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Public Relations and Advertising

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  Introduction In Delaware State’s Public Relations and Advertising program, students learn by doing. The program is built around hands-on, project-based assignments that simulate real-world PR situations. It culminates in an off-campus internship that yields professional contacts, builds student resumes, and provides the job-ready skills that employers look for in new hires. Students develop superior writing skills and learn to write for a range of media, including print, broadcast, and the Internet. They also learn layout and design, while working with state-of-the-art digital graphics technology. Above all, they cultivate a sense of how to communicate strategically — how to motivate an audience, influence public opinion, and change behaviors. Professional Prep Our public relations graduates have a successful track record of employment. In addition to landing jobs with advertising firms and public relations agencies, Delaware State grads have found work as in-house publicists and writers for corporations, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations. Others have gone into the radio, television, and newspaper industries. The Public Relations and Advertising program cultivates a broad range of industry-specific skills, including public relations writing branding and campaigns public opinion research organizational communications news writing and editing layout and design Delaware State has a campus chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA), where students can network with working professionals. The campus chapter also sponsors resume writing and interviewing workshops. Faculty Delaware State’s Mass Communications instructors teach from experience. All have spent years in the communications industry and are able to convey both the theoretical and practical concepts that students need to build their careers. In public relations, the faculty includes David Skocik, author of Practical Public Relations for the Small Business and an active official in the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). The mass communications faculty also includes documentary filmmakers, online journalists, and veterans of the newspaper, television, and radio industries. Research and Experience Students gain extensive public relations and advertising experience during their two field work experiences. The first of these, an on-campus practicum, takes place during the junior year, and another (an off-campus internship) consumes the entire second semester of the senior year. These first-hand experiences play an invaluable role in helping students land their first job and transition into the workplace. Some undergraduates from the department have participated in the McNair Program, winning research stipends and presenting their findings at national conferences. All mass communications students have the opportunity to present original research on campus every spring during Honors Day.  

Facilities

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  State-of-the-art Pro Tools digital sound recording studio State-of-the-art digital, three-camera television studio Avid nonlinear editing suite Linear editing suites State-of-the-art Broadcast electronics Audio Vault digital radio station State-of-the-art sound lab Computerized writing lab State-of-the-art distance learning lab Uplink and downlink radio and television facilities Closed-circuit student-run television station Closed-circuit student-run radio station  

Bachelor's Programs

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The Department of Mass Communications produces graduates who specialize in convergence journalism; public relations and advertising, or television-radio-film production. The curriculum combines three essential elements of learning: A theoretical approach to enable students to understand concepts of mass communications. A performance-based approach to develop skills and techniques to enable students to be proficient with communication technologies. An internship program to place students in off-campus learning environments working with professionals.  

Studio Art

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  Introduction   The Studio Art program at Delaware State strikes a balance between artistry and academics — and between creativity and career development. Working with accomplished artists in a professional environment, our students develop advanced studio skills along with the discipline, work habits, and intellectual depth necessary for success. Because our program improves the mind as well as the eye and the hand, our graduates thrive in a broad range of careers, including advertising, design, and digital multimedia. In addition, many of our students go on to graduate school. Delaware State boasts state-of-the-art facilities (including a darkroom and computer lab), plus an outstanding gallery in which students and faculty members exhibit their work alongside nationally renowned artists. The program operates on the philosophy that artists are essential to civilization, and we prepare our graduates to perform in that role. Professional Prep Many of our graduates go on to careers as independent, studio-based fine artists in various media (including painting, sculpture, and photography). Others go into commercial art, working in industries such as advertising, design, publishing, or digital media. Students in the program develop advanced skills in all major media, including computer graphics and digital art painting drawing sculpture ceramics photography printmaking 2-D and 3-D design Faculty All of Delaware State’s art faculty are successful practicing artists and dedicated teachers. The various members exhibit their art internationally, lead workshops and lectures, serve as judges, and participate in national conferences. Taken together, these activities provide the Delaware State art program with a wide network of contacts and a national reputation. The faculty’s broad range of experience enhances their ability to function as mentors, helping young artists to carve out satisfying professional and creative niches. The department has a family-like atmosphere, in which instructors and students help each other meet the challenges of creative growth and career development. Research and Experience During the senior year, Studio Art majors create a body of work and present a show in the gallery. They also complete a thesis paper and slide registry, and make an oral presentation before the department faculty. The art department sponsors lectures, workshops, and other cultural and artistic events on campus. It also operates the on-campus Arts Center/Gallery, an exhibition space that displays art by Delaware State students and faculty, as well as regional and national artists. The Arts Center/Gallery sponsors lectures, receptions, seminars, and interactive arts events, while hosting the annual Regional Scholastic Art Awards.      

