Agriculture and Related Sciences

You are here


Human Ecology Faculty and Staff

Body: 
Our faculty members are nationally and internationally known for their expertise. Faculty members have records of accomplishments, some of which are demonstrated in published peer review journals. The department promotes intra- and inter-departmental collaboration for the purpose of attracting external funds that can be used to support programs and academically talented students. Food and Nutritional Science Program Samuel A. Besong, Professor & Chairperson PhD, Animal Science (Nutrition), University of Kentucky MS, Animal Science (Nutrition), University of Kentucky BS, Agriculture, Berea College, Berea, KY VACANT, Director, Didactic Program in Dietetics Jung-lim Lee, PhD, Associate Professor PhD, Food Science & Biotechnology, Kyung-Hee University, Seoul, Korea MS, Food Science & Biotechnology, Kyung-Hee University BS, Food Science & Biotechnology, Han-Kyung National University, Korea ​Stephen Lumor, PhD, Assistant Professor Post-Doctorate, Food & Nutrition, University of Minnesota PhD, Food Science & Technology, University of Georgia MS, Food Science & Technology, University of Georgia BSc, Biochemistry, University of Ghana Shilpa Kulkarni, MS, RD, Research and Outreach Dietician MS, Human Nutrition, University of Delaware RD, University of Delaware BAMS, Ayurvedic Medicine and Surgery – Maharastra University of Health Science, India DEMS, Emergency Medicine, Ruby Hall Clinic, India Textiles and Apparel Studies Program Mopelola Adegoke, PhD, Associate Professor, Coordinator, CTFM Internship PhD, Family and Consumer Science Education, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa MS, Textile and Clothing, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa BS, Home Economics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa Jungmi Oh, PhD, Associate Professor PhD, Clothing and Textile, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida MS, Clothing and Textile, Sungshin Women’s University, Seoul, Korea BS, Clothing and Textile, Sungshin Women’s University, Seoul, Korea Jasmine Chandler, Instructor MS, Fashion Design, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA BS, Textiles and Apparel Studies, Delaware State University, Dover, DE  

Human Ecology Research Facilities

Body: 
  The department is equipped with a teaching food laboratory that provides students with hands-on experience. Students develop skills in diet planning and the development of new foods. The Foods Lab contains equipment for preparation and sensory evaluation of food products. The sensory evaluation section of the lab contains specialized carrels that are used for evaluation of products prepared in the lab. A Nutrient Analysis Computer Laboratory, adjacent to the Foods Lab, is used to calculate the nutrients in diets and recipes. The Textiles and Apparel Studies laboratory is equipped with state-of-the art equipment. Students develop skills in design and development of new products. The Gerber Computer Aid Design (CAD) equipment is the state-of-the-art equipment that helps students to develop skills in designing and product development. Research support services include the university library and the computing room with access to Internet.

