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Psychology Course Descriptions

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      201. INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) This is a survey course that covers key content areas, which comprise the modern science of psychology.  Content areas include scientific methods, learning, sensation and perception, human development, abnormal, personality and social psychology.  Prerequisite:  None.  Credit, three hours. 206. APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) The purpose of this course is to supply students with information and practical skills in several areas of applied psychology. The areas covered will include personal adjustment, organizational and industrial psychology, human engineering, and contemporary social problems. The skills that will be practiced include stress management, communications analysis, assertiveness training, conduct of small group problem-solving sessions, and practice in taking standardized tests, and design and evaluation of research. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 207. SCIENTIFIC METHOD IN PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) An examination of the scientific method and its application to the study of behavior. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 208. HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) This course surveys the broad application of psychology to disease and wellness. Topics include stress, healthy habits, substance abuse, eating disorders, chronic pain and psychoneuroimmunology. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 303. ORGANIZATIONAL AND INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) A course designed to provide the student with an overview of the application of behavioral science principles to organizations in general and industry in particular. The following content areas will be covered: (1) Organizational Theory, (2) Decision-Making, (3) Management Decision-Making, (4) Human Motivation in the Work Organization, (5) Organizational Development, (6) Personnel Selection, and (7) Human Engineering. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 308. PERSONALITY (3:3:0) Primary emphasis in this course is given to theories of personality and the assessment of personality. Freud's psychoanalytic theory, Jung's analytic theory, Murray's biosocial theory, and social psychological theories are among some of the theories discussed. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 316. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) This course studies the development of individuals from birth through adolescence including the physical, emotional, intellectual, social, and psychological factors of development. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 325. STATISTICS FOR THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (3:3:0) This course covers the conventional methods of data management and analysis for psychology and other behavioral sciences. The concepts of probability, sampling, and causality with are framed in relation to the empirical process. Descriptive and inferential statistics will be described as well as basic experimental design. Prerequisites: Psychology 201, Mathematics 101-102 or six hours of higher-level Mathematics courses. 345. COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) This course is an upper-level, one semester course, which provides an overview of the various areas of cognitive psychology, the study of mental processes. The course includes discussions of cognitive research and how it is applied to other areas of psychology (e.g., social psychology, developmental psychology, clinical, etc.) and to everyday life. In addition, this course aims to develop critical thinking, problem solving, and writing skills. 400. EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) A survey of the principles and methods employed in psychological experiments. Reading and critical analysis of existing experimental literature is emphasized. Students will conduct their own experiments and learn to write the results in APA format. Prerequisites: Psychology 201, 207, 325. Credit, three hours. 402. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) A study of mental disorders with emphasis on causes, symptoms, and treatment. Content includes anxiety disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenic disorders, and personality disorders. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 411. INTRODUCTION TO GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING (3:3:0) An overview of guidance and counseling principles and techniques. Instruction includes intensive training in basic listening and interview skills. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 413. PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING (3:3:0) The objectives of this course are to provide students with a broad overview of the dominant theories and research in the areas of learning and motivation. Students will experience some classic experiments in this area of psychology through computer simulation and classroom demonstrations. Prerequisites: 201, 207, 325. Credit, three hours. 414. COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY II (3:3:0) A course designed to treat counseling theories and provide actual experience with the counseling process. Counseling approaches from the following systems of personality and therapy will be considered: Reality Therapy, Behavioral Therapy, Rational Emotive Therapy, Rogerian Therapy, Adlerian Therapy, and Psychoanalytic Therapy. Students will participate in a group counseling experience supervised by the instructor. Prerequisites: Psychology 201, 411. Credit, three hours. 416. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) A study of the impact of social institutions on the behavior of the individual and the impact of the individual on the group including a discussion of attitudes, beliefs, public opinion, propaganda, leadership prejudice, and international tension. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours. 425. SENIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR (3:3:0) This is a one-semester capstone course.  Students will apply what they have learned from the core courses in generating an original research proposal.  Prerequisites: Psychology 201, 207, 325, 400. Credit, three hours. 422. HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY (3:3:0) A course covering the philosophical and scientific works that form the basis of modern psychology. Classic concepts such as structuralism and functionalism will be considered as well as important schools of thought such as behaviorism, psychoanalysis, Gestalt, and cognitive. Prerequisites: Psychology 201, 207, 325. Credit, three hours. 430. INDIVIDUAL READING AND CONFERENCE (2:2:0) This course is designed to provide the student the opportunity for individual extensive reading in a selected topic under the guidance of a faculty member of the psychology department. Specific activities will include (a) reading as directed, and (b) conferring with the instructor on the reading completed. A written report is required. Admission by permission of the instructor and the department chairman. Prerequisites: Psychology 201, 207, 325. Credit, two hours. (May be repeated once for credit.) 432. INDEPENDENT STUDY (3:3:0) A course designed to provide the student the opportunity for laboratory or field based research in a selected area of psychology. Prerequisites: Junior level status and consent of the instructor. Credit, three hours. 435. PRACTICA IN APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY * The Practica in Applied Psychology provides students the opportunity to observe and practice the application of behavior science principles on-the-job. The student must take the responsibility for identifying a practicum opportunity. The instructor will then work out the details of the experience with the student and the on-site practicum supervisor. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all freshman and sophomore level courses in the psychology curriculum and written permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all freshman and sophomore level courses in the psychology curriculum including, 206, 303 or 411, and written permission of the instructor. Credit, three to nine hours. * Variable credit. 436. BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE (3:3:0) The application of principles derived from learning theory to individuals and groups. Special attention will be given to parenting, treatment of abnormal behavior, and the workplace. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. Credit, three hours.  