Art Management

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  Introduction The interdisciplinary Arts Management degree offers students a rare opportunity to launch a career that combines business acumen with a passion for the arts. Arts Management majors develop a specialized set of skills that enables graduates to pursue positions at museums, galleries, nonprofit organizations, and art dealerships — or to launch their own arts-related entrepreneurial ventures. The Arts Management program includes a full range of studio courses; students develop advanced skills in painting, illustration, sculpture, graphic design, and other media. In addition, students get a practical education in the business of art via two semester-long internships. Only a few institutions offer a major comparable to Delaware State’s Arts Management degree. Professional Prep The Arts Management degree prepares graduates for immediate employment with museums, galleries, art supply firms, nonprofit, and other arts-related organizations. During the senior year, Arts Management majors complete two internships — one with a gallery, the other with a community arts organization. Both experiences enable students to cultivate professional contacts while developing practical skills that translate directly to the workplace. Students also take a required Arts Management seminar in which they learn about arts-related careers and interact with guest speakers from various parts of the art world. And they have the opportunity to connect with artists, patrons, reviewers, art buyers, and others via involvement in the Arts Center/Gallery. Faculty All of Delaware State’s art faculty are successful practicing artists and dedicated teachers. The various members exhibit their art internationally, lead workshops and lectures, serve as judges, and participate in national conferences. Taken together, these activities provide the Delaware State art program with a wide network of contacts and a national reputation. The faculty’s broad range of experience enhances their ability to function as mentors, helping young artists to carve out satisfying professional and creative niches. The department has a family-like atmosphere, in which instructors and students help each other meet the challenges of creative growth and career development. Research and Experience The Arts Management major culminates in two mandatory internships during the senior year, enabling students to develop some real-world survival skills and marketplace instincts. One of the internships takes place on campus at Delaware State’s Arts Center/Gallery, located in the Williams C. Jason Library. This exhibition space displays art by Delaware State students and faculty, as well as work by regional and national artists. The Arts Center/Gallery sponsors lectures, receptions, seminars, and interactive arts events. It also hosts the Regional Scholastic Art Awards. In their final semester, Arts Management students complete an off-campus internship with a community arts organization — typically a museum, nonprofit agency, educational institution, government program, or other public-spirited entity.      

Spanish Education

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 Effective:  Fall 2009  Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr FREN-201 Inter French Language & Culture I 3 FREN-202 Inter French Language & Culture II 3 ENG-101 English Composition I 3 ENG-102 English Composition II 3 25-101 Mathematics 101 3 25-102 Mathematics 102 3 ENG-191 University Seminar I 1 ENG-192 University Seminar II 1 xx-xxx Arts/Humanities Elective 3 FREN-242 Basic French Composition I 3 xx-xxx Natural Science 3 xx-xxx Natural Science 3       16-100 Wellness 2   Total Credits 16   Total Credits 18 Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr FREN-222 French Conversation 3 ENG-301 Inter French Comp & Stylistics II 3 36-201 Intro to General Psychology 3 ENG-200 Speech 3 ENG-201/205 World/African-American Lit I 3 ENG-202/206 World/African American Lit II 3 FREN-211 Business Registers I 3 FREN-212 Business Registers II 3 34-xxx American History 3 FREN-333/ENG-204 Linguistics 3   Total Credits 15   Total Credits 15 Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr FREN-303 Survey of French Literature I 3 FREN-304 Survey of French Literature II 3 FREN-305 French Civilization 3 FREN-306 Aspects of French Culture in the Americas 3 FREN-334 French Diction and Conversation 3 FREN-399 Independent Study I 3 FREN-335 Basic Translation I 3 FREN-336 Basic Translation II 3 31-395 Global Societies 3 FREN-307 17th Century French Literature 3   Total Credits 15   Total Credits 15 Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr FREN-401► Adv French Comp & Stylistics III 3 FREN-499 *Independent Study II 6 FREN-403 The French Novel 3 xx-xxx **Foreign Language Electives 6 xx-xxx Free Electives 6       FREN-406 History of the French Language 3         Total Credits 15   Total Credits 12               * SENIOR CAPSTONE EXP (May be taken abroad to fulfill the Study Abroad Requirement) ** May be taken abroad to fulfill the Study Abroad Requirement ► Writing Intensive Course TOTAL CREDITS: 121

