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Study Abroad Programs

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  We’re not in Antarctica—not yet. But DSU has student exchange programs on every other continent in the world, in countries ranging from France to Namibia to New Zealand. Current opportunities include: A 14-year exchange program with Mexico’s Centro de Idiomas (Center of Languages) in the Yucatan, which allows DSU foreign language students to engage in advanced Spanish language studies in Mexico and brings Mexican students to DSU Researching political and economic structures in Namibia, Africa as well as cultural heritage preservation in South Africa Earning credits with DSU’s School of Management by studying for a semester or summer in Spain, Greece and France Other overseas opportunities are in the works: a field school in Jamaica an exchange program with Cuba teaching and research exchanges with a university in Egypt Actually, DSU’s global studies begin right here at home, with an internationalized curriculum. The Global Societies Program is an introduction to world economics, politics, and cultures. Courses include World Regional Geography, International Economics and Trade, International Politics, and Politics in Developing Nations. Language offerings include French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Kiswahili, and Arabic. These exciting studies lay the groundwork for overseas travel and academic pursuits in the Study Abroad program.

Stories From Around the World

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DSU’s Study Abroad Program takes “What I Did on My Summer Vacation” to a whole new level! Del State students enjoy writing about their experiences abroad on summer or semester programs from Spain to China. Here is a small sampling of their comments: Agriculture Studies in Namibia One day they met the Prime Minister. Another day they ate barbecue at a homestead farm in the Namibian outback. Altogether it was an unforgettable three weeks in a place few Americans will ever see. Namibia is a country of spectacular mountains, deserts, canyons, and savannah that lies along the Atlantic coast of Africa. On a late-spring visit to Namibia in 2004, students in the Namibian Study Abroad Program, accompanied by John Graham, Assistant Vice President for International Affairs, and Dr. Gustav Ofosu, Chair of DSU’s Department of Biology, visited the University of Namibia (UNAM). The rural country was the perfect setting for studies in biology, natural resources, agriculture, and economic development: Students learned about the management of Namibia’s small-scale farms, which are succeeding thanks to rural development projects undertaken since the country’s independence. DSU visitors toured crop science research facilities. Students also attended a lecture at the Ministry of Women’s Affairs and Child Welfare. In the country’s capital, Windhoek, students undertook a range of political studies: They met the Namibian Prime Minister and the Speaker of the National Assembly (the nation’s Congress). Participants discussed Namibia’s political framework with the executive director of the Namibia Institute for Democracy. Students were provided with overviews of agriculture, water, and rural development, as well as education, employment, and labor relations at government ministry meetings. In the Cultural Exploration phase of their visit, students observed first-hand the day-to-day tasks of rural people at the homestead of Chief Helman Iipumbu. At the homestead they witnessed and sometimes participated in demonstrations in planting, harvesting, food processing, food storage, and the preparation of traditional dishes. Interviewed just before their departure from Africa, students were uniformly enthusiastic in their responses. “The program has been exceptional.” (Robin Abernathy, Horticulture major) “…more than I ever thought it would be.” (Beth Swain, Pre-Veterinary major) “I’ve learned a lot about myself, I’ve learned about developing countries, and I’ve learned about other people. I have a lot of big dreams, and this trip will help me to accomplish them.” (Patricia Nugent, Plant Science and Biology major) “It might be an ocean away, but it’s still an ocean close.” (Isis Johnson, Wildlife Conservation and Entomology major) “There is more to this world than the U.S. or North America,” noted food and nutrition major Crystal Jackson. “There are people on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, similar to but different from me. Africa taught me that I am only a small piece of this world; in order for me to make an effect on the earth, I must be willing to embrace and accept new challenges and new opportunities. “Study abroad is an opportunity that all students should take advantage of,” she continued. “You will never be the same. Yes, knowledge is power, but experience with knowledge can really help you expand your horizons.”   Business Management in Europe Risen from the ashes of World War II some 60 years ago, the continent of Europe is becoming a global powerhouse. Business students can witness historic changes through the School of Management’s Study Abroad Programs in Europe. The School of Management has developed links with other institutions to allow students to study abroad for a semester or a summer, and transfer credits back to DSU. One early beneficiary of these arrangements was Heidi Brison, who participated in an internship at a graduate business school in Nice, on the beautiful French Riviera. Management students Samanthia Buchanan and Danielle Chase took classes at L’École Supérieure des Sciences Economiques et Commerciales in France’s Loire Valley. The school’s focus on a wide range of commercial, economic, and social issues provides a unique opportunity for students who wish to obtain insights into European affairs and the growing significance of the EU. Management major Justin Baylor enlarged his understanding of the European Union in Barcelona, Spain, an important commercial and cultural center. He pursued his goals not only in course work, but also in tours and cultural events—all the while sharpening his Spanish language skills.   Culture and Society in New Zealand Like many other students, Racquel Johnson earned credits toward her English degree at DSU this fall. But unlike most other students, she earned them while living at the Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. Her trip was organized by a company called AustraLearn and coordinated through DSU’s Office of International Affairs. “I met all kinds of people from all over the United States,” Racquel wrote later. “We all immediately hit it off.” Her roommates were from Germany and China, and she met people of many other nationalities from around the world. Racquel enjoyed some truly exciting experiences, such as exploring caves and skydiving. The students went to movies, film festivals, conventions, and enjoyed the exciting nightlife in Wellington—“one of my favorite cities,” Racquel declared. At a convention, she met stars from “The Lord of the Rings,” the Oscar-winning movie series filmed in scenic New Zealand. She was thrilled. “To meet these cast members definitely was a highlight and a blessing in my life that I will never forget.” Life in Wellington was not all fun and games, of course. Racquel wrote serious academic papers on Ragtime to Rap, Maori Society and Culture, and Religions of India. “I enjoyed these classes thoroughly and was definitely challenged through the abundance of assignments,” she said. “I gained useful knowledge from each lecturer. “I am just incredibly thankful for the experience I had and thank the people who helped make it possible.”  
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"Study abroad is an opportunity that all students should take advantage of — you will never be the same!"


"Risen from the ashes of World War II some 60 years ago, the continent of Europe is becoming a global powerhouse."

