Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

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TV-Radio-Film Production

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  Introduction Delaware State’s TV-Radio-Film Production program attracts a lot of attention on campus, thanks to the prominence of student-run station WDSU, also known as “The Hive.” On the air since 1978, WDSU gives students an extensive hands-on education in broadcasting and audio production. This practical experience enables students to develop the technical, creative, and management skills necessary to establish a career in the radio industry. The program includes two off-campus internships at professional radio stations, where students can establish professional contacts and acquire some workplace smarts. And in the classroom, they explore mass communications from a theoretical perspective — and learn how radio evolved into (and remains) a medium that can influence public opinions, tastes, and attitudes. WDSU carries a full range of programming, including news, music, sports, and politics. Professional Preparation TV-Radio-Film Production majors develop a wide range of skills that translate directly to the workplace. These include broadcast writing sound production radio station operations news gathering and reporting media research techniques telecom management media law and ethics With the rise of the Internet and online broadcasting, the radio industry is changing. Our program emphasizes the online convergence of mass communications, preparing students for the jobs of the future. Our graduates go on to careers in all aspects of the radio business, including technical production, on-air talent, and front office management. Faculty Delaware State’s mass communications instructors teach from experience. All have spent years in the communications industry and are able to convey both the theoretical and practical concepts that students need to build their careers. Our faculty includes radio veterans such as Andy Harris (the general manager of Dover ratings leader WDOV-AM) and longtime on-air host Ava Perrine. The mass communications faculty also includes documentary filmmakers, public relations professionals, online journalists, and veterans of the newspaper and television industries. Research and Experience Between their on-campus work at WDSU and their two off-campus internships, Delaware State graduates acquire hundreds of hours of direct experience behind the microphone and at the soundboard. In addition, our students can interact with professionals by getting involved in campus chapters of the Black Broadcasters Alliance, National Association of Black Journalists, and other organizations. Some undergraduates from the Mass Communications department have participated in the McNair Program, winning research stipends and presenting their findings at national conferences. All Mass Communications students have the opportunity to present original research on campus every spring during Honors Day.      

Convergence Journalism

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  Introduction In the era of YouTube and podcasts, lots of people are passing themselves off as journalists. But there are certain traits that separate the pros from the amateurs — and Delaware State is an outstanding place to learn them. Our Convergence Journalism students have access to state-of-the-art radio and television broadcasting facilities, as well as the digital multimedia technologies of the future. Our student-run television station (Channel 14) and radio station (WDSU) serve as educational laboratories where students can learn direct, practical lessons. In addition to developing excellent writing, reporting, and editing skills, Convergence Journalism majors acquire the technical knowledge to work behind the camera or the soundboard. They gain professional experience during two off-campus internships at local news outlets such as WDOV (1410 AM) and WHYY (Channel 12). Students graduate with job-ready skills, industry contacts, and a resume that reads like a pro's. Professional Prep Because they get so much hands-on experience, Convergence Journalism majors cultivate various marketable, industry-specific skills. These include news writing and editing media research techniques media law and ethics video and audio production digital multimedia In response to the rising popularity and significance of online journalism, our program emphasizes the digital convergence of mass communications media, preparing students for the jobs of the future. Our graduates go on to careers in all aspects of convergence journalism, getting jobs as reporters, editors, production professionals, and front office managers. Faculty Delaware State’s Mass Communications instructors teach from experience. All have spent years in the communications industry and are able to convey both the theoretical and practical concepts that students need to build their careers. Our faculty includes radio veterans such as Andy Harris (the general manager of Dover ratings leader WDOV-AM) and longtime radio and television personality Ava Perrine. The mass communications faculty also includes documentary filmmakers, public relations professionals, online journalists, and veterans of the newspaper and television industries. Research and Experience All concentrations in the Mass Communications department emphasize experience-based learning, and the Convergence Journalism degree is no different. Our students spend hundreds of hours producing reports for WDSU and Channel 15, and gain many additional hours in professional work settings during their two off-campus internships. Our program includes an in-depth focus on research, introducing students to the methods and tools involved in reporting. In addition, our students can interact with professionals by getting involved in campus chapters of the Black Broadcasters Alliance, National Association of Black Journalists, and other organizations. Some undergraduates from the Mass Communications department have participated in the McNair Program, winning research stipends and presenting their findings at national conferences. All Mass Communications students have the opportunity to present original research on campus every spring during Honors Day.  