English Course Descriptions

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01-099. WRITING SKILLS / ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE. 3:3:0 This is a required course for all non-native speakers of English who make unsatisfactory scores on the English Placement Tests. Cross-listed with Foreign Languages. Credit: three hours (Non-degree). 01-100. WRITING SKILLS. 3:3:0 This course is a required course for all students who make unsatisfactory scores on the English placement tests. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic writing skills with a review of grammar and the mechanics of writing. Students are eligible to enroll in English 101 upon completion of the course. Credit: three hours (Non-degree). 01-101. ENGLISH COMPOSITION I. 3:3:0 This course is designed to develop skills and competence in writing prose compositions, reading, and listening. Problems in logical thought, organization of ideas, and comprehension in reading will receive special attention. (All students are required to earn a grade of "C" or better or they must repeat the course.) Prerequisite: Exemption from taking placements tests, a passing score on the English placement test or successful completion of English 100. Credit: three hours. 01-102. ENGLISH COMPOSITION II. 3:3:0 This course is a continuation of English 101. Emphasis will be placed on longer critical writing and the research paper. (All students are required to earn a grade of "C" or better or they must repeat the course.) Prerequisite: English 101. Credit: three hours. 01-105. BASIC STUDY OF LITERATURE. 3:3:0 This course is designed to help students develop an appreciation and understanding of literature. Attention is given to forms, styles, and ideas in selected works of poetry, drama, and short fiction. Students are also encouraged to write critically about literature. Prerequisite: English 101. Credit: three hours. Required of all English and English Education majors. 01-107. CREATIVE DRAMATICS. 3:3:0 This course is designed to aid teachers in the creative facets of learning. Emphasis is placed upon the use of the arts to improve the learning environment. Students take part in story-telling, story-dramatization, and pantomime. Credit: three hours. 01-109. ACTING I. 3:3:0 This course is a basic acting course designed to introduce the fundamental skills of performance. Course work includes exercises to develop physical and vocal freedom and performance of scenes and improvisations. Credit: three hours. 01-111. MOVEMENT AND NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION. 3:3:0 This course is designed to give intensive physical training to achieve strength and control of bodily movement, to explore basic mime techniques as they relate to non-verbal communication and to provide extensive work in theatre games to achieve physical and emotional freedom and stimulate a creative atmosphere. Credit: three hours. 01-113. INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE. 3:3:0 This course will provide the student with a general overview of theatre and its use and effect in the culture. The student will read from a general sampling of dramatic literature in its various forms including stage dramas, comedies, musicals, and other dramatic forms. Students will also be encouraged to attend and respond to campus and local productions. Credit: three hours. 01-200. SPEECH. 3:3:0 This course provides the student training in the fundamentals of diction and effective oral expression in prepared, extemporaneous and informative speeches. Emphasis placed upon preparation and delivery. Techniques of interviewing will be explored. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-201-202. WORLD LITERATURE I and II. 3:3:0 A broad cultural background is sought through a study of the literature and a consideration of the ideas expressed by the great men of letters from ancient Greece through the Renaissance (during the first semester) and from the Renaissance to the twentieth century (second semester). Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours each. 01-204. LINGUISTICS. 3:3:0 This is an introduction to the scientific study of language with emphasis on the application of modern linguistic science to the teaching of grammar and writing. Credit: three hours. 01-205. AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE I. 3:3:0 The aim of this course is to trace the beginning of African-American literature from the early plantation era to the modern phase which began with the Great Depression of the 1930's. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-206. AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE II. 3:3:0 This course traces African-American writings from the early 1930's, which saw a new concern for social equality between blacks and whites, to the present day. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-207. BLACK PROSE AND POETRY. 3:3:0 The imaginative literature in this course represents the three main genres: stories, plays, and poems by black writers, and includes a wide range of styles, techniques, and themes. To encourage concentrated study, critical essays by noted black critics are studied in depth. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-209. ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATIONS. 3:3:0 This course introduces students to the communication dynamics of an organization. Students discuss such topics as upward and downward communications, human relations, bargaining, and organizational culture. Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-210. INTRODUCTION TO FILM. 3:3:0 This course examines the art of film and introduces the students to the techniques and styles of representative film-makers. Special emphasis is placed on theories of film and methodology of film criticism as well as social, historic, and artistic relevance. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-211. CREATIVE WRITING. 3:3:0 This course examines the art of creative writing. Special attention will be given to the short story, poetry, and play writing. The student is encouraged to improve by constant comparison of his work with the best achievements in fiction and poetry. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-212. ORAL INTERPRETATION. 3:3:0 This course provides an analysis of prose and dramatic literature through experimentation with techniques used to interpret literature orally. Communication skills are developed through group and individual readings. Prerequisites: English 101, 102, and 200. Credit: three hours. 01-213. INTRODUCTION TO CHILDREN'S THEATRE. 3:3:0 This course covers play and audience analysis, directing methods, and production techniques such as design of sets, props, and costumes. Each student participates in the Fall children's theatre production at the college either by performing or doing technical production work. Credit: three hours. 01-214.THE BLACK AMERICAN NOVEL. 3:3:0 This course examines the origins, styles, themes, and literary techniques of Black novelists in America from 1800 to the present. Works will be studied in relation to the social, historical and political factors which influence them. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-217. BLACK DRAMA. 3:3:0 This course is a survey of the American Black playwrights' contribution to American drama. Plays are examined for their artistic, historic, and social significance. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-301-302. ENGLISH LITERATURE I and II. 3:3:0 This survey course is designed to increase the student's awareness of the significant trends in English literature, beginning with the Anglo- Saxon period. This course emphasizes the work of the major English writers in relation to the literary movements and ideas of their periods. Credit: three hours each. 01-303. ENGLISH LITERATURE IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 3:3:0 This course is a study of the Augustan Age with emphasis upon the reading of representative writers Defoe, Addison, Steele, Pope, Swift, and Dr. Johnson and his circle. Credit: three hours. 01-304. THE ROMANTIC PERIOD IN ENGLISH LITERATURE. 3:3:0 This course consists of readings in the prose and poetry of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, with some attention to critical reactions to their works and to a definition of Romanticism. Credit: three hours. 01-305. SHAKESPEARE. 3:3:0 The aim of this course is to impress upon the student the cultural, historical, and philosophical significance of the works of Shakespeare in relation to modern living. Representative plays from the several literary periods of Shakespeare are studied. Credit: three hours. 01-306-307. AMERICAN LITERATURE I and II. 3:3:0 Significant trends in American literary thought as reflected in the works of the major writers from the Colonial Period to the present are emphasized in this course. Credit: three hours each. 01-308. BRITISH AND AMERICAN DRAMA. 3:3:0 This course is a study of the major figures of British and American drama from the Age of Shakespeare to the twentieth century. Credit: three hours. 01-309. THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE. 3:3:0 This course is a survey of the literature of the English Renaissance, with special study of the major authors: Sidney, Spencer, Shakespeare, Johnson, and Donne. Credit: three hours. 01-311. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 3:3:0 Emphasis in this course is placed upon extensive practice in effective writing of prose composition. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit, three hours. 01-313. PLAY PRODUCTION. 3:3:0 Areas covered in this course include a general introduction to directing, staging, lighting, costuming, makeup, and other aspects of educational and recreational drama. Credit: three hours. 01-314. MODERN DRAMA. 3:3:0 This course examines the major playwrights of the twentieth century from Ibsen to Beckett, and traces the development of modern drama. Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-316. AMERICAN LITERATURE OF AFRO-AMERICAN LIFE. 3:3:0 An examination of the Black American's role in American literature (a) as a creator of the white writer's imagination, (b) as a creator of literature, and (c) as a critical observer of the literary scene. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-317. SEMINAR IN GREEK TRAGEDY. 3:3:0 This course examines the major works of the three great Greek tragedians: Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Works are analyzed in relation to the major social, religious, and political thrusts of the 5th century, B.C. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit, three hours. 01-319. MODERN NOVEL. 3:3:0 This course examines the novel as a genre and explores the development of the novel from James to Pyncheon. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-320. PLAY PRODUCTION II. 3:3:0 Play Production II is an extension of Play Production I. Areas covered in this course include a general introduction to directing, staging, lighting, costuming, makeup, and other aspects of educational and aesthetic drama. All students work, in one of many capacities, with the executing of a major college stage production. Prerequisite: English 313. Credit: three hours. 01-321. SEMINAR IN HUGHES, WRIGHT, AND BALDWIN. 3:3:0 This course examines the major works of these three great Black writers. Close attention is given to their individual styles and techniques. Works are also studied in relation to the social and historical forces which influenced them. Prerequisite: English 101, 102, 201, 202, 205, and 206. Credit: three hours. 01-322. DIRECTING I. 3:3:0 This course will give an overview of the background and techniques of the director in the theatre. Emphasis will be placed on the study of composition, scene analysis, movement, picturization, and rhythm from a director's viewpoint. The course will culminate in a public performance and a video tape project. Prerequisites: English 107, or 109. Credit: three hours. 01-323. THEATRE CRITICISM. 3:3:0 This course will examine the basic principles of the theatre criticism, survey the modern theories of theatre criticism, and investigate methods of evaluating theatre criticism. Trips to area productions and frequent practice in writing critiques will be a major focus of the course. Prerequisites: English 101, 102, 201-202 or 205-206, and 311. Credit: three hours. 01-324. PLAYWRITING. 3:3:0 This course is devoted to the analysis and writing of short plays for the stage. Students are required to write a series of exercise works focusing on basic playwriting techniques: use of action, plot, dialogue, characterization, setting, pantomime, and metaphor. The course will include reading assignments in dramatic literature parallel to techniques of each writing assignment and the reading aloud of students' works in laboratory sessions for discussion. Prerequisites: English 101, 102, 201-202 or 205-206. Credit: three hours. 01-325. HISTORY OF THE THEATRE I. 3:3:0 This course emphasizes theatre structure, production techniques, individual artists, and movements in the development of theatre from the early cultural rituals to the 1700's in Europe, America, and the Orient. Prerequisites: English 101, 102, 201-202 or 205-206. Credit: three hours. 01-326. HISTORY OF THE THEATRE II. 3:3:0 This course emphasizes theatre structure, production techniques, individual artists, and movements from the 1700's to the present in Europe, America, and the Orient. Prerequisite: English 325. Credit: three hours. 01-327. INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS. 3:3:0 This course examines the use of verbal and nonverbal transactions to create, maintain, and change person-to-person relationships. Discussions, role playing, models, and simulations will be used in instruction. Prerequisites: English 101, 102, and 200. Credit: three hours. 01-328. INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH PATHOLOGY. 3:3:0 This course examines the nature, etiology, and assessment of disorders of speech and language, including articulation, stuttering, voice, cleft palate, and childhood and adult aphasia. Prerequisites: English 101, 102, and 200, 36-201. Credit: three hours. 01-329. ADOLESCENT LITERATURE. 3:3:0 This is an interactive adolescent literature course designed to provide perspective teachers an overview of various genres, cultural perspectives, and universal themes in an age and developmentally appropriate context. Principles of selection, use and evaluation are explored. Projects focus on the design and presentation of literary concepts suitable for classroom instruction. Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. Credit: three hours. 01-330. FORENSICS. 3:3:0 This course explores methods of debate, including techniques of formal and informal argument, analysis of propositions, strategies of persuasion, and preparation of briefs. Prerequisites: English 101, 102, and 200. Credit: three hours. 01-400. TEACHING GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION. 3:3:0 In this course the student learns how to teach basic English skills (grammar and mechanics) as well as composition skills by observing, evaluating, and assisting the instructor in an English 100 or English 101 class (two hours of class work, one hour of conference with instructor per week). Prerequisites: Junior standing and consent of department. Credit: three hours. 01-401. VICTORIAN LITERATURE. 3:3:0 The aim of this course is to present selected readings of the major poets of the period; Tennyson, Browning, Rosetti, and their contemporaries against the background of Victorian thought. Credit: three hours. 01-402. CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE. 3:3:0 This course is a study of British and American writers of fiction and poetry since 1900, with emphasis on the main currents of thought in the twentieth century. Credit: three hours. 01-403. SENIOR SEMINAR. 3:3:0 The seminar embraces a correlation of the content of the various courses by review of periods, literary trends, and significant authors of English, American, and continental literature. Credit: three hours. 01-404. TEACHING ENGLISH IN THE HIGH SCHOOL. 3:3:0 This course is designed to promote effective and knowledgeable teaching of composition and literature in the high school. This course covers the content to be taught, the insights needed by the teacher, and various methods recommended in teaching the subject. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. Credit: three hours. 01-450. INTERNSHIP. 6:3:18 This course will provide a highly supervised program designed to give students first-hand knowledge and hands-on experience in the discipline. Prerequisites: Senior status and consent of the department. Credit: 3-12 hours.
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College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