Natural Resources Course Descriptions

Body: 
30-103. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE. 3:2:2 Course description goes here. Credit, three hours. 30-103. NATURAL RESOURCES AND PARK MANAGEMENT. 3:2:2 Course description goes here. Credit, three hours. 30-104. COMPUTER LITERACY. 3:3:0 The graduate in agriculture and natural resources must be computer literate. Training that utilizes application in agriculture or natural resources results in a higher degree of learning and a higher level of comfort. Credits, three hours. 30-105. BASIC ECOLOGY. 3:2:2 The study of the fundamental relationships between the living and non-living worlds, with special emphasis on man's place in nature. Prerequisites: Biology 100, 101, 102, or consent of instructor. Not offered for credit to majors in Biology, Agriculture, and Natural Resources. Two lectures, and one two-hour laboratory and field trips. Credit, three hours. 30-106. URBAN ECOLOGY 3:3:0 Ecological relationships of the urban environment, with special emphasis on the biological effects of domestic and industrial pollution, population density and urban resources. Prerequisite: Biology 100 or 101-102. Credit, three hours. 30-111. DENDROLOGY AND TREE IDENTIFICATION. 3:2:2 Systematic experience in the identification of principle forest trees of North America including special emphasis on the trees of the Delmarva Peninsula. Lectures, demonstrations and laboratories. Credit, three hours. 30-112. INTRODUCTION TO FORESTRY. 3:3:0 A study of the history and development of the nation's forest resources, forest policies: the management, development and protection of forests and related resources; and the training, experience, judgments and scientific tools needed to effectively manage these natural resources. Lectures, demonstrations and laboratory. Credit, three hours. 30-202. MICROCLIMATOLOGY. 3:3:0 A study of the climate near the ground. Influence for vegetation, snow, fog and topography on microclimates. Agricultural and medical implications. Microclimate of cities. Offered in alternate spring semesters. Credit, three hours. 30-203. INTRODUCTION TO URBAN FORESTRY. 3:3:0 A study of the management of tree communities in and around human settlements ranging from small rural communities and suburban neighborhoods, metropolitan parks and downtown areas. Lectures, demonstrations and laboratories (including weekends). Offered in alternate years. Credit, three hours. 30-205. ECOLOGY. 4:3:2 The study of organisms in relation to their environment. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. The course includes 3 weekend field trips. Offered in fall semesters. Prerequisites: Biology 101-102, or consent of instructor. Credit, four hours. 30-261. AQUACULTURE. 3:3:0 A study of the farming and husbandry of fish and other aquatic organisms throughout the world, with emphasis on North American species and practices. The laboratory includes hand-on activities and field trips to production sites. Prerequisites: General Biology 102, Ecology 205, Chemistry 102, or consent of instructor. Credits, three hours. 30-311. MAMMALOGY. 3:3:0 The identification, classification, distribution, evolution, and life history of mammals. Prerequisites: Biology 100, 101-102, or consent of the instructor. Credit, three hours. 30-312. ORNITHOLOGY. 3:2:2 A study of the field identification, ecology, and biology of the birds of the Delaware-Maryland-Virginia area. The course includes weekly field trips. Prerequisites: Biology 100, 101-102, or consent of the instructor. Credit, three hours. 30-313. LIMNOLOGY. 3:2:2 A study of the biological, chemical, and physical factors in streams and lakes, and the effects of these factors upon water and upon aquatic organisms. Prerequisites: Biology 101-102 and Chemistry 101-102, or consent of the instructor. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Credit, three hours. 30-314. ICHTHYOLOGY. 3:3:0 The identification, classification, distribution, evolution, and life history of fishes. Prerequisite: Biology 201 or consent of the instructor. Credit, three hours. 30-321. BIOMETRICS. 3:3:0 The application of statistical procedures to agriculture and natural resources. Data presentation and distribution measurements will be studied. Probability, simple correlation - regression, and analysis of variance will be included. Prerequisites: Mathematics 121 and 122 and Biology 101 and 102. Three one-hour lectures. Credit, three hours. 30-349. SCIENTIFIC WRITING. 1:1:0 Designed to inform students about writing in science, the nature of these presentations, their reliability, and critical considerations for the review, acceptance and use of such. It teaches how to write, how to analyze data, report results, as well as how to present such data in accurate and credible scientific reports, reviews and journal articles, among others. One one-hour lecture per week. Credit, one hour. 30-350. PROBLEMS TERRA ECOLOGY. 1:1:0 Discussion of topics of current interest. Presentation of student papers. Lectures, discussions, films, field trips. Credit, one hour per semester. 30-400. INTERPRETING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT. 3:2:2 Course description goes here. Credit, three hours. 30-401. SOIL AND WATER MANAGEMENT. 3:2:2 A study of the theories and practices employed in managing soil and water. Coordination of soil and water uses to improve productivity and to prevent erosion depletion. Effects of pesticides, pollution and drought. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week and an all-day field trip. Prerequisites: Natural Resources 205 and Agriculture 209 or the consent of the instructor. Credit, three hours. 30-402. VEGETATION MANAGEMENT. 3:2:2 Course description goes here. Credit, three hours. 30-403. WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT. 3:2:2 A study of the theories and applications of animal ecology pertaining to the management of natural populations and communities. Life history studies of selected wildlife species. Relationships of wildlife to ecosystems, including effects of pollution, pesticides, and habitat conditions. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory. Offered in alternate spring semesters. Prerequisites: Natural Resources 205 or consent of the instructor. Credit, three hours. 