Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

You are here


Historic Preservation M.A.

Description: 

Archaeology at Wildcat 2011

Footing excavated during the first field season at the Wildcat property by DSU graduate students in historic preservation under the direction of archaeologist Craig Lukezic and in partnership with the Archaeological Society of Delaware.

Body: 
Introduction The Graduate Program in Historic Preservation concentrates on the identification and preservation of African American historic resources. The program seeks to provide students with the necessary training and preparation for employment in this field of applied history. Courses in the program emphasize the practical and applied nature of the preservation field. The program courses are offered on Friday evenings and weekends, making the program ideal for those with current full-time employment.   Professional Preparation The goal of the program is to develop a cadre of professionals trained in the specialized methods of the preservation of African American historic resources.  Community based projects will provide students practical experience working through real preservation issues.  All courses connect to the real world of historic preservation professional practice in Delaware.    Faculty The program director, Robin L. Krawitz, professional preservationist with over thirty years of experience in field in the public, private and non-profit sectors and across the country, specializing in African American heritage preservation.  Her goal is to provide the students with hands-on and practical experiences in all classes, from guest lecturers who are expert on specific topics, to field exploration of historic resources and exploring the understanding of landscape development and preservation through extensive fieldwork.     The faculty for the historic preservation program is drawn from the practicing professionals in the field in Delaware, as well as from the history department faculty.  Graduate students have a lot of direct interaction with professors and receive much guidance and encouragement.   Research and Experience All students in the graduate program in historic preservation complete an off-campus internship with a private historical group or a local, state, or federal government agency. In addition to cultivating skills that translate directly to the workplace, students gain professional contacts via their internships, which may lead (directly or indirectly) to future employment.  Tools and methods taught in the program are based on the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Archeology and Historic Preservation and will be generally applicable to any historic preservation situation across the country. Program Contact:  rkrawitz@desu.edu
Leftbar: 

The Graduate Program in Historic Preservation at Delaware State University is a proud member of the National Council for Preservation Education: www.ncpe.us/

Program Contact Information:

Robin L. Krawitz, Director
Historic Preservation Program
Office Phone:  302 857-7139
Office Location:  ETV Building, Room 214
 
Rightbar: 

The Graduate Program in Historic Preservation at Delaware State University is a proud member of the National Council for Preservation Education: www.ncpe.us/

Program Contact Information:

Robin L. Krawitz, Director
Historic Preservation Program
Office Phone:  302 857-7139
Office Location:  ETV Building, Room 214

 

 

Forest Landing at Wildcat Farm in the Hunn Conservation Area


In addition to other projects and field exploration, the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation is a partner in the development of the historic resources in the Hunn Conservation Area, a Kent County recreational amenity under development.  This learning laboratory for the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation provides an opportunity for students to explore historic preservation and archaeological methods in a practical environment.  Work here contributes to the development of this public asset as it grows into a county park. Students will also participate in the ongoing archaeological research project underway at the property.

Themes to develop include:

  • Slavery and Abolition
  • Delaware’s Political Landscape in the 18th and 19th Centuries
  • Development of the 18th Century Port of Forest Landing
  • Development of the Worker Community at Hunntown
  • Material Culture through Archaeology

 

The Hunn Family


In addition to the Kent County and Delaware State University partnership for the development of the Wildcat Farm at the Hunn Conservation Area, the third partner in the development of this property is the Hunn Family.    Owned by this family since the 1760s, the Wildcat property continues to be of great importance and interest.  The family raises funds for projects here through the Friends of Wildcat Fund through the Delaware Community Foundation.  Family members are a key part of the Wildcat Advisory Committee that oversees and develops the path forward for this important historic place.