Public Relations and Advertising

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  Introduction In Delaware State’s Public Relations and Advertising program, students learn by doing. The program is built around hands-on, project-based assignments that simulate real-world PR situations. It culminates in an off-campus internship that yields professional contacts, builds student resumes, and provides the job-ready skills that employers look for in new hires. Students develop superior writing skills and learn to write for a range of media, including print, broadcast, and the Internet. They also learn layout and design, while working with state-of-the-art digital graphics technology. Above all, they cultivate a sense of how to communicate strategically — how to motivate an audience, influence public opinion, and change behaviors. Professional Prep Our public relations graduates have a successful track record of employment. In addition to landing jobs with advertising firms and public relations agencies, Delaware State grads have found work as in-house publicists and writers for corporations, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations. Others have gone into the radio, television, and newspaper industries. The Public Relations and Advertising program cultivates a broad range of industry-specific skills, including public relations writing branding and campaigns public opinion research organizational communications news writing and editing layout and design Delaware State has a campus chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA), where students can network with working professionals. The campus chapter also sponsors resume writing and interviewing workshops. Faculty Delaware State’s Mass Communications instructors teach from experience. All have spent years in the communications industry and are able to convey both the theoretical and practical concepts that students need to build their careers. In public relations, the faculty includes David Skocik, author of Practical Public Relations for the Small Business and an active official in the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). The mass communications faculty also includes documentary filmmakers, online journalists, and veterans of the newspaper, television, and radio industries. Research and Experience Students gain extensive public relations and advertising experience during their two field work experiences. The first of these, an on-campus practicum, takes place during the junior year, and another (an off-campus internship) consumes the entire second semester of the senior year. These first-hand experiences play an invaluable role in helping students land their first job and transition into the workplace. Some undergraduates from the department have participated in the McNair Program, winning research stipends and presenting their findings at national conferences. All mass communications students have the opportunity to present original research on campus every spring during Honors Day.  

Facilities

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  State-of-the-art Pro Tools digital sound recording studio State-of-the-art digital, three-camera television studio Avid nonlinear editing suite Linear editing suites State-of-the-art Broadcast electronics Audio Vault digital radio station State-of-the-art sound lab Computerized writing lab State-of-the-art distance learning lab Uplink and downlink radio and television facilities Closed-circuit student-run television station Closed-circuit student-run radio station  

Bachelor's Programs

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The Department of Mass Communications produces graduates who specialize in convergence journalism; public relations and advertising, or television-radio-film production. The curriculum combines three essential elements of learning: A theoretical approach to enable students to understand concepts of mass communications. A performance-based approach to develop skills and techniques to enable students to be proficient with communication technologies. An internship program to place students in off-campus learning environments working with professionals.  

Studio Art

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  Introduction   The Studio Art program at Delaware State strikes a balance between artistry and academics — and between creativity and career development. Working with accomplished artists in a professional environment, our students develop advanced studio skills along with the discipline, work habits, and intellectual depth necessary for success. Because our program improves the mind as well as the eye and the hand, our graduates thrive in a broad range of careers, including advertising, design, and digital multimedia. In addition, many of our students go on to graduate school. Delaware State boasts state-of-the-art facilities (including a darkroom and computer lab), plus an outstanding gallery in which students and faculty members exhibit their work alongside nationally renowned artists. The program operates on the philosophy that artists are essential to civilization, and we prepare our graduates to perform in that role. Professional Prep Many of our graduates go on to careers as independent, studio-based fine artists in various media (including painting, sculpture, and photography). Others go into commercial art, working in industries such as advertising, design, publishing, or digital media. Students in the program develop advanced skills in all major media, including computer graphics and digital art painting drawing sculpture ceramics photography printmaking 2-D and 3-D design Faculty All of Delaware State’s art faculty are successful practicing artists and dedicated teachers. The various members exhibit their art internationally, lead workshops and lectures, serve as judges, and participate in national conferences. Taken together, these activities provide the Delaware State art program with a wide network of contacts and a national reputation. The faculty’s broad range of experience enhances their ability to function as mentors, helping young artists to carve out satisfying professional and creative niches. The department has a family-like atmosphere, in which instructors and students help each other meet the challenges of creative growth and career development. Research and Experience During the senior year, Studio Art majors create a body of work and present a show in the gallery. They also complete a thesis paper and slide registry, and make an oral presentation before the department faculty. The art department sponsors lectures, workshops, and other cultural and artistic events on campus. It also operates the on-campus Arts Center/Gallery, an exhibition space that displays art by Delaware State students and faculty, as well as regional and national artists. The Arts Center/Gallery sponsors lectures, receptions, seminars, and interactive arts events, while hosting the annual Regional Scholastic Art Awards.      