30-404. FISHERIES SCIENCE. 3:3:0 A study of the environmental and biological factors related to the physiology and behavior of fishes. Prerequisites: Natural Resources 205, 321, or consent of the instructor. Credit, three hours. 30-405. PRINCIPLES OF FISHERIES MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 A study of the capacities of aquatic environments required by fishes with emphasis on management problems typical of selected environments. Prerequisites: Natural Resources 205, 314, and 404 or consent of the instructor. Credit, three hours. 30-431. ECOSYSTEMS. 3:2:2 Course description goes here. Credit, three hours. 30-441-442. SENIOR RESEARCH PROJECT. 6:0:12 An opportunity to undertake a research project in Agriculture and Natural Resources. Prerequisite: Open to students with a 3.125 cumulative average in Agriculture and Natural Resources, overall cumulative average of 2.75, and senior standing in Agriculture and Natural Resources. Credit, six hours. 30-452. ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION WORKSHOP. * Opportunity for practical experience in development and implementation of environmental education concepts from pre-school to adult. May be elected whenever offered. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Credit, one to three hours per semester. *Variable credit. 30-455. POPULATION-ENVIRONMENT CURRICULUM, K-12. The integration of a conceptual framework for population-environmental studies in school curriculum as a part of a program in environmental studies. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. Credit, three to six hours. 30-456. WETLANDS BIOLOGY. 3:3:0 A broad overview of the ecological structure and function of wetlands environment, emphasizing comparisons of different wetland types in terms of hydrology, soils, biogeochemistry, biota, and ecological processes. Human interactions with wetlands will be examined in terms of wetlands values and functions, delineation, classification, inventory, regulation, mitigation, compensation and management. Lectures, demonstrations, laboratories and two weekend field trips. Prerequisites: Ecology 205 or consent of instructor. Offered in alternate years. Credit, three hours. 30-462. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH. 3:2:2 Course description goes here. Credit, three hours. 30-464. NATURAL RESOURCES INTERNSHIP. Designed to give students first-hand, career related experience in a local state, or federal agency or organization. Internships must be planned with a faculty coordinator and a Field Supervisor in the semester prior to the actual placement. Qualified agency staff provide on-site supervision of the student, while the faculty coordinator monitors the Intern's progress and (in conjunction with the Field Supervisor) evaluates the Intern's work. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing. Credit, four to eight hours. 30-465. MARINE BIOLOGY. 3:2:2 A broad overview of the biota of marine environments, examining the ecological structure and function of oceanic, coastal and estuarine habitats. Aspects of physical, chemical and geological oceanography will also be covered, pertinent to biological communities and adaptations. Lectures, demonstrations, laboratories and two weekend field trips. Prerequisite: Ecology 205 and consent of instructor. Offered in alternate years. Credit, three hours. 30-466. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY. 3:2:2 A course to integrate biology and chemistry into a useful approach to poisons and pollutants and their control. Methods are developed to express and measure toxicity, predict risks, and illustrate how laws and regulations are developed to communicate risks and control hazards. The students will learn to express the complex mechanics of statistics and to reduce armacodynamics to simple graphics representations. Lectures, demonstrations, laboratories and weekend field trips. Prerequisites: Chemistry 101-102 and Ecology 205. Offered in alternate years. Credit, three hours. 30-469. ECOLOGICAL LAND USE. 3:3:0 Theory and application of environmental planning from the standpoints of public and private interests. Major topics include terrain analysis and natural and social environments. These serve as the framework upon which the results of change are analyzed and provide suitable foci for the examination of case studies which are examined. Lectures, demonstrations, laboratories and weekend field trips. Prerequisite: Ecology 205 and Soils 208. Offered in alternate years. Credit, three hours. 30-472. AIR AND NOISE QUALITY. 3:3:0 A survey of air and noise quality factors in outdoor and indoor environments with emphasis on limiting the impacts on humans and other biological subjects. Basic techniques of monitoring, control, and mitigation, with special consideration of the "sick building syndrome" will be addressed. Lectures, demonstration, laboratories, and week-end field trips. Offered in alternate years. Credit, three hours. 30-474. INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE. 3:3:0 The fundamental study of ergonomics, chemical handling, ionizing radiation, environmental stress, and occupational diseases. Recognition of work-place hazards and safety limits; the importance of personal protection and ventilation systems. Offered in alternate years. Credit, three hours. 30-475. ENVIRONMENTAL AND WILDLIFE LAW. 3:3:0 A study of the development and enforcement of environmental law. Emphasis on the history of the molding of national and regional environmental policy concerns. Synoptic review of major international, national, regional, state and local environmental laws. Prerequisite: Ecology 205. Offered in alternate years. Credit, three hours. 30-484. ADVANCED WILDLIFE BIOLOGY. 3:2:2 Advanced study of wildlife populations including the application of computers to field data analysis and theoretical models. Research techniques of project planning, record keeping, wildlife literature review and scientific writing. Environmental management using remote sensing and reconnaissance field mapping, habitat analysis and evaluation, sustained yield, and wildlife damage and control. Prerequisite: Wildlife Management 403. Lectures, demonstrations, laboratories, and weekend field trips. Offered in alternate years. Credit, three hours.