History

Body: 
    Introduction The history major at Delaware State offers a liberal arts education for the 21st century — multicultural and multidisciplinary.   Compared to most universities’ history programs, ours is more tightly integrated with other liberal arts subjects, such as philosophy, political science, economics, and sociology. Courses and material from all these disciplines reinforce each other, yielding a history degree of extraordinary academic breadth and richness.   Second, the history department at Delaware State emphasizes cultural and racial diversity. Students gain a broad range of perspectives — not merely “mainstream” interpretations but also history as told by (and about) women, slaves, immigrants, and ethnic and cultural minorities. No matter which area of concentration students choose (United States, European, African American, or World History), they get a well-rounded education that covers many perspectives.   History majors can choose to minor in Black Studies, Law Studies, or Philosophy. Professional Preparation Graduates from the history program enter the job market with a set of adaptable, marketable skills. They are proficient writers, excellent critical thinkers, and outstanding researchers. Through their studies, they develop an ability to synthesize multiple perspectives and insights into a single, balanced point of view.   The degree offers excellent preparation for graduate school in history or a related discipline, as well as advanced degrees in law, business, journalism, or education. Graduates may go directly into the work force in education, or any type of career that involves writing or research. Faculty The history department has a young and dynamic faculty. Instructors come from a diverse set of cultural and ethnic backgrounds, and they have a broad range of research interests that include military history, Latin America, Africa, maritime history, Colonial U.S. history, and the U.S. presidency.   Because the history department is small and intimate, students have a lot of direct interaction with professors and receive much guidance and encouragement. Research and Experience The history department is in the process of developing a study-abroad program that will enable students to gain credit while taking courses overseas. In addition, the history department sponsors a lecture series and hosts numerous visiting professors with varying areas of expertise.   .  

General Music

Body: 
    The music degree program at Delaware State isn’t merely a stepping stone to the big time. It is the big time. Our marching band, jazz band, concert band, and choir perform at major venues all over the world — including at President Barack Obama’s inaugural parade. We opened a state-of-the-art teaching studio in 2009, fully equipped with digital recording, composing, and editing tools, and our students have launched their own record label.   Delaware State’s Bachelor of Music program celebrates diversity, covering many genres of music from all over the world. And graduates from our music degree program routinely go on to prominent careers as performers, composers, recording artists, educators, and music industry executives.   But it’s in the classroom that Delaware State’s music major truly stands out. In addition to developing superior instrumental skills, students get an excellent, well-rounded academic education that includes professional preparation for a broad range of music-related careers. Professional Preparation Delaware State’s Bachelor of Music degree includes a new component that focuses on the business of music. Students learn about everything from marketing and promotion to songwriting, recording, and producing — material that is covered by few (if any) other university music programs.   In addition, students get a comprehensive musical education that includes advanced ear training a four-course music theory sequence instruction in piano, woodwinds, and brass music history composing and arranging conducting Faculty As a group, Delaware State’s music degree faculty boast extensive professional experience as musicians, educators, and bandleaders. Members of the music faculty have worked as major-label recording artists, producers, and composers directed award-winning bands and choirs written books and journal articles performed on national TV and in major venues nationwide Their experience and professional contacts in various aspects of the music industry are an invaluable resource for students. Faculty act as mentors and career coaches, helping students to find the right niche within a highly competitive industry. Research and Experience Few music degree programs can match the range of performing experience offered by Delaware State. Our bands and choirs tour the country and the world, performing for heads of state, festival audiences, stadiums and arenas. Delaware State’s Marching Band, popularly known as “The Approaching Storm,” is recognized as one of the nation’s best university-level performing units.   On the business side, Delaware State has launched a student-run record company that prepares students for a seamless transition into successful careers in the music industry.  