 

Faculty Research Abroad

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  The creation of the Office of International Affairs is the latest development in DSU’s commitment to global engagement. The office works to coordinate and increase the international activity of faculty and professional staff. Among their many global activities, DSU faculty have: evaluated plant pathogens in Mexico studied the distillation of essential plant oils in Australia researched how how seeds are scattered under natural conditions in six nations in South and Central America participated in workshops, conferences, and other activities in Egypt, Ukraine, Greece, Australia, Liberia, England, and elsewhere in the world. The College of Agriculture and Related Sciences engages in global plant and animal science research, aquaculture, fisheries and wildlife management, seafood safety, environmental science, soil science, nutrition and dietetics. The college also has a teaching and research Herbarium with more than 160,000 plant species from around the world. DSU faculty and staff are involved in projects across the globe. Here is a current listing of activities and agreements. The faculty of Delaware State University has long been engaged in the global search for new knowledge. DSU not only encourages internationalization—it has made global outreach a fundamental part of the university’s mission and a defining feature of DSU. Programs Abroad Angola | Austria | Bangladesh | Brazil | China | Cuba | Dominican Republic | Egypt | France | Ghana | Honduras | India | Indonesia | Italy | Jamaica | Japan | Korea | Liberia | Mauritania | Mexico | Namibia | Niger | Nigeria | Panama | Poland | Senegal | Serbia & Montenegro | South Africa | Spain | Trinidad and Tobago | Uganda | United Kingdom | Vietnam Angola The Dean of the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences with the support of the Office of International Affairs is leading a discussion with the Office of the Counsel General for Angola to explore the feasibility of an institutional partnership with Agustinho Neto University. The academic areas of mutual interest are history (historical preservation), political science and agricultural education and development as an entry point. The point of contact for this developing partnership will be Dr. Bradley Skelcher, Associate Provost. Back to Top Austria The Salzburg Seminar is an international, nonpartisan, educational organization dedicated to recognition of tomorrow’s leaders. Participation in the seminar requires nomination. Dr. John L. Graham, Assistant Vice President for International Affairs received two nominations and fellowships to participate in the 2000 seminar with the theme, “Who will Control the Food System” and in the 2001 seminar with the theme, “East Asia – The United States: A Search for Common Values.” DSU faculty who wish to participate in this prestigious, invitation-only seminar are encouraged to contact the Office of International Affairs. Back to Top Bangladesh A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) has been executed with the International University of Business, Agriculture and Technology in Dhaka, The Peoples Republic of Bangladesh, to facilitate joint research projects and the exchange of visiting scholars. The partnership also affords both institutions an opportunity to engage in joint teaching and research conferences and seminars. Faculty in the Colleges of Business, Education and Sport Sciences and of Agriculture and Related Sciences will pursue joint funding opportunities that will support the academic, service learning, study abroad, and international development research experiences sought by undergraduate and graduate students. The partnership ultimately will include public health. The partnership’s point of contact is Dr. Gholam Kibria. Back to Top Brazil The University is seriously considering a recent outreach by the Centro Universitario de Maringa seeking U.S. partners for exchange programs. The University will also participate in an education fair through the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Commercial Service in collaboration with the Brazilian Educational and Language Travel Association. Several colleges and universities will attend, giving DSU an opportunity to develop further institutional partners and tap into the international student market in the region. Back to Top China Under the provisions of an MOU with Beijing Culture and Language University (BLCU), at least thirty DSU students undertook culture and language studies in Beijing in the summer of 2007. BLCU has 700 faculty members to support the academic work of 10,000 students, of which 6,000 are from countries other than China. BLCU alumni include distinguished diplomats and journalists and fourteen ambassadors to China as well as at least thirty individuals now working in embassies in China. The point of contact is Dr. Fengshan Liu, Assistant Vice President for International Affairs. DSU has executed seven other MOUs and/or Letters of Intent ensuring collaboration and cooperation with institutions in the Peoples Republic of China: Beijing Sport University, Dalian University of Technology in Dalian, Hefei University of Technology in Hefei, the capital of Anhui province, Hunan Normal University in Beijing, Jilin University in Chanchun, Jilin province, Yantai University in Yantai, Shandong province, and Zhejiang University City College in Hang Zhou, Zhejiang province. These partnerships are supporting collaborative research and teaching projects and activities including seminars and conferences in applied mathematics and computer science. The partnerships have also led to the widening of grant support that involves providing professional training and development of academic staff and exchange of scholars. The partnerships encourage and support undergraduate and graduate students’ thesis and dissertation research to be carried out in China under a co-advisement format as well as study abroad opportunities. Other academic areas of interest identified in these partnerships include Physics and Chinese language and culture. The points of contact for the above-mentioned partnerships are Dr. Fengshan Liu, Professor and Assistant Vice President for International Affairs and Director of the Applied Mathematics Research Center, and Dr. Li Chen, Chair of the Department of Education and Sport Sciences. Back to Top Cuba A Letter of Intent with the University of Havana includes the intention to develop joint research and teaching activities including faculty exchanges and collaborative grant development, study abroad and service learning opportunities. The goal is to enable DSU students to join their Cuban counterparts in the study of history, and of the visual and performing arts, including radio, video, and film, as well as work in public health, nursing, and social work. Letters of Intent have also been signed with the the Instituto de Artes of the Universidad de las Artes, and the Instituto Superior de Ciencias Medicas de La Habana. Students will be able to engage in performances and to participate in conferences and other intellectual and scholarly endeavors. DSU’s College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences and College of Health and Public Policy are strategically designing experiential learning programs for their students as a part of their degree programs. The points of contact are Dr. Bradley Skelcher, Associate Provost, Dr. Donald Parks, Director, Art Center Gallery. Back to Top Dominican Republic As part of an HBCU consortium with Florida A & M as the negotiating institution, DSU expects to be able to offer study abroad and exchange programs at the Study Abroad Center of Pontifica Universidad Catolica Madre y Maestra. The point of contact is Ms. Candace Moore, Director of International Student Services and Scholars. Back to Top Egypt A Memorandum of Understanding between Ain Shams University in Cairo pledges to develop cooperation with DSU in scientific and academic fields. This includes the exchange of faculty, scientists and staff members in order to exchange teaching experiences, develop joint research projects and research thesis supervision as well as participation in conferences, symposia, and post-graduate courses between DSU’s Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources and its counterpart at Ain Shams. Cooperation will focus particularly in the fields of agriculture, agricultural economics, natural resources and related environmental topics. The partnership envisions future development in other disciplines such as multicultural education and cultural understanding. The point of contact is Dr. Mazen Shahin, Professor, Department of Mathematics Sciences. Back to Top France Delaware State University has a partnership with the University of Caen, located in the Normandy region of France. Students have an opportunity to study French during the summer sessions held from June through August at this prestigious French university founded some five centuries ago. Language classes are offered at the CEUIE (French acronym for the University Center for Foreign Students). The CEUIE has the distinctive feature of providing language classes designed to help students improve their French while at the same time offering courses in other subjects. Back to Top Ghana An MOU with the University of Ghana - Legon is under review. DSU is also exploring a relationship with the Ghanaian Management Institute. Students will be encouraged to participate in summer and semester abroad programs. Back to Top Honduras A Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence in Spanish, Dr. Lety Elvir Lazo, is currently in place in DSU’s Department of English and Foreign Languages. Dr. Lazo serves as the principal point of contact as a part of ongoing discussion with the Autonomous National University of Honduras. Back to Top India An MOU has been drafted with the University of Mumbai calling for exchange of faculty and students as well as scientific and technological information, data and equipment. Other partnerships that are under development include Birla Institute of Technology in Pilani, Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi, and the University of Madras in Chennai. Disciplines under consideration include computer science, physics and engineering; specifically work on parallel and distributed computing and grid computing. In addition, DSU faculty hope to collaborate in the area of bioinformatics through the Delaware Center for Scientific and Applied Computation. The points of contact for the India initiatives are Dr. Jaiwant Mulik, Assistant Professor, Computer Sciences, and Dr. Nourredine Melekechi, Professor and Vice President for Research. Back to Top Indonesia Delaware State University will collaborate with the Harriet International Network, a private, internationally renowned educational group that assists universities with establishing degree programs in foreign countries. Indonesia represents a potentially ideal location for this possibility. Back to Top Italy DSU and the University of Cagliari have signed a Letter of Intent committing them to explore areas of common interest, including joint research and teaching activities, study abroad opportunities, exchange of teaching materials and other information, collaboration in professional training and development for academic staff, and collaboration in various disciplinary areas including computer science and information technology, applied mathematics, and mathematical and theoretical physics. The point of contact is Ms. Candace Moore, Director of International Student Services and Scholars. Back to Top Jamaica The Letter of Intent between DSU and the Heart Trust/National Training Agency in Kingston identifies several areas of common interest. These include joint efforts to apply for grants from their