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What can you minor in as a Sociology or Criminal Justice Major?

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What can you Minor in as a Sociology or Criminal Justice Major List of University Majors Requirements for Minors in Sociology and Criminal Justice Requirements for Minor in Forensics Requirements for Minor in Law Studies Requirements for Minor in Psychology Requirements for Minor in Women's Studies  

Dr. Donna A. Patterson

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Bio Donna A. Patterson holds a Ph.D. in history from Indiana University, Bloomington and is the author of Pharmacy in Senegal: Gender, Healing, and Entrepreneurship. Patterson has published articles in the Journal of Healthcare for the Poor and Underserved and the Journal of Women's History and has held fellowships from the Institute for the Medical Humanities at the University of Texas Medical Branch, the West African Research Association, and Fulbright. She teaches courses in African, African American, and African Diaspora history and studies. Contact  Office: ETV 211 E-mail: dapatterson@desu.edu Phone: 302.857.6631

People

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Africana Studies Program
1200 North Du Pont Highway
Dover, DE 19901
africana@desu.edu
Tel: 302.857.6145

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Program Director: Dr. Donna Patterson, Associate Professor, Department of History, Political Science, and Philosophy Africana Studies Advisory Committee: Dr. Dolores Finger Wright, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work Dr. Akwasi Osei, Professor, Department of History, Political Science, and Philosophy Dr. F. Odun Balogun, Professor, Department of English and Foreign Languages Dr. Marshall Stevenson, Dean, College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences  & Professor, Department of History, Political Science and Philosophy Dr. Joe Amoako, Professor, Department of English and Foreign Languages

Academics

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Africana Studies Program
1200 North Du Pont Highway
Dover, DE 19901
africana@desu.edu
Tel: 302.857.6145

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REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR IN AFRICANA STUDIES The minor in Africana Studies requires nine (9) credit hours of Africana Studies courses: AFST-201, AFST-202, and AFST-400. The remaining nine (9) credit hours may be selected from any three (3) courses drawn from the humanities and the social sciences that have as their core the study of any part of or any people of the global African world. AFST-201. INTRODUCTION TO AFRICANA STUDIES The course offers a comprehensive, interdisciplinary exploration of key aspects of the African experience from antiquity to present, in Africa and throughout the African Diaspora. The course provides students with a fundamental intellectual understanding of the universal African experience as it has been described and interpreted by humanists and social scientists. Some of the themes examined in this course include pre-colonial African-European interactions, liberation, colonialism, gender, and contemporary issues facing the African diaspora. Declared minors will be given priority for the course. Credit, three hours. AFST-202. LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IN THE AFRICAN WORLD The course examines the interplay of verbal and nonverbal communication, written language, and cultural traditions of the African peoples in various parts of the world. From a scholarly perspective and within the frame of popular culture, the course looks at both contemporary and historical information to shed light on how language influences the global African societies and cultures. Credit, three hours. AFST-400. SEMINAR IN AFRICANA STUDIES Intended primarily for juniors and seniors, the Capstone Seminar in Africana Studies offers reading, writing, and small-group discussion in a particular aspect of Africana Studies. Collegial, collaborative, and reflective, the seminar format will prepare some students for graduate study. Others will use the experience to culminate and organize prior coursework and research in Africana Studies. Seminar topics will vary from year to year, but will generally reflect the current research interests of the Instructor. Credit, three hours. Electives: The remaining nine (9) credit hours may be selected from any three (3) courses drawn from the humanities and social scientists that embrace at their core the study of any part of the African Diaspora.   Options include but are not limited to: HIST 203: African American History to 1865 HIST 204: African American History From 1865 HIST 315: African History to 1884 HIST 316: African History from 1884 HIST 461: Seminar in American History: the Atlantic World HIST 334: African Americans and the Building of a Nation HIST 336: African Americans and Modern America, 1919-Present HIST 461: Seminar in American History: the Southern Plantation ENGL 205: African American Literature I ENGL 206: African American Literature II ENGL 207: Black Prose and Poetry ENGL 214: The Black American Novel ENGL 321: Seminar in Hughes, Wright, and Baldwin POL 320: Black Politics in America

Africana Studies

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Contact
Africana Studies Program
1200 North Du Pont Highway
Dover, DE 19901
africana@desu.edu
Tel: 302.857.6145

Social Media:
twitter  instagram

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Africana Studies Africana Studies promotes the awareness and understanding of the African Diaspora through the exploration of historical and contemporary phenomena. The Program brings together scholars and courses from different disciplines in the humanities and social sciences such as history, political science, literature, and sociology. Africana studies hosts a variety of events throughout the year including film screenings, conferences, guest lectures, and student gatherings. Opportunities for Minors One of the most commonly asked questions concerning the practical usefulness of becoming a student of Africana Studies is: What can I do with a major/minor in Africana Studies? The answer is: the same thing you can do with any liberal arts or science major or minor—and much more! Africana Studies is an academic discipline that provides rigorous academic preparation that emphasizes writing, discussion, critical thinking and analysis, the ability to discern and trace the connections between ideas and social phenomena, and the ability to identify the relationship of particular concepts and social realities to larger systems of knowledge and human relations. Students in Africana Studies courses explore history, philosophy, literature, religion, culture, politics, economics, language, law, and social dynamics with a special emphasis on African people in the United States and their interaction with African and other peoples in the global human experience. A concentration in Africana Studies, therefore, provides the foundation for critical thinking and broad education, which guide successful personal and professional ambitions. Furthermore, in a world that is increasingly more conscious of the value of diversity and cross-cultural communication, the Africana Studies perspective also makes the student a more attractive candidate to prospective employers. Africana Studies minors go on to become lawyers, diplomats, public health practitioners, teachers, professors, archivists, and entrepreneurs.

Our Mission

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Our Mission The Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice is committed to the principles of a liberal education and to assisting its students to think sociologically in order to better understand human behavior.  The Department’s curricula are designed to not only prepare students for careers and graduate studies in Sociology and Criminal Justice, but also to equip them with a far-reaching view of the world consistent with the goals of a liberal arts education and to prepare them to recognize the social institutions and patterns upon which everyday life rests.  The mission of the Department is intricately tied to the mission of the University which recognizes the richness in multiculturalism and cultural diversity.  In this regard, an important part of the Department’s mission is to educate students for world citizenship.  This requires knowledge that values the multitude of cultures in society, a critical understanding of multicultural perspectives and experiences, and the emerging interdependencies among members of the now global community.  Central to the Department’s mission is fostering in our students critical and analytical thinking skills, research capabilities necessary to systematically explore the complex interconnectedness among people and their social world, and to engage in life-long learning.  The Department places heavy emphasis on application of the principles of sociology and criminal justice, encouraging students to demonstrate an awareness of social inequalities and a commitment to social justice.  In this context, the Department seeks to provide an enabling environment within which students are provided with the knowledge and skills through coursework, real-life experiences, and through internships that empower them to create a more just society.   The Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice is committed to the principles of a liberal education and to assisting its students to think sociologically in order to better understand human society and human behavior.  The department’s curricula are designed to not only prepare students for careers and graduate studies in sociology and criminal justice, but also to equip them with a far-­reaching view of the world consistent with the goals of a liberal arts education and to prepare them to recognize the social institutions and patterns upon which everyday life rests.

Past Graduates Career Paths

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Past Senior Testimonials Internship Career Connections Hands on Delaware State Police Internship Experiences

Credential Possibilities

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  DAR (Diversity Agent Recruitment) Program FBI Process and Disqualifiers FBI Special Agent      

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