3:3:0 In this course, students will examine the role of technological innovation on processes of social and cultural change in a global context. Specific topics will include how past and current uses of technology yield positive and negative results, societal risks, and ethical issues. Students will analyze the relationship between technology and social problems, population trends, environment, education, and the workplace. Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200. Credit, three hours.   SCCCJ-301. JUVENILE DELINQUENCY                                                                                                       3:3:0 This course examines juvenile delinquency and the juvenile justice system.  The history, developments, and current issues related to juvenile delinquency and response to it are examined from a number of perspectives.  Additional topics include system biases, minority disproportionate representation, and gendered responses.  By the end of the course, students will be able to:  describe the extent of delinquency as it varies across time and groups; define and apply theories of juvenile delinquency; and assess the construction and response to delinquency from a variety of perspectives.  Prerequisites:  SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200 and 104.  Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-302. RURAL SOCIOLOGY                                                                                                                  3:3:0 This course explores rurality in international and domestic contexts.  Concepts and theories defining rural sociology are examined. Rural-urban differences in demographic composition, occupational structure, attitudes, and values of rural people and regional cultures are addressed. Rural services and institutions as determinants of the quality of life are discussed.  Prerequisites:  SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200.  Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-303. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                                                                             3:3:0 This course situates the study of human behavior within social context to reveal how one’s feelings and actions can be influenced by other people. We will examine the processes of human interaction and the social influences of family, group membership, generic social processes, mass media, and socioeconomic status, race, gender, and sexuality on individuals and groups. Students will examine socialization, the formation and changing of attitudes, social perception, role strain, collective behavior, intergroup and intragroup relations, and generic social processes that reproduce inequality. Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-305. URBAN SOCIOLOGY                                                                                                                 3:3:0 This course focuses on the ways cities change, how and why urban development takes place, and who has the power to make decisions that affect urban life.  The class examines the ways in which decisions made at the macro urban scale filter down to influence the different ways people experience city life including the ways different urban cultures operate to establish themselves within communities and interact with others.  Major areas discussed in this course include the history of urbanization and suburbanization, race and ethnicity within American cities, urban decline and gentrification, community activism and power, cities and globalization, the effects of neighborhoods on culture, and the future of American cities.  At the end of this course, students will be able to use urban sociological theories to explain patterns of class, race and gender based spatial inequality and critically examine unequal patterns of urban and suburban development.  Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200. Credit, three hours.           SCCJ-306. SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION                                                                                                        3:3:0 Religion continues to be an important institution in society, both within the United States and throughout the world.  This course will introduce students to the sociological study of how religion influences the lives of individuals.  Particular focus will be given to the large amount of variation within religion, as one of the goals of this class is to “de-essentialize” religion on an empirical level.  This course will prepare students to understand the causes & consequences of religion in society, as well as give them experience empirically engaging sensitive sociological topics. Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-309. MEN AND WOMEN IN SOCIETY                                                                                                   3:3:0 The course is designed to provide students with a sociological framework for analyzing and deconstructing gender relations in society. Topics will include the social construction of gender, gender socialization, power and violence, sexuality, gender relations in the family, and gender stratification in the labor force. By the end of the semester, students will have a critical understanding of gender disparities from a global perspective. Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200 or WMGS 200 Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-310. SOCIAL STRATIFICATION                                                                                                            3:3:0 This course explores the various ways in which the unequal distribution of wealth and power in the United States influences the American experience.  Specifically, the course looks at the ways in which systems of wealth inequality are maintained, how inequality is experienced and how it affects different social groups, who controls wealth and who does not and why systems of stratification matter.  By the end of this course students will be able to identify different systems of stratification, the differential impacts and effects of stratification on different groups and use theories of stratification to explain the persistence of social inequality.  Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-311. LAW ENFORCEMENT                                                                                                                    3:3:0 This course traces the historical roots and shaping of modern law enforcement agencies. The recruitment and retention, behavioral management and issues surrounding the practices and responsibilities of law enforcement officials are also examined. By the end of the semester, students will have been exposed to a range of professional careers in the field. Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200 and 208. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-313. COURTS AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                                                                                3:3:0 The course is designed to provide an analysis of the structure and function of the criminal system in the United States including the roles of the prosecutor, defender, judge, justice, and court administrator. The issues confronting the system will be considered from historical and sociological perspectives. The ideal type will be compared with actual functioning of the system and court reform programs and proposals will be discussed. Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200 and 208. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-314. METHODS OF SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH                                                                                  3:3:0 The purpose of this course is to introduce students to research problems, design, and procedures in sociology and criminal justice. Students will be exposed to the nature of the research process, including ethical practices and going through the IRB, and guidelines for formulating research questions and testable hypotheses. Topics will include conceptualization and operationalization of variables, sampling, qualitative and quantitative data collection, and the relationship between theory and research. Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-315. CRIMINAL LAW                                                                                                                              3:3:0 A study of both substantive and procedural criminal law. Consideration is given to its historical development, principles of criminal law and criminal liability, and the main doctrines of criminal law toward specific crimes and sanctions. Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200 and 208. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-316. CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                                                         3:3:0 The course examines current and controversial issues that permeate the modern criminal justice system. Emphasis is placed on critically examining the issues that come with passage of legislation and policies that impact citizens and criminal justice officials. Topics include in depth analyses of the U.S. Patriot Act, the implications of Three Strikes Laws and Stand Your Ground Laws, the nature of stop and frisk policies, and the impact of race, class and gender have on citizens’ perceptions of the criminal justice system. This course will prepare students to critically analyze current debates and policy issues in the field. Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200 and 208. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-322. ELEMENTARY STATISTICS                                                                                                             3:3:0 A course covering graphic representation of data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, the normal distribution and the use of standard scores, and simple correlation and regression. By the end of this course, students will have a basic understanding of statistics and how they fit into the research process. Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200 and 314. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-323. ADVANCED STATISTICS                                                                                                                 3:3:0 A course which is devoted to inferential statistics. This course cover interval estimation and hypotheses testing for all levels of measurements. A statistical laboratory which uses the campus computer and the ‘statistical package for the social sciences’ (SPSS) is an integral component of the course.) By the end of the course, students will be able to do basic and more advanced statistical processes to test hypotheses and conduct their own research studies using SPSS.  This course prepared students for graduate level statistics courses and is essential for students planning on entering a graduate program in Criminology, Criminal Justice, or Sociology.  Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200 and 314 and 322. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-330. POPULATION ANALYSIS                                                                                                                 3:3:0 This course examines the causes, consequences of, and interaction among the three major demographic variables: 1) fertility, 2) mortality, and 3) migration. The various policy alternatives with respect to the three (3) demographic variables will be examined. Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200 and 322. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-351. SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY                                                                                                          3:3:0 This course explores one of the central institutions of human societies; the family.  The focus is on how and why families change over time, how families vary culturally from one place to another, the function of the family in society, and the ways in which different family types operate concurrently within societies.  Some major themes explored in this course include, changing family dynamics and composition, the various roles of different family members, power within families, and how families are framed in society. By the end of this course students will be able to apply sociological theories to the study of families and describe and explain cultural variation in family structures based on class, race, ethnicity and gender. Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-356. SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION                                                                                                           3:3:0 This course will introduce students to empirical research regarding a number of topics within the sociology of education.  