governments and from international funding organizations, joint research and teaching activities, sharing of pedagogical and other materials, professional training for academic staff and students, and study abroad opportunities initially in Agriculture and Natural Resources and Environmental Science. The partnership also includes other academic programs such as fashion design & merchandising, hospitality and tourism, information technology, and education. The point of contact is Dr. Dyremple Marsh, Dean, College of Agriculture and Related Sciences. Back to Top Japan DSU is corresponding with the institutional representative of the Hiroshima College of Foreign Languages and with Josai International University in an effort to strengthen the Japanese language program at DSU. The point of contact is the Chair, Department of English and Foreign Languages. Back to Top Korea DSU has begun negotiations toward an MOU with Chonnam National University in Gwangjiu, South Korea. The College of Business at DSU and the College of Business Administration at Chonnam University seek to engage students in a reciprocating semester abroad program for students pursuing an MBA degree. The fruition of this partnership is consistent with DSU’s College of Business’ desire to provide an international experience for its students in one of the fastest growing economic regions of the world in Southeast Asia. DSU is also planning participation in an international education fair in Busan. This location represents one of the largest numbers of international students studying in foreign countries. The point of contact will be Dr. Young-Sik Kwak, Associate Dean, College of Business. Back to Top Liberia The University’s Letter of Intent with the University of Liberia identifies several areas of common interest including joint research and teaching activities and collaborative grant development. It also envisions exchange of pedagogical materials and other information. Although the initial focus of the partnership will be in agriculture, the partnership envisions future collaboration in other disciplines. Back to Top Mauritania A partnership with the University of Nouakchott at the initial stage provides an intensive summer study abroad program for students to learn the Arabic language in a cultural immersion setting. The program is coordinated by University of Nouakchott’s Faculty of Letters and Humane Sciences and the Department of National Languages and Linguistics. The partnership in advanced stages provides for the exploration of faculty exchanges and collaborative grant development with the University of Nouakchott’s College of Humanities and Social Sciences. DSU students will travel to Mauritania beginning in 2007. The partnership also provides a semester abroad program for students seeking advanced language and culture studies. The points of contact is the Chair, Department of English and Foreign Languages. Back to Top Mexico DSU has a 15-year-old partnership with the Centro De Idiomas Del Surete in Yucatan. The partnership enables students to study English as a second language at DSU in business and computer science. DSU has hosted nearly 100 students. An MOU between the International University in Cuernavaca and DSU commits the partners to developing student and faculty exchange and study abroad programs as well as collaborative efforts in research, proposal writing and technical assistance. They also expect to jointly sponsor seminars, workshops, exhibitions and conferences. The partnerships afford DSU students and public and private school teachers an opportunity to enroll in two- to six-week reciprocal intensive language training programs. The point of contact for these partnerships is Dr. Oriaku Nwosu, Professor, Department of English and Foreign Languages. Under the Letter of Intent between DSU and the University of Guanajuato, students from DSU’s Department of Nursing and Community Health will have opportunities for internships and participation in international development and service learning projects through the School of Nursing in León. This partnership also calls for study abroad opportunities, faculty exchanges, collaborative grant development and collaboration in professional training and development for academic staff. Other academic areas of mutual interests include language studies and international business. Back to Top Namibia A summer study abroad program has sent nearly 100 students to Namibia since 2002 under an MOU with the University of Namibia. The initial phase of the partnership focused on agriculture, natural resources and the biological sciences. A second phase of the program offered opportunities to widen the academic background of student participants to other areas including finance, marketing, community health, nursing, nutrition, foreign languages, history and political science. The MOU also calls for faculty and research exchanges, technical assistance and/or training and other cooperative efforts. A recent Letter of Intent has been signed by DSU and Polytechnic of Namibia calling for other joint and collaborative activities, including aquaculture and fisheries. Back to Top Niger The Government of Niger and Delaware State University are embarking on a multi-million dollar proposal funded by the World Bank. DSU will be the implementing entity. The partnership protocols and deliverables are still in the development stage. The point of contact is the Chair, Department of English and Foreign Languages. Back to Top Nigeria An MOU with the University of Uyo in the Capital of Akwa Ibom state provides for joint fundraising efforts, undergraduate and graduate degree programs, research projects, academic seminars or conferences, and faculty and student exchange programs in mathematics. The point of contact is Dr. Hanson Umoh, Professor, Department of Mathematics. Back to Top Panama The MOU with the University of Panama establishes an international development partnership supported by the United Negro College Fund Special Programs Corporation. This partnership, which is a collaboration between DSU as the lead institution and Morgan State University, enables faculty at the University of Panama to teach criminal justice with their counterparts. The University is also considering a University-wide study abroad program. The principal points of contact is Dr. Anuradha Dujari. Back to Top Poland The Letter of Intent with the University of Silesia in Katowice opens the way for the two institutions to work collaboratively on mutually beneficial teaching and research initiatives; especially chromatography and chromatographical methods of investigation, as well as other disciplinary areas. The two institutions also expect to participate in symposia and in the exchange of pedagogical materials and other information. Back to Top Senegal A Letter of Intent has been appended to the MOU with the University of Cheikh Anta Diop identifying several areas of common interest including research and teaching activities, faculty exchange and collaborative grant development. The Letter of Intent provides for a study abroad program which focuses on language acquisition in Pulaar/Fulani, Arabic, French and language translation. The study abroad program began in the summer of 2007. The points of contacts is the Chair of the Department of English and Foreign Languages. Back to Top Serbia & Montenegro DSU has Memoranda of Understanding with three universities in Serbia and Montenegro: the University of Belgrade, the University of Nis and the University of Novi Sad. These partnerships provide for exchange of students and scholars, seminars and conferences, collaborative fund-seeking efforts and degree programs. The partnership with the University of Novi Sad began in the areas of engineering (telecommunications, applied mathematics). The partnership with the University of Nis will start with a focus on electronic engineering (applied mathematics, theoretical electrical engineering, automatic control, computer science, telecommunications, and microelectronics), medicine, physics, biology and natural protection and education. The partnership with the University of Belgrade includes organizational sciences, information systems and technology, statistics and operational research. Advance stages of this partnership include transport and traffic engineering, railway, waterway, and airway transport, postal and telecommunication traffic and networks and logistics. The point of contact is Dr. Dragoljub Prokrajac, Associate Professor, Department of Computer Sciences. Back to Top South Africa DSU is corresponding with the University of Zululand. The conceptual framework provides opportunities for students and faculty to engage in research in mathematics, a wide range of disciplines in humanities and social sciences, and public health. The partnership protocol will also encourage a semester abroad program and exploring and securing joint funding. Back to Top Spain Delaware State University is corresponding with the University of Coruna regarding an international visiting student program. The partnership, once solidified, will offer Spanish language summer courses for DSU students and teaching staff. Back to Top Trinidad and Tobago The Letter of Intent executed with the University of the West Indies in St. Augustine provides for study abroad opportunities, faculty exchange, joint research activity and collaborative grant development, professional development for academic staff, and the exchange of academic material and other information. Disciplinary areas include business administration and management, international relations, and Caribbean studies. Students are encouraged to participate in summer and semester abroad programs. The point of contact is Ms. Candace Moore, Director of International Student Services and Scholars. Back to Top Uganda The MOU processed through the United Negro College Fund Special Programs Corporation and supported by the United States Agency for International Development with Makerere University Institute of Public Health and DSU’s College of Health and Public Policy provides a unique opportunity for both institutions to review and document critical aspects of past and existing malaria control policy in Uganda. Under this partnership, DSU undergraduate and graduate students participated in a groundbreaking study of the effectiveness of a new malaria protocol. Students worked with and through the Ministry of Health, USAID/Uganda, district health services offices and a host of key stakeholders who work extensively on the prevention and treatment of malaria. DSU students shadow graduate students at Makerere Univeristy Institute of Public Health who are in the research phase of completing their MPH and DPH degrees. Students gain invaluable experience in the design and implementation of practical field research and receive credit toward their degrees. Back to Top United Kingdom An MOU with the American University in London mandates a variety of cooperative activities including joint research projects and exchange of scholars and students, joint seminars and conferences and joint funding opportunities. The partnership will begin in the MBA executive and hospitality industry management programs. An international field course has also been proposed. Back to Top Vietnam The College of Business is near completion of a partnership with the National University of Vietnam to teach MBA courses in Hanoi and Haiphong with the prospect of adding other sites in later phases of the program. A majority of the core courses for the MBA would be taught by DSU faculty in lectures over a two-week period, allowing students to complete their assignments electronically over the following five weeks. The partnership would also provide summer study abroad opportunities for DSU students. The points of contact is Mr. Keshor Sheth, Director, MBA Program. Back to Top    

