October 2013


Oct. 22 Guest Lecture by Dr. Michael Mackay CANCELLED

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The guest lecture by nationally recognized nanotechnology expert Dr. Michael E. Mackay scheduled for 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 22 the Mishoe Science Center South has been CANCELLED.   There is currently no information concerning any possible rescheduling of this guest lecturer.  

DSU Dedicates "Enter to Learn, Go Forth to Serve" Arch on Campus

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Three DSU students -- (l-r) Christina Gomez, her brother Nicholas Gomez, and Ashley Rumph -- stand outside of the new arch in front of Loockerman Hall that bears the campus expectation of them -- "Enter to Learn, Go Forth to Serve."

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10/14/13 (L-r) Dr. Gladys Motley, former DSU vice president of Student Affairs; DSU President Harry L. Williams, and alumni couple Dolores and Donald Blakey, stand at the unveiled arch bearing the words Enter to Learn, Go Forth to Serve. Delaware State University has brought back a once prominent motto that greeted all who entered the front gate of the institution from the 1950s to the 1990s. While the current “Making Our Mark on the World” continues to be a guiding motto of expectation, the University has also brought back another motto that guided students for more than 40 years – “Enter to Learn, Go Forth to Serve.” That latter motto has been reincarnated in a 10-foot high black iron arch installed at the front entrance of the gate that surrounds historic Loockerman Hall. DSU President Harry L. Williams led an Oct. 11 dedication ceremony at the historic building for the new physical manifestation of restored motto. “We have chosen to install it outside Loockerman Hall because this building was the main place on a very fledgling campus where early students “entered to learn” ---it served as the Main College Building for this institution’s first 37 years of existence,” Dr. Williams said, “The unveiling of the famous words at the entrance of this historic building establishes a landmark that will be just as meaningful to our present and future DSU students as it was to many of DSU’s alumni in the latter half of the 1900s.” The restored motto was first established 1952 when the late Felmon Motley, a 1948 graduate of then-Delaware State College, constructed a sign for the front entrance of the campus which stated “May All Who Enter Here, Enter to Learn and Go Forth to Serve.” DSU President Harry L. Williams stands at the arch with DSU alumnus Samuel Guy, who made the current administration aware of the beloved motto. Dr. Gladys Motley, the widow of Mr. Motley, and the former longtime vice president of Student Affairs at DSU, shared with the dedication gathering the story of her late husband’s work in making the sign and his dedication in staying actively connected to his alma mater. “Felmon loved Delaware State, and Delaware State loved Felmon,” Dr. Motley said. The motto was a part of the front gate of the campus for 45 years; however, the sign was removed when the University launched a project in 1997 to eliminate the two one-way streets that formerly stretched from the main gate to the center of the campus and replace them with the current pedestrian mall. When the project was completed in 1997, the sign was never restored. Many alumni never forgot the motto; however, without the physical sign bearing its words incoming students from that point on never knew it existed. DSU alumnus Dr. Donald A. Blakey said it was invigorating to see the University bring back the motto, and noted that both mottos complement each other well. “Students come to DSU be educated and then they are expected to go out and serve,” said Dr. Blakey, class of 1958. “While they are doing that, they are making their mark on the world in a positive way.” Leonard Hudson, a 1971 graduate of DSC who went on use his BS in Business Administration to work for AT&T and Verizon, said the motto encouraged him to continue to serve his alma mater. “I had a strong motivation to send students to Delaware State,” Mr. Hudson said. “I believe the motto had a strong impact on a lot of people that went to school here in those years.” Wilmington attorney Samuel L. Guy, who graduated from DSC in 1981, is credited for being a catalyst in bringing that motto to the attention of the current administration about a year ago. “Everyday students were reminded of it; when their parents brought them back to school, they saw what was expected of their sons and daughters here at Delaware State,” Mr. Guy said. “And it was all because there was a physical manifestation of the motto there.” In addition to the dedication of the arch, a new historical item was also unveiled to the gathering at Loockerman Hall. Earlier this year while doing research at the Kent County Record of Deeds, Carlos Holmes, DSU director of News Services, was able to unearth a copy of the original 1891 deed that legally documents the purchase of first 95¼ acres by the Board of Trustees of the then-State College for Colored Students from Catharine McKaine, a widow, for the establishment of the College. The three-page deed – which reflects that the original property was purchased for $4,400 – now hangs in the entrance foyer of Loockerman Hall. About 50 people attended the Enter to Learn, Go Forth to Serve arch dedication ceremony at Loockerman Hall. While the dedication program was held inside the historic building due to the rain, many of the attendees posed for a picture outside in front of the arch, rainy conditions notwithstanding (see below).   Many of the Arch Dedication Ceremony attendees braved the pelting rain for a photo opp in front of the new arch.    

AKAs Win DSU's 2013 Divine 9 Challenge

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Tha ladies of Alpha Kappa Alpha celebrate their Divine 9 Challenge victory on the field during halftime of the Oct. 12 Homecoming game.

