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Contact
Africana Studies Program
1200 North Du Pont Highway
Dover, DE 19901
africana@desu.edu
Tel: 302.857.6145

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REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR IN AFRICANA STUDIES The minor in Africana Studies requires nine (9) credit hours of Africana Studies courses: AFST-201, AFST-202, and AFST-400. The remaining nine (9) credit hours may be selected from any three (3) courses drawn from the humanities and the social sciences that have as their core the study of any part of or any people of the global African world. AFST-201. INTRODUCTION TO AFRICANA STUDIES The course offers a comprehensive, interdisciplinary exploration of key aspects of the African experience from antiquity to present, in Africa and throughout the African Diaspora. The course provides students with a fundamental intellectual understanding of the universal African experience as it has been described and interpreted by humanists and social scientists. Some of the themes examined in this course include pre-colonial African-European interactions, liberation, colonialism, gender, and contemporary issues facing the African diaspora. Declared minors will be given priority for the course. Credit, three hours. AFST-202. LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IN THE AFRICAN WORLD The course examines the interplay of verbal and nonverbal communication, written language, and cultural traditions of the African peoples in various parts of the world. From a scholarly perspective and within the frame of popular culture, the course looks at both contemporary and historical information to shed light on how language influences the global African societies and cultures. Credit, three hours. AFST-400. SEMINAR IN AFRICANA STUDIES Intended primarily for juniors and seniors, the Capstone Seminar in Africana Studies offers reading, writing, and small-group discussion in a particular aspect of Africana Studies. Collegial, collaborative, and reflective, the seminar format will prepare some students for graduate study. Others will use the experience to culminate and organize prior coursework and research in Africana Studies. Seminar topics will vary from year to year, but will generally reflect the current research interests of the Instructor. Credit, three hours. Electives: The remaining nine (9) credit hours may be selected from any three (3) courses drawn from the humanities and social scientists that embrace at their core the study of any part of the African Diaspora.   Options include but are not limited to: HIST 203: African American History to 1865 HIST 204: African American History From 1865 HIST 315: African History to 1884 HIST 316: African History from 1884 HIST 461: Seminar in American History: the Atlantic World HIST 334: African Americans and the Building of a Nation HIST 336: African Americans and Modern America, 1919-Present HIST 461: Seminar in American History: the Southern Plantation ENGL 205: African American Literature I ENGL 206: African American Literature II ENGL 207: Black Prose and Poetry ENGL 214: The Black American Novel ENGL 321: Seminar in Hughes, Wright, and Baldwin POL 320: Black Politics in America

Africana Studies

Description: 

Contact
Africana Studies Program
1200 North Du Pont Highway
Dover, DE 19901
africana@desu.edu
Tel: 302.857.6145

Social Media:
twitter  instagram

Body: 
Africana Studies Africana Studies promotes the awareness and understanding of the African Diaspora through the exploration of historical and contemporary phenomena. The Program brings together scholars and courses from different disciplines in the humanities and social sciences such as history, political science, literature, and sociology. Africana studies hosts a variety of events throughout the year including film screenings, conferences, guest lectures, and student gatherings. Opportunities for Minors One of the most commonly asked questions concerning the practical usefulness of becoming a student of Africana Studies is: What can I do with a major/minor in Africana Studies? The answer is: the same thing you can do with any liberal arts or science major or minor—and much more! Africana Studies is an academic discipline that provides rigorous academic preparation that emphasizes writing, discussion, critical thinking and analysis, the ability to discern and trace the connections between ideas and social phenomena, and the ability to identify the relationship of particular concepts and social realities to larger systems of knowledge and human relations. Students in Africana Studies courses explore history, philosophy, literature, religion, culture, politics, economics, language, law, and social dynamics with a special emphasis on African people in the United States and their interaction with African and other peoples in the global human experience. A concentration in Africana Studies, therefore, provides the foundation for critical thinking and broad education, which guide successful personal and professional ambitions. Furthermore, in a world that is increasingly more conscious of the value of diversity and cross-cultural communication, the Africana Studies perspective also makes the student a more attractive candidate to prospective employers. Africana Studies minors go on to become lawyers, diplomats, public health practitioners, teachers, professors, archivists, and entrepreneurs.

Our Mission

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Our Mission The Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice is committed to the principles of a liberal education and to assisting its students to think sociologically in order to better understand human behavior.  The Department’s curricula are designed to not only prepare students for careers and graduate studies in Sociology and Criminal Justice, but also to equip them with a far-reaching view of the world consistent with the goals of a liberal arts education and to prepare them to recognize the social institutions and patterns upon which everyday life rests.  The mission of the Department is intricately tied to the mission of the University which recognizes the richness in multiculturalism and cultural diversity.  In this regard, an important part of the Department’s mission is to educate students for world citizenship.  This requires knowledge that values the multitude of cultures in society, a critical understanding of multicultural perspectives and experiences, and the emerging interdependencies among members of the now global community.  Central to the Department’s mission is fostering in our students critical and analytical thinking skills, research capabilities necessary to systematically explore the complex interconnectedness among people and their social world, and to engage in life-long learning.  The Department places heavy emphasis on application of the principles of sociology and criminal justice, encouraging students to demonstrate an awareness of social inequalities and a commitment to social justice.  In this context, the Department seeks to provide an enabling environment within which students are provided with the knowledge and skills through coursework, real-life experiences, and through internships that empower them to create a more just society.   The Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice is committed to the principles of a liberal education and to assisting its students to think sociologically in order to better understand human society and human behavior.  The department’s curricula are designed to not only prepare students for careers and graduate studies in sociology and criminal justice, but also to equip them with a far-­reaching view of the world consistent with the goals of a liberal arts education and to prepare them to recognize the social institutions and patterns upon which everyday life rests.