French Education

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Effective:  Fall 2009 Freshman Fall Semester Freshman Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr FREN-201 Inter French Lang & Cult 3 FREN-202 Inter French Lang & Cult 3 ENG-101 English Composition I 3 ENG-102 English Composition II 3 25-101 Mathematics I 3 25-102 Mathematics II 3 ENG-191 University Seminar I 1 ENG-192 University Seminar II 1 xx-xxx Natural Science Elective 3 34-xxx American History 3 xx-xxx Arts/Humanities Elective 3 xx-xxx Natural Science Elective 3       16-100 Wellness 2   Total Credits 16   Total Credits *TAKE PRAXIS I 18 Sophomore Fall Semester Sophomore Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr FREN-242 Basic Composition I 3 FREN-334 French Diction and Conv. 3 ENG-201/205 World/African American Lit I 3 ENG-202/206 World/African American Lit II 3 36-201 Intro to General Psychology 3 12-207 Lifespan Development 3 ENG-200 Speech 3 FREN-333/ENG-204 Linguistics 3 FREN-222 French Conversation 3 12-204 Philosophical Foundations of Ed 3       FREN-301 Inter Composition & Stylistics 3   Total Credits 15   Total Credits **ADMISSION TO TEP (45 credits-GPA 2.5) 18 Junior Fall Semester Junior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr FREN-305 Civilization I 3 FREN-499 ***Independent Study II 3 12-313 Intro to Ed of Children with Exceptional Needs 3 36-316 Developmental Psychology 3 12-322 Teaching Reading in Sec. Schools 3 12-357 Effective Tchg & Classroom Mgmt 4 12-318/31-395 Multicult Ed (Majors only) or Global Societies 3 12-344 Instructional Technology 3 FREN-303 Survey of French Lit I 3 FREN-304 Survey of French Lit II 3   Total Credits 15   Total Credits ****TAKE PRAXIS II 16 Senior Fall Semester Senior Spring Semester Course Course Name Cr Course Course Name Cr 07-405 Second Language Testing 3 12-400 *****Pre Service/Student Teaching 12 07-409 Methods & Mats for Tchg For Languages 3       12-416 Analysis of Student Teaching 1       xx-xxx ******Foreign Language Elective 3       FREN-401► Adv Comp and Stylistics 3         Total Credits 13   Total Credits 12               *****SENIOR CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE ***Independent Study II and ******Foreign Language Elective to be taken abroad ► Writing Intensive Course TOTAL CREDITS:  123

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in History

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  A student who chooses this major must complete the requirements of the current history curriculum. A total of 36 hours of history are required and the student must earn a "C" or better in each course. A student must complete History 101, 102, 201 and 202, or 101, 102, 203 and 204, and must also take twenty-four hours on the 300 and 400 levels. In the upper division sections, each student must complete a twelve-hour program of either United States, European, African American, or World History, which will comprise his/her area of specialization. The remaining twelve hours must be taken in areas outside of the field of specialization, including at least three hours in each area. First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-XXX Mathematics 3 34-101 World Civilization to the Eighteenth Century 3 34-191 University Seminar I 1 XX-XXX Science 3-4     18-19 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 25-XXX Mathematics 3 33-200 American National Government 3 34-102 World Civilization from the Eighteenth Century 3 34-192 University Seminar II 1 XX-XXX Science 3-4     16-17 Second Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 32-101 or 32-201 Human Geography or World Regional Geography 3 34-201 or 34-203 American Civilization to 1865 or The African American Experience to 1865 3 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3     15 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 03-101 Critical Thinking 3 34-202 or 34-204 American Civilization from 1865 or The African American Experience from 1865 3 34-290 Introduction to Historical Methods 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     15 Third Year First Semester     34-300 Delaware History 3 34-XXX American History (300-400) 3 34-XXX European History (300-400) 3 XX-XXX Art/Humanities Elective ** 3 XX-XXX Open Elective 3     15 Second Semester     31-395 Global Societies 3 34-446 Research Methods in History 3 34-XXX African-American History (300-400) 3 34-XXX World History (300-400) 3 XX-XXX Open Elective 3     15 Fourth Year First Semester     34-475 Senior Capstone 3 34-XXX History Concentrations (300-400) 6 XX-XXX Social Science Elective ** 3 XX-XXX Open Electives 3     15 Second Semester     34-XXX History Concentration 3 XX-XXX Art/Humanities Elective ** 3 XX-XXX Social Science Elective ** 3 XX-XXX Open Electives 6     15   Total credits 124-126   **Social Science elective may be met with 300-400 level courses in Economics, Sociology, Psychology, Political Science, or Physical Geography. Art/Humanities upper-level electives may be met with 300-400 level courses in Art, Art History, Philosophy, English, or a Foreign Language.  

Curriculum for Bachelor's Degree in Political Science

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    First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 25-XXX Mathematics 3 33-103 Introduction to Political Science 3 34-191 University Seminar I 1 XX-XXX Science 3-4     15-16 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 25-XXX Mathematics 3 32-101 Human Geography 3 34-101 or 34-102 World Civilization to the Eighteenth Century or World Civilization from the Eighteenth Century 3 34-192 University Seminar II 1 XX-XXX Science 3-4     16-17 Second Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 33-200 American National Government 3 34-201 or 34-203 American Civilization to 1865 or The African American Experience to 1865 3 XX-101 Elementary Foreign Language I 3     15 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 03-101 Critical Thinking 3 33-220 Comparative Government 3 34-202 or 34-204 American Civilization from 1865 or The African American Experience from 1865 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     15 Third Year First Semester     03-XXX Philosophy Elective 3 33-210 Contemporary Political Ideologies 3 33-230 International Politics 3 33-410 or 37-314 Research Methods in Political Science or Methods of Sociological Research 3 40-201 Macroeconomics 3     15 Second Semester     31-395 Global Societies 3 33-XXX Political Science Electives 6 40-202 Microeconomics 3 XX-XXX Arts / Humanities Elective 3     15 Fourth Year First Semester     33-475 Senior Capstone 3 33-XXX Political Science Electives 6 XX-XXX Open Electives 6     15 Second Semester     33-XXX Political Science Electives 6 XX-XXX Open Electives 9     15   Total credits 121-122  

