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TESL Course Descriptions

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    ENG-504/404. SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION. This course is an analysis of current issues in second language acquisition based on readings and research findings. Discussion of theories includes the Acculturation Model, the Nativization Model, Accommodation Theory, Discourse Theory, the Monitor Model, the Variable Competence Model, the Universal Hypothesis, Neuro-functional Theory and other models. Prerequisites: 12 semester hours of a foreign language. Credit, 3 hours. ENG-518. METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE. This course introduces students to basic concepts and methodologies for teaching second language learners. It is designed as a review of theories, programs, approaches, strategies, and techniques for effective second language teaching methods. Additionally, the course addresses theories of acquisition of a second language. ENG-510. STRUCTURE OF MODERN ENGLISH. Structure of Modern English is an advanced course in the grammar and structure of English. It is designed to give intensive study and practice in analyzing the structure of English sounds, words, phrases, and sentences; doing error analysis; recognizing and correcting errors; taking examinations; writing research papers and engaging in various pedagogically-oriented linguistic analysis projects. ENG-512. SEMINAR ON THEORIES AND PRACTICE OF SECOND LANGUAGE LEARNING AND TESTING. This seminar will focus on and put into practice relevant aspects of applied linguistics, second language acquisition (SLA), pedagogy and testing. Topics include interactive and non-interactive hypermedia technologies, computer-assisted language learning (CALL) and second language (L2) literacy, language testing and technology, distance learning, online chat discussions, software selection, and more. Course formats include readings, discussion, demonstrations, and hands-on sessions with technologies. As part of a teaching portfolio, students will create their own computer-based materials for teaching. ENG-519. TEACHING THE MULTICULTURAL-MULTILINGUAL STUDENT. This course introduces students to the theories, methods, techniques, educational perspectives and issues involved in teaching children from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. This course includes a field experience. ENG-520. FOUNDATIONS OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION. This course is designed to equip bilingual and second language teachers with the tools, knowledge and philosophy for working with language minority students in the context of bilingual/ESL programs. The course introduces candidates to the historical, political and legal foundations of bilingual education programs in the United States, in addition to exploring different models of bilingual programs and their psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic foundations upon which they rest. EDU-557. EFFECTIVE TEACHING SKILLS AND CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT. This course combines effective teaching skills and classroom management into one comprehensive course. It is designed to provide basic pedagogical tools and conceptual frames necessary for creating effective teaching and learning environments. Students will be introduced to the current research on best practices that inform teachers/practitioners. Students will be required to demonstrate through individual and small group experiential activities, the critical teaching skills that are embodied in the Delaware Teaching Standards, multiple assessment strategies, micro-teaching, mastery teaching, cooperative le4arning strategies and other instructional models. Additionally the student will have the opportunity to develop reflective teaching skills in the planning, delivery and evaluation of their cohort’s teaching performances. In a convivial atmosphere, the instructor and peers will provide feedback on an individual’s teaching related to performance-based objectives and learner outcomes. This course incorporates current research on the most effective strategies for improving classroom discipline, motivation, interpersonal relationships and academic performance on all grade levels. Attention is given to aspects of diversity and/or cultural factors that influence perceptions about classroom management and also factor which may assist in facilitating mainstreaming efforts. 4 credits. ENG-590. PRACTICUM. This course provides students with the opportunity to supplement coursework with practical work experience related to their educational program. Students work under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the School District where they are assigned as well as with the direct guidance of their instructor. EDU-601. CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN AMERICAN EDUCATION. This course analyzes current trends, problems and theories based upon examination of recent educational literature. Students critically explore topics related to the formulation of curriculum, instructional policy and methodology in education. 3 credits. EDU-604. THEORIES AND METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. This course is a study of educational theories as applied to curriculum and instruction with emphasis on current trends and the identification of the instructional process, organizing operations and skills for teaching. 3 credits. EDU-608. DIAGNOSTIC TEACHING OF READING. This course consists of a review of current research and opinion, evaluation of materials techniques and programs for assessment and prescription of reading techniques. A Practicum provides students the opportunity to implement and evaluate a diagnostic-prescriptive reading program. 3 credits. EDU-611. THEORIES AND PRACTICIES IN EXCEPTIONALITIES. This course is designed to identify exceptional learners and provide an understanding of their educational needs. Specific teaching techniques will be explored, as well as principles and practices of program development. 3 credits. EDU-614. HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. Educational implications of human development over the life-span are examined. Students will survey research with special attention to the applications to teaching and developmentally appropriate school programs. 3 credits. EDU-625/688. INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS AND RESEARCH/ACTION RESEARCH. This course covers application of basic statistical techniques and research methodologies employed in qualitative and quantitative research in education. The focus of the course is primarily on action research and students will develop an action research plan as a course requirement. 3 credits.  