This includes issues such as inequality, student performance, the relationship between education and the marketplace, and the school-to-prison pipeline.  Students will read works from multiple theoretical standpoints, and conducted using several different methodological approaches.  Students will write book reviews and other assignments designed to give them experience with literature searches, and class participation will be encouraged. This course will prepare students to understand the effects of social structure and power in relation to the consequences and meanings of education in the United States.  Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-360. SOCIOLOGY OF WORK                                                                                                                    3:3:0 This course gives students an opportunity to engage the sociological literature studying work.  The course will address topics such as organizational behavior, alienation, systems of control, occupational differentiation, work and leisure, and job satisfaction.  More specifically, it will look at three issues: the destabilization of work and employment, the shift toward a service-based economy and away from industry, and the decline of U.S. labor unions.  This course will prepare students to understand the social patterns that influence our working lives in nonobvious ways, applying sociological theories to a specific institution in society.  Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-380. MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY                                                                                                                      3:3:0 A critical analysis of the American medical system, including an examination of the structure of health care delivery, interaction within medical settings, and the sociocultural factors which influence morbidity, medical service utilization, and treatment. Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 or 102 and 200. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-399. INDEPENDENT STUDY                                                                                                                       3:3:0 Individual reading or field study by students wishing to pursue a special interest within the field of sociology, but not covered by one of the regular sociology courses.  Prerequisites:  Consent of the Instructor.  Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-402. PRINCIPLES OF CORRECTIONS                                                                                                        3:3:0 A general course describing the history and evolution of the modern correctional system. This course examines the purpose of corrections and punishment, the treatment and rehabilitation of offenders under correctional supervision, problems with jails/prisons, and preparing offenders for release into the community. Additional topics address community-based corrections and probation/parole.  Prerequisites: SCCJ 311 or 313 or 315 or 316. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-405. SOCIOLOGY OF SEXUALITIES                                                                                                         3:3:0 This course will explore the relationship between sexuality, gender and the body in a U.S. and global context. The social construction of sexuality, sexual identities, historical trends, social movements, and current policy debates, will be covered. Prerequisites: SCCJ 101 and SCCJ 309 or WMGS 201. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-406. SOCIOLOGY OF LAW                                                                                                                         3:3:0 A general treatment of the social origins and consequences of the law and legal process. Special emphasis is placed on problems of legal sanctions. Review of analysis of selected areas of theory and research in the sociology of law. Topics covered will include such areas as civil litigation and the civil courts, police operations and the sociology of law and order, educational laws and the operations of educational institutions, and sociological theories of justice, and the operations of legal agencies. Some attention is paid to law and the law-like phenomena and other sanctioning mechanisms in other societies, including primitive societies, but main emphasis is on American society. Prerequisites: SCCJ 311 or 313 or 315 or 316. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ 408. SOCIOLOGY OF POVERTY                                                                                                                 3:3:0 This course focuses on the causes and consequences of poverty.  Poverty is analyzed from a sociological perspective and focuses on the structural forces shaping poverty as well as the experiences of people living in poverty.  A focus on the ways major economic, political and educational institutions mitigate and exacerbate poverty. By the end of this course students will be able to use theories of stratification to understand changing poverty rates and utilize research-based evidence to develop critical arguments about poverty related policies. Prerequisites: SCCJ 200 and SCCJ 310.   SCCJ-409. REAL/REEL CULTURE                                                                                                                       3:3:0 This course will foster an understanding of human culture and how mass media including, movies, music, television, print media and the internet are affecting the construction and negotiation of social identities and culture.  This course will explore how and why the mass media, especially the corporate and consumer media, portrays various identities including gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, and disability and how these identities  mix, swirl, reinforce and conflict with our own ideas of who we are. This course will contribute to students’ abilities to develop a critical argument using research based evidence and sociological theories. Prerequisites: SCCJ 200 and consent of the Instructor. Credit, three hours.        SCCJ-412. SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES                                                                                                               3:3:0 Facts never speak for themselves.  