English and Foreign Languages Department

Bachelor's Programs
English
English or Theatre Arts Minor
 

 

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in English

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  Effective:  Fall 2009    Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr ENGL-191 University Seminar I 1 ENGL-105 Basic Study of Literature 3 ENGL-101 English Composition I 3 ENGL-102 English Composition II 3 HIST-xxx American History 3 xx-xxx Social Science Elective 3 MTSC-101 Survey of Mathematics I 3 MTSC-102 Survey of Mathematics II 3 xx-xxx Natural Science 3 xx-xxx Natural Science 3 xx-xxx Arts/Humanities Elective 3 MVSC-100 Wellness 2       ENGL-192 University Seminar II 1   Total Credits 16   Total Credits 18 Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr ENGL-200 Speech 3 ENGL-204 Linguistics 3 ENGL-301 English Literature I 3 ENGL-302 English Literature II 3 xx-xxx Foreign Language 101 3 xx-xxx Foreign Language 102 3 ENGL-201 / 205 World / African-American Literature I 3 ENGL-202 / 206 World / African-American Literature II 3 PSYC-201 Intro.  to General  Psychology 3 ENGL-xxx English Elective 3 xx-xxx Arts/Humanities Elective 3         Total Credits 18   Total Credits 15 Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr ENGL-311► Advanced Composition 3 ENGL-305 Shakespeare 3 ENGL-306 American Literature I 3 ENGL-307 American Literature II 3 ENGL-xxx English Elective 3 ENGL-xxx English Electives 6 xx-xxx Foreign Language 201 3 xx-xxx Foreign Language 202 3 GLOB-395 Global Societies 3         Total Credits 15   Total Credits 15 Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr ENGL-402 Contemporary Literature 3 ENGL-403 *Senior Seminar 3 ENGL-xxx English Elective 3 xx-xxx Electives (Free) 9 xx-xxx Electives (Free) 6                                                         Total Credits 12   Total Credits 12   *SENIOR CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE ►Writing Intensive Course   TOTAL CREDITS: 121    

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Music Education

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    First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 06-1XX Major Applied Instrument 1 06-107 or 115 Chorus or Marching Band 1 06-113 Music Theory I and Ear Training I 3 06-120 Piano Class I 1 06-126 or 06-128 Woodwinds or Brasses 1 06-191 University Seminar I 1 25-101 Survey of Mathematics I 3 XX-XXX Humanities Elective (Introduction to Music is highly recommended) 3     17 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 01-200 Speech 3 06-1XX Major Applied Instrument 1 06-108 or 116 Chorus or Concert Band 1 06-114 Music Theory II and Ear Training II 3 06-121 Piano Class II 1 06-192 University Seminar II 1 25-102 Survey of Mathematics II 3   Required to take PPST/PRAXIS 16 Second Year First Semester     01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 06-130 or 06-132 Strings or Percussion 1 06-2XX Major Applied Instrument 1 06-207 or 215 Chorus or Marching Band 1 06-213 Music Theory III and Ear Training III 3 06-323 Music History and Literature I 2 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3 36-201 Introduction to General Psychology 3     17 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 06-2XX Major Applied Instrument 1 06-208 or 216 Chorus or Concert Band 1 06-214 Music Theory IV and Ear Training IV 3 12-204 Philosophical Foundations of Education 3 12-313 Introduction to Education of Exceptional Children 3 36-204 or 36-316 Educational Psychology or Developmental Psychology I 3     17   Required to pass PPST/PRAXIS Admission to Teacher Education Program   Third Year First Semester     06-3XX Major Applied Instrument 1 06-301 Elementary General and Vocal Music Methods (K-8) 3 06-307 or 315 Chorus or Marching Band 1 06-309 or 06-310 Vocal Conducting or Instrumental Conducting 2 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3 XX-XXX Natural Science Elective 3     15 Second Semester     06-3XX Major Applied Instrument 1 06-302 Secondary General and Vocal Music Methods (7-12) 3 06-308 or 316 Chorus or Concert Band 1 12-318 or 31-395 Multicultural Education or Global Societies 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3 XX-XXX Natural Science Elective 3     14 Fourth Year First Semester     06-4XX Major Applied and Senior Recital 1 06-407 or 415 Chorus or Marching Band 1 06-4XX Major Applied Instrument & Senior Recital (Senior Capstone) 1 12-302 Reading in the Content Areas 3 12-357 Effective Teaching Skills and Classroom Management 3 12-416 Analysis of Student Teaching 1 XX-XXX Free Elective 3     13 Second Semester     12-400 Preservice / Student Teaching (Senior Capstone) 12     12   Total credits 121  