Graduate Enrollment Policies and Procedures

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  Health Records The University requires that all graduate students file a personal health and immunization record with the Student Health Center at the time of first enrollment. Appropriate forms are sent directly to newly enrolled graduate students. Forms are also available at the Student Health Center. Registration Graduate students register for courses at the time specified on the Academic Calendar. After the schedule is approved by the advisor, a student receives a pin number and is then allowed to web register. Course lists are published each semester by the Registrar’s Office and are available for viewing at the student services web site at http://www.desu.edu. All charges, such as tuition and applicable fees for the ensuing semester, must be paid at the time of registration, or arrangements made with the Office of Student Accounts, before registration is official. Graduate students not officially registered for a course will not be permitted to attend the course and will not receive credit at the end of the semester. Delaware State University regularly mails schedule/bills to students, but cannot assume responsibility for their receipt. If students do not receive a bill on or before the beginning of each semester, it is the students' responsibility to contact the Office of Student Accounts or to go on-line to obtain information relative to their bill. Graduate Course Levels Courses which may apply towards a graduate program are numbered 500 and above. Course Loads Full-time graduate enrollment is defined at DSU as a minimum of 6 credit hours. Students enrolled in less than 6 credit hours per semester hours are considered part-time students, with those enrolled for 3 credit hours defined as half-time students. Auditing Classes Courses may be taken for audit by graduate or non-degree students with the permission of the instructor and the student’s advisor. No credits are earned for auditing courses. The deadline for designating a course as an Audit is at the end of the first week of each semester. A grade of "AU" is entered on the graduate student's record for the course. Graduate students are charged tuition for the credit hours. Add/Drop Courses may be added or dropped online or by using a drop/add slip during the periods prescribed in the Academic Calendar. Courses dropped during the official drop/add period will not appear on the student’s transcript. From the end of the late registration period through the last day to drop courses, graduate students who wish to withdraw from a course must complete the drop/add form, consult with their advisor, and submit the form to the instructor for signature. The graduate student is then responsible for delivering the form to the Registrar’s Office no later than 4:00 p.m. of the Last Day to Drop Courses (as prescribed in the Academic Calendar). The graduate student will be assigned a grade of “W” for the course by the Registrar’s Office. For courses offered on a schedule different from the regular fall, spring, and summer terms, the add period is the shorter of one week or the calendar equivalent of 13% of the instructional time. For such courses that meet only once per week, the add period ends on the day before the second meeting of the class. The last day to drop such a course is prior to completion of 60% of the instructional time. To add or drop a course, the student must complete a “Notice of Class Change” form, and submit it to the Records office, signed by the student, the student’s advisor, and the instructor of the course. The department Chairperson may sign on behalf of the instructor, if the instructor is not available. To add a course after the late registration fee requires in addition the signature of the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research or designee. Withdrawal from Courses or University After the last day to drop courses, withdrawal from a course requires a graduate student to obtain the advisor’s approval and then to petition the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research, explaining that they are interested in withdrawing from the course due to extenuating circumstances beyond their control. Such a petition must contain conclusive evidence, properly documented, of the situation that prevents completion of the course. Acceptable reasons do not include dissatisfaction with performance in a course, with instruction, or with an expected grade. If the petition is approved, the graduate student will receive a grade of “WA” (Administrative Withdrawal) in the course. A graduate student who wishes to withdraw from all courses or the graduate program must obtain and complete a Withdrawal Form for Graduate Students from the Registrar’s Office. Withdrawal is complete when all necessary signatures have been obtained and the form has been received in and processed by the Registrar’s Office. A student who withdraws from the University will receive a grade of “W” in each course enrolled that term. All withdrawals must be completed on or before the last day to withdraw from the University as indicated on the Academic Calendar for the term. For graduate courses offered on a schedule different from the standard academic terms, the last day to withdraw from a course is prior to completion of 60% of the instructional time. The last day to withdraw from the University is prior to the final week of the student’s classes. To re-enter the graduate program after withdrawing from the University a graduate student must reapply for admission. Administrative Withdrawal from the University A student with a compelling reason (such as documented extreme personal difficulty or documented medical reason) may request to be administratively withdrawn from the University for a previous term. Administrative withdrawal is rarely granted, but it may be warranted in some circumstances. Only the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs may authorize such withdrawal, and the following procedure must be followed. The student must submit a written request for administrative withdrawal from the University, to the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research. The request must state the compelling reason, specify the term to be withdrawn, and be accompanied by documentation of the validity of the reason. The Dean of Graduate Studies and Research reviews the request and submits his or her recommendation in writing to the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, along with the request and documentation from the student. If the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs approves the request, the student is reported to the Registrar’s Office as “Administratively Withdrawn,” and a grade of “WA” is assigned for all courses taken during that semester. The Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs also informs the student in writing of the decision. The student must reapply, in order to reenter the graduate program for a subsequent term. Grading Policies Graduate students are issued grades at the end of each term. For each course in which the graduate student was enrolled, either a letter grade or a symbol will be entered on the graduate student's academic record. Only courses completed with a grade of "A," "B," or "C" can be used toward fulfilling the graduation requirements for a graduate degree. The following letter designations are used to indicate the quality of achievement in a graduate course: Grade Interpretation Points A Excellent 4.0 B Good 3.0 C Fair 2.0 D Poor 1.0 F Failure 0.0 Symbols     I* Incomplete Q Thesis/Dissertation in progress, proceeding satisfactorily but Incomplete W Withdrawn AU Audit S/U Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (Field Experience) WA Administrative Withdrawal *A grade of “Q” is to be used when thesis or dissertation research is in progress and proceeding satisfactorily. If the thesis or dissertation is not proceeding satisfactorily, a U grade is given. The Q grade can be used for several semesters. At the time the thesis or dissertation is presented, defended, and graded, the thesis/dissertation advisor will submit the appropriate quality grade (A, B, C, D, F, S, or U) for the final term, and use grade change forms to convert a sufficient number of prior to the final grade that the number of graded thesis/dissertation credits is equal to the number required for the degree. An "I" will automatically convert to an "F" if not removed within the first six (6) weeks of the following term. An Incomplete Documentation Form must be submitted by the course instructor to the respective Graduate Program Director. Academic Probation Graduate students who receive a grade of “U” in a graduate course or thesis/dissertation or do not achieve a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or greater at the end of a semester are placed on academic probation for the following term. Dismissal Any of the following situations will result in the academic dismissal of a graduate student working toward a graduate degree: Receiving a grade of "D" or "F" in a graduate course; Failure to achieve a term grade point average of 3.0 or greater while on academic probation; Being placed on academic probation for more than two terms; or Receiving three (3) grades of “C.” Veterans in Continuing Education Programs All eligible persons desiring to receive educational assistance through the Veterans Administration are required to apply for admission to the University as a degree candidate. Change of Major or Personal Data Changes in major and personal data (address or telephone number) must be submitted to the Office of Records and Registration on the appropriate forms. Graduate students changing to a different program must be accepted by the new program. Automobile Registration and Parking Regulations Graduate students must register their vehicles with the University Police Department in order to park on the Dover campus. Official car registration, proof of insurance, and the appropriate parking fee are required at the time of registration. Graduate students will receive a parking decal that must be displayed on their vehicle as directed at all times to avoid being towed or ticketed.