History Course Descriptions

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SURVEY COURSES WORLD HISTORY 34-101. WORLD CIVILIZATION TO THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 3:3:0 A survey of the growth of the great cultures from ancient times to the 18th century. Credit: three hours. 34-102. WORLD CIVILIZATION FROM THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 3:3:0 A survey of the growth of the great cultures of the modern world from the 18th century to the present. The major emphasis of the course is on the trends and developments of the 20th century. Credit: three hours. 34-104. HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT OF DELAWARE. 1:1:0 A survey course in the history and government of Delaware. Credit: one hour. 34-201. AMERICAN CIVILIZATION TO 1865. 3:3:0 A course that covers the period from 1492 to the close of the Civil War. Cultural and economic developments are given emphasis. Credit: three hours. 34-202. AMERICAN CIVILIZATION FROM 1865. 3:3:0 A study that concentrates on the United States from 1865 to the present with emphasis on the trends and developments of the 20th century. Credit: three hours. 34-203. THE AFRICAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE TO 1865. 3:3:0 An historical and analytical study of African Americans from the colonial era to the end of the Civil War. It includes the study of the cultural heritage of African Americans, their contributions to the building of America, including the economic and political institutions, and the role of African Americans in the expansion of American freedom, liberty, and democracy. Credit: three hours. 34-204. THE AFRICAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE FROM 1865. 3:3:0 A study of African American life from Reconstruction to the present. It focuses on the challenges of achieving racial justice and equality in the face of adversity. This course looks at protest movements leading to institutional reform, African American contributions to the creation of a modern urban culture, overall American economic prosperity, and global power and leadership. Credit: three hours. 34-333. AFRICAN AMERICANS IN COLONIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA. 3:3:0 This course covers African American history from the first arrival of Africans at Jamestown in 1619. It looks at the development of an African American culture, the contribution of African Americans to the building of America, and their role in the American Revolution. It ends with the adoption of the United States Constitution. Prerequisite: History 201 and History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-334. AFRICAN AMERICANS AND THE BUILDING OF A NATION, 1789-1865. 3:3:0 An upper division course which covers a study of African Americans and their contribution to the establishment of a republic in America, westward expansion, defense of the country, and the establishment of freedom for millions during the Civil War. Prerequisite: History 201 or History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-335. AFRICAN AMERICANS FROM RECONSTRUCTION THROUGH WORLD WAR I. 3:3:0 A study of African Americans' struggle to achieve racial justice and equality during the Reconstruction Era and the challenge to their freedom during the Jim Crow Era. This course also covers African Americans and the settlement of the West, the farming the South, and the industrialization of the North. It also investigates their role in the wars fought by the United States covering federal military occupation in the South, the Plains Native American Wars, the Spanish American War, the Philippines War, and World War I. Prerequisite: History 202 or History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-336. AFRICAN AMERICANS AND MODERN AMERICA, 1919 TO THE PRESENT. 3:3:0 This covers the contributions of African Americans to the establishment of an urban-based, modern culture in the United States beginning with the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s. It will cover the challenges of surviving the devastation of the Great Depression, fighting Jim Crow and the fascists in World War II, and the struggle for Civil Rights during the Cold War Era. It will end with the contemporary America in the Post Modern and Post Cold War World taking a global perspective. Prerequisite: History 202 or History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-420. AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY FROM THE COLONIAL ERA THROUGH 1877: SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on a selected topic in African American history from colonial times through the end of Reconstruction. Credit: three hours. 34-421. AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY, 1877 TO THE PRESENT: SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in African American history from the end of Reconstruction to present. Credit: three hours. UPPER DIVISION COURSES: UNITED STATES HISTORY CONCENTRATION 34-323. COLONIAL AMERICA, 1492-1763. 3:3:0 This course will cover Native American history before European contact with a focus on North America. It will investigate the cultural, political, economic institutions of the Native Americans. It will study the exploration and settlement of the New World by the Europeans, especially the English colonies in North America, and the development of colonial society. Prerequisite: History 201 or History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-324. REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA AND THE EARLY REPUBLIC, 1763-1814. 3:3:0 A study of the American Revolution, the framing of the Constitution, and the formation of the early republic through the second war for independence, the War of 1812. Prerequisites: History 201 or History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-325. NATIONAL PERIOD, 1815-1877. 3:3:0 The study of the development of the new American nation, its westward expansion, cultural, political, and economic patterns, sectionalism leading to the Civil War, and the effect of that conflict on American life during Reconstruction. Prerequisites: History 201 or History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-326. THE GILDED AGE, 1877-1896. 3:3:0 A study of the battle for the West, the development of a nationwide industrial and commercial system, growth of urban life, major cultural developments produced by social and intellectual revolutions, the New South and Jim Crow, and workers' and farmers' protest movements. Prerequisites: History 202 and History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-327. THE PROGRESSIVE AND MODERN ERA, 1896-1945. 