Music Education

Body: 
  Introduction For students who want a career in music education, there’s no better preparation than a Bachelor in Music Education from Delaware State. Our department has a national reputation for excellence in the field, so Delaware State’s music education graduates are in very high demand. They enter the work force with outstanding musical technique, lots of performing experience, an excellent general academic background, and a professional teaching credential. After graduation, most music education majors pursue careers as music teachers at the K-12 level. Some establish themselves as community band directors or private teachers, and others continue their studies in graduate school. Delaware State’s music education degree is flexible enough to support a broad range of music-related professional options. Professional Prep Upon earning a Bachelor in Music Education from Delaware State, graduates are fully licensed to teach in Delaware and all states with reciprocal agreements. Students receive a comprehensive teacher education that includes coursework and hands-on experience in developmental psychology educational psychology multicultural education instruction and classroom management multicultural student populations student teaching In addition, students get a comprehensive musical education that includes advanced ear training a four-course music theory sequence instruction in piano, woodwinds, and brass music history composing and arranging conducting Faculty As a group, Delaware State’s music degree faculty members possess decades of experience as music educators. They have taught at the high school and college levels, while directing award-winning bands with extensive performing credentials. In addition, members of the music faculty have worked as major-label recording artists, producers, and composers written books and journal articles performed on national TV and in major venues nationwide Their experience and professional contacts in various aspects of music education and the music industry are an invaluable resource for students. Faculty act as mentors and career coaches, helping students to find the right niche. Research and Experience During the senior year, all music education majors complete a 12-week student teaching placement in a real-world classroom. Throughout the four year program, students in the music education program can gain performing experience in Delaware State’s nationally renowned bands and choir. Our students tour the country and the world, performing for heads of state, festival audiences, stadiums and arenas. Delaware State’s Marching Band, popularly known as “The Approaching Storm,” is recognized as one of the nation’s best university-level performing units.  

Spanish - Non Teaching

Body: 
    Introduction As America’s Spanish-speaking population rises, so too does the demand for professionals who have advanced Spanish skills. Delaware State’s Spanish program offers outstanding preparation for a whole range of potential careers. Students acquire fluency in the language and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world — skills that are increasingly marketable in a diversifying nation.   Spanish majors get a global perspective at Delaware State, whose international faculty and student population include many native Spanish speakers. In addition, students take classes overseas via our extensive study-abroad program, spending up to 6 months in countries as varied as Mexico, France, Senegal, Mauritania, China, and Mexico.   With its emphasis on cultural diversity, this program provides a foundation for numerous types of careers in the global village of the 21st century. Professional Preparation Graduates of the Spanish program enjoy excellent career prospects, due to the rising demand for fluency in the language and cultures of Latin America. Job possibilities exist in the private, public, and nonprofit sectors, and can be found both in the United States and overseas. Our graduates commonly find employment as teachers translators and interpreters business personnel international lawyers and patent attorneys diplomatic corps US. naturalization service agents Faculty The foreign language programs at Delaware State are taught by a multicultural faculty who combine real-world experience with academic expertise. With small class sizes, instructors can get to know each student personally, offering one-on-one mentorship and guidance that goes far beyond textbooks and lectures. The faculty consists of specialists in literature, linguistics and foreign language education.  

French - Non Teaching

Body: 
    Introduction Delaware State’s unique French major focuses on the global reach of the language. In addition to mastering French in classroom setting, students take courses overseas in Delaware State’s outstanding study-abroad program, spending up to 6 months in countries as varied as France, Senegal, Mauritania, China, and Mexico. With its emphasis on cultural diversity, this program provides a foundation for numerous types of careers in the global village of the 21st century. Professional Prep All French majors take required courses in translation, business, world literature, and global societies. In addition, students can build professional skills via a field placement as a French teacher, or by studying abroad. Many students become fluent in Fulani, Chinese, Spanish, or another language in addition to French. This broad base of language and cultural skills prepares students for a range of professional opportunities in teaching, diplomacy, interpreting, international business, and other fields. Faculty Faculty in the French department have a long list of research and publishing credits. They also represent a diverse range of cultural and ethnic backgrounds, providing a broad global perspective. Intimate class sizes enable professors to provide students with personal advice, encouragement, and mentorship throughout the undergraduate years and even after graduation. Research and Experience Delaware State has study-abroad relationships on four continents, providing students with the opportunity to immerse themselves in foreign cultures and languages. Overseas study usually occurs in the senior year. In addition, students can apply for field placements (in the United States or overseas) as French teachers, gaining valuable work experience while earning credit.  