Sociological analysis always involves nonfactual elements such as traditions, beliefs, and goals.  This course will review many of the key social theories in contemporary sociology, classical sociology, and the intellectual traditions that linked them together.  This course will help students use explicit theoretical conceptualizations as essential tools for studying and understanding society.  Prerequisites: SCCJ 314.   SCCJ-415. VICTIMOLOGY                                                                                                                                 3:3:0 The role of victims in crimes, their treatment by the criminal justice system, their decisions to report crimes and help prosecute offenders, and victim compensation. Special focus on sexual assault and family violence. By the end of this course, students will have a broad understanding of the role social constructs play in the victimization experience for people who are victimized, both in terms of their experience with the criminal justice system and their experience understanding and processing what occurred.  Prerequisites: SCCJ 311 or 313 or 315 or 316. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-420. COMPLEX ORGANIZATIONS                                                                                                            3:3:0 The general objective of the course is to examine internal and external factors which affect the behavior, performance and effectiveness of formal organizations—internal factors such as an organization’s structure; its patterns of authority; channels of communications, etc., and external factors such as the environment within which the organization operates. This course will prepare students to think critically about how the organization of collective action influences the outcomes of collective action.  Prerequisites: SCCJ 314. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-435. SOCIAL CHANGE                                                                                                                            3:3:0 Examination of the causes, mechanics, patterns, strategies, or consequences of change in structure (relationships and institutions) of societies, and analysis of specific kinds of change such as revolutions, social movements, modernization, and industrialization. By the end of this course students will understand the socio-historical context of social change; they will be able to use theories to identify and differentiate patterns of social change and to explain when, how and why social changes occur. Prerequisites: SCCJ 200 and 322. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-448. SENIOR SEMINAR                                                                                                                           3:3:0 This is the capstone course for sociology and criminal justice majors.  In this course, students will demonstrate writing, critical thinking, information literacy, and oral presentation skills of a college graduate.  The instructor will determine the topic of focus and students will complete a capstone research project where they appraise contemporary social problems, critique sociological/criminological research, use scientific findings to support a sociological argument, discuss the importance and impact of social inequality on the various social institutions and groups, and develop a critical argument using a sociological perspective. Prerequisites: SCCJ 314 and 412; Senior status with major or minor in Sociology/Criminal Justice. Credit, three hours.   SCCJ-450. CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP  Internship Form                                                                          3:3:0 Designed to give students first-hand, career related experience in a local agency or organization. Internships must be planned with the Department's Internship Instructor and a Field Supervisor in the semester prior to the actual placement. Qualified agency staff provides on-site supervision of the student, and the Internship Instructor, in conjunction with the Field Supervisor, monitors the intern's progress and evaluates his/her work. Prerequisites: SCCJ 200 and junior status with major or minor in Criminal Justice, and consent of the Internship Coordinator. Credit, three hours

Psychology Course Descriptions

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      201. INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) This is a survey course that covers key content areas, which comprise the modern science of psychology.  Content areas include scientific methods, learning, sensation and perception, human development, abnormal, personality and social psychology.  Prerequisite:  None.  Credit, three hours. 206. APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) The purpose of this course is to supply students with information and practical skills in several areas of applied psychology. The areas covered will include personal adjustment, organizational and industrial psychology, human engineering, and contemporary social problems. The skills that will be practiced include stress management, communications analysis, assertiveness training, conduct of small group problem-solving sessions, and practice in taking standardized tests, and design and evaluation of research. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 207. SCIENTIFIC METHOD IN PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) An examination of the scientific method and its application to the study of behavior. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 208. HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) This course surveys the broad application of psychology to disease and wellness. Topics include stress, healthy habits, substance abuse, eating disorders, chronic pain and psychoneuroimmunology. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 303. ORGANIZATIONAL AND INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) A course designed to provide the student with an overview of the application of behavioral science principles to organizations in general and industry in particular. The following content areas will be covered: (1) Organizational Theory, (2) Decision-Making, (3) Management Decision-Making, (4) Human Motivation in the Work Organization, (5) Organizational Development, (6) Personnel Selection, and (7) Human Engineering. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 308. PERSONALITY (3:3:0) Primary emphasis in this course is given to theories of personality and the assessment of personality. Freud's psychoanalytic theory, Jung's analytic theory, Murray's biosocial theory, and social psychological theories are among some of the theories discussed. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 316. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) This course studies the development of individuals from birth through adolescence including the physical, emotional, intellectual, social, and psychological factors of development. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 325. STATISTICS FOR THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (3:3:0) This course covers the conventional methods of data management and analysis for psychology and other behavioral sciences. The concepts of probability, sampling, and causality with are framed in relation to the empirical process. Descriptive and inferential statistics will be described as well as basic experimental design. Prerequisites: Psychology 201, Mathematics 101-102 or six hours of higher-level Mathematics courses. 345. COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) This course is an upper-level, one semester course, which provides an overview of the various areas of cognitive psychology, the study of mental processes. The course includes discussions of cognitive research and how it is applied to other areas of psychology (e.g., social psychology, developmental psychology, clinical, etc.) and to everyday life. In addition, this course aims to develop critical thinking, problem solving, and writing skills. 400. EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) A survey of the principles and methods employed in psychological experiments. Reading and critical analysis of existing experimental literature is emphasized. Students will conduct their own experiments and learn to write the results in APA format. Prerequisites: Psychology 201, 207, 325. Credit, three hours. 402. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) A study of mental disorders with emphasis on causes, symptoms, and treatment. Content includes anxiety disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenic disorders, and personality disorders. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 411. INTRODUCTION TO GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING (3:3:0) An overview of guidance and counseling principles and techniques. Instruction includes intensive training in basic listening and interview skills. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 413. PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING (3:3:0) The objectives of this course are to provide students with a broad overview of the dominant theories and research in the areas of learning and motivation. Students will experience some classic experiments in this area of psychology through computer simulation and classroom demonstrations. Prerequisites: 201, 207, 325. Credit, three hours. 414. COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY II (3:3:0) A course designed to treat counseling theories and provide actual experience with the counseling process. Counseling approaches from the following systems of personality and therapy will be considered: Reality Therapy, Behavioral Therapy, Rational Emotive Therapy, Rogerian Therapy, Adlerian Therapy, and Psychoanalytic Therapy. Students will participate in a group counseling experience supervised by the instructor. Prerequisites: Psychology 201, 411. Credit, three hours. 416. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) A study of the impact of social institutions on the behavior of the individual and the impact of the individual on the group including a discussion of attitudes, beliefs, public opinion, propaganda, leadership prejudice, and international tension. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 425. SENIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR (3:3:0) This is a one-semester capstone course.  Students will apply what they have learned from the core courses in generating an original research proposal.  Prerequisites: Psychology 201, 207, 325, 400. Credit, three hours. 422. HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) A course covering the philosophical and scientific works that form the basis of modern psychology. Classic concepts such as structuralism and functionalism will be considered as well as important schools of thought such as behaviorism, psychoanalysis, Gestalt, and cognitive. Prerequisites: Psychology 201, 207, 325. Credit, three hours. 430. INDIVIDUAL READING AND CONFERENCE (2:2:0) This course is designed to provide the student the opportunity for individual extensive reading in a selected topic under the guidance of a faculty member of the psychology department. Specific activities will include (a) reading as directed, and (b) conferring with the instructor on the reading completed. A written report is required. Admission by permission of the instructor and the department chairman. Prerequisites: Psychology 201, 207, 325. Credit, two hours. (May be repeated once for credit.) 432. INDEPENDENT STUDY (3:3:0) A course designed to provide the student the opportunity for laboratory or field based research in a selected area of psychology. Prerequisites: Junior level status and consent of the instructor. Credit, three hours. 435. PRACTICA IN APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY * The Practica in Applied Psychology provides students the opportunity to observe and practice the application of behavior science principles on-the-job. The student must take the responsibility for identifying a practicum opportunity. The instructor will then work out the details of the experience with the student and the on-site practicum supervisor. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all freshman and sophomore level courses in the psychology curriculum and written permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all freshman and sophomore level courses in the psychology curriculum including, 206, 303 or 411, and written permission of the instructor. Credit, three to nine hours. * Variable credit. 436. BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE (3:3:0) The application of principles derived from learning theory to individuals and groups. Special attention will be given to parenting, treatment of abnormal behavior, and the workplace. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours.  

