July 2014


STARS Summer Program -- Photo Slideshow

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STARS participants got a lot of hands-on experience in research techniques during the July 6 thru Aug. 2 DSU summer program.

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Science and Technology Academy for Residence Scholars (STARS) is a summer enrichment program at DSU designed to stimulate and extend the interest of high school students in the fields of mathematics, science, and information technology. Its purpose is to encourage them to investigate careers in these disciplines. STARS offers enjoyable, hands-on experimentation combined with an extensive use of technology. For images from the program, click on the below photo slideshow, followed by additional information: Every day the students participate in two academic sessions in the morning and two sessions in the afternoon. In the evenings, the students are engaged in SAT Preparation sessions and follow up activities. There are field trips on the weekends.

DSU Jumpstart Freshmen Work Project With Local Museums

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DSU Jumpstart freshmen Ayanna Hatcher, Ashanna Goldsboro, Zaniyah Godley, Dallis Gerald, Joy Brown and Isaiah Collins participate in a paper-marbling training session at the John Dickerson Plantation in preparation for their Aug. 2 presentation at that state historic site.

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A group of incoming DSU freshmen – who have already started their academic journey through participation in the University’s Jumpstart Program – are already getting hands-on experience in Delaware State’s core value tradition of community service by working on a project with local museums. In connection with partnership between DSU Jumpstart Program – an academic enrichment/leadership transition program for first-time freshmen – and the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs, 28 new DSU students are working with four local museums to come up with interactive history-related programs that are specific to each one of those sites. The students have been split up into separate teams between the four sites and are developing the interactive activities that specific designed to help tell the story of the museum in which they are assigned. They will present their activities between 9 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 2 at the following Dover-area locations: The First State Heritage Park Welcome Center and Galleries, located in the Delaware Public Archives, 121 Martin Luther King Blvd. The John Dickerson Plantation, 340 Kitts Hummock Road. The Johnson Victrola Museum, 375 S. New St. The Old State House, 25 The Green. The partnership is giving the students a unique opportunity to experience how museums develop public programming through efficient time-management, teamwork, critical thinking and creativity – valuable skills that the students will need as they move forward in their lives. The Aug. 2 events at all of the above four museums are free and open to the public. For more info about the events, call the Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs at (302) 736-7411.

DSU Hosts 2nd Annual HBCU Philanthropy Symposium

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DSU's Division of Institutional Advancement recently hosted a number of regional HBCUs at its second annual Historically Black College and University Philanthropy Symposium on July 24-25, 2014.

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DSU's Division of Institutional Advancement recently hosted a number of regional HBCUs at its second annual Historically Black College and University Philanthropy Symposium on July 24-25 in the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center.The Symposium’s objective is to build a consortium of regional HBCU institutions to establish a process among the participating institutions in which philanthropic outreach solutions and best practices can be shared. Schools are thereby empowered to effectively address the challenges they face in fundraising. The consortium allows each institution to better leverage funding opportunity in an increasingly competitive market for philanthropy dollars.The attendees of DSU's 2nd annual HBCU Philanthropy Symposium take time out for a group photo moment.The keynote speaker this year was Johnny C. Taylor, Jr., president and CEO of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. "I applaud Delaware State University's leadership in convening a group of our public HBCUs to prepare themselves for fundraising success." The keynoted share his sage perspective, noting that in order to attract significant donors, HBCUs to focus their work on things that matter “People with dollars want you to solve societal problems,” Mr. Taylor said. “We have to go out and reposition the work we do. Areas like national security, future water shortages and Africa, people will give you money for work in those areas.” DSU Harry Williams addressed the symposium about the current state of HBCUs.  Symposium attendees included the host school Delaware State University, Bowie State University, Cheyney University, Coppin State University, Lincoln University, Morgan State University, University of Maryland Eastern Shore and the University of the District of Columbia. The participants engaged in interactive dialogue to determine feasible initiatives that could immediately become collaborative efforts among all of the participating schools.  The most significant issues discussed were increasing student philanthropy and strategies to get more support from university presidents and trustees.   In addition, several strategies were discussed on how to increase annual giving, engage alumni, and strategically make asks for transformational gifts to the respective universities. Representatives from Delmarva Power, JP Morgan Chase, the Thurgood Marshall College Fund (TMCF), Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE), and CFRE International also participated in the symposium, sharing their knowledge as guest speakers and panelists. 