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Studio Art

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B.A. DEGREE IN STUDIO ART Effective Fall 2010 Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr ART103 Intro to Drawing (f)   3   ART108 Surv of MacIntosh (v)   3   ART191 Univ. Seminar I (f)   1   ART104 2 D-Design (so)   3   ENGL101 English Comp I   3   ART192 Univ. Sem II (so)   1   MTSC101 Survey of Math I   3   ENGL102 English Comp II   3   SPSC100 Lifetime Fitness   2   MTSC 102 Survey of Math II   3   xx-xxx Art/Human. Elective   3   xx-xxx Business Elective   3     Total Credits 15     Total Credits 16   Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr ART205 Intermediate Drawing (f)   3   ART304 Intro to Painting (I) (s)   3   ART206 3-D Design (f)   3   ART301 Sculpture I (s)   3   ART207 or 208 Computer Graphics (v)   3   xx-xxx Elective   3   xx-xxx Natural Sci Elective   3   ENGL 200 Speech     3   xx-xxx Foreign Language I   3   HIST2xx American History   3   ENGL201 or 205 World Lit I or Afro-Amer Lit I   3     201,202,203 or 204                           Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr ART308 Life Drawing (f)   3   ART307 Watercolor Painting (II) (s)   3   ART302 Ceramics (f)   3   ART318 Art History II (s)   3   ART317 Art History I (f)   3   ART325 Photography (s)   3   HIST395 Global Societies   3   ART333 Printmaking (s)   3   xx-xxx Social Science   3   xx-xxx Elective   3                                             Total Credits 15     Total Credits 15   Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr Course Course Name Sem Cr Gr ART315 or 316 African Am. Art or Modern Art History (v)   3   ART450 Senior Exp Art (Capstone Exper.) (v)   9   ART408 Adv Painting (III) (f)   3   ARTxxx Elective or Adv Comp Graphics (v)   3   ART-xxx Selected Topics in Art   3             xx-xxx Elective   3             xx-xxx Elective   3                                   Total Credits 15     Total Credits 12                               Credits  <  121 >      ** Senior Capstone           SO  –  Spring Only  *Writing Intensive      FO  –  Fall Only    B   –    Both Sem.    V  –    Variable

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Art Education

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Effective Fall 2010 Freshman Fall Semester Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr ART103 Intro to Drawing (fo) 3 UNIV191 Univ. Seminar I (fo) # 1 ENGL101 *English Comp I 3 MATH101 Survey of Math I 3 EDUC204 *Phil Foundation of Edu 3 ART201 *Art Educ Theory (fo) # 3 Total Credits 16 Course Course Name Cr ART108 Surv of MacIntosh (B) 3 ART104 2 D-Design (so) 1 ART192 Univ. Sem II (so) # 3 ENGL102 English Comp II 3 MATH102 Survey of Math II 3 PSYC201 Intro to Psychology 3 Total Credits 16 Sophomore Fall Semester Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr ART205 Intermediate Drawing (fo) 3 ART206 3-D Design (fo) 3 ENGL200 Speech 3 xx-xxx Natural Sci Elective 3 xx-xxx Foreign Language I 3 ENGL201/205 World Lit I/Afro-Amer. Lit I 3 Total Credits 18 Course Course Name Cr ART304 Intro to Painting (I) (so) 3 ART301 Sculpture I (so) 3 SPSC100 Lifetime Fitness 2 EDUC318 Multicult. Educ/global societies 3 xx-xxx Foreign Language II 3 PSYC316 Dev Psychology I 3 Total Credits 17 Junior Fall Semester Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr ART308 Life Drawing (fo) 3 ART302 Ceramics (fo) 3 ART317 Art History I (fo) * 3 ART341 Meth & Matls Sec. Art (fo) **# 3 HIST34-2xx History 3 Total Credits 15 Course Course Name Cr ART307 Watercolor Painting (II) (so) 3 ART318 Art History II (so) * 3 ART333 Photography (so) 3 ART333 Printmaking (so) 3 ART-342 Meth & Matls Sec. Art (so) **# 3 Total Credits 15 Senior Fall Semester Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr ART340 Art for Spec Educ (fo) * 3 ART408 Adv Painting (III) (fo) 3 EDUC302 Reading Content Area (B) 3 EDUC357 Effective Teaching (B) 4 EDUC416 Analysis of Student 1 Total Credits 14 Course Course Name Cr ART307 Seminar Art Ed ** (B 1 ART318 Student Teach in Art (B) * ** 12 Total Credits 13 ** - Senior Capstone (05-410 & 12-400) * - Writing Intensive # - Student must apply and be accepted into TEP prior to taking 7th sem. Ed. Classes so - Spring Only fo - Fall Only B - Both Semester V -   Variable