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10/14/13 The Ladies of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., celebrate their victory on the Alumni Stadium football field during the halftime of the Homecoming game.   The Divine Nine Challenge has recognized the ladies of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority, Inc., as the 2013 Most Divine Among the Nine at Delaware State University.   The ladies of Alpha Kappa Alpha raised $1,720 during the online challenge with a thrilling late push.   DSU’s Divine 9 Challenge engages fraternities and sororities in a competition to raise scholarship dollars for DSU students.  The online giving challenge took place from Oct. 4-12.   In addition to being recognized during the Oct. 12 Homecoming football game, Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority will also be honored for their winning effort during the Dec. 14 President’s Scholarship Ball and as well as in future publications.   Omega Psi Phi and Delta Sigma Theta finished second and third, respectively, in the Divine 9 Challenge. The total amount raise was $3,715.

DSU's Pi Eta of Kappa Alpha Psi wins National Chapter of the Year.

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Brandon Allen, Pi Eta president, and Calvin Carter, advisor, accept the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity's Edward G. Irvin Undergraduate Chapter of the Year Award at the fraternity's national gathering in Houston, Tx.

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The Pi Eta Chapter (Delaware State University) of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., has been honored as the Edward G. Irvin Undergraduate Chapter of the Year Award recipient by the national Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.   The Edward G. Irvin Undergraduate Chapter of the Year Award is the highest Grand Chapter award available to undergraduate chapters for outstanding achievement in the community and at their respective university. Pi Eta was able to win this award among 700-plus chapters in the fraternity. Pi Eta has not only represented Kappa Alpha Psi very well in their achievements, but also Delaware State University. It is the first time in the chapter's history that it has won that national honor.   The award was presented to the Pi Eta Chapter at the national fraternity’s 81st Grand Chapter Meeting on Aug. 6-11 in Houston, Texas. 2013.

Filmmaker Lee Daniels Tells His Story at DSU

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Dr. Dolores Finger Wright, associate professor of sociology, gets some love from Lee Daniels follow his Oct. 17 guest speaking engagement in the Education and Humanities Theater on campus.

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Filmmaker Lee Daniels kept it “real” at DSU Education & Humanities Theater on Oct. 17 The director of the critically acclaimed and box office hit Lee Daniel’s The Butler was the guest speaker as part of the DSU Office of Student Affairs’ Make Your Mark Speakers Series. Mr. Daniel shared with the well-attended gathering his life story from his youth to his successful career in the film industry. For images of Mr. Daniels’ visit, click on the below photo slideshow, followed by more information on the event. At the end of the article, there is also a link to a video clip of a DSU Inside Perspective interview of the filmmaker. To see an interview on DSU Inside Perspective, click on the following DSU YouTube link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozItw74Dsf4 Mr. Daniels began by noting that he did not finish college, and told the students in attendance that they are blessed. “You should enjoy your tenure here at Delaware State University,” he said. The Philadelphia native noted that he became involved in the film industry at a time before black directors began to have some success. “There weren’t any mentors, no Spike Lee yet, no blacks working behind the scene,” Mr. Daniels said. “Survival instincts took me from early college to Hollywood.” While he began by directing small theatre ensembles in Baldwin Hills, Ca., he also took a job as a receptionist for a nursing agency. Then with a keen sense of opportunity, Mr. Daniels started his own nursing agency. “I stole five of their clients and took all the black girls (nurses) with me,” he said, to the humor of the gathering. After making what he said “an enormous amount of money” he sold his business and refocused his efforts on the film industry. He went to work as a casting director and an actors’ agent, contributing to the casting of films such as Prince’s Purple Rain and Under the Cherry Moon. Lee Daniels gave a frank account of his life and career at a well-attended gathering in the E&H Theater on campus. “I learned from the ground up what it was like to be on the (filming) set,” Mr. Daniels said. “That was my school.” He was later hired by Warner Brothers to be its head of minority talent, a post that brought him in contact with a lot of talented black actors. He was later inspired by the Broadway show “Dreamgirls,” which inspired him to launch his own casting agency. However, he said, there was still not an abundance of significant acting jobs for African American performers. “Then I got the idea for (the 2001 film) Monster’s Ball and produced it,” Mr. Daniels said. He added that there were many who predicted that the film would not do well. “I am very proud of the fact that Halle Berry was the first black woman to win the Academy Award (for Best Actress),” he said. He eluded to his past drug problem, he noted that night Ms. Berry received the Award, he could not attend the celebration party afterward because he was at home “with his crack pipe.” He said his responsibility to raise his adopted children prompted him to give up drugs for good soon thereafter. “I thought I was saving them, and they ended up saving me,” said the filmmaker, who noted that he has been drug-free from illegal substances for 17 years. Mr. Daniel detail there rest of his filmography journey: The Woodsman, a 2004 film he produced about a pedophile trying to assimilate back into society after serving a jail sentence; Shadowboxer (2005), his first directorial effort; Tennessee (2008), which he produced starring singer Mariah Carey; Precious (2009), which he directed and produced and resulted in a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for Mo’Nique; The Paperboy (2012); as well as The Butler. “When Halle Berry won the Oscar, I thought it doesn’t get any better than this,” Mr. Daniels said. “But God said, ‘no Negro, it does’ .” As he shared his life story, he quite frankly talked about his gay sexual orientation and the challenges it has caused for him. At the end of his presentation, he took numerous questions from the audience and gave some advice to those who aspire to make it in the film industry, noting toughness is required. “It is a cutthroat business,” Mr. Daniels said. Watch a video interview with Mr. Daniels on a segment of DSU Inside Perspective.  

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