DSU Faculty Awarded $400,000 NSF Grant

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The three-year grant – which totals $399,908 – will enable DSU to invest in information technology resources that will facilitate the implementation of cyber-learning that use web technology that can provide a rich and immersive learning environment.

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A group of DSU faculty members led by Dr. Andrew Lloyd of the Department of Biological Sciences has been awarded a National Science Foundation grant that is expected to put the University in the forefront of institutions of higher education by implementing  “cyber-learning” strategies to improve STEM instruction and increase student achievement and retention. The three-year grant – which totals $399,908 – will enable DSU to invest in information technology resources that will facilitate the implementation of cyber-learning that use web technology that can provide a rich and immersive learning environment. The grant will expand DSU’s distance learning infrastructure in support of the cyber-learning strategies, which will be broadly adopted throughout DSU’s biological sciences curriculum as well as in other STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) courses. Cyber-learning technologies will be used to implement inverted or “flipped” classroom model in the core courses for students majoring in the biological sciences. In a flipped classroom, learning activities that are normally carried out inside the classroom, such as lecturing and reviewing PowerPoints, take place outside of class, and learning activities that are normally completed at home, such as applying the course concepts in homework assignments, become the focus of in-class work. “This grant will allow us to implement teaching techniques which research has shown to be effective in enhancing learning,” said Dr. Lloyd, the principal investigator of the grant. Co-principal investigators of the grant include Dr. Leonard Davis, chair of the Department of Biological Sciences; Dr. Sabrina McGary, associate professor of biological sciences; Dr. Michael Boone, associate vice president of distance learning; and Dr. Rebecca Fox-Lykens, director of the Center for Teaching and Learning.    

Three DSU Students Take Trip with Living Freedom Riders

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(L-r) DSU students Jacquaniese Washington, Jonpaul Brown and Kristyn Green were selected to take part in the U.S. Department of Education's commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. As part of the event, the students spent time with living members of the Freedom Riders movement of the early 1960s.

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Three DSU students recently received firsthand accounts of what it was like to be a part of the dangerous Freedom Riders’ journeys through the country’s Deep South during the early 1960s. Kristyn Green stands outside photos of the president and vice president at the U.S. Department of Education where the event began. The Del State students – Jonpaul Brown, a junior from Schenectady, N.Y.; Kristyn Green, a senior  from Philadelphia; and Jacquaniese Washington, a sophomore from Birmingham, Ala. – all mass communications majors, were selected to take part in the U.S. Department of Education’s July 1 commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 signing. Because Ms. Washington grew up in Birmingham, the celebration of the Civil Rights Act had poignant significance for her. “I have family members who were hosed in the same street that I went to school at – or who could only eat at certain restaurants, whereas I can eat at all restaurants with my white or Asian friends,” Ms. Washington said. “It is important for me to know my history and to be able to meet people who have sacrificed so much.” As part of the commemoration, living members of the Freedom Riders were also celebrated for their protest of the southern states’ illegal discrimination in interstate bus travel. The Freedom Riders protest was one of several forms of civil protests that led up to the 1964 passage of the Civil Rights Act. As part of the experience, the DSU students joined the Freedom Riders for a bus trip from Washington D.C. to the old House Chambers in Richmond, Va. The living veterans of those protests shared stories of their experiences on those dangerous rides through Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana in the early 1960s. “These individuals were beaten and they bled for what they believed in,” said Ms. Green. “There is nothing more humbling than sitting shoulder to shoulder with someone who has been spit on, smacked, hosed, bitten and beaten so that we can be treated fairly and so that our dreams can be obtained.” Jonpaul Brown poses proudly with two unidentified Freedom Riders. Jacquaniese Washington said it was important to meet people who had sacrificed so much. Mr. Brown and Ms. Washington were chosen as student documentarians for the event as a result of their journalism and videography skills. They were given media passes, and they videotaped interviews of the Freedom Riders and others that they will put together as a documentary.  The student filmmakers have been asked to share their finished product – which they have already entitled “A Ride of a Lifetime” – with the U.S. Department of Education. Ms. Green is a student activist whose community involvement and strong application won her inclusion in the event. She will give a reflection presentation on her experiences on the trip in the fall at DSU. The trio also took part in the event’s opening ceremony at the U.S. Department of Education, which included the singing of “We Shall Overcome” as well as a keynote address from Hank Thomas, an original freedom rider. Additionally, student NAACP members recited poems, sang and presented original artwork, one special one being “Black Rushmore.” The day’s events were culminated with the Freedom Riders giving autographs upon the group’s return to the U.S. Department of Education. “Without civil rights I wouldn’t be able to have my own business, to go to college and gain knowledge to be the type of man I want to be down the road,” Mr. Brown said.