Arts course descriptions

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  The Bachelor of Arts Degree Tracks in Art: The department offers career tracks in Art Education, General Art and Arts Management Art and Art Education    Art-101. INTRODUCTION TO ART                                                                                                            3:3:0 A survey of history from prehistoric times to the present, the course offers an introduction to analysis and evaluation of the visual arts, with emphasis on the relationship of end product to design, technique, and cultural background.  The main purpose of the course is to gain appreciation for all art forms.  Lectures are presented with the use of slides/PowerPoint and other visual aids. Credit, three hours.   Art-103. INTRODUCTION TO DRAWING                                                                                    3:3:3 This is a basic drawing and composition course.  The exploration of a variety of techniques, tools, and media used in drawing.  Studies include problems in composition, line, perspective, volume, and value.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-104. TWO-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN (2D-DESIGN)                                                                        3:3:3 An introduction to the fundamental elements and principles of design and composition through studies promoting understanding and application of these concepts.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-108. SURVEY OF MACINTOSH STUDIO                                                                                          3:4:0 The course introduces basic computer literacy skills, principles, and specific applications that are related to computer graphics and multimedia applications to students who never used computers in the arts.  There will be an introduction to the World Wide Web.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-191. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR I-ART                                                                                   1:2:0 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success.  Academic skills will be developed.  These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the internet, and word processing.  Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed.  Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals.  Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution, and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. Credit, one hour.   Art-192. UNIVERSITY SEMINAR II- ART                                                                                                1:1:0 University Seminar is a two-semester, General Education course sequence designed to provide students with the essentials for a smooth transition to college life and academic success.  Academic skills will be developed.  These skills include critical reading, thinking, listening, writing, speaking, and using the library, the internet, and word processing.  Values clarification, coping with peer pressures, and the impact of a healthy lifestyle will be addressed.  Opportunities will be provided for self-evaluation and growth in basic learning strategies as well as personal and career goals.  Knowing the history of the University, feeling connected to the institution, and sharing a common educational experience with other freshmen are important goals of this course. Credit, one hour.   Art-201. ART EDUCATION:  THEORY AND PRACTICE                                                    3:3:0 The course is designed to introduce elementary and art education majors to theories and practices of art education as they investigate contemporary trends in teaching art.  Course content focuses on the four (4) components of Discipline Based Art Education (DBAE):  art history, aesthetics, criticism, and production, while utilizing a holistic model that reflects state and national standards, and the use of art as a vehicle for self-expression.  Course content will also explore the growth and development of children as revealed in their art, and the integration of art into Social Science, Mathematics, Science, and Language Art curriculum.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-205. INTERMEDIATE DRAWING                                                                                                       3:3:3 The course is geared to increase students’ technical, critical, and historical knowledge as it pertains to various drawing media.  Students will be able to study multiple problems that range from basic working fundamentals and methods to complex pictorial organization and imaginative perception of objects, scenes, and mark making as a conveyor of feeling, sensation, and personal ideas.  The emphasis will be on art studio production, but will be balanced with critical dialogue lectures on techniques, historical references, and student research.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, 05-104, or consent of the Instructor.   Art-206. THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN (3D-DESIGN)                                                    3:3:3 Geared to introduce the student to studio work in three-dimensional design, basic spatial concepts, and creation of expression with attention to form, space arrangement, movement, proportion, unity, and contrast.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-207. COMPUTER GRAPHICS                                                                                                               3:3:3 Graphic Design and Typography continues to develop design concepts with an emphasis on layout and design on the Macintosh computer.  Type styles and design, pre-press color theory, and visual communication are stressed.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-208. COMPUTER IMAGING                                                                                                 3:3:3 The course treats the Macintosh computer as a fine arts tool.  Emphasis is placed on creating aesthetically pleasing works of art.  Students will create new images using drawing and painting software and will be able to manipulate existing photographs using a color scanner and image processing software.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, 05-104, 05-108, or consent of the Instructor. Credit, three hours.   Art-209. DRAWING AND PAINTING FOR NON-MAJORS                                                  3:3:3 Drawing and Painting for non-majors offers an introduction to basic studio art practices and art appreciation.  Students will have the opportunity to acquire technical artistic skills, and the chance to explore various materials and methods for drawing and painting.  Students will be encouraged to develop basic techniques of representational drawing and painting.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-229. ARTS MANAGEMENT SEMINAR                                                                                              3:3:0 This seminar is designed to introduce students to careers and opportunities in the arts management field.  Students will research current trends in arts administration and explore the diversity of career opportunities.  Students will have the opportunity to connect with a community arts organization and to develop a model project that portrays an understanding of organizational and programmatic development. Credit, three hours.   Art-300. FIBERS                                                                                                                                                3:3:3 Studio experience in fiber art forms including weaving, macramé, fiber sculpture, various loom and off-loom procedures, warp design, basic weaves and knots, and designing woven textiles.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-301. SCULPTURE I                                                                                                                                   3:3:3 Emphasis is placed on manipulation of media in sculpture design utilizing clay, plaster, wood, and other materials.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  Consent of the Instructor for non-Art majors. Credit, three hours.   Art-302. CERAMICS I                                                                                                                                      3:3:3 Hand-building techniques are covered with an introduction to the potter's wheel and other ceramics techniques including firing and glaze making.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  Consent of the Instructor for non-Art majors. Credit, three hours.   Art-303. JEWELRY DESIGN                                                                                                                        3:3:3 An introduction to basic jewelry techniques including the lost wax process.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, 05-104, 05-206, or consent of the Instructor for non-Art majors. Credit, three hours.   Art-304. INTRODUCTION TO PAINTING                                                                                                3:3:3 Introduces students to basic painting techniques and problems through the exploration of color mixture, form, content, and pictorial depth in a variety of media.  Emphasis on proper archival techniques, canvas, paper choices, and stretcher building will be included.  Historical and contemporary approaches to painting will be studied through hands-on studio demonstrations followed by concentrated student projects.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  Consent of the Instructor for non-Art majors. Credit, three hours.   Art-307. WATERCOLOR (PAINTING II)                                                                                  3:3:3 Introduces various methods of handling watercolor.  Experimentation with techniques, development of skills, discussion of methods, and styles of watercolorists will be explored.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, 05-104, 05-304, or consent of the Instructor. Credit, three hours.   Art-308. LIFE DRAWING                                                                                                                               3:3:3 Designed to help the student develop ability in drawing from life.  The course includes the drawing of the human figure and the development of an understanding of the structure of the human anatomy.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, or consent of the Instructor. Credit, three hours.   Art-315. MODERN ART                                                                                                                                  3:3:0 The development of the visual arts from the First World War to present day.  Emphasis will be on the many styles and objectives of contemporary artists and their antecedents. Credit, three hours.   Art-316. AFRICAN-AMERICAN ART HISTORY/MODERN                                                                3:3:0 Primarily concerned with the history of African-American art in the United States, the course also investigates the survival of African forms in the Caribbean and in South America.  Although the emphasis is on art history, the styles and objectives of modern artists and their antecedents, the course is interdisciplinary and draws upon visual and literary examples of an African legacy in American life.  Museum visits and an independent research and/or studio projects supplement slide lectures, video, and class discussion. Credit, three hours.   Art-317. ART HISTORY I                                                                                                                               3:3:0 A study of the development of visual art forms with an emphasis on drawing, printmaking, pottery, painting, sculpture, architecture, crafts, and the preservation of art.  The content area of study will include Prehistoric art up through the Gothic Period of art within Western Civilization.  Students will know and be able to recognize the differences between the following aspects of art:  the illustrative, the decorative, and the expressive. Credit, three hours.     Art-318. ART HISTORY II                                                                                                                             3:3:0 A study of humanism from the Proto-Renaissance up to the birth of the Modern Art Movement.  Students will examine the development of visual art forms with an emphasis on drawing, printmaking, painting, sculpture, architecture, crafts, and the preservation of art.  