Graduate Academic Policies and Regulations

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Changed to new 2009 Copy.

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  Academic Advisement Students accepted into a graduate program are assigned a faculty advisor by their Graduate Program Director. Graduate students should consult with their advisor in selection of courses, degree requirements, and related matters. Admission to Candidacy For a Master's degree student, official admission to the graduate program constitutes admission to candidacy, unless the specific program has additional requirements. No graduate student will be allowed to register for a master’s level course after completion of fifteen (15) fifteen hours at Delaware State University unless he/she has been admitted to the program and to candidacy. Each doctoral program is required to state clearly and to communicate to its students the requirements for candidacy. Students in doctoral programs must apply for candidacy after they have completed the program's core required coursework with an average of B or higher, and have successfully passed the qualifying examination. A program may use an alternative assessment process comparable to the qualifying examination and appropriate to the discipline to allow the student to demonstrate the content knowledge and other skills deemed to be essential prerequisites for entering the dissertation phase. Applications for admission to candidacy must be submitted for approval prior to the dissertation phase, and in no cases later than two semesters prior to graduation. Admission to doctoral candidacy must be approved by the respective Graduate Program Director and by the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research. It is the responsibility of the graduate student to become familiar with the policies and procedures governing admission to candidacy in his/her degree program. Degree Requirements and Application for Graduation In order to earn a master's or a doctorate degree, graduate students must satisfy all of the institutional requirements as well as the specified requirements of the program in which they are enrolled. At a minimum to earn a Master’s degree, a student must have earned at least 30 graduate credits, of which no more than 6 may be thesis, internship, or other special project. At a minimum to earn a doctoral degree, a student must have earned at least 60 graduate credits (including those previously applied toward a Master’s degree and accepted as part of the doctoral curriculum), of which not more than 12 may be for the dissertation. Students may take additional thesis or dissertation credits, as needed, for the duration of their project. In no cases may additional thesis/dissertation credits be substituted for core or elective courses in determining qualification for the degree. To earn a graduate degree, the graduate student must have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher (on a 4.0 scale) for all work taken on the graduate level. Graduate students who expect to graduate in May must file an Application for Graduation with the Office of Records and Registration and the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research by February 1 of that year. Participation in Graduation Exercises Graduate students may participate in the annual graduation exercises in May only if the following conditions are met: File the application for graduation by February 1; Enroll in all courses required to complete degree requirements; Successfully complete those courses of current enrollment and satisfy all degree program requirements; and Submit any required thesis or dissertation to the library for binding not later than the last day of the Final examination period. Satisfy all financial obligations to the university. Graduate degree recipients interested in participating in Commencement ceremonies must submit the Application for Graduation according to the procedures and deadlines in place, even if they completed the requirements the previous August or December. Submitting an Appeal Appeals concerning reevaluation of a final course grade should be submitted as follows: Graduate students should file, in writing, the complaint or appeal to the appropriate Graduate Program Director for resolution. The Graduate Program Director shall reply to the student within 10 working days; If the disposition is not favorable, the graduate student may appeal to the respective College Dean, by submitting the previous appeal documents, the Graduate Program Director’s response, and any additional relevant information. The Dean shall reply to the student within 10 working days. If the disposition is not favorable, the final appeal may be brought in writing to the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research. All prior documents plus additional information must be submitted. The Dean of Graduate Studies and Research shall reply to the student within 10 working days. Appeals concerning reinstatement from dismissal from a graduate program must be submitted to the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research. The appeal must be in writing, include documented support from the Graduate Program Director and College Dean, and provide an explanation from the student describing how he/she will complete the degree program successfully, if reinstated Thesis A master’s degree student, who elects or is required to complete a thesis, must have a Thesis Committee established not later than the end of the second semester of full-time residency. The Committee shall consist of a minimum of four (4) members equivalent to the rank of Assistant Professor or above, at least one of whom shall be from outside the department. A graduate student initiating a thesis project should select a topic in consultation with the Research Advisor and the Graduate Program Director. The graduate student must file for and receive approval from the Thesis Committee during the semester prior to beginning work on the thesis. At a minimum this request will require the student to submit a brief written thesis proposal to the Committee for its approval. Graduate Programs may have additional requirements, including but not limited to oral presentation of the project proposal. Due to the nature of research and creative work at the graduate level, it is expected that the thesis project may evolve in unanticipated ways. Graduate students are strongly advised to consult frequently with their Research Advisor and to keep their thesis committee members apprised of progress. In the event that the student and the Advisor decide to make substantive changes in the project’s goals, aims, or scope, a revised thesis proposal should be submitted, reviewed, and approved in the same manner as the original one was. The application for approval of the Thesis Committee membership is available in the Department Office, from the Graduate Program Director, and from the School of Graduate Studies and Research. The style manual to be used in writing the thesis will be designated by the respective department. Certain mandatory formatting requirements are described in the Delaware State University Thesis Handbook, available at www.desu.edu, from the Graduate Program Director, and from the School of Graduate Studies and Research. A graduate student preparing a thesis or dissertation must present and satisfactorily defend the thesis in an oral presentation and examination by the Thesis Committee during the student’s final semester. The thesis defense has four components: (a) presentation of the work by the student; (b) defense of the thesis by the student through questioning in an open session by the Committee members and others in attendance and, if requested by the Committee, at a closed session for the Committee and the student only; (c) discussion by the Committee in a closed session to determine whether or not the thesis, including its defense, is satisfactory; and (d) communication to the student by the Committee chairperson the outcome of the defense. The Committee has five alternatives: (a) to accept the thesis without any recommended changes, and for all members to sign the approval page; (b) to accept the thesis, subject to the student making the recommended changes, with all Committee members, except the chairperson signing the approval page, and the chairperson responsible for checking the revised thesis to ensure the changes were made, and signing approval at that time; (c) to recommend revision to the thesis, but not to sign until the revised thesis has been submitted to and reviewed and approved by the Committee members; (d) to recommend revision of the thesis and a second meeting of the Committee with the student to review the thesis and complete the defense; or (e) to determine the thesis, including its defense, to be unsatisfactory, and therefore the student fails. The Committee chairperson will communicate the decision to the student and except for alternatives (a) and (e) the expected time period for completing the revisions and process. The thesis defense should be scheduled and publicly announced at least three (3) weeks in advance, so that interested persons can attend the presentation portion. All members of the Committee shall be given a copy of the final draft of the thesis at least one week (7 days) prior to the examination for master’s theses. Graduate students must have the thesis completed, defended, approved, and submitted to the library for binding prior to the date grades are due for the term. Students whose final signed theses/dissertations are not submitted to the library before the Spring semester grades are due will not be eligible to participate in the May Commencement Ceremonies. For further information relative to the thesis, a copy of the Thesis Handbook may be requested from the School of Graduate Studies and Research. The thesis and all related procedures must be completed by April 15 for those planning to graduate at the conclusion of the Spring Semester. The finished thesis, which includes changes resulting from the oral examination along with a completed approval form, must comply with criteria described in the Thesis Handbook. The University Library will bind the required bound copies of the Thesis at the student's expense. Once completed, the student will distribute the thesis as follows: one bound original to the Department one bound copy to the University Library one bound copy to the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research one copy to each committee member (binding not required) one copy to the student (binding not required) A graduate student who requires more than one semester to complete the thesis will receive the symbol Q (Thesis