Past Graduates Career Paths

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Past Senior Testimonials Internship Career Connections Hands on Delaware State Police Internship Experiences

Credential Possibilities

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  DAR (Diversity Agent Recruitment) Program FBI Process and Disqualifiers FBI Special Agent      

NOBLE - National Organization for Black Law Enforcement Executives

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Dear Teachers and Faculty, As the National Conference approaches for NOBLE (National Organization for Black Law Enforcement Executives), the Collegiate Chapter is attempting to raise funds to pay for eleven (11) of their memberships to attend. Please take a moment to look over their fundraiser and participate where you can. This is an exceptional opportunity for them, any support you can offer is greatly appreciated! Have a wonderful week! The average American spends $667 per year shopping online and that number is growing.  One of the largest online retailers is Amazon.com.  When you make purchases at Amazon after visiting our Fundinco homepage we earn a commission for every sale.  If all of our supporters simply moved their online purchases over to Amazon by visiting our Fundinco homepage we would generate an amazing $500 in commissions!  But we need everyone’s help, working together and are relying on you.  Thanks for your continued support; we couldn’t do it without you!                The link below will take you directly to our Fundinco homepage where you can start shopping by clicking the Amazon button: http://www.fundinco.org/orghome.php?orgid=1309  Make sure to add the Fundinco link above to your favorites (a.k.a. bookmark) so that you can come back anytime you shop online and raise money.  Also, make sure to follow Fundinco on Twitter and Facebook to stay advised of great deals.  You don't want to miss these! - Marcus Smith Marcus Smith, President of NOBLE (National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Excutives) Collegiate chapter Delaware State University 1200 N DuPont Hwy Box 288 Dover, Delaware 19901     Classification: Junior  Major: Criminal justice Minor: Philosophy https://www.linkedin.com/pub/marcus-smith/90/464/608 “Life begins at the end of your comfort zone.”  ~ Neale Donald Walsch    

Lee Streetman

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Lee Streetman Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice   Contact Information Delaware Hall – Room 112 Phone: 302.857.6678 Email: lstreetman@desu.edu   Education PhD, University of Delaware MA, University of Delaware   Courses Taught Introduction to Sociology Courts and Criminal Justice Victimology Principles of Correction   Research Interests Ethnic boundary maintenance Offender reentry Speciesism   Recent Publications Streetman, L. G. (2013). "NASCAR's Obama Phenomena & the Overculturalized Conception of Fan.” Journal of Social Sciences Research, vol. 2, 75-108. Streetman, L. G. (2007). Offenders in Transition: Just Trying to do Good. A Health Risk Assessment of Released Inmates. New York: iUniverse.   Recent Presentations Streetman, L. G. (2015). Signifiers and Spatial Practices that Reconstitute and Challenge Ethnic Boundaries at American Stock Car Racing Events. Presented at the International Sociology of Sports Association World Congress in Paris, France. Streetman, L. G. (2015). Attitudes toward the Treatment of Nonhuman Animals and the Influence of downstate Delaware and the State Fair. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Sociological Society in New York, NY.

Kevin Ralston

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Kevin Ralston Assistant Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice   Contact Information Delaware Hall - Room 134 Phone: 302.857.7616 Email: kralston@desu.edu   Education BA, Wake Forest University MA, University of Delaware PhD, University of Delaware   Courses Taught Research Methods Elementary Statistics Social Deviance Victimology   Research interests Race, class, gender, and victimization Masculinity and victimization Sexual victimization   Recent Presentations: Ralston, K. (March 2016). Recreating and Revising Masculinity after Sexual Victimization. Presented at the Eastern Sociological Society annual conference in Boston, MA.

Dorothy Dillard

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Dorothy Dillard Department Chair Associate Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice   Contact Information Delaware Hall – Room 122 Phone: 302.857.7510 Fax: 302.857.7774 Email: ddillard@desu.edu   Education Ph.D., University of Delaware M.A., University of Delaware B.S., Auburn University   Courses Taught Senior Seminar Capstone Juvenile Delinquency Social Institutions   Research Interests Social Policy, with an emphasis on impact on minorities Juvenile Justice System:  DMC Assessment:  Social/public programs and student learning   Recent Publication News Journal Op-Ed, January 3, 2016, “Time to Re-examine Policing in America” Juvenile Court/Essay 3, entry for Book 10 Juvenile Justice, digital resource published by Wisewire. Drug Treatment In Prisons and Jails/Essay 10, entry for Book 7 Criminal Justice, digital resource published by Wisewire.   Recent Presentations Dillard, D. (August 2015). Instructor Role in Assessment, Presented at DSU New Faculty Orientation. Dillard, D. (June 2015). Community Role in Drug Prevention and Addiction Recovery, Presented at IMAC’s Faith Based Approach: Substance Abuse Prevention Forum.

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