Agriculture Course Descriptions

Body: 
29-101-102. AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES SCIENCE. 1:1:0 The role of Agriculture and Natural Resources in human history, present and future. Discussion of current opportunities. One one-hour lecture per week. Credit, one hour. 29-103. BASIC AGRICULTURE. 3:2:2 Introduction to the fundamental principles of scientific agriculture. This course will examine the relationship of agriculture to human survival and human interactions, the place of agriculture in human history and how it relates to population growth and the roles that the consumption and production of food and fiber play in society. Science elective for non-agriculture majors. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Credit, three hours. 29-204. FRUIT PRODUCTION. 3:2:2 A study of scientific principles impacting fruit production. Breeding and selection, asexual techniques, and development of fruiting bodies will be included. Adaptation, cultural practices, and storage of major fruit species will be considered. Prerequisite: General Horticulture. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Credit, three hours. 29-206. INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL SCIENCE. 3:2:2 A study of the various species of livestock and their commercial production. Breed characteristics will be studied as they relate to selection, feeding, care, disease control and marketing for maximum economic performance. The role of animal agriculture in U.S. society today will be stressed. Prerequisites: Biology 101-102, Chemistry 101. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Credit, three hours. 29-207. INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL NUTRITION. 3:2:2 Basic nutrition and feeding practices for the various species of commercial livestock. Feeds, their sources, composition, characteristics and feed value will be explored. Ration balancing and its practical field application will be discussed. Prerequisites: Agriculture 206, Math 103-104. Two lectures and one two-hour recitation per week. Credit, three hours. 29-208. SOIL SCIENCE. 3:2:2 A study of soils, their physical and chemical characteristics, with special emphasis on those factors which affect plant growth. Soil formation, the use of fertilizers, and soil and water conservation are considered. Special emphasis is placed on the soils of Delaware and their management. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: College Chemistry, Biology 102 and Mathematics 103 and 104. Credit, three hours. 29-209. MEAT AND MEAT PROCESSING. 3:3:0 A study of slaughtering, grading, cutting, processing, identification, buying and cooking of cuts of meat. Credit, three hours. 29-210. LANDSCAPING. 3:2:2 Theory and practice of landscape design with special application to the home grounds. Practice in drawing and estimating planting plans and differential leveling will also be emphasized. Grading, propagations, plant combinations and uses in association with structures and gardens will be studied. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Credit, three hours. 29-219. GENERAL HORTICULTURE. 3:2:2 A study of fruit, vegetable and ornamental plants; the factors which influence their culture, value, and importance, with particular references to the Delmarva Peninsula. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Credit, three hours. 29-304. MARKETING AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS. 3:3:0 To acquaint the student with the basic nature of agriculture product marketing as it relates to producers, consumers, food processors, wholesalers and retailers. Examine how food marketing works and its role in the food industry and the economy. Three one-hour lectures per week. Credit, three hours. 29-305. INTRODUCTION TO POULTRY SCIENCE. 3:2:2 Poultry production with emphasis on integrated broiler operations on the Delmarva Peninsula. Strains, housing, equipment, nutrition and disease control will be discussed. Embryology and table egg production will also be addressed. Prerequisites: Biology 101-102. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Credit, three hours. 29-306. ADVANCED POULTRY SCIENCE. 3:2:2 An advanced study of the commercial poultry industry with special emphasis on commercial broiler production. Building design, equipment, ventilation and feeding systems will be covered. Emphasis will also be directed toward flock health, nutrition, daily care and commercial processing. In addition, hands on experience with raising a commercial flock of 1000 broilers will be a primary focus of the laboratory. Prerequisites: Introduction to Poultry Science 305, Biology 102. Credit, three hours. 29-307. ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY. 3:2:2 Course description goes here. Credit, three hours. 29-308. PLANT PATHOLOGY. 3:2:2 A study of parasitic and non-parasitic diseases. Fungal, bacterial, and viral diseases will be considered. Damage due to nutrient deficiencies, air pollutants, and other environmental causes will be studied. Insects damaging plants will be studied. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: Biology 102. Offered in alternate years. Credit, three hours. 29-309. FARM MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 The problem of organizing, coordinating, and managing farm enterprises. A study of the methods used in farm business analysis together with farm accounting and bookkeeping. Prerequisites: Math 121 and 122, Economics 201, Animal Science 206 and Crops 317. Three one-hour lectures per week. Credit, three hours. 29-310. VEGETABLE GARDENING. 3:2:2 Fundamentals in the production of vegetable crops. Scientific principles of plant growth will be applied to vegetable production practices. Adaption and breeding will be included. Production systems and soil interactions will be included. Production systems and soil interactions will be studied. Prerequisite: General Horticulture. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Credit, three hours. 29-315. LIVESTOCK SELECTION AND BREEDING. 3:2:2 An in depth study of the livestock breeding industry with special emphasis on methods of evaluating animals using visual, genetic and performance records. Selection criteria, rations, index systems, expected progeny differences, expected breeding values and repeatability will be covered for the major livestock species. Live animal evaluation will be the primary focus of the laboratory. Prerequisites: Introduction to Animal Science and Biology 102. Credit, three hours. 29-317. FUNDAMENTALS OF CROP PRODUCTION. 