incomplete) for each semester in which progress is satisfactory, until the thesis/dissertation is satisfactorily completed. A graduate student who has previously registered for thesis and completed all course and research requirements may choose not to register for, or work on the thesis but must pay the current Sustaining Fee (all other fees waived) for each semester until the degree is completed. Semesters not registered will count toward the time limit allotted to complete the degree. The Graduate Program Director and Dean of Graduate Studies and Research must approve all registrations for the Sustaining Thesis beyond one semester. Dissertation A doctoral degree student must have a Dissertation Committee established not later than the end of the third semester of full-time residency and before his or her dissertation project begins. For a doctoral dissertation, the Committee will be augmented by an additional expert member from outside the University at the time of dissertation defense. The Committee membership must be approved by the Research Advisor, Graduate Program Director, College Dean, and Dean of Graduate Studies and Research. A graduate student initiating a dissertation project should select a topic in consultation with the Research Advisor and the Graduate Program Director. The graduate student must file for and receive approval from the Dissertation Committee during the semester prior to beginning work on the dissertation. At a minimum this request will require the student to submit a brief written dissertation proposal to the Committee for its approval. Graduate Programs may have additional requirements, including but not limited to oral presentation of the project proposal. Due to the nature of research and creative work at the graduate level, it is expected that the dissertation project may evolve in unanticipated ways. Graduate students are strongly advised to consult frequently with their Research Advisor and to keep their dissertation committee members apprised of progress. In the event that the student and the Advisor decide to make substantive changes in the project’s goals, aims, or scope, a revised dissertation proposal should be submitted, reviewed, and approved in the same manner as the original one was. The application for approval of the Dissertation Committee membership is available in the Department Office, from the Graduate Program Director, and from the School of Graduate Studies and Research. The style manual to be used in writing the dissertation will be designated by the respective department. Certain mandatory formatting requirements are described in the Delaware State University Dissertation Handbook, available at www.desu.edu, from the Graduate Program Director, and from the School of Graduate Studies and Research. A graduate student preparing a dissertation must present and satisfactorily defend the dissertation in an oral presentation and examination by the Dissertation Committee during the student’s final semester. The Dissertation defense has four components: (a) presentation of the work by the student; (b) defense of the dissertation by the student through questioning in an open session by the Committee members and others in attendance and, if requested by the Committee, at a closed session for the Committee and the student only; (c) discussion by the Committee in a closed session to determine whether or not the Dissertation, including its defense, is satisfactory; and (d) communication to the student by the Committee chairperson the outcome of the defense. The Committee has five alternatives: (a) to accept the dissertation without any recommended changes, and for all members to sign the approval page; (b) to accept the dissertation, subject to the student making the recommended changes, with all Committee members, except the chairperson signing the approval page, and the chairperson responsible for checking the revised thesis to ensure the changes were made, and signing approval at that time; (c) to recommend revision to the dissertation, but not to sign until the revised dissertation has been submitted to and reviewed and approved by the Committee members; (d) to recommend revision of the dissertation and a second meeting of the Committee with the student to review the dissertation and complete the defense; or (e) to determine the dissertation, including its defense, to be unsatisfactory, and therefore the student fails. The Committee chairperson will communicate the decision to the student and except for alternatives (a) and (e) the expected time period for completing the revisions and process. The Dissertation defense should be scheduled and publicly announced at least three (3) weeks in advance, so that interested persons can attend the presentation portion. All members of the Committee shall be given a copy of the final draft of the dissertation three weeks (21 days) prior to the examination for a doctoral dissertation. Graduate students must have the dissertation completed, defended, approved, and submitted to the library for binding prior to the date grades are due for the term. Students whose final signed dissertations are not submitted to the library before the Spring semester grades are due will not be eligible to participate in the May Commencement Ceremonies. For further information relative to the dissertation, a copy of the Dissertation Handbook may be requested from the School of Graduate Studies and Research. The dissertation and all related procedures must be completed by April 15 for those planning to graduate at the conclusion of the Spring Semester. The finished dissertation, which includes changes resulting from the oral examination along with a completed approval form, must comply with criteria described in the Dissertation Handbook. The University Library will bind the required bound copies of the Dissertation at the student's expense. Once completed, the student will distribute the dissertation as follows: one bound original to the Department one bound copy to the University Library one bound copy to the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research one copy to each committee member (binding not required) one copy to the student (binding not required) A graduate student who requires more than one semester to complete the dissertation will receive the symbol Q (dissertation incomplete) for each semester in which progress is satisfactory, until the thesis/dissertation is satisfactorily completed. A graduate student who has previously registered for thesis/dissertation and completed all course and research requirements may choose not to register for, or work on the dissertation, but must pay the current Sustaining Fee (all other fees waived) for each semester until the degree is completed. Semesters not registered will count toward the time limit allotted to complete the degree. The Graduate Program Director and Dean of Graduate Studies and Research must approve all registrations for the Sustaining Dissertation beyond one semester. Change of Program If an admitted student wishes to change to a different program offered at DSU, a request must be made by the student, in writing, to the Graduate Program Director of the different program. Upon receipt of the request, the student’s file will be forwarded to the Chairperson of the desired program for review. If both the Chairperson of the desired program and the respective Dean of Graduate Studies and Research approve, the formal transfer of program will be made in the respective Graduate Studies Offices with notification to the former program Chairperson, new program Chairperson, the student, and the Registrar. The time limit for completion of the degree runs from the date of acceptance into the new program, with credit brought in subject to the appropriate transfer limitation. Time Limitation For full time students a maximum of five years is permitted to complete Masters degree requirements and a maximum of seven years is permitted to complete Doctoral degree requirements. For part time and under extenuating circumstances, these time limitations can be extended. Summer Sessions Some graduate programs offer courses during the Summer sessions for graduate students who wish to accelerate their degree programs. Notification of FERPA The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) provides graduate students with certain rights with respect to their education records: They are: The right to inspect and review the graduate student’s education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access. Graduate students should submit to the Registrar, respective Dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official, written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The University official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the University official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the graduate student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed. The right to request the amendment of the graduate student’s education records that the graduate student believes to be inaccurate or misleading. Graduate students may ask the University to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the graduate student, the University will notify the graduate student of the decision and advise the graduate student of his or her right to a hearing. Procedures will be provided to the graduate student when notified of the right to a hearing. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the graduate student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, or assisting another school official performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Upon request, the University discloses education records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Delaware State University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office U. S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20202-4605 Directory Information The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act permits the release of directory-type information to third parties outside the institution without written consent of the student provided the student has been given the opportunity to withhold such disclosure. The University releases, upon inquiry to third parties outside the University, directory information without written consent of the student. Directory information at Delaware State University includes: Name Address (including e-mail address) Telephone number College/school Classification Major field of study Dates of attendance Enrollment status Honors Degree(s) conferred (including dates) Graduate students who do not wish to have the above information released should fill out an information exclusion card at the Records Office.