The content area of study will include the role of religion, politics, and societal change and its affect on art.  Students will know and be able to recognize the differences between the following aspects of art:  the illustrative, the decorative, and the expressive. Credit, three hours.   Art-320. AESTHETIC ISSUES IN ART EDUCATION                                                                            3:3:0 An introduction to a variety of cultural institutions and their aesthetics and criticism with an emphasis on their relationships to the artist and the viewer. Credit, three hours.   Art-325. PHOTOGRAPHY                                                                                                                             3:4:3 Photography 325 is a course that is designed to give the student an introduction to the 35mm camera and the darkroom and deals primarily with black and white photography techniques.  Previous photographic knowledge is helpful but not necessary to successfully complete the course.  Both aesthetic and technical concepts are introduced and developed from the most elementary level.  A variety of assignments are provided to challenge the student.  The production of high quality prints is stressed.  A 35-mm. camera with manual capabilities is required.  Limited enrollment restrictions apply due to the necessary provision of facilities and equipment needed for each student.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  Consent of the Instructor for non-Art majors. Credit, three hours.   Art-329. UNIVERSITY GALLERY INTERNSHIP                                                                   3:3:0 The course is designed to provide practical experience to Arts Management students in the business of running an art gallery.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-229. Credit, three hours.   Art-333. PRINTMAKING                                                                                                                                3:3:3 The course will introduce students to various fine arts methods of printmaking.  Mono-print, relief, intaglio, and serigraph processes will be explored.  Painterly and photographic approaches to creating designs suitable for printing methods will be encouraged.  Once approaches to basic media have been introduced, students will be guided to combine processes in a contemporary manner.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, 05-104, or consent of the Instructor for non-Art majors. Credit, three hours.   Art-340. ART FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION                                                                                              3:3:0 The course is designed to deal with the teaching of the exceptional children and those children with disabilities.  Educational processes and methods will be provided to augment the growth and development of the child's behavior through an integrated arts approach.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-341. METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR ELEMENTARY ART TEACHERS                        3:3:0 The course is designed to give prospective elementary art teachers current methods and practices in art education through discussions, readings, classroom observations, field trips, and visual media.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-342. METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR SECONDARY ART TEACHERS                            3:3:0 The course is designed to give prospective secondary art teachers current methods and practices in art education through discussions, readings, classroom observations, field trips, and visual media.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.     Art-408. ADVANCED PAINTING (PAINTING III)                                                                  3:3:3 Emphasizes oil painting, acrylic painting, and newer media.  The course will give further experience in painting as a means of expression.  Students will focus on a series of related works in relationship to concept, technique, and media.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, 05-104, 05-304, or consent of the Instructor for non-Art majors. Credit, three hours.   Art-410. SEMINAR IN ART EDUCATION                                                                                 1:2:0 The course will enable students to discuss situations and problems encountered in their student teaching in the context of current concepts and philosophy in Art Education.  Should be taken concurrently with 12-400. Credit, one hour.   Art-411. SCULPTURE II                                                                                                                 3:3:3 Designed to offer extensive use of building methods and some metal techniques.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, 05-104, 05-206, 05-302. Credit, three hours.   Art-412. CERAMICS II                                                                                                                                    3:3:3 This is a laboratory course with lecture.  Hand-building techniques are covered with an in-depth exploration of the potter’s wheel and other ceramics techniques including firing, and glaze making and application.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-103, 05-104, 05-206, 05-301. Credit, three hours.   Art-414. ADVANCED COMPUTER IMAGING                                                                                        3:3:3 Assignments will be individualized with the consent of the Instructor in the first half of the course.  Emphasis will be placed on collage and digital painting techniques, aesthetic development, color correction for multiple output options, complex masking and compositing, and acquiring control over the subtle application of special effects filters.  The second half of the course will introduce students to three-dimensional applications and/or time based media.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.   Art-425. ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY                                                                                                    3:4:3 Designed to give the students an opportunity to continue their work in black and white photographic techniques and to develop advanced camera skills.  Part of the course will involve the use of the computer for enhancing the photograph and the use of mixed media combined with the photographic image.  (Lab Fee) Prerequisites:  05-325. Credit, three hours.   Art-429. COMMUNITY ARTS INTERNSHIP                                                                                           12:0:12 This capstone course is designed to introduce arts management students to the business of art through a practicum experience within a community arts setting.  Students will be assigned to an arts organization for a semester field experience. Credit, twelve hours.   Art-445. INDEPENDENT STUDY                                                                                                 3:3:0 445A (Ceramics), 445B (Painting), 445C (Watercolor), 445D (Photography), 445E (Drawing), 445F (Sculpture), 445G (Graphics), 445H (Art History), 445I (Printmaking).  The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.     Art-445A. INDEPENDENT STUDY – CERAMICS                                                                  3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.      Art-445B. INDEPENDENT STUDY – PAINTING                                                                                    3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.   Art-445C. INDEPENDENT STUDY – WATERCOLOR                                                                         3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.   Art-445D. INDEPENDENT STUDY – PHOTOGRAPHY                                                                       3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.   Art-445E. INDEPENDENT STUDY – DRAWING                                                                                    3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.   Art-445F. INDEPENDENT STUDY – SCULPTURE                                                                                3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.   Art-445G. INDEPENDENT STUDY – GRAPHICS                                                                   3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.   Art-445H. INDEPENDENT STUDY – ART HISTORY                                                                           3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.   Art-445I. INDEPENDENT STUDY – PRINTMAKING                                                                           3:3:0 The course is designed to allow the qualified advanced art major to pursue, in-depth, a selected area of interest in Art or Art Education under the guidance of an Art faculty member. Prerequisites:  Consent of the related faculty member & Chair.  Junior or Senior status (or special students). Credit, three hours.   Art-450. SENIOR EXPERIENCE IN ART                                                                                  9:9:0 The senior experience is divided into three (3) parts:  1) a senior thesis, 2) an individual show 3) and a professional portfolio.  The course is required of all Studio Art majors.  The course is taken and completed during the last semester of the Senior year.  (Lab Fee) Credit, nine hours.   Art-460. SELECTED TOPICS IN ART EDUCATION                                                                            3:3:0 This course is a continued in-depth independent study by the qualified advanced art major or minor (or under certain circumstances, a special student) that wishes to pursue a specific interest in art, based on the topic chosen.  Each student will coordinate specific goals and requirements with his or her professor.  Prerequisites:  Consent of Instructor and Chair. Credit, three hours.   Art-461. SELECTED TOPICS IN ART HISTORY                                                                   3:3:0 The course is a continued in-depth independent study by the qualified advanced art major or minor (or under certain circumstances, a special student) that wishes to pursue a specific interest in art, based on the topic chosen.  Each student will coordinate specific goals and requirements with his or her professor.  Prerequisites:  Consent of Instructor and Chair. Credit, three hours.   Art-462. SELECTED TOPICS IN STUDIO ARTS                                                                                    3:3:3 The course is a continued in-depth independent study by the qualified advanced art major or minor (or under certain circumstances, a special student) that wishes to pursue a specific interest in art, based on the topic chosen.  Each student will coordinate specific goals and requirements with his or her professor.  Prerequisites:  Consent of Instructor and Chair.  (Lab Fee) Credit, three hours.     Art-463. SELECTED TOPICS IN ART THEORY                                                                                    3:3:0 The course is a continued in-depth independent study by the qualified advanced art major or minor (or under certain circumstances, a special student) that wishes to pursue a specific interest in art, based on the topic chosen.  Each student will coordinate specific goals and requirements with his or her professor.  Prerequisites:  Consent of Instructor and Chair. Credit, three hours.   Art-464. SELECTED TOPICS IN ARTS MANAGEMENT                                                    3:3:0 The course is a continued in-depth independent study by the qualified advanced art major or minor (or under certain circumstances, a special student) that wishes to pursue a specific interest in art, based on the topic chosen.  Each student will coordinate specific goals and requirements with his or her professor.  Prerequisites:  Consent of Instructor and Chair. Credit, three hours.   Art-495. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION                                                                                                    3-9:3:0 Cooperative Education allows students to combine academic study with on-the-job experience by working on paid training assignments coordinated by the Department.  The major objective of cooperative education is the application of classroom theory to a work environment. Prerequisites:  Consent of the Instructor & chair.  

Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice

Description: 

Delaware State University
Department of  Sociology & Criminal Justice
Delaware Hall
Room 122
302.857.6670
302.857.7774

Dr. Dorothy Dillard, Chairperson, Associate Professor

 

 

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Our Mission The Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice is committed to the principles of a liberal education and to assisting its students to think sociologically in order to better understand human behavior.  The Department’s curricula are designed to not only prepare students for careers and graduate studies in Sociology and Criminal Justice, but also to equip them with a far-reaching view of the world consistent with the goals of a liberal arts education and to prepare them to recognize the social institutions and patterns upon which everyday life rests.  The mission of the Department is intricately tied to the mission of the University which recognizes the richness in multiculturalism and cultural diversity.  In this regard, an important part of the Department’s mission is to educate students for world citizenship.  This requires knowledge that values the multitude of cultures in society, a critical understanding of multicultural perspectives and experiences, and the emerging interdependencies among members of the now global community.  Central to the Department’s mission is fostering in our students critical and analytical thinking skills, research capabilities necessary to systematically explore the complex interconnectedness among people and their social world, and to engage in life-long learning.  The Department places heavy emphasis on application of the principles of sociology and criminal justice, encouraging students to demonstrate an awareness of social inequalities and a commitment to social justice.  In this context, the Department seeks to provide an enabling environment within which students are provided with the knowledge and skills through coursework, real-life experiences, and through internships that empower them to create a more just society.   The Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice is committed to the principles of a liberal education and to assisting its students to think sociologically in order to better understand human society and human behavior.  The department’s curricula are designed to not only prepare students for careers and graduate studies in sociology and criminal justice, but also to equip them with a far-­reaching view of the world consistent with the goals of a liberal arts education and to prepare them to recognize the social institutions and patterns upon which everyday life rests. Our Degrees Offered The Department offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminal Justice. The Sociology major provides a comprehensive grounding in the academic discipline of Sociology, its theories, methods, and findings. The Criminal Justice major provides a comprehensive grounding in the discipline of criminology, as well as analysis of the multitude of social factors and institutions that impact the criminal justice system. The Department also offers a minor in Sociology and a minor in Criminal Justice. Click on following links for curriculums: Criminal Justice Curriculum Sociology Curriculum Department of Sociology & Criminal Justice Brochure Course Descriptions   Why Choose a Degree in Sociology Sociology graduates have successful careers in such diverse occupations as non-profit business consultation, healthcare, gerontology, risk management and insurance fund-raising and advocacy groups, international relations, state and federal government agency administration, urban and community planning, military officer, career management, evaluation research, seminar and workshop consultations, public opinion polling, market research and employee relations.  To graduate with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology, a student must complete at least 121 credit hours of coursework. Coursework includes general education courses, as well as a wide range of Sociology courses.  Sociology majors must complete an internship in their junior or senior year.  Sociology majors are encouraged to complete a minor and/or develop a specific area of interest, such as law studies, woman and gender issues or health promotion.  A minimum grade of “C” is required in most Sociology courses. Minor in Sociology To graduate with a minor in Sociology, a student must complete 18 credit hours of coursework.  Required courses are:  Introduction to Sociology, Social Institutions, Social Psychology, Methods of Research in Sociology, Sociological Theories and an elective course in Sociology at the 300 or 400 level. Sociology and Criminal Justice Minor Curriculum   Why Choose a Degree in Criminal Justice Criminal Justice careers may entail law enforcement, probation and corrections, legal research, or homeland security. Preparation for professional and graduate schools includes law school or advanced degrees in Sociology. Today,  a variety of  master’s and doctoral programs are offered in criminal justice, criminology, gender studies, urban sociology, and applied sociology across the country and around the globe. To graduate with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Criminal Justice, a student must complete at least 121 credit hours of coursework.  Coursework includes general education courses as well as Criminal Justice courses and an internship.  A minimum grade of “C” is required in most Criminal Justice courses.  Minor in Criminal Justice To graduate with a minor in Criminal Justice, a student must complete 18 credit hours of coursework.  Required courses are: Intro to Criminal Justice, Criminology, Law Enforcement, Courts & Criminal Justice, Methods of Research in Criminal Justice and an elective course in Criminal Justice at the 300 or 400 level. Sociology and Criminal Justice Minor Curriculum   Internships Both curricula in the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice require that students complete an internship.  Internships are designed to enable students to apply classroom knowledge in the professional work setting.  They are a central component to preparing for the professional job market, building professional credentials and networking. Completion of an internship is a requirement for graduation.  Internship Form DSU Sociology and Criminal Justice majors have completed internships in a wide variety of agencies, including but not limited to: Interpol, Washington, DC Washington, DC, Pretrial Services Delaware Department of Correction State Congressional Offices Delaware State University Police State Police (Delaware and other states) Division of Family Services Private Law Offices Attorney General’s Office Probation and Parole (Delaware and other states) Administrative Office of the Courts (Delaware and other states) Delaware State Bureau of Investigation Public Defender’s Office(Delaware and other states) Juvenile Detention Centers  (Delaware and other states)   Clubs & Organization The CJ Club   The Criminal Justice Club is formed and led by students.  As a student enrichment organization, it promotes awareness of life after college by hosting guest speakers and social activities that allow for informal interaction among students, faculty and professionals.  CJ Club activities include field trips, guest speakers, mock interviews, fundraising strategies and discussions regarding the Criminal Justice field. The Criminal Justice Club has taken trips to such places as: The Federal Bureau of Investigation, Delaware Correctional Center, Baylor Correctional Institution for Women and The Ferris School. NOBLE (National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives) The mission of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE) is to ensure equity in the administration of justice in the provision of public service to all communities and to serve as the conscience of law enforcement by being committed to justice by action. The vision/goal of NOBLE is to be recognized as a highly competent, public service organization that is at the forefront of providing solutions to law enforcement issues and concerns, as well as to the ever-changing needs of our communities. DSU hosts the only college chapter of NOBLE.  NOBLE not only allows students to interact with professionals, but it also has a Mentoring Program that allows students to shadow a professional, and it provides students with opportunities to network and secure internships. Students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 to participate. Students interested in NOBLE must complete and submit an application to the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice. DSU NOBLE Club Ongoing Fundraiser
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Faculty


Dr. Dorothy Dillard
Chairperson/Associate Professor
Delaware Hall – Room 122
302.857.7510
302.857.7774 (fax)

ddillard@desu.edu

Areas of Expertise

  • Social Policy Analysis
  • Minority Overrepresentation in Criminal and Juvenile Systems
  • Program  Evaluation
  • Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Dr. Lee Streetman
Professor

Delaware Hall – Room 112
302.857.6678
lstreetman@desu.edu

Teaching and Research Interest

  • Introduction to Sociology
  • Criminology
  • Juvenile Delinquency
  • Criminal Law
  • Courts and Criminal Justice

Dr. Kylie Parrotta
Associate Professor
Delaware Hall – Room 118
302.857.7694

kparrotta@desu.edu

Teaching and Research Interest

  • Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality
  • Social Psychology
  • Subcultural Deviance
  • Sentencing Disparity
  • Work-Family-Leisure Balance
  • Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Dr. Laurin Parker
Assistant Professor
Delaware Hall – Room 117
302.857.6423
lsparker@desu.edu