Graduate Program in Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL)

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  Objectives The MA in TESL is designed to achieve the following: Provide candidates with exposure to the theory and practice of teaching English to children whose first language is not English (LEP and ELL); Certify teachers as ESL teachers; Provide candidates with an advanced level of expertise and a thorough training in the discipline of analyzing the various facets of teaching LEP and ELL children; and Provide candidates with the preparation necessary for a career as a schoolteacher. The MA in TESL is an interdisciplinary program designed for educational personnel at the early childhood, elementary as well as secondary school levels. The program emphasizes the training of teachers who are interested in working with second language learners from diverse linguistic settings. It also helps its candidates explore research related to bilingual and bicultural children. Finally, the program is open for non-degree teachers who simply want to take courses for Certification or for certified teachers who simply need Content Knowledge courses. The interdisciplinary program involves courses taught in the Department of English and Foreign Languages and courses taught in the Department of Education. Faculty and staff from the above departments shall cooperate to make the program a success. While candidates shall use facilities available in both departments, the department of English and Foreign Languages is responsible for coordinating and directing the student orientation, student advisement, student teaching, field experience, thesis projects and portfolio reviews. Admission Requirements For admission to graduate study, applicants must show evidence that they have earned a bachelor’s degree at a regionally accredited college or university, possess the ability to do graduate work of high quality, and be proficient in the target language. Bachelor’s degrees earned from international institutions may be considered, to the discretion of the relevant admissions personnel. Also, applicants must submit to the Program Admissions’ Committee their GRE (Graduate Record Examination) scores or accepted equivalent, one official transcript from all previous undergraduate and graduate work, three letters of recommendation from professors or supervisors, and an 800-word statement of purpose indicating educational career goals and experience.  Applicants must have taken and passed Praxis I before they are admitted.  Teachers who intend to take courses for purposes of certification only must show evidence that they have earned a bachelor’s degree at a regionally accredited college or university, in addition to proof of their professional affiliation with a particular school system in the nation. Also, candidates need a pre- or co-requisite teacher education program in the following areas: English, Foreign Language, Elementary Education, or Content Areas for ES (O) L; Elementary Education (or Exceptional Children) for Bilingual: Elementary Content Area such as Biology, English, or Exceptional Children for Bilingual: Secondary. Other requisites include the following: Content Knowledge proficiency in the language where certification is sought: 15 semester hours of language at the intermediate level or above (or content knowledge Praxis II test) for Bilingual and up to 30 semester hours at the intermediate level for ESOL (or content knowledge Praxis II test) Productive Language test for Bilingual speakers Verification of knowledge of the relative culture (course, study abroad, native experience, etc. Furthermore, candidates have to fulfill the following language requirements: Proficiency in English: Native or near native fluency is required of all candidates. Degree Requirements This is a proposal for a two-degree plan: a 36 semester-hour plan without thesis but with a Comprehensive Exam (Plan A) or a 30 semester-hour plan with thesis (6 credits), excluding the Comprehensive Exam (Plan B). Candidates of either plan must complete a 3-credit practicum. Here is a breakdown of both programs: Plan A includes: 21 semester hours concentration in educational foundations, bilingual education and linguistics courses 12 hours in a minor concentration A 3-credit hour practicum A Comprehensive Exam Plan B includes: 21 semester hours concentration in educational foundations, bilingual education and linguistics courses 6 hours of electives A 3-credit hour practicum A Comprehensive Exam A thesis (6 hours) Curriculum Grid   Year 1 Session Course # and credit Course Title Fall I ENG-518    (3 credits) Methods of Teaching English as a Second Language* Fall II EDU-557   (3 credits) Effective Teaching Strategies* Spring I ENG-519   (3 credits) Teaching the Multi-cultural/ Multilingual Student* Spring II EDU-614   (3 credits) Human Development in Education Summer I ENG-504   (3 credits) Second Language Acquisition Summer I ENG-510   (3 credits) Structure of Modern English Summer II ENG-512   (3 credits) Seminar on Theories and Practice of Second Language Learning and Testing Summer II EDU-611   (3 credits) Theories and Practices in Exceptionalities Year 2       Fall I EDU-608   (3 credits) Diagnostic Teaching of Reading* Fall II ENG-590   (3 credits) Practicum* Spring I (3 credits) Elective/Thesis Spring II (3 credits) Elective/Thesis   *Courses require EFE as mandated by the Council of Professional Educators (CPE)   Electives       ENG-520. Foundations of Bilingual Education                                                                               EDU-601. Contemporary Issues in American Education                                                               EDU-604. Theories and Methods of Instruction                      EDU-625. Introduction to Statistics and Research in Education  