Art Management

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  Introduction The interdisciplinary Arts Management degree offers students a rare opportunity to launch a career that combines business acumen with a passion for the arts. Arts Management majors develop a specialized set of skills that enables graduates to pursue positions at museums, galleries, nonprofit organizations, and art dealerships — or to launch their own arts-related entrepreneurial ventures. The Arts Management program includes a full range of studio courses; students develop advanced skills in painting, illustration, sculpture, graphic design, and other media. In addition, students get a practical education in the business of art via two semester-long internships. Only a few institutions offer a major comparable to Delaware State’s Arts Management degree. Professional Prep The Arts Management degree prepares graduates for immediate employment with museums, galleries, art supply firms, nonprofit, and other arts-related organizations. During the senior year, Arts Management majors complete two internships — one with a gallery, the other with a community arts organization. Both experiences enable students to cultivate professional contacts while developing practical skills that translate directly to the workplace. Students also take a required Arts Management seminar in which they learn about arts-related careers and interact with guest speakers from various parts of the art world. And they have the opportunity to connect with artists, patrons, reviewers, art buyers, and others via involvement in the Arts Center/Gallery. Faculty All of Delaware State’s art faculty are successful practicing artists and dedicated teachers. The various members exhibit their art internationally, lead workshops and lectures, serve as judges, and participate in national conferences. Taken together, these activities provide the Delaware State art program with a wide network of contacts and a national reputation. The faculty’s broad range of experience enhances their ability to function as mentors, helping young artists to carve out satisfying professional and creative niches. The department has a family-like atmosphere, in which instructors and students help each other meet the challenges of creative growth and career development. Research and Experience The Arts Management major culminates in two mandatory internships during the senior year, enabling students to develop some real-world survival skills and marketplace instincts. One of the internships takes place on campus at Delaware State’s Arts Center/Gallery, located in the Williams C. Jason Library. This exhibition space displays art by Delaware State students and faculty, as well as work by regional and national artists. The Arts Center/Gallery sponsors lectures, receptions, seminars, and interactive arts events. It also hosts the Regional Scholastic Art Awards. In their final semester, Arts Management students complete an off-campus internship with a community arts organization — typically a museum, nonprofit agency, educational institution, government program, or other public-spirited entity.      

Spanish Education

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 Effective:  Fall 2009  Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr FREN-201 Inter French Language & Culture I 3 FREN-202 Inter French Language & Culture II 3 ENG-101 English Composition I 3 ENG-102 English Composition II 3 25-101 Mathematics 101 3 25-102 Mathematics 102 3 ENG-191 University Seminar I 1 ENG-192 University Seminar II 1 xx-xxx Arts/Humanities Elective 3 FREN-242 Basic French Composition I 3 xx-xxx Natural Science 3 xx-xxx Natural Science 3       16-100 Wellness 2   Total Credits 16   Total Credits 18 Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr FREN-222 French Conversation 3 ENG-301 Inter French Comp & Stylistics II 3 36-201 Intro to General Psychology 3 ENG-200 Speech 3 ENG-201/205 World/African-American Lit I 3 ENG-202/206 World/African American Lit II 3 FREN-211 Business Registers I 3 FREN-212 Business Registers II 3 34-xxx American History 3 FREN-333/ENG-204 Linguistics 3   Total Credits 15   Total Credits 15 Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr FREN-303 Survey of French Literature I 3 FREN-304 Survey of French Literature II 3 FREN-305 French Civilization 3 FREN-306 Aspects of French Culture in the Americas 3 FREN-334 French Diction and Conversation 3 FREN-399 Independent Study I 3 FREN-335 Basic Translation I 3 FREN-336 Basic Translation II 3 31-395 Global Societies 3 FREN-307 17th Century French Literature 3   Total Credits 15   Total Credits 15 Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr FREN-401► Adv French Comp & Stylistics III 3 FREN-499 *Independent Study II 6 FREN-403 The French Novel 3 xx-xxx **Foreign Language Electives 6 xx-xxx Free Electives 6       FREN-406 History of the French Language 3         Total Credits 15   Total Credits 12               * SENIOR CAPSTONE EXP (May be taken abroad to fulfill the Study Abroad Requirement) ** May be taken abroad to fulfill the Study Abroad Requirement ► Writing Intensive Course TOTAL CREDITS: 121