3:2:2 An introduction to the fundamentals of crop growth and the study of the more important field crops. Emphasis will be placed on the effects of various cultural practices on the plant growth. Crop distribution and breeding will be considered. Cropping systems will be developed and analyzed. Prerequisite: Biology 102. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Credit, three hours. 29-319. HORTICULTURAL PLANT MATERIALS. 3:2:2 Ecology, taxonomy, and landscape uses of herbaceous and wood plant materials. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week and field trips. Credit, three hours. 29-323. AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES MACHINERY. 3:4:2 Principles of function and operation, stressing proper selection, use and management of agriculture and natural resource machinery. Two two-hour lectures per week. Credit, three hours. 29-324. AGRICULTURAL AND NATURAL RESOURCES POWER. 3:2:2 A study of the types of power available to operate agricultural and natural resources equipment. Combustion engines, electric motors and other power sources will be explored. Design, operating principles and maintenance will be emphasized. Measurements of power and power source selection will be considered. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Credit, three hours. 29-325. INTRODUCTION TO ENTOMOLOGY. 3:2:2 Course description goes here. Credit, three hours. 29-350. PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES. An opportunity to pursue independent study and research. May be elected during junior and senior years. Prerequisites: approval by instructor. Credit, one to three hours per semester. 29-404. SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE. 3:3:0 An evaluation of agricultural production practices to determine the potential for profitable production, maintaining environmental quality, and insuring that food requirements of the population will be met. The biology of food production systems will be explored to determine relationships between inputs, output and social-environmental impacts. The interface between mechanization, specialized buildings, labor, and biological systems will be evaluated. Prerequisites: Animal Science 206, Soil Science 208, Crop Production 317. Three one-hour lectures per week. Credits, three hours. 29-406. BEEF AND SHEEP PRODUCTION 3:2:2 A study of the principle of nutrition, physiology, and reproduction as they relate to the economic production of beef and lamb. Sound management techniques and their integration into a sustainable enterprise will be studied. Breeding and selection as it relates to both registered and commercial herds and flocks will be considered. Prerequisites: Animal Science 206, Animal Nutrition 207. Two one-hour lectures and one two hour laboratory per week. Credits, three hours. 29-407. METHODS OF TEACHING AGRICULTURE. 3:3:0 This course, through numerous demonstrations, indicates how basic educational principles and techniques may be applied in the teaching of agriculture in the secondary school. The importance of demonstration as a method is given special consideration. Problems of organization, management and evaluation in department of agriculture in secondary schools are explored. Credit, three hours. 29-408. PLANT CELL AND TISSUE CULTURE. 4:3:3 An introduction to the theory, application, and technique of plant cell and tissue culture. Cell theory, totipotency, and the genetic basis of plant cell and tissue culture will be presented, along with methods and techniques for the culture, growth, and development of plant cells and tissues. Prerequisites: Biology 101 and 102, Plant Physiology 306. Two one and one-half hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Credits, four hours. 29-409. PRINCIPLES OF WEED SCIENCE. 3:2:2 This course is a study of weeds and their control. Principles involving weed plant classification, weed biology and ecology, and plant and herbicide chemistry will be presented. Practices which prevent, eliminate, and control weeds in grain crops, legumes, vegetables, fruit, pasture, and other crop ecologies will be discussed. Herbicide formulations and safe herbicide use will be taught. Prerequisites: Biology 102, Crops 317 or Horticulture 219. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Credit, three hours. 29-419. PLANT PROPAGATION AND GREENHOUSE MANAGEMENT. 3:2:2 Techniques and principles of plant propagation by seeds, grafts, buds, cuttings, layers and division. Fundamentals of greenhouse management and construction. Two lectures, two hours of laboratory per week including field trips. Credit, three hours. 29-420. FOOD DISTRIBUTION MANAGEMENT. 3:3:0 A study of the application of administrative management principles relative to firms engaged in food distribution with emphasis on food retailing organizations. Credit, three hours. 29-449. APPLY JOB - GRADUATE SCHOOL. 1:1:0 Provides an opportunity to learn the techniques of preparing to successfully apply for jobs and graduate school and to practice taking the Graduate Record Exam. Grades are based on class participation and on production of resumes and other career-oriented materials. One one-hour lecture per week. Credit, one hour. 29-451. AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES ECOSYSTEMS. 3:2:2 A senior level philosophical course, integrating concepts in social, physical, and biological sciences with an introduction to the quantitative synthesis of ecological systems. The course is designed to provide the specialist with a total view of resource use and management. Prerequisites: Biology 205 and Natural Resources 321 or consent of the instructor. Offered in spring semesters. Credit, three hours. 29-463. FORAGE CROP PRODUCTION AND MANAGEMENT. 3:2:2 A study of the characteristics, adaptation, improvement management and utilization of grasses and legumes for animal feed and their role in row crop agriculture. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites, Agriculture 317, 208. Credit, three hours. 29-464. BEEF PRODUCTION AND MANAGEMENT. 3:2:2 Course description goes here. Credit, three hours. 29-466. PORK PRODUCTION AND MANAGEMENT. 3:2:2 Application of the principles of nutrition, physiology, and herd selection, breeding, and marketing to swine production and management. Structure of the industry, enterprise establishment, systems of production, production practices and herd improvement programs will be discussed. Evaluation of production responses and economic returns will be covered. Prerequisites, Agriculture 206 and 207. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Credit, three hours. 29-495. CO-OP AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES. Course description goes here.