Research and Interests

  • Prisoner re-entry
  • Corrections
  • Courts
  • Race, class and gender

Dr. John Balzarini
Assistant Professor
Delaware Hall – Room 129A
302.857.7103
jbalzarini@desu.edu

Research Interests

  • Urban sociology
  • Community urban culture
  • Gentrification
  • Urban policy
  • Social movements and Social change
  • Social capital

Dr. Kevin Ralston
Assistant Professor
Delaware Hall - Room 134
302.857.7616
kralston@desu.edu

Areas of Expertise

  • Race,Class, Gender and Victimization
  • Masculinity
  • Sexual Victimization
  • Deviance

Mr. Ben Shamburger, MSW
Instructor/Retention Specialist
Delaware Hall - Room 129
302.857.6234
bshamburger@desu.edu

Research Interests

  • U.S Families 
  • Blended Families
  • Multi-racial/cultural Families
  • Grandparents raising grandchildren

 

 

Department of Psychology

Description: 

 

Delaware Hall Room 221
302-857-6660
Fax: 302-857-6661

  

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The Department of Psychology recognizes and supports the overall mission of Delaware State University by providing students with the necessary education for entry level positions in human service related fields and preparing students for graduate studies. More specifically, the psychology program is designed to empower and affirm undergraduate students through broad based training in the foundations of psychology, which emphasizes the need to understand human behavior through critical thinking and scientific endeavors.   The department recognizes and supports the mission of the American Psychological Association (APA) which is "to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people's lives" (APA. [2009]. APA Mission Statement. Retrieved July 27, 2009 from http://www.apa.org/about/). In addition to teaching, the Psychology faculty are engaged in a variety of research and service activities and involve students in many of these activities.   What is Psychology? Psychology is the field of science devoted to understanding behavior and mental processes.  This includes biological and social influences on behavior, how the world is experienced via the five senses, consciousness, learning, memory, thinking, intelligence, language, development across the life span, motivation, emotion, sexuality and gender, stress and health, personality, and psychological disorders and therapies.  In addition to advancing our basic understanding of the above topics, psychology also aims to apply that knowledge to solve a wide variety of real-world problems, such as developing methods of teaching that more effectively promote student learning, designing work environments that increase morale and productivity, or helping athletes to prepare mentally for participation in sports.   Careers with a Degree in Psychology Bachelor's Degree A bachelor’s degree in psychology can be highly flexible and adaptable to many different kinds of careers (Landrum & Davis, 2007; Schwartz, 2000). In the 1994-1995 Psychology Baccalaureate Survey conducted by the American Psychological Association (Grocer & Kohout, 1997), people with bachelor’s degrees in psychology found careers in the following areas:   ·      education and teaching ·      consulting and statistical analysis ·      administration or clerical services ·      professional services ·      sales ·      health and health-related services ·      research and development or research and development management   Other possible careers include marketing researcher, social worker, and communications specialist (Landrum & Davis, 2007; Schwartz, 2000). With its emphasis on critical thinking and empirical observation, psychology trains people for a variety of potential workplace environments and requirements. (Ciccarelli & White, 2009, pp. B4-B5) Graduate Degree In addition to preparing students for careers such as those above, a bachelor’s degree in Psychology also prepares students to pursue graduate studies in a variety of fields, including business, law, child and family studies, education, social work, management, and, of course, psychology. Some of the careers open to individuals with a graduate degree in Psychology are psychiatry*, psychoanalysis, psychiatric social work, clinical or counseling psychology, or teaching and/or research in any area of psychology. (*Psychiatry requires an M.D.)   The Psychology Program Psychology Major All students who select Psychology as a major must complete both the general education requirements (see General Education Program) and the requirements of the Psychology major.  In all, 120 total credit hours are required for a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology.  The complete list of requirements can be found at the links below: Current (Fall 2011) Psychology Curriculum (for all students entering the Psychology major on or after May 12, 2011) Fall 2009 Psychology Curriculum (for students who entered the Psychology major between Fall 2009 and May 11, 2011) Fall 2008 Psychology Curriculum (for students who entered the Psychology major during the 2008-2009 academic year)   Psychology Minor The requirements for a minor in Psychology can be found at the links below: Current (Fall 2011) Psychology Minor Requirements (for students entering the Psychology minor on or after May 12, 2011) July 2009 Psychology Minor Requirements (for students who entered the Psychology minor between July 2009 and May 11, 2011)        
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Faculty Profile


Dr. Gwendolyn Scott-Jones
Associate Professor and Chairperson

Dr. Padmini (Nina) Banerjee
Associate Professor

Dr. Brian Friel
Associate Professor

Dr. Michael Gawrysiak
Assistant Professor

Dr. Rachel Pulverman
Associate Professor

Dr. John D Rich, Jr.
Associate Professor

Dr. Amy Rogers
Associate Professor

Ms. Heidi Hoffman
Adjunct Instructor and Practicum Coordinator

Dr. James P. Kurtz
Adjunct Associate Professor

Dr. Roy A. Lafontaine
Adjunct Associate Professor

Ms. Tawanda Morgan
Adjunct Instructor

Dr. Francene Perry-Brown
Adjunct Assistant Professor

 

Staff


Ms. Terri (Nichols) Harrington
Administrative Secretary

 

Department of Art

Description: 

 

Education and Humanities Building Room 134A
Phone: 302.857.6680
Fax: 302.857.6681

 

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The Department of Art seeks to provide high-quality education for Art majors, as well as to provide courses for the prospective elementary and secondary teachers, while providing courses that satisfy General Education Requirements for the entire University population. Combining Your Love of Art with a Meaningful Career   If you have always had an interest in the arts but aren’t aware of the career opportunities available to you, the Department of Art will be able to guide you through an education that is not only worthwhile, but most rewarding as well. Your personal path toward graduation will enable you to pursue a variety of stimulating professions after graduation.  Delaware State University strikes a balance between general academic and major studio-related courses to support intellectual and artistic growth.  In this balance, students are able to seek a variety of courses that offer different career paths.  You will have the opportunity to work with professional artists in an environment that is conducive to high standards of intellectual and creative practice. Delaware State offers abundant facilities and state-of-the-art equipment for all majors, including studio space.  The department office is located in the Education and Humanities Building, where most of the majors’ classes are held.  All majors utilize fully equipped studios and maintains its own Arts Center/Gallery where students engage in historical and contemporary history classes.  The gallery exhibits the work of students, faculty members and nationally recognized artists, as well as featuring an array of international artifacts.  The gallery also hosts lectures and university and community-based programs in music, theatre and visual art.  Our pursuit of interdisciplinary programs enables students to utilize innumerable facilities throughout the campus for intellectual discourse and creative expression.  Delaware State University’s Department of Art believes that the arts are fundamental components of human civilization.  We believe that if you choose our program and stay on course, you will enter one of the most personally rewarding, life-enhancing professions and work with some of the most dedicated scholars you will ever encounter.  
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Chair:

Donald Becker Ed. D. M.F.A

Professor:

Roberta Tucci, Ed.D, M.F.A

Associate Professors:

Hazel Bradshaw-Beaumont, PhD

Ms. Lori Crawford, M.F.A.

Mr. George Lorio, M.F.A.

Assistant Professor

Mr. William Colbert, M.F.A.

Department Secretary

Inger Lawton

 

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