English Course Descriptions

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01-099. WRITING SKILLS / ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE. 3:3:0 This is a required course for all non-native speakers of English who make unsatisfactory scores on the English Placement Tests. Cross-listed with Foreign Languages. Credit: three hours (Non-degree). 01-100. WRITING SKILLS. 3:3:0 This course is a required course for all students who make unsatisfactory scores on the English placement tests. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic writing skills with a review of grammar and the mechanics of writing. Students are eligible to enroll in English 101 upon completion of the course. Credit: three hours (Non-degree). 01-101. ENGLISH COMPOSITION I. 3:3:0 This course is designed to develop skills and competence in writing prose compositions, reading, and listening. Problems in logical thought, organization of ideas, and comprehension in reading will receive special attention. (All students are required to earn a grade of "C" or better or they must repeat the course.) Prerequisite: Exemption from taking placements tests, a passing score on the English placement test or successful completion of English 100. Credit: three hours. 01-102. ENGLISH COMPOSITION II. 3:3:0 This course is a continuation of English 101. Emphasis will be placed on longer critical writing and the research paper. (All students are required to earn a grade of "C" or better or they must repeat the course.) Prerequisite: English 101. Credit: three hours. 01-105. BASIC STUDY OF LITERATURE. 3:3:0 This course is designed to help students develop an appreciation and understanding of literature. Attention is given to forms, styles, and ideas in selected works of poetry, drama, and short fiction. Students are also encouraged to write critically about literature. Prerequisite: English 101. Credit: three hours. Required of all English and English Education majors. 01-107. CREATIVE DRAMATICS. 3:3:0 This course is designed to aid teachers in the creative facets of learning. Emphasis is placed upon the use of the arts to improve the learning environment. Students take part in story-telling, story-dramatization, and pantomime. Credit: three hours. 01-109. ACTING I. 3:3:0 This course is a basic acting course designed to introduce the fundamental skills of performance. Course work includes exercises to develop physical and vocal freedom and performance of scenes and improvisations. Credit: three hours. 01-111. MOVEMENT AND NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION. 3:3:0 This course is designed to give intensive physical training to achieve strength and control of bodily movement, to explore basic mime techniques as they relate to non-verbal communication and to provide extensive work in theatre games to achieve physical and emotional freedom and stimulate a creative atmosphere. Credit: three hours. 01-113. INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE. 3:3:0 This course will provide the student with a general overview of theatre and its use and effect in the culture. The student will read from a general sampling of dramatic literature in its various forms including stage dramas, comedies, musicals, and other dramatic forms. Students will also be encouraged to attend and respond to campus and local productions. Credit: three hours. 01-200. SPEECH. 3:3:0 This course provides the student training in the fundamentals of diction and effective oral expression in prepared, extemporaneous and informative speeches. Emphasis placed upon preparation and delivery. Techniques of interviewing will be explored. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-201-202. WORLD LITERATURE I and II. 3:3:0 A broad cultural background is sought through a study of the literature and a consideration of the ideas expressed by the great men of letters from ancient Greece through the Renaissance (during the first semester) and from the Renaissance to the twentieth century (second semester). Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours each. 01-204. LINGUISTICS. 3:3:0 This is an introduction to the scientific study of language with emphasis on the application of modern linguistic science to the teaching of grammar and writing. Credit: three hours. 01-205. AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE I. 3:3:0 The aim of this course is to trace the beginning of African-American literature from the early plantation era to the modern phase which began with the Great Depression of the 1930's. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-206. AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE II. 3:3:0 This course traces African-American writings from the early 1930's, which saw a new concern for social equality between blacks and whites, to the present day. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-207. BLACK PROSE AND POETRY. 3:3:0 The imaginative literature in this course represents the three main genres: stories, plays, and poems by black writers, and includes a wide range of styles, techniques, and themes. To encourage concentrated study, critical essays by noted black critics are studied in depth. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-209. ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATIONS. 3:3:0 This course introduces students to the communication dynamics of an organization. Students discuss such topics as upward and downward communications, human relations, bargaining, and organizational culture. Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-210. INTRODUCTION TO FILM. 3:3:0 This course examines the art of film and introduces the students to the techniques and styles of representative film-makers. Special emphasis is placed on theories of film and methodology of film criticism as well as social, historic, and artistic relevance. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-211. CREATIVE WRITING. 3:3:0 This course examines the art of creative writing. Special attention will be given to the short story, poetry, and play writing. The student is encouraged to improve by constant comparison of his work with the best achievements in fiction and poetry. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-212. ORAL INTERPRETATION. 3:3:0 This course provides an analysis of prose and dramatic literature through experimentation with techniques used to interpret literature orally. Communication skills are developed through group and individual readings. Prerequisites: English 101, 102, and 200. Credit: three hours. 01-213. INTRODUCTION TO CHILDREN'S THEATRE. 3:3:0 This course covers play and audience analysis, directing methods, and production techniques such as design of sets, props, and costumes. Each student participates in the Fall children's theatre production at the college either by performing or doing technical production work. Credit: three hours. 01-214.THE BLACK AMERICAN NOVEL. 3:3:0 This course examines the origins, styles, themes, and literary techniques of Black novelists in America from 1800 to the present. Works will be studied in relation to the social, historical and political factors which influence them. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-217. BLACK DRAMA. 3:3:0 This course is a survey of the American Black playwrights' contribution to American drama. Plays are examined for their artistic, historic, and social significance. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-301-302. ENGLISH LITERATURE I and II. 3:3:0 This survey course is designed to increase the student's awareness of the significant trends in English literature, beginning with the Anglo- Saxon period. This course emphasizes the work of the major English writers in relation to the literary movements and ideas of their periods. Credit: three hours each. 01-303. ENGLISH LITERATURE IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 3:3:0 This course is a study of the Augustan Age with emphasis upon the reading of representative writers Defoe, Addison, Steele, Pope, Swift, and Dr. Johnson and his circle. Credit: three hours. 01-304. THE ROMANTIC PERIOD IN ENGLISH LITERATURE. 3:3:0 This course consists of readings in the prose and poetry of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, with some attention to critical reactions to their works and to a definition of Romanticism. Credit: three hours. 01-305. SHAKESPEARE. 3:3:0 The aim of this course is to impress upon the student the cultural, historical, and philosophical significance of the works of Shakespeare in relation to modern living. Representative plays from the several literary periods of Shakespeare are studied. Credit: three hours. 01-306-307. AMERICAN LITERATURE I and II. 3:3:0 Significant trends in American literary thought as reflected in the works of the major writers from the Colonial Period to the present are emphasized in this course. Credit: three hours each. 01-308. BRITISH AND AMERICAN DRAMA. 3:3:0 This course is a study of the major figures of British and American drama from the Age of Shakespeare to the twentieth century. Credit: three hours. 01-309. THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE. 3:3:0 This course is a survey of the literature of the English Renaissance, with special study of the major authors: Sidney, Spencer, Shakespeare, Johnson, and Donne. Credit: three hours. 01-311. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 3:3:0 Emphasis in this course is placed upon extensive practice in effective writing of prose composition. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit, three hours. 01-313. PLAY PRODUCTION. 3:3:0 Areas covered in this course include a general introduction to directing, staging, lighting, costuming, makeup, and other aspects of educational and recreational drama. Credit: three hours. 01-314. MODERN DRAMA. 3:3:0 This course examines the major playwrights of the twentieth century from Ibsen to Beckett, and traces the development of modern drama. Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-316. AMERICAN LITERATURE OF AFRO-AMERICAN LIFE. 3:3:0 An examination of the Black American's role in American literature (a) as a creator of the white writer's imagination, (b) as a creator of literature, and (c) as a critical observer of the literary scene. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-317. SEMINAR IN GREEK TRAGEDY. 3:3:0 This course examines the major works of the three great Greek tragedians: Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Works are analyzed in relation to the major social, religious, and political thrusts of the 5th century, B.C. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit, three hours. 01-319. MODERN NOVEL. 3:3:0 This course examines the novel as a genre and explores the development of the novel from James to Pyncheon. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-320. PLAY PRODUCTION II. 3:3:0 Play Production II is an extension of Play Production I. Areas covered in this course include a general introduction to directing, staging, lighting, costuming, makeup, and other aspects of educational and aesthetic drama. All students work, in one of many capacities, with the executing of a major college stage production. Prerequisite: English 313. Credit: three hours. 01-321. SEMINAR IN HUGHES, WRIGHT, AND BALDWIN. 