TV-Radio-Film Production

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Introduction Delaware State’s TV-Radio-Film Production program attracts a lot of attention on campus, thanks to the prominence of student-run station WDSU, also known as “The Hive.” On the air since 1978, WDSU gives students an extensive hands-on education in broadcasting and audio production. This practical experience enables students to develop the technical, creative, and management skills necessary to establish a career in the radio industry. The program includes two off-campus internships at professional radio stations, where students can establish professional contacts and acquire some workplace smarts. And in the classroom, they explore mass communications from a theoretical perspective — and learn how radio evolved into (and remains) a medium that can influence public opinions, tastes, and attitudes. WDSU carries a full range of programming, including news, music, sports, and politics. Professional Preparation TV-Radio-Film Production majors develop a wide range of skills that translate directly to the workplace. These include broadcast writing sound production radio station operations news gathering and reporting media research techniques telecom management media law and ethics With the rise of the Internet and online broadcasting, the radio industry is changing. Our program emphasizes the online convergence of mass communications, preparing students for the jobs of the future. Our graduates go on to careers in all aspects of the radio business, including technical production, on-air talent, and front office management. Faculty Delaware State’s mass communications instructors teach from experience. All have spent years in the communications industry and are able to convey both the theoretical and practical concepts that students need to build their careers. Our faculty includes radio veterans such as Andy Harris (the general manager of Dover ratings leader WDOV-AM) and longtime on-air host Ava Perrine. The mass communications faculty also includes documentary filmmakers, public relations professionals, online journalists, and veterans of the newspaper and television industries. Research and Experience Between their on-campus work at WDSU and their two off-campus internships, Delaware State graduates acquire hundreds of hours of direct experience behind the microphone and at the soundboard. In addition, our students can interact with professionals by getting involved in campus chapters of the Black Broadcasters Alliance, National Association of Black Journalists, and other organizations. Some undergraduates from the Mass Communications department have participated in the McNair Program, winning research stipends and presenting their findings at national conferences. All Mass Communications students have the opportunity to present original research on campus every spring during Honors Day.

Convergence Journalism

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  Introduction In the era of YouTube and podcasts, lots of people are passing themselves off as journalists. But there are certain traits that separate the pros from the amateurs — and Delaware State is an outstanding place to learn them. Our Convergence Journalism students have access to state-of-the-art radio and television broadcasting facilities, as well as the digital multimedia technologies of the future. Our student-run television station (Channel 14) and radio station (WDSU) serve as educational laboratories where students can learn direct, practical lessons. In addition to developing excellent writing, reporting, and editing skills, Convergence Journalism majors acquire the technical knowledge to work behind the camera or the soundboard. They gain professional experience during two off-campus internships at local news outlets such as WDOV (1410 AM) and WHYY (Channel 12). Students graduate with job-ready skills, industry contacts, and a resume that reads like a pro's. Professional Prep Because they get so much hands-on experience, Convergence Journalism majors cultivate various marketable, industry-specific skills. These include news writing and editing media research techniques media law and ethics video and audio production digital multimedia In response to the rising popularity and significance of online journalism, our program emphasizes the digital convergence of mass communications media, preparing students for the jobs of the future. Our graduates go on to careers in all aspects of convergence journalism, getting jobs as reporters, editors, production professionals, and front office managers. Faculty Delaware State’s Mass Communications instructors teach from experience. All have spent years in the communications industry and are able to convey both the theoretical and practical concepts that students need to build their careers. Our faculty includes radio veterans such as Andy Harris (the general manager of Dover ratings leader WDOV-AM) and longtime radio and television personality Ava Perrine. The mass communications faculty also includes documentary filmmakers, public relations professionals, online journalists, and veterans of the newspaper and television industries. Research and Experience All concentrations in the Mass Communications department emphasize experience-based learning, and the Convergence Journalism degree is no different. Our students spend hundreds of hours producing reports for WDSU and Channel 15, and gain many additional hours in professional work settings during their two off-campus internships. Our program includes an in-depth focus on research, introducing students to the methods and tools involved in reporting. In addition, our students can interact with professionals by getting involved in campus chapters of the Black Broadcasters Alliance, National Association of Black Journalists, and other organizations. Some undergraduates from the Mass Communications department have participated in the McNair Program, winning research stipends and presenting their findings at national conferences. All Mass Communications students have the opportunity to present original research on campus every spring during Honors Day.  

