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"Taking a Stand for the Right to Life: When the Law as Fiction Is Obviously Limited."

QUINTESSENTIAL DIVERSITY ROUNDTABLE
WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES

Bank of America, Longwood Auditorium

co-led by Dr. Kylie Parrotta, DSU Sociology and WGS professor, plus student-panelists.

For more information, contact:
Dr. A. Myrna Nurse, Director
Women’s and Gender Studies Minor Program
Department of English and Foreign Languages
302-857-6574
mnurse@desu.edu

"Surviving Violence in Relationships: Sex and Gender."

QUINTESSENTIAL DIVERSITY ROUNDTABLE
WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES

Bank of America, Longwood Auditorium

co-led by Dr. Melissa Harrington, DSU Biology and WGS professor, plus student-panelist

 

Documentary: Obsession: Radical Islam's War against the West

Bank of America Building
Longwood Auditorium

In conjunction with
​Delaware Humanities Forum

Women's and Gender Studies Events

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Quintessential Diversity Roundtable (Monthly) “Quintessential Diversity Roundtable” is a humanities project that is intended to emphasize gender, race, sexuality, and ethnicity. It seeks to promote public dialogue on human rights that are non-negotiable in the call for human dignity. The project is further intended to examine the ways in which religious, historical, literary, and philosophical texts have been used to invent laws and perpetuate mores that oppressed and denied Americans’ access to basic human rights and an acceptable quality of life Opening Event Tuesday, September 22, 2015, 7:00 pm: “‘To Be or Not to Be’: What Literary History Teaches on Suicide.” Dr. Carol E. Henderson, Vice Provost for Diversity, University of Delaware, Keynote Speaker Location: Bank of America, Longwood Auditorium Discussion on the representation of suicide of famous literary figures who committed suicide, led by Dr. Susmita Roye, DSU English and WGS professor. Student panelists: Emily Teel (English major) and Kyle Sheppard (Psychology major, WGS minor).   Thursday, October 22, 2015, 7:00 pm: “Surviving Violence in Relationships: Sex and Gender.” Discussion on the problems faced by lesbians, bisexuals, gays, transgenders, queers, intersexuals, and asexuals, co-led by Dr. Melissa Harrington, DSU Biology and WGS professor. Student panelists: Brittany Smith (English major) and Omolade Oludare (Biology major, WGS minor). Location: Bank of America, Longwood Auditorium Tuesday, November 17, 2015, 7:00 pm: “Taking a Stand for the Right to Life: When the Law as Fiction Is Obviously Limited.” Discussion on suicide bombing, euthanasia, mass murder, and mass suicide, co-led by Dr. Kylie Parrotta, DSU Sociology and WGS professor. Student panelists: Damara Jones (Criminal Justice major, WGS minor) and Ashlee Bruner (Political Science major, WGS minor). Location: Bank of America, Longwood Auditorium Tuesday, February 23, 2016, 7:00 pm: “When Dating Goes Wrong: The Ethics of Relationships.” Discussion on dating violence, blind dating, and the pitfalls of social media dating, led by Dr. Stephen Taylor, DSU Philosophy professor. Student panelists: Keda Dorisca (Political Science major, WGS minor) and Dominique Lockett (Pre-Nursing major, WGS minor). Location: Bank of America, Longwood Auditorium Tuesday, March 22, 2016, 12:00 noon – 6:00 pm: “Celebrating Women’s History: Focus on Native American Heritage, Migration, and Women in the Workplace.” Discussion Native American women’s achievements and currents challenges that they and women in the workplace, led by Carla and Allan Messinger, Cultural Educator and Consultant, Native American Heritage Programs. Faculty co-panelist: Ramona Beverly, DSU English adjunct. Location: Bank of America, Longwood Auditorium Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 7:00 pm: “Because Knowledge Empowers: What World Religions Teach about Temperance, Moral Responsibility, and Individual Choices.” Discussion on alcohol abuse, sexual assault, and individual responsibility, led by Dr. Dennis Burke, DSU Philosophy professor. Student panelists: Jordan McClements (English major, Philosophy minor) (Mass Communications major, WGS minor). Location: Bank of America, Longwood Auditorium   This program is partially funded by a grant from the Delaware Humanities Forum, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
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For more information, contact

Dr. A. Myrna Nurse, Director
Department of English and Foreign Languages
302.857.6574
 
Dr. Padmini Banerjee, Assistant Director
Department of Psychology
302.857.7040

Policies

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Dropping Courses Although students are allowed to drop courses, they are strongly encouraged to meet with their academic advisor in order to discuss the various support services available and curriculum planning. After meeting with an advisor, if the student has exhausted all avenues for successful completion of a given course, the student may then obtain approval from their advisor and submit the DROP/ADD form to the Registrar’s Office thereafter, bearing the required signatures. A drop fee of $10.00 per course will be assessed after late registration. Please refer to the academic calendar for the last day to drop classes for each semester.   Official Withdrawal from the University All withdrawals from the University are initiated in the Office of Records and Registration, Administration Building, first floor.    Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Satisfactory Academic Progress, SAP, is a process to review a federal aid recipient’s academic record and compare it to defined criteria. Learn more about SAP.   Class Attendance Regular class attendance is a vital part of the educational process. Students are required to attend all classes. If a faculty member chooses to evaluate attendance as part of a grade for a course, such a policy must be written in the syllabus, which is distributed at the beginning of a course. The policy must state what part of the course grade is based on attendance and how individual absences will be assessed. If a faculty member declines to integrate attendance as part of a course grade, under no circumstances may a student's final grade be reduced solely because of class absences. The Office of the Provost and Vice-President for Academic Affairs issues excuses for students who are absent from classes due to participation in official University related activities or on University related travel. In all other cases, only the instructor can approve a student's request to be excused from class.   No Show Report/Documentation for Non-Attendance All enrolled students are required to attend each class at least once during the first week of classes in order to verify attendance in the class. Failure to verify attendance in a class before the end of the first week of classes will result in the course being deleted from the students’ schedule.   Academic Probation, Suspension and Dismissal A student on probation who fails to earn a 2.00 average at the following semester will be suspended academically.  At the expiration of the period a student may apply for readmission on probation.  The student must complete a minimum of nine (9) semester hours with a grade point average of 2.00 (“C”) or better during the semester of his/her reinstatement. If a student on probation fails to earn the necessary 2.00 average, he/she will be dismissed from the University. He/she may apply to the Office of Admissions for reinstatement if he or she successfully completes twelve semester hours with an average of 2.00 (“C”)  in summer school at the University or attends another accredited institution and completes twenty-four semester hours with a grade point average of 2.00 (“C”) or better. A student on probation will be allowed to take no more than thirteen semester hours.  Students on academic probation and have incompletes in courses taken the previous semester will not be permitted to register until the incompletes are removed and an average of 2.00 is achieved. A student whose grade point average is below 1.70 at the end of any semester shall be placed on academic probation for the succeeding semester unless the student’s cumulative grade point average is 2.00 or greater.  A student on probation is ineligible to hold elective positions or to represent the University in any capacity. Students with academic probationary status or students who are academically suspended may attend summer school at Delaware State University.  The grades earned in summer school will be computed with the grades of the last semester that the student was enrolled to determine the academic standing of the student.

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