3:3:0 This course focuses on the end of isolationism beginning in the 1890s through the emergence as a global power in 1945 studying the Spanish- American, the Philippines War, World War I, and World War II. It covers progressive reform movements focusing on business regulation, urban, state, and national political reform, social work, and rural reform. Beginning with the 1920s, it will study the emergence of modern American and the second industrial revolution producing economic and cultural change through the challenges of the Great Depression. Prerequisites: History 202 and History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-328. AMERICA FROM 1945 TO THE PRESENT. 3:3:0 A study of the changes in American life since 1945, new global perspectives, and the problems of contemporary life in America. Prerequisites: History 202 and History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-433. COLONIAL HISTORY (1492-1763): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in American colonial history from 1492 to 1763. Credit: three hours. 34-434. REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA (1763-1790): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the American Revolutionary Era to the ratification of the Constitution. Credit: three hours. 34-435. THE EARLY REPUBLIC (1790-1815): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:30 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the early republic years through the end of the War of 1812. Credit: three hours. 34-436. THE NATIONAL PERIOD (1815-1860). 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the National Period from the end of the War of 1812 through the beginning of the Civil War Era. Credit: three hours. 34-437. THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION (1860-1877): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the Civil War ERA through Reconstruction. Credit: three hours. 34-438. THE GILDED AGE (1877-1896): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the Gilded Age, 1877-1896. Credit: three hours. 34-439. THE PROGRESSIVE ERA (1896-1919): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the Progressive Era, 1896-1919. Credit: three hours. 34-440. THE EARLY MODERN ERA (1920-1941). 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the early modern era, 1920-1941. Credit: three hours. 34-441. THE WORLD WAR II ERA THROUGH THE KOREAN WAR (1941-1952): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of World war II and the beginning of the Cold War through the Korean War. Credit: three hours. 34-442. MODERN AMERICAN HISTORY (1953-1975): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in American History from 1953 through 1975 covering cultural history and the Vietnam War. Credit: three hours. 34-443. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN (1975 TO THE PRESENT): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in contemporary American history from 1975. Credit: three hours. 34-461. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 201 or 34-107 African-American Experience to 1865 and History 202 or History 108 Recent Black Experience, depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. 34-466. SEMINAR IN BLACK STUDIES. 3:3:0 Credit: three hours. UPPER DIVISION COURSES: EUROPEAN HISTORY CONCENTRATION 34-301. ENGLAND TO 1688. 3:3:0 The founding of the English national state and the political, cultural, and economic development of early modern England and the Commonwealth. Prerequisite: History 101. (May be offered as a European History elective.) Credit: three hours. 34-302. ENGLAND AND THE BRITISH COMMONWEALTH FROM 1688. 3:3:0 Political, economic, and cultural growth of modern England and the Commonwealth. Prerequisite: History 102. (May be offered as a European or World History elective). Credit: three hours. 34-319. ANCIENT HISTORY TO THE FIFTH CENTURY A.D. 3:3:0 This course details the evolution of ancient civilizations in Mesopotamia and Egypt and describes the contributions of the Greeks, Hellenistic, and Roman cultures. Prerequisite: History 101. Credit: three hours. 34-320. MEDIEVAL EUROPE FROM 500 A.D. TO 1500 A.D. 3:3:0 The history and civilization of Europe is examined with particular attention being paid to the development of institutions and ideas that characterize Western Culture. Prerequisite: History 101. Credit: three hours. 34-321. EARLY MODERN EUROPE FROM 1500 A.D. TO 1815 A.D. 3:3:0 The Renaissance, Reformation, and Enlightenment are highlighted with particular emphasis on the emergence of Humanism, Science, and Rationalism. Prerequisite: History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-322. MODERN EUROPE FROM 1815 TO THE PRESENT. 3:3:0 A study of the principal cultural, economic, and political developments in Europe since the French Revolution and an introduction to recent historical scholarship. Prerequisite: History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-332. HISTORY OF RUSSIA. 3:3:0 A study of Russian History from the emergence of the first Slavic settlements to the rise of the modern Soviet state. Political, economic, and intellectual trends are highlighted. Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102. (May be offered as a European or World History elective.) Credit: three hours. 34-344. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN HISTORY. 3:3:0 An intensive investigation of a topic within the discipline of History under the guidance of a faculty member. Course requirements include regular conferences relating to a research paper or other appropriate project. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor, execution of a written agreement describing the subject and scope of the research project prior to enrollment, and 15 hours of prior course work in History. Credit: three hours. 462. SEMINAR IN EUROPEAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102 depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. UPPER DIVISION COURSES: WORLD HISTORY CONCENTRATION 34-313. LATIN AMERICA TO 1824. 3:3:0 The history of Latin American from pre-Colombian times through the wars of independence. Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-314. LATIN AMERICA SINCE 1824. 3:3:0 The history of Latin America since independence, with special emphasis on conditions today, including the relations of Latin America with the United States and the rest of the world. Prerequisite: History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-315. AFRICAN HISTORY TO 1884. 3:3:0 The history of Africa from earliest times to the Berlin Conference which signaled the division of Africa by the European powers. Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-316. AFRICAN HISTORY SINCE 1884. 3:3:0 The history of colonialism in Africa, the movement toward independence, and conditions in selected countries since independence. Prerequisite: History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-463. SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102 depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. 34-464. SEMINAR IN ASIAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102 depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. 