French Education

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Effective:  Fall 2009 Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr FREN-201 Inter French Lang & Cult 3 FREN-202 Inter French Lang & Cult 3 ENG-101 English Composition I 3 ENG-102 English Composition II 3 25-101 Mathematics I 3 25-102 Mathematics II 3 ENG-191 University Seminar I 1 ENG-192 University Seminar II 1 xx-xxx Natural Science Elective 3 34-xxx American History 3 xx-xxx Arts/Humanities Elective 3 xx-xxx Natural Science Elective 3       16-100 Wellness 2   Total Credits 16   Total Credits *TAKE PRAXIS I 18 Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr FREN-242 Basic Composition I 3 FREN-334 French Diction and Conv. 3 ENG-201/205 World/African American Lit I 3 ENG-202/206 World/African American Lit II 3 36-201 Intro to General Psychology 3 12-207 Lifespan Development 3 ENG-200 Speech 3 FREN-333/ENG-204 Linguistics 3 FREN-222 French Conversation 3 12-204 Philosophical Foundations of Ed 3       FREN-301 Inter Composition & Stylistics 3   Total Credits 15   Total Credits **ADMISSION TO TEP (45 credits-GPA 2.5) 18 Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr FREN-305 Civilization I 3 FREN-499 ***Independent Study II 3 12-313 Intro to Ed of Children with Exceptional Needs 3 36-316 Developmental Psychology 3 12-322 Teaching Reading in Sec. Schools 3 12-357 Effective Tchg & Classroom Mgmt 4 12-318/31-395 Multicult Ed (Majors only) or Global Societies 3 12-344 Instructional Technology 3 FREN-303 Survey of French Lit I 3 FREN-304 Survey of French Lit II 3   Total Credits 15   Total Credits ****TAKE PRAXIS II 16 Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 07-405 Second Language Testing 3 12-400 *****Pre Service/Student Teaching 12 07-409 Methods & Mats for Tchg For Languages 3       12-416 Analysis of Student Teaching 1       xx-xxx ******Foreign Language Elective 3       FREN-401► Adv Comp and Stylistics 3         Total Credits 13   Total Credits 12               *****SENIOR CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE ***Independent Study II and ******Foreign Language Elective to be taken abroad ► Writing Intensive Course TOTAL CREDITS:  123

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in History

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  A student who chooses this major must complete the requirements of the current history curriculum. A total of 36 hours of history are required and the student must earn a "C" or better in each course. A student must complete History 101, 102, 201 and 202, or 101, 102, 203 and 204, and must also take twenty-four hours on the 300 and 400 levels. In the upper division sections, each student must complete a twelve-hour program of either United States, European, African American, or World History, which will comprise his/her area of specialization. The remaining twelve hours must be taken in areas outside of the field of specialization, including at least three hours in each area. First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-XXX Mathematics 3 34-101 World Civilization to the Eighteenth Century 3 34-191 University Seminar I 1 XX-XXX Science 3-4     18-19 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 25-XXX Mathematics 3 33-200 American National Government 3 34-102 World Civilization from the Eighteenth Century 3 34-192 University Seminar II 1 XX-XXX Science 3-4     16-17 Second Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 32-101 or 32-201 Human Geography or World Regional Geography 3 34-201 or 34-203 American Civilization to 1865 or The African American Experience to 1865 3 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3     15 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 03-101 Critical Thinking 3 34-202 or 34-204 American Civilization from 1865 or The African American Experience from 1865 3 34-290 Introduction to Historical Methods 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     15 Third Year First Semester     34-300 Delaware History 3 34-XXX American History (300-400) 3 34-XXX European History (300-400) 3 XX-XXX Art/Humanities Elective ** 3 XX-XXX Open Elective 3     15 Second Semester     31-395 Global Societies 3 34-446 Research Methods in History 3 34-XXX African-American History (300-400) 3 34-XXX World History (300-400) 3 XX-XXX Open Elective 3     15 Fourth Year First Semester     34-475 Senior Capstone 3 34-XXX History Concentrations (300-400) 6 XX-XXX Social Science Elective ** 3 XX-XXX Open Electives 3     15 Second Semester     34-XXX History Concentration 3 XX-XXX Art/Humanities Elective ** 3 XX-XXX Social Science Elective ** 3 XX-XXX Open Electives 6     15   Total credits 124-126   **Social Science elective may be met with 300-400 level courses in Economics, Sociology, Psychology, Political Science, or Physical Geography. Art/Humanities upper-level electives may be met with 300-400 level courses in Art, Art History, Philosophy, English, or a Foreign Language.  

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