Faculty

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Knowledge is key to achieving your life goals, and at DSU you’ll acquire the education and skills you need to be a competitive force in today’s changing global job market. Whether you’re preparing for a career in international relations through one of our study-abroad programs, looking to hone your talents as a music major or learning the latest technology in applied optics, DSU has a dedicated faculty and challenging curriculum to empower you for life’s road ahead. Most DSU students will agree that our world-renowned faculty helps set us apart from other colleges and universities. We have some of the most knowledgeable and dedicated instructors in higher education today. In fact, our 199 faculty members, spread over 20 departments, hold a total of 160 doctoral degrees, and 38 have reached the rank of full professor. Our faculty’s years of practical experience help DSU students connect what they learn in the classroom to their chosen major’s applications in industry and everyday life. Our 19:1 student-to-faculty ratio ensures that you’ll get the attention you need to grasp the concepts and theories in your discipline. Learn a new scientific approach in one of our state-of-the-art laboratories in the Mishoe Science Center, or discover a love for Harlem Renaissance poetry in an English class in the Education and Humanities Building. The range of disciplines and learning opportunities is vast, and discovering your niche at DSU can lead to a world of exciting career options. Choose any one of nearly 70 academic paths and embark upon a journey that will lead to a competitive and adventurous career.

Distance Education & Learning Technologies

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Delaware State University
Distance Education & Learning Technologies

1200 North Dupont Hwy.
Dover, DE 19901

302-857-7122

blackboard@desu.edu

 

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Distance Learning at DSU Some of the courses you will take at DSU use the web-based learning management system called Blackboard.  There are three types of courses offered using Blackboard: Web-enhanced courses.  Although all of your class sessions are conducted in a classroom here on the campus your professor will use one or more aspects of Blackboard to distribute content or to conduct various learning activities. Blended learning courses.  Instead of always meeting in the classroom, your professor will substitute some of the scheduled class time for online activities (i.e. online discussions, lectures, exams and assignments). Online distance education courses.  For this type of course, you will NEVER meet in a classroom on campus with your professor.  Through Blackboard, your professor will provide you with a syllabus, list of required textbooks, lectures and details of course assignments.  You will submit your assignments and participate in discussions with both your professor and classmates online through Blackboard. FAQs How do I access Blackboard as a student? You can access Blackboard from any computer that has an internet connection. Go to https://dsuonline.blackboard.com and enter your username and password. Username: This is the same username that you use to access your student email account. Password: This is the same password that you use to access your student email account. Example: Username: jdoe13@students.desu.edu / Password: {your student email password} I logged in but I have a course not showing or a course that needs to be removed. Blackboard and Banner are now connected (as of Fall 2013) and you do not need to contact our office. The system will automatically update Blackboard with your courses from Banner. The updates occur several times during the day. Any course changes in Banner should be automatically reflected on Blackboard within 24 hours. How do I register for an online class? You register the same way you register for traditional classes — through Banner. Simply go to myDESU and log-in. The only difference is that in the course schedule listing, online courses have a section 40-49 and will be labeled as an online course. Once registered, your classes are automatically loaded onto Blackboard (within 24 hours) and you can access them by logging into Blackboard using your student email username and password as described above. Unable to log-in? For log-in assistance, please contact the IT Help Desk at (302) 857-7028 or stop by their office located in the BOA building, Room 313. For all other issues with Blackboard, please contact our office at blackboard@desu.edu or stop by our office in EH 205.  