Curriculum for Fisheries / Wildlife Management (Wildlife Option)

Body: 
    Revised Fall 2007 First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 23-101 General Biology I & Lab 4 25-121 College Algebra or A/B 3-4 29-191 University Seminar I 1 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3     16-17 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 03-105 or 03-202 Contemporary Moral Issues or Ethics 3 23-102 General Biology II & Lab 4 25-122 Trigonometry 3 30-103 Introduction to Environmental Science 3 29-192 University Seminar II 1     17 Second Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 23-205 Ecology 4 24-101 General Chemistry I & Lab 4 30-111 Dendrology 3     17 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 23-200 Invertebrate Zoology 3 23-210 Genetics 3 24-102 General Chemistry II & Lab 4 40-201 Macroeconomics 3     17 Third Year First Semester     XX-101 Foreign Language I 3 30-311 Mammalogy 3 30-321 Biometrics 3 30-325 Fish / Wildlife Management 3 34-395 Global Societies 3     15 Second Semester     XX-102 Foreign Language II 3 23-202 Systematic Botany 4 29-208 Soil Science 3 30-312 Ornithology 3 30-350 or 29-350 Problems Terra Ecology or Problems in Agriculture and Natural Resources 3     15 Fourth Year First Semester     30-469 Ecological Land Use 3 30-475 Environmental / Wildlife Law 3 30-484 Advanced Wildlife Biology 3 01-XXX Advisor Approved Communications Elective 3     12 Second Semester     30-451 Agriculture and Natural Resources Ecosystems (Senior Capstone Course) 3 30-456 Wetlands Biology 3 30-XXX Advisor Approved NR Elective 3 XX-XXX Elective 3     12   Total credits 121  