DSU Reaches New Accords with Schools in Ghana & China

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Seated (l-r) Dr. Huadong Yu, President of Changchun University of Science and Technology (CUST), and DSU President Harry L. Williams sign two agreements for joint academic program between the two institutions. Standing behind them (l-r): Ms. Yadong Bai, CUST associate director of International Affairs; Dr. Yong Yang, CUST Provost; Dr. Yanzhong Li, CUST vice president; Dr. Fengshan Liu, DSU Asst. Vice President for International Affairs; and an unidentified CUST staff member.

                 

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DSU President Harry L. Williams recently traveled to China and Ghana, where he signed new agreements with five different institutions that will facilitate cooperative degree programs, faculty/student exchanges and other collaborations. DSU President Harry L. William joins Professor William Otoo Ellis, vice-chancellor of Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, in signing an agreement that will facilitate faculty/students exchanges. Dr. Williams and representatives of the College of Agriculture and Related Sciences -- Dr. Dyremple Marsh, college dean; Dr. Albert Essel, associate dean for Cooperative Extension; and Dr. Marikis Alvarez, associate dean for research – were in the West African country of Ghana June 14-19 where agreements were signed with the University of Cape Coast, Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration, and Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology. The Memorandum of Understanding documents signed between DSU and the Ghanaian institutionsl of higher education will facilitate faculty/student exchanges, research collaborations, joint grant proposals and other academic and development activities. Dr. Williams and Dr. Fengshan Liu, associate vice president of International Affairs, also traveled to China, where new agreements were signed with Changchun University of Science and Technology and Dalian University of Technology’s School of Continuing Education. Two eight-year formal cooperative degree program agreements with Changchun University (located in the Chinese province of Jilin) will provide Chinese students with an opportunity to study computational mathematics and optical information science/technology at DSU during their senior year after completing the degree requirements of their first three years at Changchun.  A five-year formal accord with Dalian University (located in the Chinese province of Liaoning) will enable qualified students to enroll in DSU’s Master of Business Administration program. The Dalian students will be able to enroll in the MBA Program at either DSU’s main campus in Dover or at its DSU@Wilmington location. The students from both Changchun and Dalian will pay out-of-state tuition for their time at DSU. The recent agreements with these two Chinese universities are an expansion of faculty/student exchange agreements reached with DSU several years ago. “These agreements are solid evidence that international institutions of higher education are finding outstanding academic value in Delaware State University and great opportunities for their students to achieve their academic aspirations by studying abroad at DSU,” Dr. Williams said. “We will continue to work to expand our international portfolio and establish this institution as a highly desired global educational destination.” With the recent agreements in China, DSU now has joint academic programs with five Chinese universities. In addition to Changchun and Dalian, there are also joint programs with Ningbo University of Technology, Sanming University and Jilin University of Finance and Economics. Currently DSU has agreements with 32 institutions of higher education outside of the United States in the countries of China, Ghana, Korea, France, South Africa, Bangladesh, India and Mexico.

2014 GEMS Summer Program -- Photo Slideshow

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The GEMS students got microscopic looks at DNA during their summer program at Delaware State University.

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DSU's Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Science (GEMS) Program offers middle students the opportunity to explore new pursuits in Crime Scene Investigation and expand upon their current interests with unique hands-on experiences.For images from the GEMS program that took place from July 14-18, click on the below photo slideshow, followed by additional information:The students are rising 6th-9th graders and have the title of ‘Student Interns.’ Throughout the summer program period (July 7 thru Aug. 1), there is a new group of students each week. Lisa Escobar Hertzog of the Delaware Academy of Public Safety and Security is the lead teacher and program leader.  The following DSU students are also involved as peer mentors to assist in the instruction of the young participants: Vanessa Cruz  (head peer mentor), Jaime Watson, Taylor Brown and Keiyanna Wright.Mr. Gabe Jimenez is primary DSU coordinator, and is assisted by Dr. Clytrice Watson, associate professor of biological sciences, and Dr. Leonard Davis, chair of the Department of the Biological Sciences.The GEMS Program is funded by the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System. This joint DSU/U.S. Army Educational Outreach Program is offered at no cost to the student. Students will earn a $100 stipend for attending and successfully completing a one-week session.