34-465. SEMINAR IN AFRICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102 depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. NOTE: The list of seminar classes each semester will show the specific topic to be covered. Example: Seminar in American History-American Diplomatic History. UPPER DIVISION ELECTIVES AND SPECIALTY COURSES 34-290. INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL METHODS. 3:3:0 This course is designed to introduce history majors, and others, to history as a social science discipline. The major emphasis of the course is on research methods, historical analysis, historical interpretation, historiography, and writing formal research papers. This course is a prerequisite for all History majors seeking to enter 300-400 level History course. 34-300. HISTORY OF DELAWARE. 3:3:0 The development of Delaware from colonial times to the present, the land, the people, the culture, the institutions. Resources of the state will be used and special projects will enable the students to play a part in preserving the rich heritage of the state. Prerequisite: History 201 or History 202. (May be offered as an American History elective). Credit: three hours. 34-312. AMERICAN MILITARY HISTORY. 3:3:0 This course examines the history of American military forces from the Revolution against Britain through the Gulf War. The causes of war, as well as its prevention, are emphasized. Credit: three hours. 34-445. TEACHING HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3:3:0 Instruction in current methods, materials and appropriate activities for effective teaching of social science in secondary schools including preparation of lesson plans, units and projects, demonstrations, visits to schools and discussions on special problems in teaching social science. Emphasis is placed on technological advances and their application to the modern classroom experience. Emphasis is placed on technological advances and their application to the modern classroom experience. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit: three hours. 34-446. RESEARCH METHODS IN HISTORY. 3:3:0 This an advanced level course which focuses on methods of historical research, including the use of archives, library research skills, and accessing government documents. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three hours. 34-447. COMPUTER SKILLS IN HISTORICAL RESEARCH. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on the use of the computer, including word processing, spread sheets, data bases, graphics and publishing programs. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three hours. 34-448. HISTORIOGRAPHY OF AMERICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on the study of various schools of thought and interpretation in the writing of American History. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three hours. 34-429. A HISTORIOGRAPHY OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on the study of various schools of thought and interpretation in the writing of African American History. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three hours. 34-470. HISTORY INTERNSHIP. 3:3:0 Students interested in an internship experience with a private historical group or a local, state, or federal government agent should consult with the department chairperson for program information. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three to twelve hours.  (34) SURVEY COURSES WORLD HISTORY 34-101. WORLD CIVILIZATION TO THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 3:3:0 A survey of the growth of the great cultures from ancient times to the 18th century. Credit: three hours. 34-102. WORLD CIVILIZATION FROM THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 3:3:0 A survey of the growth of the great cultures of the modern world from the 18th century to the present. The major emphasis of the course is on the trends and developments of the 20th century. Credit: three hours. 34-104. HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT OF DELAWARE. 1:1:0 A survey course in the history and government of Delaware. Credit: one hour. 34-201. AMERICAN CIVILIZATION TO 1865. 3:3:0 A course that covers the period from 1492 to the close of the Civil War. Cultural and economic developments are given emphasis. Credit: three hours. 34-202. AMERICAN CIVILIZATION FROM 1865. 3:3:0 A study that concentrates on the United States from 1865 to the present with emphasis on the trends and developments of the 20th century. Credit: three hours. 34-203. THE AFRICAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE TO 1865. 3:3:0 An historical and analytical study of African Americans from the colonial era to the end of the Civil War. It includes the study of the cultural heritage of African Americans, their contributions to the building of America, including the economic and political institutions, and the role of African Americans in the expansion of American freedom, liberty, and democracy. Credit: three hours. 34-204. THE AFRICAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE FROM 1865. 3:3:0 A study of African American life from Reconstruction to the present. It focuses on the challenges of achieving racial justice and equality in the face of adversity. This course looks at protest movements leading to institutional reform, African American contributions to the creation of a modern urban culture, overall American economic prosperity, and global power and leadership. Credit: three hours. 34-333. AFRICAN AMERICANS IN COLONIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA. 3:3:0 This course covers African American history from the first arrival of Africans at Jamestown in 1619. It looks at the development of an African American culture, the contribution of African Americans to the building of America, and their role in the American Revolution. It ends with the adoption of the United States Constitution. Prerequisite: History 201 and History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-334. AFRICAN AMERICANS AND THE BUILDING OF A NATION, 1789-1865. 3:3:0 An upper division course which covers a study of African Americans and their contribution to the establishment of a republic in America, westward expansion, defense of the country, and the establishment of freedom for millions during the Civil War. Prerequisite: History 201 or History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-335. AFRICAN AMERICANS FROM RECONSTRUCTION THROUGH WORLD WAR I. 3:3:0 A study of African Americans' struggle to achieve racial justice and equality during the Reconstruction Era and the challenge to their freedom during the Jim Crow Era. This course also covers African Americans and the settlement of the West, the farming the South, and the industrialization of the North. It also investigates their role in the wars fought by the United States covering federal military occupation in the South, the Plains Native American Wars, the Spanish American War, the Philippines War, and World War I. Prerequisite: History 202 or History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-336. AFRICAN AMERICANS AND MODERN AMERICA, 1919 TO THE PRESENT. 