Curriculum for Fisheries / Wildlife Management (Fisheries Option)

Body: 
    Revised Fall 2007 First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 23-101 General Biology I & Lab 4 25-121 College Algebra or A/B 3-4 29-191 University Seminar I 1 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3     16-17 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 23-102 General Biology II & Lab 4 25-122 Trigonometry 3 30-103 Introduction to Environmental Science 3 29-192 University Seminar II 1     14 Second Year First Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 23-200 Invertebrate Zoology 3 24-101 General Chemistry I & Lab 4 30-203 Fish / Wildlife Management 3     16 Second Semester     01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 23-210 Genetics 4 24-102 General Chemistry II & Lab 4 40-201 Macroeconomics 3     14 Third Year First Semester     XX-101 Foreign Language I 3 26-121 Concepts of Physics I 3 30-314 Ichthyology 3 30-321 Biometrics 3 34-395 Global Societies 3     15 Second Semester     XX-102 Foreign Language II 3 26-122 or 30-302 Concepts of Physics II or Hydrology 3 29-208 Soil Science 3 30-313 Limnology 3 30-350 Problems in Agriculture and Natural Resources 3     15 Fourth Year First Semester     30-261 Aquaculture 3 30-302 Hydrology 3 30-404 Fisheries Science 3 30-469 Ecological Land Use & Planning 3 30-475 Environmental / Wildlife Law 3     15 Second Semester     03-105 or 03-202 Contemporary Moral Issues or Ethics 3 30-405 Fisheries Management 3 30-451 Agriculture and Natural Resources Ecosystems (Senior Capstone Course) 3 30-456 Wetlands Biology 3 XX-XXX Advisor Approved Elective 3     15   Total credits 120  

Curriculum for Pre-Veterinary Science

Body: 
    Revised Fall 2007 First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 23-101 General Biology I & Lab 4 25-121 College Algebra or A/B 3-4 29-191 University Seminar I 1 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3     16-17 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 XX-XXX Humanities Elective 3 23-102 General Biology II & Lab 4 25-122 Trigonometry 3 29-102 Agriculture and Natural Resources Science 1 29-192 University Seminar II 1     15 Second Year First Semester     01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 24-101 General Chemistry I & Lab 4 25-251 Calculus I 4 29-206 Animal Science 3 XX-101 Foreign Language I 3     18 Second Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 24-102 General Chemistry II & Lab 4 29-207 Animal Nutrition 3 XX-102 Foreign Language II 3     16 Third Year First Semester     23-201 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy or (207) 3 24-301 Organic Chemistry I 4 26-201 Physics I 4 30-321 Biometrics 3 XX-XXX Approved Elective 3     17 Second Semester     23-210 Genetics 3 24-301 Organic Chemistry II 4 26-202 Physics II 4 29-208 Soil Science 3     16 Fourth Year First Semester     23-305 Microbiology 3 29-317 Crop Production 3 29-XXX Animal Science Elective (non-ruminant) 3 40-201 Macroeconomics 3     12 Second Semester     24-403 Biochemistry 4 29-404 Sustainable Agriculture (Senior Capstone Course) 3 29-XXX Animal Science Elective (ruminant) 3 34-395 Global Societies 3     13   Total credits 121  

Curriculum for Plant Science - Horticulture Option

Body: 
    Revised Fall 2007 First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 23-101 General Biology I & Lab 4 25-121 College Algebra or A/B 3-4 29-191 University Seminar I 1 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3     16-17 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 XX-XXX- Humanities Elective 3 23-102 General Biology II & Lab 4 25-122 Trigonometry 3 29-102 Agriculture and Natural Resources Science 1 29-192 University Seminar II 1     15 Second Year First Semester     01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 23-205 Ecology 4 24-101 General Chemistry I & Lab 4 29-210 Landscaping 3 29-219 Horticulture 3     17 Second Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 24-102 General Chemistry II & Lab 4 29-208 Soil Science 3 XX-101 Foreign Language I 3     16 Third Year First Semester     23-209 General Botany 3 23-306 Plant Physiology 3 29-308 Plant Pathology 3 29-465 Weed Science 3 30-321 Biometrics I 3     15 Second Semester     23-210 Genetics 3 29-419 Plant Propagation & Greenhouse Management 3 34-395 Global Societies 3 23-202 Systematic Botany 3 XX-102 Foreign Language II 3     15 Fourth Year First Semester     29-319 Horticultural Plant Materials 3 30-202 Microclimatology 3 XX-XXX Elective 3 XX-XXX Elective 3     12 Second Semester     29-404 Sustainable Agriculture (Senior Capstone Course) 3 29-408 Plant Cell & Tissue Culture 3 40-201 Macroeconomics 3 XX-XXX Elective 3 XX-XXX Elective 3     15   Total credits 121  