3:3:0 This course examines the major works of these three great Black writers. Close attention is given to their individual styles and techniques. Works are also studied in relation to the social and historical forces which influenced them. Prerequisite: English 101, 102, 201, 202, 205, and 206. Credit: three hours. 01-322. DIRECTING I. 3:3:0 This course will give an overview of the background and techniques of the director in the theatre. Emphasis will be placed on the study of composition, scene analysis, movement, picturization, and rhythm from a director's viewpoint. The course will culminate in a public performance and a video tape project. Prerequisites: English 107, or 109. Credit: three hours. 01-323. THEATRE CRITICISM. 3:3:0 This course will examine the basic principles of the theatre criticism, survey the modern theories of theatre criticism, and investigate methods of evaluating theatre criticism. Trips to area productions and frequent practice in writing critiques will be a major focus of the course. Prerequisites: English 101, 102, 201-202 or 205-206, and 311. Credit: three hours. 01-324. PLAYWRITING. 3:3:0 This course is devoted to the analysis and writing of short plays for the stage. Students are required to write a series of exercise works focusing on basic playwriting techniques: use of action, plot, dialogue, characterization, setting, pantomime, and metaphor. The course will include reading assignments in dramatic literature parallel to techniques of each writing assignment and the reading aloud of students' works in laboratory sessions for discussion. Prerequisites: English 101, 102, 201-202 or 205-206. Credit: three hours. 01-325. HISTORY OF THE THEATRE I. 3:3:0 This course emphasizes theatre structure, production techniques, individual artists, and movements in the development of theatre from the early cultural rituals to the 1700's in Europe, America, and the Orient. Prerequisites: English 101, 102, 201-202 or 205-206. Credit: three hours. 01-326. HISTORY OF THE THEATRE II. 3:3:0 This course emphasizes theatre structure, production techniques, individual artists, and movements from the 1700's to the present in Europe, America, and the Orient. Prerequisite: English 325. Credit: three hours. 01-327. INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS. 3:3:0 This course examines the use of verbal and nonverbal transactions to create, maintain, and change person-to-person relationships. Discussions, role playing, models, and simulations will be used in instruction. Prerequisites: English 101, 102, and 200. Credit: three hours. 01-328. INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH PATHOLOGY. 3:3:0 This course examines the nature, etiology, and assessment of disorders of speech and language, including articulation, stuttering, voice, cleft palate, and childhood and adult aphasia. Prerequisites: English 101, 102, and 200, 36-201. Credit: three hours. 01-329. ADOLESCENT LITERATURE. 3:3:0 This is an interactive adolescent literature course designed to provide perspective teachers an overview of various genres, cultural perspectives, and universal themes in an age and developmentally appropriate context. Principles of selection, use and evaluation are explored. Projects focus on the design and presentation of literary concepts suitable for classroom instruction. Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-330. FORENSICS. 3:3:0 This course explores methods of debate, including techniques of formal and informal argument, analysis of propositions, strategies of persuasion, and preparation of briefs. Prerequisites: English 101, 102, and 200. Credit: three hours. 01-400. TEACHING GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION. 3:3:0 In this course the student learns how to teach basic English skills (grammar and mechanics) as well as composition skills by observing, evaluating, and assisting the instructor in an English 100 or English 101 class (two hours of class work, one hour of conference with instructor per week). Prerequisites: Junior standing and consent of department. Credit: three hours. 01-401. VICTORIAN LITERATURE. 3:3:0 The aim of this course is to present selected readings of the major poets of the period; Tennyson, Browning, Rosetti, and their contemporaries against the background of Victorian thought. Credit: three hours. 01-402. CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE. 3:3:0 This course is a study of British and American writers of fiction and poetry since 1900, with emphasis on the main currents of thought in the twentieth century. Credit: three hours. 01-403. SENIOR SEMINAR. 3:3:0 The seminar embraces a correlation of the content of the various courses by review of periods, literary trends, and significant authors of English, American, and continental literature. Credit: three hours. 01-404. TEACHING ENGLISH IN THE HIGH SCHOOL. 3:3:0 This course is designed to promote effective and knowledgeable teaching of composition and literature in the high school. This course covers the content to be taught, the insights needed by the teacher, and various methods recommended in teaching the subject. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. Credit: three hours. 01-450. INTERNSHIP. 6:3:18 This course will provide a highly supervised program designed to give students first-hand knowledge and hands-on experience in the discipline. Prerequisites: Senior status and consent of the department. Credit: 3-12 hours.
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College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

English and Foreign Languages Department

Bachelor's Programs
English
English or Theatre Arts Minor
 

 

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