English - Non Teaching

Body: 
    Introduction Delaware State teaches English literature from a global perspective. Students absorb the great works of Great Britain and the United States, from Shakespeare to the contemporary classics, and then go beyond to explore a wide range of literary voices, including women, immigrants, ethnic and racial minorities. Our program uses literature as a window onto the diversity of human insight and experience — as well as the common themes that unite all people.   The English program lays a strong, broad academic foundation, with required coursework in history, psychology, mathematics, and foreign languages. Students develop superior writing and critical thinking skills, which can be applied across many different career paths. At bottom, literature is the study of the human condition — all humans, of every race, color, and creed. Professional Preparation Students who graduate from the English program have almost unlimited options. Graduate school is a common option — either for continued studies in writing and literature, or for advanced degrees in law, business, government, journalism, or education. Graduate who go directly in the work force can market their strengths in writing and communication, as well as their multicultural perspective and solid background in many liberal art disciplines. Faculty Faculty in the English department have a long list of research and publishing credits. They also represent a diverse range of cultural and ethnic backgrounds, providing a broad global perspective. Intimate class sizes enable professors to provide students with personal advice, encouragement, and mentorship throughout the undergraduate years and even after graduation.  

English Education

Body: 
    Introduction As America becomes more diverse, there’s a growing need for English teachers trained in multicultural education, including English as a Second Language (ESL). Delaware State’s English Education program emphasizes the specialized knowledge and skills that multicultural educators need. Students gain hands-on teaching experience and participate in research. Job prospects are very bright in this important niche — most of our students have jobs waiting for them upon graduation. Professional Preparation This interdisciplinary program fulfills all requirements for State of Delaware teacher certification; graduates are fully licensed. It prepares teachers to work with students of all ages, from a wide range of cultural and language backgrounds. Students will Work as a student teacher in a real-world classroom for 12 weeks Participate in research projects related to bilingual and bicultural children Take required courses in the English, Education, and Psychology departments English Education courses are open to students from other majors who want to prepare for teacher certification, as well as certified teachers who would like to take Content Knowledge courses. Faculty Most professors in the English Education department began their careers as certified teachers, so they possess real-world classroom experience in addition to academic expertise. This perspective, combined with Delaware State’s small class sizes, enables faculty to offer one-on-one mentorship and guidance. They develop personal relationships with their students, offering lessons that go far beyond textbooks and lectures. Research and Experience The English Education major requires several hundred hours of direct classroom observation and student teaching. In addition, students have the opportunity to participate in research studies focused on subjects such as literacy, ESL, multicultural education, the teaching of reading, and teacher training.  

Dr. Akwasi Osei

Body: 
  Expertise is in Global Studies, International political economy, Africa in the international system, the African Diaspora and multicultural education. He has published in all these areas.  His latest publication is Global Societies: an Introduction (2007) co-edited with Dr. F. Odun Balogun.  His Recurrence and Change in a Post Independence African State published in 1999 was reissued in 2003 in paperback.  Served as the Chair of the DSU Faculty Senate for many years Currently serves as the Acting Associate Dean of the College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences; ETV 110, 302-857-6622, aosei@desu.edu PhD Howard University  