3:3:0 This covers the contributions of African Americans to the establishment of an urban-based, modern culture in the United States beginning with the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s. It will cover the challenges of surviving the devastation of the Great Depression, fighting Jim Crow and the fascists in World War II, and the struggle for Civil Rights during the Cold War Era. It will end with the contemporary America in the Post Modern and Post Cold War World taking a global perspective. Prerequisite: History 202 or History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-420. AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY FROM THE COLONIAL ERA THROUGH 1877: SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on a selected topic in African American history from colonial times through the end of Reconstruction. Credit: three hours. 34-421. AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY, 1877 TO THE PRESENT: SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in African American history from the end of Reconstruction to present. Credit: three hours. UPPER DIVISION COURSES: UNITED STATES HISTORY CONCENTRATION 34-323. COLONIAL AMERICA, 1492-1763. 3:3:0 This course will cover Native American history before European contact with a focus on North America. It will investigate the cultural, political, economic institutions of the Native Americans. It will study the exploration and settlement of the New World by the Europeans, especially the English colonies in North America, and the development of colonial society. Prerequisite: History 201 or History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-324. REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA AND THE EARLY REPUBLIC, 1763-1814. 3:3:0 A study of the American Revolution, the framing of the Constitution, and the formation of the early republic through the second war for independence, the War of 1812. Prerequisites: History 201 or History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-325. NATIONAL PERIOD, 1815-1877. 3:3:0 The study of the development of the new American nation, its westward expansion, cultural, political, and economic patterns, sectionalism leading to the Civil War, and the effect of that conflict on American life during Reconstruction. Prerequisites: History 201 or History 203. Credit: three hours. 34-326. THE GILDED AGE, 1877-1896. 3:3:0 A study of the battle for the West, the development of a nationwide industrial and commercial system, growth of urban life, major cultural developments produced by social and intellectual revolutions, the New South and Jim Crow, and workers' and farmers' protest movements. Prerequisites: History 202 and History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-327. THE PROGRESSIVE AND MODERN ERA, 1896-1945. 3:3:0 This course focuses on the end of isolationism beginning in the 1890s through the emergence as a global power in 1945 studying the Spanish- American, the Philippines War, World War I, and World War II. It covers progressive reform movements focusing on business regulation, urban, state, and national political reform, social work, and rural reform. Beginning with the 1920s, it will study the emergence of modern American and the second industrial revolution producing economic and cultural change through the challenges of the Great Depression. Prerequisites: History 202 and History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-328. AMERICA FROM 1945 TO THE PRESENT. 3:3:0 A study of the changes in American life since 1945, new global perspectives, and the problems of contemporary life in America. Prerequisites: History 202 and History 204. Credit: three hours. 34-433. COLONIAL HISTORY (1492-1763): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in American colonial history from 1492 to 1763. Credit: three hours. 34-434. REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA (1763-1790): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the American Revolutionary Era to the ratification of the Constitution. Credit: three hours. 34-435. THE EARLY REPUBLIC (1790-1815): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:30 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the early republic years through the end of the War of 1812. Credit: three hours. 34-436. THE NATIONAL PERIOD (1815-1860). 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the National Period from the end of the War of 1812 through the beginning of the Civil War Era. Credit: three hours. 34-437. THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION (1860-1877): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the Civil War ERA through Reconstruction. Credit: three hours. 34-438. THE GILDED AGE (1877-1896): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the Gilded Age, 1877-1896. Credit: three hours. 34-439. THE PROGRESSIVE ERA (1896-1919): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the Progressive Era, 1896-1919. Credit: three hours. 34-440. THE EARLY MODERN ERA (1920-1941). 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of the early modern era, 1920-1941. Credit: three hours. 34-441. THE WORLD WAR II ERA THROUGH THE KOREAN WAR (1941-1952): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in the history of World war II and the beginning of the Cold War through the Korean War. Credit: three hours. 34-442. MODERN AMERICAN HISTORY (1953-1975): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced-level course which focuses on selected topics in American History from 1953 through 1975 covering cultural history and the Vietnam War. Credit: three hours. 34-443. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN (1975 TO THE PRESENT): SELECTED TOPICS. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on selected topics in contemporary American history from 1975. Credit: three hours. 34-461. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 201 or 34-107 African-American Experience to 1865 and History 202 or History 108 Recent Black Experience, depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. 34-466. SEMINAR IN BLACK STUDIES. 3:3:0 Credit: three hours. UPPER DIVISION COURSES: EUROPEAN HISTORY CONCENTRATION 34-301. ENGLAND TO 1688. 3:3:0 The founding of the English national state and the political, cultural, and economic development of early modern England and the Commonwealth. Prerequisite: History 101. (May be offered as a European History elective.) Credit: three hours. 34-302. ENGLAND AND THE BRITISH COMMONWEALTH FROM 1688. 3:3:0 Political, economic, and cultural growth of modern England and the Commonwealth. Prerequisite: History 102. (May be offered as a European or World History elective). Credit: three hours. 