Curriculum for Plant Science - Agronomy Option

Body: 
    Revised Fall 2007 First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Fitness and Wellness 2 23-101 General Biology I and Lab 4 25-121 College Algebra or A/B 3-4 29-191 University Seminar I 1 34-201 34-202 34-203 34-204 American Civilization to 1865, or American Civilization from 1865, or The African-American Experience to 1865, or The African-American Experience from 1865 3     16-17 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 XX-XXX Humanities Elective 3 23-102 General Biology II & Lab 4 25-122 Trigonometry 3 29-102 Agriculture and Natural Resources Science 3 29-192 University Seminar II 1     15 Second Year First Semester     01-201 01-205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 23-205 Ecology 4 24-101 General Chemistry I & Lab 4 29-206 Animal Science 3 XX-XXX Elective 3     17 Second Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-202 01-206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 24-102 General Chemistry II & Lab 4 29-208 Soil Science 3 32-101 Human Geography 3     16       Third Year First Semester     23-210 Genetics 3 29-205 Plant Physiology 3 29-317 Crop Production 3 29-465 Weed Science 3 30-321 Biometrics I 3 XX-101 Foreign Language I 3     18 Second Semester     XX-XXX Elective 3 29-463 Forage Crop Production & Mgt 3 34-395 Global Societies 3 XX-XXX Elective 3 XX-102 Elementary Foreign Language II 3     15 Fourth Year First Semester     29-308 Plant Pathology 3 29-309 Farm Management 3 30-202 Microclimatology 3 30-401 Soil & Water Management 3     12 Second Semester     29-404 Sustainable Agriculture (Senior Capstone Course) 3 40-201 Macroeconomics 3 XX-XXX Elective 3 XX-XXX Elective 3     12   Total credits 121  

Curriculum for General Agriculture

Body: 
  Revised Fall 2007 First Year First Semester     01-101 English Composition I 3 16-100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 23-101 General Biology I & Lab 4 25-121 College Algebra or A/B 3 29-191 University Seminar I 1 34-201 or 34-202 or 34-203 or 34-204 American Civilization to 1865 American Civilization from 1865 The African-American Experience to 1865 The African-American Experience from 1865 3     16-17 Second Semester     01-102 English Composition II 3 23-102 General Biology II & Lab 4 25-122 Trigonometry 3 29-102 Agriculture and Natural Resources Science 1 29-192 University Seminar II 1 XX-XXX Humanities Elective 3     15 Second Year First Semester     01-201 or 205 World Literature I or African-American Literature I 3 23-205 Ecology 4 24-101 Chemistry I 4 29-206 Animal Science 3 40-201 Macroeconomics 3     17 Second Semester     01-200 Speech 3 01-202 or 206 World Literature II or African-American Literature II 3 29-207 Animal Nutrition 3 29-208 Soil Science 3 37-101 Introduction to Sociology 3     15 Third Year First Semester     29-305 Poultry Science 3 29-317 Crop Production 3 29-409 Weed Science 3 30-321 Biometrics 3 37-102 Principles of Sociology 3 XX-101 Foreign Language I 3     18 Second Semester     34-395 Global Societies 3 XX-102 Foreign Language II 3 XX-XXX Elective 3 XX-XXX Elective 3 XX-XXX Elective 3     15 Fourth Year First Semester     29-XXX Animal Science Elective 3 29-309 Farm Management 3 XX-XXX General Elective 3 XX-XXX General Elective 3     12 Second Semester     29-304 Marketing Agricultural Products 3 29-404 Sustainable Agriculture (Senior Capstone Course) 3 XX-XXX Elective 3 XX-XXX Elective 3     12   Total credits 120  

Pages