Public Relations and Advertising

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  Introduction In Delaware State’s Public Relations and Advertising program, students learn by doing. The program is built around hands-on, project-based assignments that simulate real-world PR situations. It culminates in an off-campus internship that yields professional contacts, builds student resumes, and provides the job-ready skills that employers look for in new hires. Students develop superior writing skills and learn to write for a range of media, including print, broadcast, and the Internet. They also learn layout and design, while working with state-of-the-art digital graphics technology. Above all, they cultivate a sense of how to communicate strategically — how to motivate an audience, influence public opinion, and change behaviors. Professional Prep Our public relations graduates have a successful track record of employment. In addition to landing jobs with advertising firms and public relations agencies, Delaware State grads have found work as in-house publicists and writers for corporations, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations. Others have gone into the radio, television, and newspaper industries. The Public Relations and Advertising program cultivates a broad range of industry-specific skills, including public relations writing branding and campaigns public opinion research organizational communications news writing and editing layout and design Delaware State has a campus chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA), where students can network with working professionals. The campus chapter also sponsors resume writing and interviewing workshops. Faculty Delaware State’s Mass Communications instructors teach from experience. All have spent years in the communications industry and are able to convey both the theoretical and practical concepts that students need to build their careers. In public relations, the faculty includes David Skocik, author of Practical Public Relations for the Small Business and an active official in the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). The mass communications faculty also includes documentary filmmakers, online journalists, and veterans of the newspaper, television, and radio industries. Research and Experience Students gain extensive public relations and advertising experience during their two field work experiences. The first of these, an on-campus practicum, takes place during the junior year, and another (an off-campus internship) consumes the entire second semester of the senior year. These first-hand experiences play an invaluable role in helping students land their first job and transition into the workplace. Some undergraduates from the department have participated in the McNair Program, winning research stipends and presenting their findings at national conferences. All mass communications students have the opportunity to present original research on campus every spring during Honors Day.  

Facilities

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  State-of-the-art Pro Tools digital sound recording studio State-of-the-art digital, three-camera television studio Avid nonlinear editing suite Linear editing suites State-of-the-art Broadcast electronics Audio Vault digital radio station State-of-the-art sound lab Computerized writing lab State-of-the-art distance learning lab Uplink and downlink radio and television facilities Closed-circuit student-run television station Closed-circuit student-run radio station  

Bachelor's Programs

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The Department of Mass Communications produces graduates who specialize in convergence journalism; public relations and advertising, or television-radio-film production. The curriculum combines three essential elements of learning: A theoretical approach to enable students to understand concepts of mass communications. A performance-based approach to develop skills and techniques to enable students to be proficient with communication technologies. An internship program to place students in off-campus learning environments working with professionals.  

Studio Art

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  Introduction   The Studio Art program at Delaware State strikes a balance between artistry and academics — and between creativity and career development. Working with accomplished artists in a professional environment, our students develop advanced studio skills along with the discipline, work habits, and intellectual depth necessary for success. Because our program improves the mind as well as the eye and the hand, our graduates thrive in a broad range of careers, including advertising, design, and digital multimedia. In addition, many of our students go on to graduate school. Delaware State boasts state-of-the-art facilities (including a darkroom and computer lab), plus an outstanding gallery in which students and faculty members exhibit their work alongside nationally renowned artists. The program operates on the philosophy that artists are essential to civilization, and we prepare our graduates to perform in that role. Professional Prep Many of our graduates go on to careers as independent, studio-based fine artists in various media (including painting, sculpture, and photography). Others go into commercial art, working in industries such as advertising, design, publishing, or digital media. Students in the program develop advanced skills in all major media, including computer graphics and digital art painting drawing sculpture ceramics photography printmaking 2-D and 3-D design Faculty All of Delaware State’s art faculty are successful practicing artists and dedicated teachers. The various members exhibit their art internationally, lead workshops and lectures, serve as judges, and participate in national conferences. Taken together, these activities provide the Delaware State art program with a wide network of contacts and a national reputation. The faculty’s broad range of experience enhances their ability to function as mentors, helping young artists to carve out satisfying professional and creative niches. The department has a family-like atmosphere, in which instructors and students help each other meet the challenges of creative growth and career development. Research and Experience During the senior year, Studio Art majors create a body of work and present a show in the gallery. They also complete a thesis paper and slide registry, and make an oral presentation before the department faculty. The art department sponsors lectures, workshops, and other cultural and artistic events on campus. It also operates the on-campus Arts Center/Gallery, an exhibition space that displays art by Delaware State students and faculty, as well as regional and national artists. The Arts Center/Gallery sponsors lectures, receptions, seminars, and interactive arts events, while hosting the annual Regional Scholastic Art Awards.      

