The Graduate Program in Historic Preservation at Delaware State University is a proud member of the National Council for Preservation Education: www.ncpe.us/

Program Contact Information:

Robin L. Krawitz, Director
Historic Preservation Program
Office Phone:  302 857-7139
Office Location:  ETV Building, Room 214
rkrawitz@desu.edu
 
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Archaeology at Wildcat 2011

Footing excavated during the first field season at the Wildcat property by DSU graduate students in historic preservation under the direction of archaeologist Craig Lukezic and in partnership with the Archaeological Society of Delaware.

  Historic Preservation M.A.

Introduction

The Graduate Program in Historic Preservation concentrates on the identification and preservation of African American historic resources. The program seeks to provide students with the necessary training and preparation for employment in this field of applied history. Courses in the program emphasize the practical and applied nature of the preservation field. The program courses are offered on Friday evenings and weekends, making the program ideal for those with current full-time employment.
 

Professional Preparation

The goal of the program is to develop a cadre of professionals trained in the specialized methods of the preservation of African American historic resources.  Community based projects will provide students practical experience working through real preservation issues.  All courses connect to the real world of historic preservation professional practice in Delaware. 
 

Faculty

The program director, Robin L. Krawitz, professional preservationist with over thirty years of experience in field in the public, private and non-profit sectors and across the country, specializing in African American heritage preservation.  Her goal is to provide the students with hands-on and practical experiences in all classes, from guest lecturers who are expert on specific topics, to field exploration of historic resources and exploring the understanding of landscape development and preservation through extensive fieldwork.  
 
The faculty for the historic preservation program is drawn from the practicing professionals in the field in Delaware, as well as from the history department faculty.  Graduate students have a lot of direct interaction with professors and receive much guidance and encouragement.
 

Research and Experience

All students in the graduate program in historic preservation complete an off-campus internship with a private historical group or a local, state, or federal government agency. In addition to cultivating skills that translate directly to the workplace, students gain professional contacts via their internships, which may lead (directly or indirectly) to future employment.  Tools and methods taught in the program are based on the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Archeology and Historic Preservation and will be generally applicable to any historic preservation situation across the country.

Program Contact:  rkrawitz@desu.edu

The Graduate Program in Historic Preservation at Delaware State University is a proud member of the National Council for Preservation Education: www.ncpe.us/

Program Contact Information:

Robin L. Krawitz, Director
Historic Preservation Program
Office Phone:  302 857-7139
Office Location:  ETV Building, Room 214

 

 

Forest Landing at Wildcat Farm in the Hunn Conservation Area


In addition to other projects and field exploration, the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation is a partner in the development of the historic resources in the Hunn Conservation Area, a Kent County recreational amenity under development.  This learning laboratory for the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation provides an opportunity for students to explore historic preservation and archaeological methods in a practical environment.  Work here contributes to the development of this public asset as it grows into a county park. Students will also participate in the ongoing archaeological research project underway at the property.

Themes to develop include:

  • Slavery and Abolition
  • Delaware’s Political Landscape in the 18th and 19th Centuries
  • Development of the 18th Century Port of Forest Landing
  • Development of the Worker Community at Hunntown
  • Material Culture through Archaeology

 

The Hunn Family


In addition to the Kent County and Delaware State University partnership for the development of the Wildcat Farm at the Hunn Conservation Area, the third partner in the development of this property is the Hunn Family.    Owned by this family since the 1760s, the Wildcat property continues to be of great importance and interest.  The family raises funds for projects here through the Friends of Wildcat Fund through the Delaware Community Foundation.  Family members are a key part of the Wildcat Advisory Committee that oversees and develops the path forward for this important historic place.