Claude E. Phillips Herbarium

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    The following are helpful hints to help you achieve success at Delaware State University inside and outside of the classroom. “You're here because you're smart” Successful Students . . . have clear educational goals. (Try writing your goals down on paper.) are active learners who learn for the sake of learning. have good study skills. are interested in their coursework. have the will to succeed. Effective Students . . . have a regular study schedule. usually work at the same time each day. work mostly in a regular study place. review notes soon after a lecture. do not get easily distracted. do not need exams for motivation. (adapted from Walter Pauk, How to Study in College, 4th edition, p. 5 and 14) To achieve successfully and to be effective you need to: Keep academics as your priority! Attend each class regularly. Be sure to participate in class! Find supportive peers with similar academic goals. Meet with your Adviser and instructors regularly. Get to know and utilize University resources. Don't be afraid to ask questions of your Professor and Residence Life staff members - they are here to help you! Do your assignments on a daily basis. Buy and read necessary text for class. Always read before your classes, and write down questions to ask your professor/Instructor. Schedule study time everyday. Don't let assignments and studying pile up. Get involved in an activity on campus. DSU has numerous organizations for student involvement - see what different   organizations have to offer and get involved. Some students suggest getting involved in at least one organization or   activity.  Other students suggest the rule of three: get involved in DSU's version of an organization you were involved   with in high school (i.e. glee club, student government), get involved in a second organization related to your major, and   get involved in a third organization that is completely new to you. Get to know your instructors. They are a valuable resource. The moment you feel overwhelmed in any area of life, seek assistance. Become a good time manager! Strive for excellence. Find a study environment that meets your learning needs. (Library, your room, the lounge, outside under a tree etc.) Set goals for yourself; find someone that can hold you accountable to your goals. Ask a staff or faculty member to be a your Mentor ! If you don't understand something, seek clarification. Always, always ask Questions!! Below are a few important resources from which you can seek assistance. The following are websites that can help you with your study skills: Academic Tips dot Org Sweet Briar College Academic Resource Center Purplemath Time Management   The following are GPA calculators: University of Minnesota Duluth GPA Calculator My-GPA-Calculator dot Com   

International Students at DSU

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Ni Hao! My name is Anita Jarman, in Chinese, Mei Li (it means “beautiful”). I was one of seven DSU Hornets who studied at Beijing Sport University. Studying Chinese was one thing, but actually adapting to the culture and using the language made a wonderful combination. Every day we attended classes on speaking, listening and reading and writing.

Anita Jarman (middle left) and Kristin Hopkins (middle right) with a group of people they met while studying abroad in China.

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The Office of International Affairs (OIA) provides a campus community that values diversity and promotes global education and cross-cultural understanding; programs and services that promote academic as well as personal growth and development of international students; and encourages positive interactions among foreign and domestic students. We enroll students from Africa, Europe, South America, Asia, and the Caribbean. The Office of International Affairs supports international students on a variety of levels and provides guidance on the following: Financial, academic, social and personal matters Immigration rules, regulations, and responsibilities Campus and community activities Cultural concerns Preparation and processing of immigration documents An orientation for new students Every new international student enrolled at DSU is required to attend the International Student Orientation which helps students adjust to a new academic system, a new culture, and a new community. Even if you have had prior experience in the United States, it is crucial that students’ par take in this orientation as previous participants have enjoyed the time to meet other international students and get acquainted with new surroundings. The OIA is located in the Grossley Hall, Room 116.  We encourage all students, faculty and staff to contact our office on international related issues.  We will be happy to assist in any way we can. Academic Year Once accepted to the University, students receive an acceptance package regarding the dates of New Student Orientation, the beginning of classes and additional information. Undergraduate international students are required to arrive on campus in time to participate in New Student Orientation. The academic year runs from late August through mid-May. Semesters have the following duration: Fall Semester—Approximately Late August through Mid December. Spring Semester—Approximately Mid January 15 through Early May. Summer Sessions I & II —Approximately Late May 22 through Mid August as determined by the individual session. For specific admissions requirements, click here for our application procedures for international students. Additional Resources More resources can be found on the International Students Links and the International Students Forms pages. Contact Us Office hours are 8:30am – 4:30pm EST, Monday – Friday Dr. Fengshan Liu, Assistant Vice President for International Affairs Phone: 302-857-7418    Email: fliu@desu.edu Ms. Candace Moore, Director of International Student Services Phone: 302-857-6474    Email: cmoore@desu.edu Ms. Latasha Daniels, Senior Secretary and J-1 Officer Phone: 302-857-6421    Email: ldaniels@desu.edu Delaware State University Office of International Affairs Grossley Hall, Room 116 Dover, De  19901 302.857.6421
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Our Global Mission

We all are part of a global economy and society. In fact, we’re members of a community of more than 6 billion people in nearly 270 countries who speak hundreds of languages—and who work 24/7!

When DSU graduates enter the real world, they must be equipped to thrive in this global arena and to move easily among its many cultures. Creating globally aware, globally involved students is a major part of this university’s mission.

Delaware State University builds a culture of global awareness in numerous ways, including:

• Focusing on international teaching, research, and learning activities

• Cultivating relationships with international programs, institutions of higher education, and global communities.

At DSU, the world is our university—a laboratory for research and learning. Our students and faculty, and our visiting international students, possess a special kind of curiosity about other cultures, and a true concern for the world.

Find out how you can be a part of our global outreach.

International Students Association

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      The International Students Association is dedicated to satisfying the needs of international students while at DSU. The organization comprises of hardworking, devoted and serious students putting their best efforts to good use. Our association has been created for the benefit of any international student and we extend our welcome to all so we as international students may learn from citizens of this country. This is an open invitation for all international students to join the association. Please come for the fellowship at meetings and participate in fun activities or talk with fellow members. The most important thing is to be recognized as an international student. The goals of the ISA are to: Create a positive atmosphere for international students to interact intellectually and socially to enjoy   their stay at Delaware State University. Develop a culture of collegiality among all students. Harness our multicultural strength to help our institution and its members make a positive contribution    to national and international development. Membership fee: $10 per year   Advisors   Dr. Ladji Sacko Foreign Language Dept Education and Humanities Bldg, Rm 228 302-857-6598 lsacko@desu.edu Officers President: Khadija Tall (267) 210-6692 khadija_tall@yahoo.com Vice President: Eliezer Ayettey Corresponding Secretary: Orirat Badru Recording Secretary/ Public Relations Director: Jervane Orr Treasurer: Yemi Kolawole Historian: Darryl Green Event Coordinator: Joy Balogun Mr. ISA: Awele Olisemeka Mrs. ISA: Kelechi Onwudiwe  

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