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in History

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  A student who chooses this major must complete the requirements of the current history curriculum. A total of 36 hours of history are required and the student must earn a "C" or better in each course. A student must complete History 101, 102, 201 and 202, or 101, 102, 203 and 204, and must also take twenty-four hours on the 300 and 400 levels. In the upper division sections, each student must complete a twelve-hour program of either United States, European, African American, or World History, which will comprise his/her area of specialization. The remaining twelve hours must be taken in areas outside of the field of specialization, including at least three hours in each area. First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-XXX Mathematics 3 34-101 World Civilization to the Eighteenth Century 3 34-191 University Seminar I 1 XX-XXX Science 3-4     18-19 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 25-XXX Mathematics 3 33-200 American National Government 3 34-102 World Civilization from the Eighteenth Century 3 34-192 University Seminar II 1 XX-XXX Science 3-4     16-17 Second Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 32-101 or 32-201 Human Geography or World Regional Geography 3 34-201 or 34-203 American Civilization to 1865 or The African American Experience to 1865 3 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3     15 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 03-101 Critical Thinking 3 34-202 or 34-204 American Civilization from 1865 or The African American Experience from 1865 3 34-290 Introduction to Historical Methods 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     15 Third Year First Semester     34-300 Delaware History 3 34-XXX American History (300-400) 3 34-XXX European History (300-400) 3 XX-XXX Art/Humanities Elective ** 3 XX-XXX Open Elective 3     15 Second Semester     31-395 Global Societies 3 34-446 Research Methods in History 3 34-XXX African-American History (300-400) 3 34-XXX World History (300-400) 3 XX-XXX Open Elective 3     15 Fourth Year First Semester     34-475 Senior Capstone 3 34-XXX History Concentrations (300-400) 6 XX-XXX Social Science Elective ** 3 XX-XXX Open Electives 3     15 Second Semester     34-XXX History Concentration 3 XX-XXX Art/Humanities Elective ** 3 XX-XXX Social Science Elective ** 3 XX-XXX Open Electives 6     15   Total credits 124-126   **Social Science elective may be met with 300-400 level courses in Economics, Sociology, Psychology, Political Science, or Physical Geography. Art/Humanities upper-level electives may be met with 300-400 level courses in Art, Art History, Philosophy, English, or a Foreign Language.  

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Political Science

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    First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-XXX Mathematics 3 33-103 Introduction to Political Science 3 34-191 University Seminar I 1 XX-XXX Science 3-4     15-16 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 25-XXX Mathematics 3 32-101 Human Geography 3 34-101 or 34-102 World Civilization to the Eighteenth Century or World Civilization from the Eighteenth Century 3 34-192 University Seminar II 1 XX-XXX Science 3-4     16-17 Second Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 33-200 American National Government 3 34-201 or 34-203 American Civilization to 1865 or The African American Experience to 1865 3 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3     15 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 03-101 Critical Thinking 3 33-220 Comparative Government 3 34-202 or 34-204 American Civilization from 1865 or The African American Experience from 1865 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     15 Third Year First Semester     03-XXX Philosophy Elective 3 33-210 Contemporary Political Ideologies 3 33-230 International Politics 3 33-410 or 37-314 Research Methods in Political Science or Methods of Sociological Research 3 40-201 Macroeconomics 3     15 Second Semester     31-395 Global Societies 3 33-XXX Political Science Electives 6 40-202 Microeconomics 3 XX-XXX Arts / Humanities Elective 3     15 Fourth Year First Semester     33-475 Senior Capstone 3 33-XXX Political Science Electives 6 XX-XXX Open Electives 6     15 Second Semester     33-XXX Political Science Electives 6 XX-XXX Open Electives 9     15   Total credits 121-122  

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