TESL Course Descriptions

Body: 
    ENG-504/404. SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION. This course is an analysis of current issues in second language acquisition based on readings and research findings. Discussion of theories includes the Acculturation Model, the Nativization Model, Accommodation Theory, Discourse Theory, the Monitor Model, the Variable Competence Model, the Universal Hypothesis, Neuro-functional Theory and other models. Prerequisites: 12 semester hours of a foreign language. Credit, 3 hours. ENG-518. METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE. This course introduces students to basic concepts and methodologies for teaching second language learners. It is designed as a review of theories, programs, approaches, strategies, and techniques for effective second language teaching methods. Additionally, the course addresses theories of acquisition of a second language. ENG-510. STRUCTURE OF MODERN ENGLISH. Structure of Modern English is an advanced course in the grammar and structure of English. It is designed to give intensive study and practice in analyzing the structure of English sounds, words, phrases, and sentences; doing error analysis; recognizing and correcting errors; taking examinations; writing research papers and engaging in various pedagogically-oriented linguistic analysis projects. ENG-512. SEMINAR ON THEORIES AND PRACTICE OF SECOND LANGUAGE LEARNING AND TESTING. This seminar will focus on and put into practice relevant aspects of applied linguistics, second language acquisition (SLA), pedagogy and testing. Topics include interactive and non-interactive hypermedia technologies, computer-assisted language learning (CALL) and second language (L2) literacy, language testing and technology, distance learning, online chat discussions, software selection, and more. Course formats include readings, discussion, demonstrations, and hands-on sessions with technologies. As part of a teaching portfolio, students will create their own computer-based materials for teaching. ENG-519. TEACHING THE MULTICULTURAL-MULTILINGUAL STUDENT. This course introduces students to the theories, methods, techniques, educational perspectives and issues involved in teaching children from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. This course includes a field experience. ENG-520. FOUNDATIONS OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION. This course is designed to equip bilingual and second language teachers with the tools, knowledge and philosophy for working with language minority students in the context of bilingual/ESL programs. The course introduces candidates to the historical, political and legal foundations of bilingual education programs in the United States, in addition to exploring different models of bilingual programs and their psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic foundations upon which they rest. EDU-557. EFFECTIVE TEACHING SKILLS AND CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT. This course combines effective teaching skills and classroom management into one comprehensive course. It is designed to provide basic pedagogical tools and conceptual frames necessary for creating effective teaching and learning environments. Students will be introduced to the current research on best practices that inform teachers/practitioners. Students will be required to demonstrate through individual and small group experiential activities, the critical teaching skills that are embodied in the Delaware Teaching Standards, multiple assessment strategies, micro-teaching, mastery teaching, cooperative le4arning strategies and other instructional models. Additionally the student will have the opportunity to develop reflective teaching skills in the planning, delivery and evaluation of their cohort’s teaching performances. In a convivial atmosphere, the instructor and peers will provide feedback on an individual’s teaching related to performance-based objectives and learner outcomes. This course incorporates current research on the most effective strategies for improving classroom discipline, motivation, interpersonal relationships and academic performance on all grade levels. Attention is given to aspects of diversity and/or cultural factors that influence perceptions about classroom management and also factor which may assist in facilitating mainstreaming efforts. 4 credits. ENG-590. PRACTICUM. This course provides students with the opportunity to supplement coursework with practical work experience related to their educational program. Students work under the immediate supervision of experienced personnel at the School District where they are assigned as well as with the direct guidance of their instructor. EDU-601. CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN AMERICAN EDUCATION. This course analyzes current trends, problems and theories based upon examination of recent educational literature. Students critically explore topics related to the formulation of curriculum, instructional policy and methodology in education. 3 credits. EDU-604. THEORIES AND METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. This course is a study of educational theories as applied to curriculum and instruction with emphasis on current trends and the identification of the instructional process, organizing operations and skills for teaching. 3 credits. EDU-608. DIAGNOSTIC TEACHING OF READING. This course consists of a review of current research and opinion, evaluation of materials techniques and programs for assessment and prescription of reading techniques. A Practicum provides students the opportunity to implement and evaluate a diagnostic-prescriptive reading program. 3 credits. EDU-611. THEORIES AND PRACTICIES IN EXCEPTIONALITIES. This course is designed to identify exceptional learners and provide an understanding of their educational needs. Specific teaching techniques will be explored, as well as principles and practices of program development. 3 credits. EDU-614. HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. Educational implications of human development over the life-span are examined. Students will survey research with special attention to the applications to teaching and developmentally appropriate school programs. 3 credits. EDU-625/688. INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS AND RESEARCH/ACTION RESEARCH. This course covers application of basic statistical techniques and research methodologies employed in qualitative and quantitative research in education. The focus of the course is primarily on action research and students will develop an action research plan as a course requirement. 3 credits.  

Pages