34-319. ANCIENT HISTORY TO THE FIFTH CENTURY A.D. 3:3:0 This course details the evolution of ancient civilizations in Mesopotamia and Egypt and describes the contributions of the Greeks, Hellenistic, and Roman cultures. Prerequisite: History 101. Credit: three hours. 34-320. MEDIEVAL EUROPE FROM 500 A.D. TO 1500 A.D. 3:3:0 The history and civilization of Europe is examined with particular attention being paid to the development of institutions and ideas that characterize Western Culture. Prerequisite: History 101. Credit: three hours. 34-321. EARLY MODERN EUROPE FROM 1500 A.D. TO 1815 A.D. 3:3:0 The Renaissance, Reformation, and Enlightenment are highlighted with particular emphasis on the emergence of Humanism, Science, and Rationalism. Prerequisite: History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-322. MODERN EUROPE FROM 1815 TO THE PRESENT. 3:3:0 A study of the principal cultural, economic, and political developments in Europe since the French Revolution and an introduction to recent historical scholarship. Prerequisite: History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-332. HISTORY OF RUSSIA. 3:3:0 A study of Russian History from the emergence of the first Slavic settlements to the rise of the modern Soviet state. Political, economic, and intellectual trends are highlighted. Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102. (May be offered as a European or World History elective.) Credit: three hours. 34-344. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN HISTORY. 3:3:0 An intensive investigation of a topic within the discipline of History under the guidance of a faculty member. Course requirements include regular conferences relating to a research paper or other appropriate project. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor, execution of a written agreement describing the subject and scope of the research project prior to enrollment, and 15 hours of prior course work in History. Credit: three hours. 462. SEMINAR IN EUROPEAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102 depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. UPPER DIVISION COURSES: WORLD HISTORY CONCENTRATION 34-313. LATIN AMERICA TO 1824. 3:3:0 The history of Latin American from pre-Colombian times through the wars of independence. Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-314. LATIN AMERICA SINCE 1824. 3:3:0 The history of Latin America since independence, with special emphasis on conditions today, including the relations of Latin America with the United States and the rest of the world. Prerequisite: History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-315. AFRICAN HISTORY TO 1884. 3:3:0 The history of Africa from earliest times to the Berlin Conference which signaled the division of Africa by the European powers. Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-316. AFRICAN HISTORY SINCE 1884. 3:3:0 The history of colonialism in Africa, the movement toward independence, and conditions in selected countries since independence. Prerequisite: History 102. Credit: three hours. 34-463. SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102 depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. 34-464. SEMINAR IN ASIAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102 depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. 34-465. SEMINAR IN AFRICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 Prerequisite: History 101 or History 102 depending on the topic. Credit: three hours. NOTE: The list of seminar classes each semester will show the specific topic to be covered. Example: Seminar in American History-American Diplomatic History. UPPER DIVISION ELECTIVES AND SPECIALTY COURSES 34-290. INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL METHODS. 3:3:0 This course is designed to introduce history majors, and others, to history as a social science discipline. The major emphasis of the course is on research methods, historical analysis, historical interpretation, historiography, and writing formal research papers. This course is a prerequisite for all History majors seeking to enter 300-400 level History course. 34-300. HISTORY OF DELAWARE. 3:3:0 The development of Delaware from colonial times to the present, the land, the people, the culture, the institutions. Resources of the state will be used and special projects will enable the students to play a part in preserving the rich heritage of the state. Prerequisite: History 201 or History 202. (May be offered as an American History elective). Credit: three hours. 34-312. AMERICAN MILITARY HISTORY. 3:3:0 This course examines the history of American military forces from the Revolution against Britain through the Gulf War. The causes of war, as well as its prevention, are emphasized. Credit: three hours. 34-445. TEACHING HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3:3:0 Instruction in current methods, materials and appropriate activities for effective teaching of social science in secondary schools including preparation of lesson plans, units and projects, demonstrations, visits to schools and discussions on special problems in teaching social science. Emphasis is placed on technological advances and their application to the modern classroom experience. Emphasis is placed on technological advances and their application to the modern classroom experience. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit: three hours. 34-446. RESEARCH METHODS IN HISTORY. 3:3:0 This an advanced level course which focuses on methods of historical research, including the use of archives, library research skills, and accessing government documents. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three hours. 34-447. COMPUTER SKILLS IN HISTORICAL RESEARCH. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on the use of the computer, including word processing, spread sheets, data bases, graphics and publishing programs. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three hours. 34-448. HISTORIOGRAPHY OF AMERICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on the study of various schools of thought and interpretation in the writing of American History. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three hours. 34-429. A HISTORIOGRAPHY OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY. 3:3:0 This is an advanced level course which focuses on the study of various schools of thought and interpretation in the writing of African American History. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three hours. 34-470. HISTORY INTERNSHIP. 3:3:0 Students interested in an internship experience with a private historical group or a local, state, or federal government agent should consult with the department chairperson for program information. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level. Credit: three to twelve hours. <------Back to Political Science Course Descriptions

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